Sunday 9 May 1915 – We Lost 4,330

by greatwarliveslost

Anthony Frederick Wilding

Anthony Frederick Wilding

The British attack opposite Fromelles and La Bassee in an attempt to capture the Aubers Ridge.  In the crucial preliminary bombardment fewer than eight percent of the artillery shells fired are high explosives, and the total time during which a sustained artillery barrage is possible is only forty minutes, severely limiting the amount of damage that will be done to the German barbed wire and trench defences.  Many of the shells are too light to do serious damage to the German earthworks.  As a result of the failures of the preliminary bombardment, when the British soldiers attack the German defences are relatively undamaged.  After the failure of the first assault, British troops running back to the safety of their own lines are fired on by the Germans as they run, but as they have with them a number of German prisoners, they are thought by the troops in the British trenches to be an enemy attack, and are fired on from the British side also.  Few survive the cross fire.  In an attempt to restore order Brigadier General Arthur Willoughby George Lowry-Cole CB DSO General Officer Commanding 25th Brigade 8th Division stands on the parapet of a British trench, where as he is exhorting the retreating men to make a stand, he is shot dead by enemy machine gun fire at age 54.  This afternoon General Haig orders a second attack, despite reports from air force reconnaissance of the steady forward movement of German reinforcements.  The commander of the Indian Corps, General Wilcocks protests at the order to attack again, as he had protested earlier and successfully at Neuve Chapelle. General Gough, commanding the Seventh Division also reports to Haig that, after a personal reconnaissance of the ground, he is convinced of the certainty of any further attempt to attack by daylight being a failure.  Only General Haking, commanding the First Division, has confidence in a further assault, Haig accepts Haking’s judgment.  Led by the kilted pipers of the 1st Black Watch, playing their bagpipes, the British forces attack again.  They are savaged by German machine gun fire.  When Haig orders the attack to be pushed in with bayonet at dusk, the commanders on the spot make it known that they regard such orders as a mistake. Haig cancels the orders, and tells the commanders that they must succeed on the following day.  The losses on this day, the first and as it emerges the only day of the Battle of Aubers Ridge are 458 officers and 11,161 men including 461 members of the Northamptonshire Regiment killed.  The Gloucestershire Regiment and the South Wales Borderers go over the top at 16:00 and are devastated by machine gun fire. Between then they will lose 495 men.

For the attack at Aubers Ridge (in support of the French in Artois) three radio equipped aircraft are detailed to report the progress of the infantry who are to display white linen strips, seven feet long by two feet wide, as they reach successive lines in the German defenses.  Unfortunately, the infantry does not reach those lines, and the airmen, in the smoke and dust of battle, find the tiny earth-colored figures of friend and foe beneath them impossible to distinguish.  The aircraft send 42 messages, but they are of little value.  This is the first such air scout report used to aid ground troops.  Soon “wireless” reports from aircraft become an essential element in artillery programs, and bad visibility is to be regarded as virtually fatal to chances of  success.

The first men of Kitchener’s New Army leave for active service in France. The first to embark is the Ninth (Scottish) Division one of the many New Army volunteer Divisions that were recruited during the previous nine months with great zeal all over Britain.  The Ninth Division is followed within two weeks by the Twelfth (Eastern) Division which also goes to the Western Front.  Three more New Army Divisions are being made ready for Gallipoli.

Corporal Charles Sharpe (Lincolnshire Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Rouges Bancs.  When in charge of a blocking party sent forward to take a portion of the German trench he is the first to reach the enemy’s position and using bombs with great determination and effect, he himself clears them out of a trench fifty yards long.  By this time all his party has fallen and he is then joined by four other men with whom he attacks the enemy again with bombs and captures a further trench two hundred yards long.  Corporal James Upton (Sherwood Foresters) is also awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Rouges Bancs.  During the whole of this day Corporal Upton displays the greatest courage in rescuing the wounded while exposed to very heavy rifle and artillery fire, going close to the enemy’s parapet regardless of his own personal safety.  One wounded man is killed by a shell whilst this NCO is carrying him.  When Corporal Upton is not actually carrying in the wounded he is engaged in bandaging and dressing the serious cases in front of our parapet, exposed to the enemy’s fire.

