Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Sunday 25 November 1917 We Lost 780

Temporary Lieutenant Arthur Christopher Paul Mackworth (Rifle Brigade attached MI5) dies at home at age 31.  His brother was killed in November 1914 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Arthur William Mackworth 6th Baronet. A third brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment at Ladysmith in January 1900.

Today’s losses include:

  • A son of a Baronet
  • Multiples families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South Africa War
  • The Captain of the Devon County hockey team
  • A man whose brother will be killed in the blitz in 1940 after serving in the Great War
  • A descendant of a Peninsular War veteran
  • The son of the Lancashire Constabulary

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Harry Archer DSO (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is the sometime Captain of the Devon County hockey team.
  • Gunner Frederick G Potten (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action. His brother Arthur Edward will serve in the Royal Garrison Artillery during the Great War and will survive.  He will then be killed in a German air raid on Folkestone on the 5th October 1940.
  • Private Edward J Sutherland (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received in action at Cambrai. His brother was killed in action in October 1916.
  • Private William Hill (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 25. His brother was killed six weeks earlier.
  • Private John K Smith (Scots Guards) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Trooper John Dennis Jenkinson (Lancers) dies of wounds at age 19 at the 61st Field Ambulance. He is a direct descendant of a soldier who served in the Peninsular War and the son of the Superintendent of the Lancashire Constabulary.
  • Private Arnold L Lilley (Highland Light Infantry) is killed at age 27. His son will be killed in May 1944.

 

Saturday 24 November 1917 We Lost 330

Alick George Cubitt

The armed drifters HM Present, Help, Paramount and Majesty drive the German submarine U-48 aground southwest of the Goodlands and she is then blown up by her crew. The steamship S S Dunrobin (Master Henry Ison) is torpedoed and sunk by U-53 forty-nine miles southwest of the Lizard. Thirty one including her master are killed.

     Today’s losses include:

  • A General
  • The Headmaster of Cross Hill Boys School
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby player
  • A son of the 2nd Baron Ashcombe
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A columnist for The State
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Arthur Cecil Lowe CMG DSO, Commanding Royal Artillery, 66th Division is killed in action at age 49 near Ypres.
  • Captain John Middleton Downend (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 29. He is the Headmaster of Cross Hill Boy’s School.
  • Captain Denis Laurence Monaghan (Irish Rifles attached Tank Corps) is killed at age 29. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Alick George Cubitt (Hussars) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of Henry Cubitt, the 2nd Baron Ashcombe.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Winton Ayers (Australian Flying Corps) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 24. His brother was killed in September of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Tristram William Jordan Wilson (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is a drama critic and contributor to the columns of The State.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Henry Martin (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend John Martin Vicar of Granborough.
  • Private Ephraim Dodds (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Robert Hewitt (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private Alexander Hepburn (Highland Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed last March.
  • Private Arthur Lunney (Royal Scots) is killed at age 24 in Palestine one day after his brother was killed.

Friday 23 November 1917 We Lost 1,037

The 40th Division attacks into the woods of Bourlon Ridge supported by almost a hundred tanks and 430 guns. They make little progress. The 40th Division reaches the crest of the ridge but will be held there and suffer over 4,000 casualties for their efforts for three days. As the British use up their strength to take the ridge the Germans are reinforcing the area. As early as today the German command feels that a British breakthrough will not occur and began to consider a counter-offensive. 20 divisions were arrayed in the Cambrai area. The Germans plan to retake the Bourlon salient and also to attack around Havrincourt while diversionary attacks will hold IV Corps. Overall it is hoped to at least reach the old positions on the Hindenburg Line.

