Friday 4 June 1915 – We Lost 1,930

by greatwarliveslost

Royal Naval Division

At Gallipoli the Anglo-French forces try for a third time to reach the hill of Achi Baba.  More than 30,000 British and French troops take part in the attack.  At one point the Turks have built a dummy trench. The British bombard it at 08:00 then the men advance at 12:00, only to find the real trench beyond is intact and fully manned. Nevertheless, with heavy loss, they capture it, driving the Turks out and capturing six Turkish machine guns.  Then they are shelled, deliberately by the Turks and accidentally by their own artillery, which has at last discovered the error of the dummy trench. Seeking to escape this double bombardment, the men abandon their guns and return, under continual Turkish fire, to their own lines. Most of their officers are killed.  Immediately opposite Krithia, the advance by men of the Lancashire Fusiliers is successful, and the Turks are driven back to within a half a mile of the village of Krithia.  This is the opportunity for the British commander Gen Aylmer Hunter-Weston, to exploit the Turkish weakness, but he decides instead to send his reserves to that sector of the line where the French have failed to push the Turks back, and where the Hood Battalion of the Royal Naval Division has almost been destroyed.  As a result of this decision the men who have advanced almost to Krithia have to fall back, and accept new positions only five hundred yards in front of their starting off trenches of the morning.  Between 250 and 500 yards of Turkish held trenches are captured this day, on a mile long front, but Achi Baba remains well behind the Turkish lines. To bring the British and French wounded back to the beaches for evacuation is an arduous task, under continual Turkish sniping and artillery fire.  Indian mule cart drivers, and men of the Zion Mule Corps, after bringing ammunition from the beaches to the trenches, will return with a new cargo, the wounded. The British alone suffer 4,000 casualties in this costly failure.

As for the dead, the need to consolidate the new positions means that there is no time for burials.  On the front occupied by the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, a territorial battalion arrives shortly afterwards on the peninsula and they must bury corpses as their first task on shore. When burials take place, they can be sickening.

The Hood Battalion of the Royal Naval Division loses six of its remaining ten officers (of the thirty that originally arrived on the peninsula).

  •  Lieutenant Commander Raymond S Parsons is killed. His brother Francis Newton Parson (Essex Regiment) was awarded the Victoria Cross for going to the aid of Private Ferguson on the Modder River on 15th February 1900 in South Africa and was later killed on 10th March 1900. Another brother will die of injuries after falling in March 1919 while also serving in the Royal Navy.
  • Lieutenant Oscar Freyberg, whose brother Bernard (the future 1st Baron Freyberg) is now in Cairo recovering from a stomach wound is also killed. Oscar is last seen alive in action in a Turkish trench, a pistol in both hands. His body is never found.
  • Sub Lieutenant Wendell Stacey is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend F B Stacey.
  • Stoker 1st Class Daniel Smith is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in September of this year on the Western Front.

The Collingwood Battalion also suffers heavy casualties.

  •  Commander Alexander Young Crawshay Mainwaring Spearman (commanding Collingwood Battalion) is killed on Gallipoli at age 52. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Cadwalladr Coker.
  • Lieutenant Commander Wallace Moir Annand is killed. His son Captain Richard Annand (Durham Light Infantry) will be awarded the Army’s first Victoria Cross in the Second World War for service in May 1940 and his brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Francis Molyneaux Badham dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick John Badham Rector of Kilbixy.
  • Sub Lieutenant John Eric Davies is killed. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the next three months.
  • Sub Lieutenant Adair Grey Bagshawe is killed at age 30. He is the son of Frank T Bagshawe Commissioner of Police Madras India.
  • Sub Lieutenant Ronald Worthington Jukes is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Worthington Jukes formerly of the Shobrooke Rectory.
  • Able Seaman Norman Fraser Roy is killed at age 23. His brother will die at home on service in February 1919.
  • Able Seaman Frederick William Gibbs (Howe Royal Naval Division) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July next year.

Members of the Manchester Regiment killed today include

  •  Lieutenant Colonel William George Heys (commanding officer 1st/6th Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 48 while inspecting a captured Turkish trench.
  • Major James Herbert Staveacre (commanding 7th Battalion) is killed at age 42. He is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain Joseph Holt is killed at age 33. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Holt JP 1st
  • Lieutenant George Sidney James dies of wounds at age 22. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War, three of them this year including one who will be killed in September on Gallipoli. They are sons of the Reverend Charles Henry James Vicar of Haigh.
  • Second Lieutenant John Barlow Emmott is killed. He is the nephew of the Right Honorable Lord Emmott PC GCMG.
  • Second Lieutenant Humphrey Kaye Bonney Nevinson dies of wounds on board the Hospital Ship Somali off Gallipoli at age 23. He is the son of the Rector of Medbourns in Market Harborough.
  • Sergeant William Moore Bell Nanson is killed at Krithia at age 34. He is a veteran of the South Africa War who played rugby for England earning 2 caps.
  • Private Harold Buzza (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at Krithia. His brother will die of pneumonia on service in May 1918.
  • Private Robert Leigh Redfern (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August next year. Private John Eardley (Manchester Regiment). He has been serving on the peninsula since the landings in April.  In civilian life he is an avid autograph collector. After his death a postcard is found in his trench which reads: “A man who goes on calmly hunting autographs with all civilization crumbling around him, and the Turkish enemy not far below the horizon, really deserves to succeed.  So here goes, G Bernard Shaw”.

Two Zeppelins raid England but are hampered by strong winds and poor visibility over the coast.  L10 bombs Gravesend, SL3 crosses the coast ten miles south of Bridlington, flies north to Flamborough Head and sets course for Hull at 00:30 the next morning.  Due to strong headwinds it abandons its raid after dropping a few bombs in open country. The raid injures eight.