Corporal John Ripley (Black Watch) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery at Rue du Bois.  When leading his section on the right of the right platoon in the assault, he is the first man of the battalion to ascend the enemy’s parapet and from there he directs those following him to the gaps in the German wire entanglements.  He then leads his section through a breach in the parapet to a second line of trench, which had previously been decided upon as the final objective in this part of our line.  In that position Corporal Ripley, with seven or eight men, establishes himself, blocking both flanks and arranging a fire position, which he continues to defend until all his men have fallen and he himself has been badly wounded in the head.  Lance Corporal David Finlay (Black Watch) is also awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty near Rue du Bois when he leads a bombing party of twelve men with the greatest gallantry in the attack until ten of them have fallen.  Lance Corporal Finlay then orders the two survivors to crawl back, and he himself goes to the assistance of a wounded man and carries him over a distance of one hundred yards of fire swept ground into cover, quite regardless of his own personal safety.

The 9th (Scottish) Division begins to detrain at Saint-Omer becoming the first New Army Division to go overseas.

General Louis Botha captures Windhoek, SW Africa the territorial objective of the campaign without a fight.  The negotiations for surrender are carried on by telephone from Karibib.

 Today’s losses include:

  • A seven time (including 4 singles in a row) Wimbledon tennis champion
  • A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame
  • An Olympic Silver medalist
  • Multiple Olympic Bronze medal winners
  • A Davis Cup champion
  • A solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand
  • Seven battalion commanders
  • The son of poet and playwright Oscar Wilde
  • The father of writer Christopher Isherwood whose best known work The Berlin Stories will be adapted into the musical Cabaret
  • A son of Alice Liddell Hargreaves who was the inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of the High Sheriff of Devon
  • The son of an Alderman
  • The son of a Judge of the High Court
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • An original Boy Scout
  • Multiple actors
  • The son of a member of the Editorial Staff of The Times
  • A man killed by a lion on service
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A brother of Lawrence of Arabia
  • A General
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The grandson of a General
  • The Master of Harrow
  • An Aide de Camp to the Governor of Victoria and the Governor of Australia
  • The Principal Cellist of the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra
  • The Founder and Conductor of the Edward Mason Choir and member of his wife’s Grimson String Quartet
  • A member of St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band
  • A member of the Choir of St Paul’s Cathedral
  • A First Class English cricketer
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • An England rugby International
  • A rugby player for Newtown
  • A Rosslyn Park rugby footballer
  • A man who will have a brother and a brother-in-law killed later in the war
  • A man whose brother will die as a prisoner of war in the Second World War
  • A man whose nephew and namesake will be killed in 1944
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father will be killed later in the Great War
  • A man whose father was killed in the South African War
  • A man whose father was killed on service in 1897
  • A man whose brother will die on service as a Brigadier in 1945
  • The son of the 11th Earl of Galloway
  • The son of the 9th Earl of Harrington
  • The son of the 7th Lord Rodney
  • The son of the 3rd Viscount Hardinge
  • The son of the 4th Viscount Templetown
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A grandson of Lord Leigh
  • A grandson of the Earl of Winchelsea nd Nottingham
  • A grandson of a Baronet
  • Nephew of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 One of the greatest tennis players of the era and member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame is killed in action while serving as a Captain in the Armored Car Division, Royal Marines at age 31. Anthony Frederick Wilding is a former Wimbledon Champion, 1907 (Doubles), 1908 (Doubles), 1910 (Singles and Doubles), 1911 (Singles), 1912 (Singles) & 1913 (Singles). He also won the 1912 Olympic Indoor Singles Bronze Medal.  He was a member of the All England Lawn Tennis Club and was a qualified Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.  He was ranked #3 in the world when he went to fight the Great War. He was in the process of being on the winning Australian Davis Cup team in August 1914 when war was declared and one week earlier he and his teammate swept the German team of Oscar Kreuzer and Otto Fratzheim who will both be captured returning to Germany from the United States and made prisoners for the remainder of the Great War.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Edward Bradshaw Isherwood (York and Lancaster Regiment commanding 1st battalion) is killed at age 45. He is the son of John Bradshaw Isherwood JP and he served in the South African Campaign. His son is the writer Christopher Isherwood his best known work The Berlin Stories will be adapted as the musical