  • Lieutenant Algernon Hyde Villiers (Lothians and Border Horse Yeomanry attached Machine Gun Corps) is killed in Bourlon Wood at age 31. He is the son of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Francis Villiers PC GCMG GCVO British Minister to Belgium and grandson of the 4th Earl Clarendon the famous Foreign Secretary.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the British Minister to Belgium
  • A grandson of the 4th Earl Clarendon
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A 10-victory ace
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Celtic footballer
  • A man shot at dawn

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Timothy Idwal Hope-Evans (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend J Hope-Evans.
  • Lieutenant Walter Sibbald Laidlaw (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 28. His brother died of wounds in April 1915.
  • Lieutenant William Edwin Jenkins (Royal Flying Corps) a ten-victory ace is killed in a flying accident.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Ward Meredith Weeks (South Wales Borderers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in next September.
  • Second Lieutenant Lawrence Henry Martin (Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Richard D’Olier Martin.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Westgate Beauchamp (Dorsetshire Regiment attached Hampshire Regiment) is killed in Jerusalem at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend J G Beauchamp.
  • Lance Corporal George Howell (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 24. His son will be killed in May 1941.
  • Private Don Waters (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 26 at Bourlon Wood. His brother was accidentally killed in November 1915.
  • Private Archie McMillan (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed. He was a footballer for Celtic.
  • Private Arthur H Westwood (East Surrey Regiment) is shot at dawn at age 20. His brother will die of wounds next April.
  • Private George Lunney (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed tomorrow in Palestine.

Thursday 22 November 1917 We Lost 934

Albert Medal

Strongly reinforced Turkish forces attack Nebi Samwil, (the tomb of the prophet Samuel), a Mosque five miles northwest of Jerusalem which was captured by British forces yesterday.

  • Captain Charles Russell (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. The Charles Russell Memorial is established in memory of Captain Russell, Senior Professor and Principal of Patna College from 1906 to 1914. The Memorial provides that, from time to time, as funds permit, some eminent person should be invited to deliver in Patna a lecture on some great achievement of the human mind in Literature, Art, Philosophy, or Science, and m that these lectures should be published under the general title of the Russell Lectures.
  • Captain Gerald Banes-Walker (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed in action in Palestine at age 28. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Lieutenant Locke Francis William Angerstein Kendall (Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds received in the same battle at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John Francis Kendall Vicar of Richmond.
  • Private William George Benney (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in Palestine. His brother died on service in India in September 1916.

In Mesopotamia Lieutenant Arthur Richard Waddams (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Merwara Infantry) is instructing a class in firing rifle grenades.  While a private of the Burma Infantry is under instruction the rifle missfires and the detonator of the grenade starts working without the grenade leaving the rifle.  Lieutenant Waddams rushes forward and pushes back the soldier, seizes the rifle with one hand and the grenade with the other and tries to throw it over the wall before it explodes.  Unfortunately the grenade explodes in his hand and he receives fatal wounds at age 26.  The soldier is only slightly wounded.  For his actions Lieutenant Waddams will be awarded a posthumous Albert Medal.

Today’s losses include:

  • An Albert Medal winner
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A General
  • The grandson of a General
  • The grandson of a Baronet

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Edward Rowland Bennett Stokes-Roberts CB (Royal Engineers) dies of pneumonia at Baghdad at age 48.
  • Captain Charles William Bruce (Gordon Highlanders) is accidentally killed. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Walter Smythe Baronet.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Edward Hoare Hales (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds at home at age 31. He is the son of the late Major General Arthur Hales.
  • Sergeant Russell Dean Gerrie (Eastern Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend J P Gerrie.
  • Private Thomas Hall (South Wales Borderers) is killed in action at Bourlon Wood at age 28. His brother was killed in June 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Private Francis John Bailey (Sussex Regiment) is killed by shell fire in his trench at age 30. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private James Royal (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the third brother to be killed in the Great War.
  • Gunner George Owen Smitheringale (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 29. His brother was killed in September 1914.

Wednesday 21 November 1917 We Lost 796

When the battle of Cambrai is renewed today the pace of British advance is greatly slowed. The abandoned Flesquières and then Cantaing are captured in the very early morning, but in general the British take time to reinforcing their gains rather than expanding. The efforts of III Corps are officially halted and attention is turned to IV Corps. The continuing effort is aimed at the ridge. Fighting is fierce around Bourlon and at Anneux, just before the woods, is very costly. German counter attacks squeeze the British out of Moeuvres today and Fontaine tomorrow. Even when Anneux is taken the 62nd Division finds it unable to even enter Bourlon Woods. The British are left exposed in a salient. Haig still wants Bourlon Ridge and the exhausted 62nd Division will be replaced by the 40th Division under John Ponsonby in two days.