 Today’s losses include:

  • An avid autograph collector
  • A pioneering embryologist
  • An author and playwright
  • The Assistant Master at the Manchester Grammar School
  • An England Rugby International
  • The son of the Commissioner of Police in Madras India
  • The brother of the future 1st Baron Freyberg
  • The father of the Army’s first Victoria Cross winner in the Second World War
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner in the South African War
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Two brothers lost on service one in the South African War one in the Great War
  • Two brothers both killed today one on Gallipoli one on the Western Front
  • A man whose father was killed in the Black Mountain Expedition of 1888, who lost two uncles one in Chitral and one in Afghanistan and who had a brother killed on the Indian Frontier in 1897
  • A man whose two nephews will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple families that will lose two or three sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • Multiple members of the clergy who will lose a son
  • A son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Five battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A nephew of Lord Emmott
  • The son of a General

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel John William Jessop (commanding 1st/4th Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 55.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Augustus Jacques (commanding 14th Sikhs) is killed on Gallipoli leading a charge at age 48. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Kinton Jacques Rector of Brindle.
  • Major Hedley Morton Battye (Gurkha Rifles) is killed on Gallipoli at age 38. His father Major Legh Richmond Battye (Gurkha Rifles) was killed in the Black Mountain Expedition on 18th June 1888 at age 43 while his brother Lieutenant Richmond Moffat Battye (Bengal Cavalry) was killed on 1st December 1897 at age 28 also serving on the Indian Frontier. He also had two uncles killed in Chitral and Afghanistan.
  • Major Ivon D’esterre Roberts (Royal Field Artillery commanding the Anson Battalion Royal Naval Division) is killed on Gallipoli at age 36.
  • Major Sydney James Sparling (Royal Marines, Royal Naval Division) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. His brother will be killed in September of this year.
  • Captain John Wilfred Jenkinson (Worcestershire Regiment attached Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 43. He is a pioneering embryologist who worked on early development of mouse and frog embryos. He published the first English textbook on Experimental Embryology in 1909. The Jenkinson Memorial Lectures in Embryology at the University of Oxford is named after John Wilfred Jenkinson.
  • Captain Reginald Crommelin Popham-Blyth (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 38. He is the son of the Right Reverend George F Popham-Blyth Bishop of Jerusalem.
  • Captain Oscar Robert Walker (Worcestershire Regiment attached Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 34. He is the son of the Honorable W F Walker.
  • Captain Wynyard Keith Brown (Gurkha Rifles attached West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 27. He is the son of the late Colonel F D M Brown VC.
  • Captain Richard Clift Fippard (West Yorkshire Regiment attached Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli. On the same day on the Western Front his brother Corporal Herbert John Fippard (London Regiment) is killed at age 29.
  • Lieutenant Horatio Nelson Ormsby (Cameronians) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in September of next year.
  • Lieutenant Norman McRury (Black Watch attached King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend John McRury.
  • Lieutenant James Colin Grogan (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 25. He is the son of Brigadier General E G Grogan and has a brother who will be killed in January 1918.
  • Lieutenant Mauriace Francis Cromie (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He has two brothers who will be killed one in October of this year and a second as Naval Attaché in Petrograd in August 1918.
  • Lieutenant Eric Larkin Wheadon Leake (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 19 on Gallipoli three weeks after his brother was killed on the Western Front.
  • Lieutenant Hector MacLennan Guthrie (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 22. He had been awarded the 1st Class Honors Degree from Aberdeen University in July 1914. Lieutenant Norman Victor Holden (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend William Holden and was Assistant Master at the Manchester Grammar School.
  • Lieutenant John Bolton (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. He is the son of Henry Hargreaves Bolton JP.
  • Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Kenneth Nowell McKenzie (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 21 on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Donald James McKenzie Canon of Lahore.
  • Lieutenant George Leslie Calderon (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 46. He is an author and playwright, who went to France in October 1914 as an interpreter with the Royal Horse Guards. Author of The Maharani of Arakan: A Romantic Comedy in One Act Founded on the Story of Sir Rabindranath Tagore. From 1900 to 1903 his was on the library staff of the British Museum. He visited Tahiti in 1906 and wrote the book of the same name about his time there. His brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Crewe Coles (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed by Werner Voss in April 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Cyril Decimus Field (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in just over 2 months.
  • Second Lieutenant William Raymond Hornby (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at Gallipoli. He is the son of the Baronet and Lady Hornby.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Cuthbert Danvers Martin (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Basil Martin Rector of Pudleston.
  • Second Lieutenant William Augustine Harper Lowry (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Sikhs) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War and his sisters two sons will be killed in the Second World War.
  • Second Lieutenant Sidney Vandyke Hasluck (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Sikhs) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Ernest Edward Hasluck Vicar of Sixpenny Handley Dorset.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Thornton Prickard (South Wales Borderers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend William Edward Prickard.
  • Petty Officer Motor Mechanic Oswald New (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed on Gallipoli at age 30. His brother will be killed in April 1918. Lance Corporal Edward Milton (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds at home at age 22. His brother will be killed in September next year.
  • Private George Gordon (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 17. His older brother will be killed in action fifteen days.
  • Private Herbert Turner (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. His brother will be when the hospital ship Salta is sunk in April 1917.
  • Trooper Ernest John McIndoe (Australian Light Horse) dies of wounds. He is the son of Councillor John McIndoe. Saddler A Stittle (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed one month before the end of the war.
  • Private Alec Boyle (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed. His two brothers were killed last year.
  • Four members of the crew of the trawler Excel lose their lives today including her Skipper Peter Moxey, Mate Frank C Moxey and Third Hand Edward Richard Moxey.