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Charles France-Hayhurst (commanding 4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 43. He played cricket at Eton in 1891 and his brother died while serving in the Royal Navy in February.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Marshall Finch DSO (commanding 2nd Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas Ross Finch and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Leigh Maxwell (Royal Marines) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. Lieutenant Colonel Victor George Howard Rickard (commanding 2nd Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 40. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Courtenay Moroe.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Swinton Tulloh (commanding 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Osbert Clinton Baker (commanding 1st Irish Rifles) is killed at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Aylmer Richard Sancton Martin (commanding 2nd Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the Reverend H Martin Vicar of Thatcham and a South African War Veteran.
  • Major Leonard Russell (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is the son of John Russell JP.
  • Major Giles Rooke (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the late Major General W Rooke.
  • Captain Arthur Reginald French and his brother Lieutenant ‘Honorable’ George Philip French (South Wales Borderers) killed in action at ages 35 and 25. Arthur is the 5th Baron De Freyne and had succeeded to the title in 1913 and they are two of four sons of the 4th Baron to be killed in the Great War. Lord de Freyne served as an enlisted man in the United States Army in the Philippines.
  • Captain Charles Augustus Werner (Rifle Brigade) the Master of Harrow is killed at age 38.
  • Captain Wilfred John Hutton Curwen (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 32. He previously served as Aide de Campe to ‘Sir’ John Fuller Governor of Victoria and the Right Honorable Lord Denman Governor of Australia. He played Association football for Oxford and was a member of MCC.
  • Captain Alan Knyveton Hargreaves DSO (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 33. His mother is Alice Liddell Hargreaves the inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Captain Charles Mylne Mullaly (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 30. He is the first of three sons of Major General ‘Sir’ Herbert Mullaly who will lose their lives as a result of war service.
  • Captain Paul Adrian Kennedy (Rifle Brigade) is killed by a sniper while leading his Company in an attack on Aubers Ridge, near Fromelles at age 28. He is the second of three sons of ‘Sir’ John Gordon Kennedy KCMG of HM Diplomatic Service to be killed in the war. Captain Kennedy was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade in 1906. He served with his Regiment in Malta, Egypt, and India, and was at home on leave when the War broke out. He went to France the following month and was wounded in the Battle of the Aisne and invalided home. In December 1914 he was offered two Staff appointments, which he refused. He returned to the Front in March 1915 and is killed by a sniper.
  • Captain Christopher York Pease (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Alfred Pease the Baronet.
  • Captain and Adjutant George Ernest Weatherhead (Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 39. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Robert Johnston Weatherhead Vicar of Seacombe.
  • Captain Montagu Hill Clephane Wickham (Connaught Rangers) is killed age 36. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Hill Wickham and The Princess Eugenie Paleologue. He served in the South Africa War and with the West Africa Frontier Force from 1908 to 1914.
  • Captain David Dudley (Punjabi Light Infantry attached Jat Light Infantry) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Dudley Vicar of Overmunnow and he is a veteran of the South Africa War.
  • Captain and Adjutant ‘the Honorable’ Eric Edward Montagu John Upton (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Henry Upton the 4th Viscount Templetoown and grandson of Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham.