By this morning the Egyptian Expeditionary Force has gained a line nearly five kilometers (at its nearest point) west of Jerusalem.  The city will deliberately be spared anything in the nature of bombardment or direct attack.

17th Balloon Section Royal Flying Corps leaves a booby-trapped kite balloon over Salonika containing 500 pounds of high explosives. When the balloon is approached by a German machine they detonate the explosives bringing down and killing the leading German ace on the Salonika front.

Lieutenant Edward William Horner (Hussars) is killed in action by a shot to the chest while defending the village of Noyelles at age 24.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Horner KCVO and had been severely wounded in May 1915 and lost a kidney.  He rejoined his regiment in 1916.  He is the brother-in-law of Raymond Asquith son of Prime Minister Asquith who will also be killed in the Great War.  He is reported to be a descendant of ‘Little Jack Horner” of the nursery rhyme fame.

Lieutenant Ewart Alan Mackintosh MC (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 24 at Cambrai.  He is a noted Great War poet.  His works included “A Highland Regiment” published in 1917; “War, the Liberator” published in 1918 and “Miserere” published after the war in 1919.

Cha Till Maccruimein
(Departure of the 4th Camerons)

The pipes in the streets were playing bravely,
The marching lads went by,
With merry hearts and voices singing
My friends marched out to die;
But I was hearing a lonely pibroch
Out of an older war,
“Farewell, farewell, farewell, MacCrimmon,
MacCrimmon comes no more.”

And every lad in his heart was dreaming
Of honour and wealth to come,
And honour and noble pride were calling
To the tune of the pipes and drum;
But I was hearing a woman singing
On dark Dunvegan shore,
“In battle or peace, with wealth or honour,
MacCrimmon comes no more.”

And there in front of the men were marching,
With feet that made no mark,
The grey old ghosts of the ancient fighters
Come back again from the dark;
And in front of them all MacCrimmon piping
A weary tune and sore,
“On the gathering day, forever and ever,
MacCrimmon comes no more.”

Today’s losses include:

  • The brother-in-law of previously killed Raymond Asquith son of the Prime Minister
  • A reported descendant of ‘Little Jack Horner’ of nursery rhyme fame
  • A Great War Poet
  • A battalion commander
  • A well known polo player
  • An Albert Medal winner
  • A clergyman
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A brother of the 3rd Lweedmouth
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Murray Pirie DSO (21st “Empress of India’s” Lancers attached Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed in action in Palestine. He is a well-known polo player of the era.
  • Captain William Neilson AM (Cameronians attached King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds. He will be awarded the Albert Medal next year for his actions last February.
  • Captain the Reverend Hugh Philip Skakle MC (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at Cantaing at age 28. He is a clergyman of the Church of Scotland.
  • Captain Frank Guy Shackle MC (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 27 and his son will be killed in January 1943.
  • Second Lieutenant Marmaduke Edward Marjorisbanks (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the brother of Dudley Churchill Marjoribanks 3rd Lord Lweedmouth.
  • Lance Corporal Charley Gully (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Frederick Kitching (South Wales Borderers) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 33. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private George Frederick Bird (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die on service at home as a munitions worker having previously served in the Royal Army Medical Corp less than one week before the Armistice.

Tuesday 20 November 1917 We Lost 1,973

The battle of Cambrai begins at 06:00 with carefully prepared and predicted, but unregistered, fire barrage by 1,003 guns on key German defences, followed by smoke and a creeping barrage 300 yards ahead to cover the first advances. Despite efforts to preserve secrecy, the German forces have received sufficient intelligence to be on moderate alert: an attack on Havrincourt is anticipated, as is the use of tanks.

Initially there is considerable success in most areas the Hindenburg Line is penetrated with advances of up to 8 kilometers achieved. On the right, the 12th (Eastern) Division advances as far as Lateau Wood before digging in is ordered; the 20th (Light) Division forces a way through La Vacquerie and then advances to capture a key bridge across the St Quentin canal at Masnières. The bridge collapses under the weight of the crossing tanks. The bridge collapse halts the hopes for advance there. In the center the British capture Ribécourt and Marcoing, but when the cavalry passes through, they are dealt a sharp blow and fall back from Noyelles.