  • Captain Duncan Hamlyn Davidson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 37 at Neuve Chapelle. He is the elder son of Duncan Davidson DL JP and of Flora Frances Davidson eldest daughter of ‘Sir’ Francis Burdett Baronet. At the outbreak of the South African War Captain Davidson after having served with the Gordon Militia, obtained a commission, through the late King, in the Seaforth Highlanders, although he was over age at the time. He served with his Regiment in Egypt and India, and was then posted to the Adjutancy of the 4th Seaforth Territorial Battalion which he gave up in 1913. He was stationed at Agra when orders came for the Indian Force to proceed to France, where he arrived in October 1914. He was severely wounded on 17th December and invalided home. He returned to his Battalion on 28 March 1915.
  • Captain Frederick William Grantham (Munster Fusiliers) is killed leading his men in a charge at Richebourg at age 44. He is the second son of ‘Sir’ William Grantham Judge of the High Court, MP for East Surrey 1874-85, and for Croydon in 1885-6 and is a veteran of the South Africa War.  His elder son will be killed next month on Gallipoli while his younger son will lose his life serving as a Pilot Instructor in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in June 1942.  He is a great traveler in the Far East and an authority on Eastern philosophy. He made many journeys on foot in the interior of China and walked with Buddhist monks from Siam to Burma. Captain Grantham served in the South African War receiving the King’s Medal. On the outbreak of the War he rejoined the Royal Munster Fusiliers, with whom he had served in South Africa, and left for the Front in September 1914. He served continuously with his Regiment through the winter of 1914-15.
  • Captain Cyril Holland (Royal Field Artillery) is shot and killed at age 29 when involved in a dual with a German sniper while sniping himself. He is the eldest son of playwright and poet Oscar Wilde and Constance Lloyd Wilde. After this father’s imprisonment in 1895, his mother changed their name to Holland, which was an old family name. He was considered pompous and intolerant by his brother officers.
  • Captain Alan Geoffrey Fox (Royal Engineers attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in an aerial combat at age 27. He is one of the first five officers in the Army taught to fly.
  • Captain Reginald Baird Trotter (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 41. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry and the Honorable Lady Trotter 11th of Mortonhall and 2nd of Charterhall.
  • Captain Walter Fairfax Richardson (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 41. He is the son of Major General Richardson CB.
  • Captain John Edmund Valentine Isaac DSO (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 35. He played first team Cricket for the Orange Free State 1906-7 and for Worcester 1907-8. He is the son of John Swinton Isaac DL and grandson of Major General R H Crofton RA. His brother will be killed in July 1916.  He was an English cricketer a right-handed batsmen who played ten first-class matches in South Africa and England between 1906 and 1908.  Isaac’s first-class debut came for the South Africa Army cricket team in the only match of that standard they ever played, when they met MCC at Thara Tswane, Pretoria in January 1906. In 1906-07 he played four times for Orange Free State in the Currie Cup.  In 1907 and 1908, Isaac made five appearances for Worcestershire County Cricket Club.  He rode in various races, winning the Cairo Grand National in 1911, on a horse trained and partly owned by him. Captain Isaac was gazetted to the Northumberland Fusiliers in 1900 and in June of that year joined his Regiment on active service in South Africa. He was dangerously wounded at Nooitgedacht and received the King’s Medal and three clasps. He was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade in 1908 and served with them in Malta and Egypt. He left the Regiment in 1911, and went to Vancouver, engaging in real estate. He hunted and shot on the Yukon and played polo in California. On the rumor of war Captain Isaac at once started for England and rejoined his Regiment. In October 1914 he went to the Front as ADC and Camp Commandant to Major-General ‘Sir’ Thompson Capper, commanding 7th He was wounded at the 1st Battle of Ypres and received the DSO for “conspicuous gallantry” on that occasion, besides being twice mentioned in Despatches. He returned to the Front in December 1914 but in the spring, after his General was wounded, he resigned his appointment on the Staff and joined his Regiment, reaching them three days before today’s action on the Aubers-Fromelles Ridge.