In the center the 51st (Highland) Division is stalled at its first objective, Flesquières, leaving the advances around it exposed. It is believed that the commander of the 51st General George Montague Harper substitutes his own tank drill for the standard one and that an excessive space between the tanks and the infantry contributes to the failure. Flesquières is also one of the strongest points in the German line and is flanked by other strong points. Its defenders acquit themselves well against the tanks, engaging them aggressively. Almost forty tanks are knocked out by the Flesquières artillery, including sixteen by a single gun reportedly manned by a lone gunner. Despite this the Germans are forced to abandon Flesquières during the night.

On the left the 62nd (2nd West Riding) Division sweeps all the way through Havrincourt and Graincourt to within reach of the woods on Bourlon Ridge and the 36th (Ulster) Division on their left reaches the Bapaume-Cambrai road. Of the tanks 180 are out of action after the first day, although only 65 have been destroyed. Of the remainder 71 have suffered mechanical failure and 43 had been ‘ditched’. The British had suffered approximately 4,000 casualties and have- taken 4,200 prisoners, a casualty rate half that of Third Ypres (Passchendaele), and a greater advance in six hours than in three months there.  However, the British have failed to reach the heights of Bourlon Ridge. The German command is quick to send up reinforcements overnight and is relieved that the British do not manage to fully exploit their early gains.

The 75th Division, the last one formed during the war, of Gurkas and British from India, captures the Jerusalem-Jaffa road and then tomorrow will capture the vital hill of Nebi Samwil, the key to the city. The division adopts a key as its unit symbol.

Eighteen scouts of the Royal Flying Corps leave the ground under most unfavorable weather conditions in order to reconnoiter certain areas, and Captain Edward Mannock returns first with valuable information, while many other pilots bring back information that is of considerable use.

During an attack the tank which Captain Richard William Leslie Wain (Manchester Regiment attached Tank Corps) is commanding is disabled by a direct hit near an enemy strong point which is holding up the attack. Captain Wain and one man, both seriously wounded are the only survivors. Though bleeding profusely from his wounds, he refuses the attention of stretcher-bearers, rushes from behind the tank with a Lewis gun, and captures the strong point, taking about half the garrison prisoners. Although his wounds are very serious he picks up a rifle and continues to fire at the retiring enemy until he receives a fatal wound in the head. It is due to the valour displayed by Captain Wain that the infantry are able to advance and due to his efforts he will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The son of a later former Member of Parliament
  • A son of the 4th Baron Kensington
  • A grandson of the 3rd Baron ffrench
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A Double Cambridge Blue
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The brother of an Olympic Gold Medal rower who also served
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A 5-victory ace
  • A Bedfordshire Constable
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • A man whose son was killed at Jutland
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Strangways Linton DSO MC (commanding 4th Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel W J Alderman DSO (commanding 6th Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed.
  • Major Robert Oscar Cyril Ward (Scottish Horse attached Tank Corps) is killed in action at age 36. He was a double blue at Trinity College, Cambridge.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Cecil Edwardes (Scottish Horse attached Tank Corps) is killed in action at age 41. He is the son of the 4th Baron Kensington.
  • Captain Robert Edward Angus (Ayreshire Yeomanry attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 23. He is the only son of James Angus JP and grandson of Robert Angus DL.
  • Captain Robert Elcum Horsfall (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Ewart Douglas Horsfall served in the Rifle Brigade and Royal Flying Corps earning the DSO and MC and is a Gold and Silver Medal Olympic rower who will later manage the British Olympic Rowing Team.
  • Captain Donald Farquharson Roberts MC (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Lieutenant Harold Martin Joseph Blake (Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in January 1916 and they are grandsons of Charles Austin ffrench 3rd Baron ffrench of Castle ffrench.
  • Lieutenant Richard Frederic Norreys Bertie (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed at age 41. He is the grandson of the Reverend Honorable Frederic Bertie.
  • Lieutenant John Francis Edens (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Lieutenant Gilbert Trenchard Carre (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Augustus Carre Rector of Smarden who has previously lost two other sons in the Great War, the first in September 1915 and the second in October 1916.
  • Lieutenant Cyril Gordon Jones (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend David Jones
  • Lieutenant Alexander Charles Nicholas March de Lisle (Leicestershire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 20 when his RE8 is hit by a shell and crashes while on artillery observation near Ypres. He is the son of the late Edwin Joseph Lisle March Phillipps de Lisle Member of Parliament for Mid-Leicestershire from 1886-92.
  • Second Lieutenant Owen Watkin Wynn Hardinge Meredith (General List attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed when he is shot down by machine gun fire, while attacking a balloon near Cambrai at age 24. He is the only son of the late Vernerable Archdeacon Thomas Meredith late Vicar of Wolston and Archdeacon of Singapore. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge University.  He left Cambridge when the War broke out and took up war work at Coventry, subsequently entering Aeroplane Works at Hendon.  At an aerodrome in England he made a record for high flying. He obtained his wings in July 1917 and went out to the front in October 1917. The Charity of Owen Watkin Wynn Hardinge Meredith will be set up by Thomas Meredith in memory of his son. A capital sum of money is in war stock and the interest from this is to be used to help the poor of the Parish of Tibberton.
  • Second Lieutenant John Alan Harvey (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the only son of Reverend Ralph Harvey.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Alexander McFie (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend George Paton McFie.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Bannerman (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Norman Carlyon Phear (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in an accident at age 19. His brother was killed last month.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Handley Lanphier Symons (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the Very Reverend Dean Symons who lost another son in September 1916.
  • Chaplain the Reverend George Harvey Ranking attached IV Heavy Artillery is killed at age 46. He is the Vicar of Fernhurst, Sussex.
  • Sergeant Thomas Frederick Stephenson DCM (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 23. He is a five victory ace.
  • Sergeant George Stephen Babbington (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is a member of the Bedfordshire Constabulary.
  • Sergeant George Douglas (Tank Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the third of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Sergeant Albert Ingham Robinson (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Lance Corporal Herbert Charles Taylor (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 20. He is the third of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private John B Sutherland (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at Cambrai. His brother will die of pneumonia in November 1918.
  • Private James Bernard Bygrave (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 31. His two brothers have already lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Harry Wyndham Collins (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private James Alexander (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at Cambrai at age 19. His brother was killed last August.
  • Private Victor Carew (Royal Newfoundland Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Jeremiah Donnelly (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Richard John Ballard (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in Palestine at age 20. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Gunner Allan Adie (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the first and youngest of three brothers who are killed in the War.
  • Private John William Nugent (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 35. His son will be killed in May 1944.
  • Private William Corke (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 40. His son was killed on HMS Defence at Jutland.
  • Private Benjamin Phillips (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in April 1916.

Monday 19 November 1917 We Lost 542

Cap badge of the 3rd Gurkha Rifles

Navy divers go down on the wreck of the German submarine UC-47, enter her despite their hard-hat gear and recover charts of the minefields she had laid in earlier operations.

British forces in Palestine capture Kuryet-el-Enab and Beit Likia.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Melville Grey-Smith (Gurkha Rifles) is killed in action in Palestine. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Captain Geoffrey William Pepperrell Abraham (Glamorgan Yeomanry attached Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at Port Said received at Sheria at age 22. He is the son of the Right Reverend Charles Thomas Abraham (Vicar of Bakewell and Bishop of Derby).
  • Lieutenant Kingsley Christopher Shuttleworth (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Professor Henry Carey Shuttleworth.
  • Second Lieutenant G E C Thomson (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 20. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran, JP and has a brother who was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Fred Rhodes (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Men whose death made the same woman a widow in the Great War

  • Brigadier General Charles Gosling & Captain Maurice Howard Helyar (both men will die before their only child is born from their widow Victoria Repps Evans-Lombe
  • Major Ernest Cole Fleming & Captain George Armand Furse
  • Major George Bernard Stratton & Captain Percy Yarborough Harkness
  • Captain William Leefe Robinson VC & Captain Herbert Connell Whipple
  • Sergeant Christopher Loomes & Lance Corporal Albert Hewitt
  • Sergeant Charles Isidore Laugeard & Gunner Walter Gaudin Mason
  • Corporal Noel Clayton & Private Gerald Clarke
  • Private Edwin Curley & Private Bryen Sidney Smither
  • Private George Henry Berry & Private Robert Herring
  • Stoker George Thomas Illing & Stoker Percy Franklin