  • Lieutenant Charles Selwyn Cowley (Northamptonshire Regiment) killed at age 21. He is the son of John Selwyn Cowley JP.
  • Lieutenant Noel Price James Turner (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend John James Turner Vicar of Pentreheglin.
  • Lieutenant Charles Stirling Walter Greenland (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is initially wounded and is on his way back to a dressing station when he is killed by a random shell. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Albert Greenland.
  • Lieutenant Henry Mills Goldsmith (Devonshire Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) won a Bronze Medal as a member of the 1908 eight-oared shell with coxswain team. He is 29 years old.
  • Lieutenant Edward Henry Leigh (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 26. He is the second son of the Honorable ‘Sir’ E Chandos Leigh KCB KC to be killed in the war and grandson of Lord Leigh. Lieutenant Leigh received his Commission in 1911 when he joined the Rifle Brigade in India, being promoted Lieutenant in 1913. He went to the Front with his Regiment in November 1914 and took part in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, his Battalion gaining the distinction of being the first actually to enter and capture that village.
  • Lieutenant Talbot FitzRoy Eden Stanhope (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the 9th Earl of Harrington.
  • Lieutenant Robert Larmour Neill (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lieutenant Kenneth Herbert Clayton Woodroffe (Rifle Brigade attached Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He was a cricketer for Hampshire and Sussex from 1912 to 1914. His two brothers, including Second Lieutenant Sidney Clayton Woodroffe VC, will be killed in the next 13 months.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Keith Anthony Stewart (Black Watch) is killed leading his men in the charge from Bois du Biez towards the Aubers Ridge at age 20. He is the younger son of Randolph, 11th Earl of Galloway. Lieutenant Stewart was gazetted to the Black Watch in August 1914 and went to the Front in the following December. He served at the Battles of Givenchy, Neuve Chapelle, and Festubert.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lamour Neill (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lieutenant James Augustus Stewart (Royal Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. He is a nephew of the late ‘Sir’ Augustus A J Stewart, 9th Baronet of Fort Stewart.
  • Lieutenant Edward Phillips Jackson (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend William Edward Jackson Rector of Loughton.
  • Lieutenant Wilfrid Stanley Bird (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend George Bird Rector of Newdigate.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Roland Juckes (Sussex Regiment) is killed in the Battle of Aubers Ridge at age 19. His brother will be killed in July of this year.
  • Lieutenant Bertie Charles Lousada (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in November 1914 and his brother-in-law last February.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Edward Mapletoft Atkinson (Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of Major General John Richard Breeks Atkinson who has already had one son killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Reginald John Legard (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘Sir’ James Legard KCB.
  • Lieutenant George Robert Murray Crofts (Welsh Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the late Reverend J Crofts Vicar of Dalton Wigan Christ’s Hospital 1903-1911. He was also the Senior Grecian Scholar of Jesus College, Oxford.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Lenthall Loder-Symonds (Cameronians) is killed in action at age 22. He is one of four brothers who will die in the Great War and they are sons of Captain Frederick Cleave Loder-Symonds JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Ralph Hardinge (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of the 3rd
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Mason (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 36. He was for seventeen years on the Music Staff at Eton College, the principal Cellist of the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra and founder and conductor of the Edward Mason Choir. His wife was a violinist who performed professionally as Jessie Grimson of the Grimson String Quartet which included her husband.