Sunday 18 November 1917 We Lost 387

Frederick Stanley Maude

Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Frederick Stanley Maude KCB, CMG, DSO, Commander in Chief Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force dies of cholera at age 51 in Baghdad.  While leading the attack on Ramadi Maude went down with cholera and although he was quickly taken back to Baghdad he dies there today.  Rumours circulate that he had been poisoned but the evidence suggests that he probably contracted the disease from contaminated milk.  Maude was born in Gibraltar into a military family; his father was ‘Sir’ Frederick Francis Maude – a general who had been awarded the Victoria Cross in 1855 during the Crimean War, and who is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.  He attended Eton College and then the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. He graduated in 1883 and joined the Coldstream Guards in February 1884.  Maude first saw active service in Egypt from March to September 1885, where he was awarded the Egyptian Medal and the Khedive’s Egyptian Star. He next saw service as a Major during the South Africa War, where he served from January 1900 to March 1901 he won a DSO and the Queen’s South African Medal. From 1901 to 1904, he served on the staff of the Governor-General of Canada, in which capacity he accompanied the Duke and Duchess of York on their Royal Tour of Canada in September and October 1901.  He returned to Britain to become second-in-command at the Coldstream Guards and then he joined the General Staff, was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1907 and Colonel in 1911.

In the Great War Maude first served in France. He was a staff officer with III Corps when, in October 1914, he was promoted to Brigadier-General and given command of the 14th Brigade. He was wounded in April 1915 and returned home to recover. He returned to France in May and, in June, he was promoted to Major-General and transferred to command the 33rd Division still in training.  In mid-August, however, Maude was instead given charge of the 13th Division in Suvla. The 13th suffered heavy casualties retreating from Suvla and landing and later evacuating from Helles before being shifted to Mesopotamia in March 1916.  Maude arrived to catch the end of the British failure at the Siege of Kut where he was promoted to Lieutenant-General, replacing General George Gorringe as commander of the newly dubbed Tigris Corps (III Army Corps) in July 1916. Despite being instructed to do no more than hold the existing line, Maude set about to re-organising and re-supplying his mixed British and Indian forces. He was made commander of all Allied forces in Mesopotamia in late July 1916, replacing ‘Sir’ Percy Lake.

Given reinforcements and more equipment, Maude directed his force in a steady series of victories. Advancing up the Tigris and winning the battles of Mohammed Abdul Hassan, Hai and Dahra in January 1917, recapturing Kut in February 1917 and then taking Baghdad on 11th March 1917. From Baghdad, he launched the Samarrah Offensive and extended his operations to the Euphrates and Diyala rivers.  After a lull over the summer, by November his forces were engaged at Ramadi and Tikrit when he became ill from cholera. Curiously, he died in the same house as German General von der Goltz a year earlier. He will be succeeded by General Marshall, who takes a more passive approach as a commander.

The light cruiser HMS Blonde is leading the submarines K1 (Commander C S Benning), K3, K4 and K7 in line ahead off the Danish coast when she is forced to turn sharply to port to avoid three cruisers that cross her bows from starboard to port.  The abrupt change of course takes the submarines by surprise and K1 and K4 collide.  K1 had stopped due to salt water instead of fuel coming through the sprayers and extinguishing her boilers.  K3 passes close on the port side.  K4, following K3, suddenly observes the red light of K1 and although taking avoiding action strikes K1 a glancing blow abreast the conning tower.  Water pours into the control room.  Within minutes, chlorine gas was being released from the batteries. Blonde is signaled that K1 is sinking and the cruiser closes lowering two cutters.  Rescue boats make five trips and transfer all 56 members of the crew to Blonde.  A discussion is then held as to whether K1 can be saved and it is decided to sink her.