  • Second Lieutenant William Patrick Heffernan (Irish Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He was a prize winning athlete at boxing and running at Dublin University and was the son of Dr W K Heffernan JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Swayne Pearce (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward C Pearce.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Stewart Waddington (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His father Major F S W Raikes was killed in action in 1897 and his brother will die on service as a Brigadier in April 1945.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘Sir’ William Graham Hoste 4th Baronet (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 19. He is the only son of the 3rd Baronet the late ‘Sir’ William H C Hoste Baronet. Lieutenant Hoste left for France in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant George Pickersgill Cable (Rifle Brigade) is killed while leading his platoon in the attack at age 23. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Ernest Cable, High Sheriff of Devon and ex-President of the Bengal Chamber of Commerce.  Lieutenant Cable obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade on the outbreak of the War in August 1914 and went to the Front in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Henry Powell (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of a member the Editorial Staff of “The Times”.
  • Second Lieutenant Kenneth Rose Dennys (Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. He is a young actor who appeared in Maeterlinck’s Blue Bird and was Private Secretary to Monsignor R H Benson.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ William Francis Rodney (Rifle Brigade attached Royal Flying Corps) dies of wounds received in action at the end of a long and continuous ranging of guns which have silenced several German batteries. He was an original Boy Scout and the son of the 7th Lord Rodney.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert George Ferguson-Davie (Portsmouth Battalion, Royal Marines) is also killed. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Arthur Francis Ferguson-Davie Baronet CIE DSO who will be killed next year in Mesopotamia.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Cecil Brian (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds in October 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Russell Eagar (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1918 and their father Captain Edward Boaz Eagar (Northumberland Fusiliers) was killed during the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant William Lionel Brownlow (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 18. He is the son of Brigadier General D’Arcy Charles Brownlow.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Banes-Walker (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He played five matches for the Somerset Cricket Club in 1914. He also played rugby for the Clifton Rugby Football Club and hockey for Gloucestershire. The Devonshire Regiment are not involved in the initial assault but are ordered into the front British trenches in support. As they are moving up, they come under heavy German artillery and machine-gun fire, and between 18:45 and 19:30 Banes-Walker is killed His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Maurice Day (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend Benjamin William Day Rector of St Peter’s Sandwich.
  • Second Lieutenant James Ingleby Farmer (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the late Reverend James Farmer.
  • Second Lieutenant Jasper Moore Mayne (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in February 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Ellis Cunliffe (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the brother of ‘Sir’ Cyril Henley Cunliffe the 8th
  • Second Lieutenant Kenneth Henry Anderson (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20 at Quinn’s Post. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Hudson Anderson.
  • Second Lieutenant Roy Fazan (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is a Rosslyn Park rugby footballer and his nephew and namesake will be killed in the same regiment in 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Helier Lawrence (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the brother of Thomas Edward Lawrence “of Arabia”
  • Sergeant Major James Sharp Armour DCM is killed. His brother will die of illness in April 1919.
  • Sergeant Walter Fellowes and his brother Private Albert Edward Fellowes age 20 are killed together.
  • Sergeant Norman Baird (Black Watch) is killed at age 25. His son will lose his life in July 1944 serving in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
  • Sergeant Henry William Sheppard (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Sergeant Robert Watson (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Alexandria. His brother will be killed in November 1917 and they are nephews of the Bishop of St David’s.
  • The actor Corporal Robert Vincent (Australian Imperial Forces) is killed in action at Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Alfred Tame age 28 and his brother Acting Corporal William George Tame (Berkshire Regiment) are killed together. Another brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Corporal Henry Berry (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is an English International Rugby player who earned four caps and scored in two games in the Five Nations tournament of 1910.  After service in the South African War as a guard on St Helena, he played rugby for the Regiment from 1902 until his discharge in 1909.  He then played for Gloucester between 1909 and 1913.  In 1909 he was selected as a reserve for the England team.  He is one of one hundred eleven international rugby players who will lose their lives in the Great War including three other members of that 1910 England team, L Haigh, R H M Hands and E R Mobbs.
  • Corporal Joseph Oxby (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 28. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lance Corporal James Henry Hunt (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Lance Corporal William Wright is killed. His brother will die of wounds in October 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Pridham (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. His younger brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private James Brawn (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die as a prisoner of war of the Japanese in May 1944.