At 06:23 in the early morning dark the German submarine UC-47 is found by HMS P-57 (Lieutenant Commander Harry Charles Birnie), one of sixty patrol boats designed specifically to hunt submarines.  It has bows of hard steel for ramming U-boats, a 4-inch gun, pom-poms and two special depth-charge throwers.  A lookout on P-57 spots a “big buoy” which turns out to be the conning tower of the submarine only two hundred yards away.  P-57 swings violently to port by her commander and her engines race at full speed ahead.  The patrol boat strikes the submarine just before the conning tower and almost at a right angle to the hull.  The force of the attack drives the submarine down and away and she starts to pass astern the patrol boat.  The crew of P-57 quickly releases a depth charge and then turn and releases another.  Soon oil is seen coming to the surface close to a buoy the patrol boat has dropped and P-57 drops another depth charge.  P-57 patrols around for the rest of day and the next night but none of the German submarine’s crew comes to the surface.  Commander Birnie will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for this action.

Today’s losses include:

  • The Commander in Chief of the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a General

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Matthew Halligan (Dublin Fusiliers attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 36. His brother died of wounds in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Patrick Waters (Royal Flying Corps) is accidentaly killed when his plane falls apart on landing at age 28. He is the only child of Brigadier General Wallscourt Hely Hutchinson Waters CVO CMG.
  • Private Frederick Charles Nunn (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.

Saturday 17 November 1917 We Lost 507

Evelyn Achille de Rothschild

German minesweepers clearing a path through the British minefield in the Heligoland Bight near the coast of Germany are intercepted by three British cruisers, HMS Calypso, HMS Cardiff and HMS Caledon, performing counter-minesweeping duties. The German ships flee south toward the protection of the battleships SMS Kaiser and SMS Kaiserin. The two cruisers engage the German battleships, while their own screening force of the battlecruisers HMS Tiger, HMS Renown, HMS Repulse, HMS Courageous, and HMS Glorious of the First Battlecruiser Squadron, commanded by Admiral Sir Charles Napier, come up to assist.  All personnel on the bridge of HMS Calypso, including Captain Herbert L Edwards, are killed by a 12-inch shell. HMS Repulse, Captain William Boyle, later Admiral of the Fleet, 12th Earl of Cork and Orrery, briefly engage the German battleships, but the Germans make it back to the safety of their own minefields with the loss of one minesweeper.

A total of twenty-two naval personnel are killed in this the Second Battle of Heligoland Bight.

  • Ordinary Seaman John Henry Carless (Royal Navy, HMS Caledon) dies of wounds at age 21 received while performing acts that will be rewarded with a posthumous Victoria Cross. Although mortally wounded in the abdomen, he still continued serving the gun at which he was acting as rammer, lifting a projectile and helping to clear away the other casualties.  He collapses once, but gets up, tries again, and cheers on the new gun’s crew.  He then falls down and dies.  He not only set a very inspiring and memorable example, but he also, while mortally wounded, continues to do effective work against the King’s enemies.
  • Bugler Charles Ernest Timmins (Royal Marine Light Infantry HMS Cardiff) age 14 is killed when a shell strikes the ships bridge. His father was killed in the sinking of HMS Hogue.

The destroyer HMS Firedrake sinks the German submarine UC-51 off Harwich.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A fourteen year old Marine bugler
  • Captain of HMS Calypso
  • Grandson of Baron de Rothschild
  • The son of a member of the clergy and Chaplain to the services
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Evelyn Achille de Rothschild (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) dies at Citadel Hospital, Cairo of wounds received during the Battle of Mughar Ridge age 31. He is a member of the prominent Rothschild banking family.  He was born into wealth and privilege and was expected to play a major role with the N M Rothschild & Sons At the outbreak of the Great War he and his brother Anthony joined the Army. In November 1915 while on the Western Front he was wounded and sent home to recuperate. Within a few months he was back at the Front where in March 1916 his service resulted in his being Mentioned in Dispatches. Sent to fight in Palestine, he was critically wounded on 13th November fighting the Turkish Seventh Army and he dies of those wounds today. On 5th December 1920 his brother, Captain Anthony de Rothschild, will unveil the War Memorial in the churchyard of All Saints Church at Wing, Buckinghamshire honoring Evelyn and his other comrades from Wing who were killed in the war. He is the grandson of Baron Lionel Nathan de Rothschild.
  • Captain (Brigade Major) Charles Gordon Dowding MC (Punjabis) is killed in action in East Africa at age 28. He is the son of the late Reverend William Berkeley Dowding Chaplain to the Forces.
  • Driver William Francis Pulham (King Edward’s Horse) dies at home as a result of shell shock. His brother will be killed next March.