  • Brothers and Privates Frederick age 19 and George Clarke age 21 are killed serving in the Northamptonshire Regiment.
  • Private Jack Deans (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Jack Anker is killed at age 19 four months after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Harold Robert Burchnell is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in two years.
  • Private Joseph Garside is killed. His brother will die of pneumonia on service next December.
  • Private Ernest Burrough Lock is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Private Samuel Woodcock is killed at age 27. His brother will die of wounds in August 1917.
  • Private James Simmons is killed. His brother will die at home from gas poisoning and shell shock in December 1918.
  • Albert age 19 and Harry Hughes age 18 are killed serving as Privates with the ‘A’ Company 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment in action neaer Sanctuary Wood, Zillebeke.
  • Private Henry George Cooke (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in August.
  • Sapper Fred Grubb (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 23. The silver medalist in both the Road Race (Cycling) and the Team Time Trial at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics,
  • Rifleman Paul Frederick Hebert (Rifle Brigade) is killed at Ypres. He is the son of Alderman H F Hebert.
  • Rifleman Frederick Kennard (Rifle Brigade) is killed near Ypres at age 26. His brother will die of wounds in the same general vicinity in December.
  • Private Joseph Hancock (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private James Bain (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 28. His brother will be killed in September 1915 serving in the Royal Naval Reserve.
  • Private Harold Arthur Croxford (London Regiment) is killed in action. He was a member of the choir of St Paul’s Cathedral.
  • Private George Henry Gaston (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Richebourg at age 24. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Wilfred Johns (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in Mesopotamia in December 1916.
  • Private Edward Shadwell (Canterbury Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Sidney Ames Trout (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brothers were killed last year.
  • Private Arthur Maurice Tweed Newman (London Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Edwin Tweed Newman Vicar of St Andrew’s Whittlesey.
  • Private Richard Roy Davis (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed exactly one week before.
  • Driver James Edward Clifford Williams (Australian Army Service Corps) dies of injuries in Egypt at age 27. He played Rugby for Newtown in 1908.
  • Private Arthur Henry Coppack (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Johns (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in December 1916 in Mesopotamia.
  • Private James Harper Shepherd (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed near Richebourg L’Avoue at age 18. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private Joseph M Adamson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918.
  • Private John McNamara (Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 35. He is the second of three members of the St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band who will be killed in the first year of the Great War.
  • Private Percy Etherington (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Private Reuben Wheatley (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in the explosion of HMS Bulwark last November.
  • Private Frederick Wadey (Queens West Surrey Regiment) is killed at Festubert. He is the first of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Randle Newcombe Griffin (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in December 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Horatio John Griffin Rector of Broxholme.
  • Private Thomas Edwin Lyons (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Private Edward Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Harry Fletcher (Sherwood Foresters) is killed one month after his brother was killed.
  • Private William Francis Elmes (Sussex Regiment) a veteran of the South African War is killed at age 34. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private William Joseph Bull (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at Frezenburg Ridge. His brother died of wounds in September 1914.
  • Private William Monaghan (Royal Scots) is killed in action at age 27. His brother Frank was killed in February 1915. Private Donald Royan DCM (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 30. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Three sets of brothers serving in the London Regiment, Privates Dudley Graham Millington age 29 and Arthur Gordon Millington age 30. Privates Charles Albert and George Harry Heaver and Corporal William Henry and Private Walter Sydney Belsten are killed side by side at Aubers Ridge.
  • At least two other sets of brothers will be killed today serving together. Lance Corporal Aubrey age 25 and Private Jack Brooks age 26 and Albert age 20 and William Hawkins age 24 are killed serving in the Sussex Regiment.
  • Scout Norman Sinclair (Northern Rhodesia Police) is killed by a lion on active service on the Rhodesian frontier.