Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: ANZAC

Thursday 4 October 1917 We Lost 4,997

David Gallaher

The Battle of Broodseinde Ridge is a British attack on an eight mile front from the railway north of Langemarck to Tower Hamlets Ridge on the Ypres-Menin Road. The main attack is conducted by the I Anzac, II Anzac Corps and XVIII Corps, with flanking attacks supporting the main attack conducted by the X Corps, IX Corps and XIV Corps. Additionally, fourteen tanks are also used. The attack is timed to start at 06:00 hours. The northernmost corps (XIV Corps) encounters a bog during its advance – resulting in it losing the protection of the creeping barrage. The XIV Corps encounters machine gun fire from defences along the edge of Houlthulst Forest and suffers 1,700 casualties while gaining very little ground. The northern corps of the main attack (XVIII Corps) manages to capture all of its objectives at a cost of 2,000 casualties. German artillery fire and counter attacks later resulted in the Germans recapturing the northern half of the village of Poelcappelle.

The I ANZAC Corps now has one of the most unique experiences of the war. When it was preparing to attack, a German artillery bombardment falls on it causing 1 in 7 of the attacking forces to become casualties. When the Australian forces starts to attack, the cause of the German artillery fire became apparent, when they are met by a German regiment in no-man’s land. Due to the superior numbers involved, the Australians quickly rout the Germans and continue the attack. Despite hard fighting to defeat the fortifications of the Flandern I line, the Australians reach the first objective (the “Red Line” a line 100 to 200 yards short of the crest of the ridgeline) by 07:20. During the hour long halt at the first objective, parts of the 1st Australian Division has to fight German pillboxes positioned along the crest of the ridgeline. The Australians consolidate just short of the second objective due to defensive fire from German positions along the edge of “Daisy Wood”.  This effort costs the Australian divisions approximately 4,500 casualties. Initially, the II ANZAC Corps has an easier time than its neighbouring ANZAC units. During the advance to the second onjective (the “Blue Line” a line 200 to 400 yards beyond the crest of the ridgeline), it has to advance through parts of the Flandern I line. Despite this, the second objective is reached by 09:00, at a cost of 3,500 casualties (including 1,853 New Zealanders). the attack by the X Corps achieves most of its objectives (advancing 800 yards), although unsubdued German artillery fire from behind the Ghevulelt Plateau causes large numbers of casualties (8,000 casualties in the three attacking divisions). The southernmost corps (the IX Corps) experiences the same problems as the X Corps and makes little headway against the German defences.

After the attacking units reach their final positions, Allied artillery fires an interdiction barrage for an additional two and a half hours, allowing the attacking troops to establish defences (trenches, outposts, defensive wire entanglements, etc.). As a result, when the Germans counter-attack, most of the counter-attacks are dispersed purely through the use of Allied artillery. The attack is a stunning attritional success, with an average advance of over 1,000 yards and the Australian 3rd Division advancing up to 1,900 yards. Capture and retention of ground is varied, with limited (or no) advance maintained by the southernmost Corps, to moderate gains between Menin Road and Polygon Wood and all objectives at Broodseinde Ridge. By mid-afternoon it is decided that no further attacks will take place.

Captain Clement Robertson (West Surrey Regiment attached Tank Corps) is killed at age 28. At Zonnebeke, Belgium, Captain Robertson leads his tanks in attack under heavy shell, machine-gun and rifle fire over ground which has been ploughed by shell-fire. He and his batman have spent the previous three days and nights going back and forth over the ground, reconnoitering and taping routes, and, knowing the risk of the tanks missing the way, he now leads them on foot, guiding them carefully towards their objective, although he must have known that this action would almost certainly cost him his life. He is killed after the objective has been reached, but his skillful leading had already ensured success. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. Captain Robertson is a founding member of the Delgany Golf Club where his name is the first on the President’s Cup.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The only child of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A founding member of the Delgany Golf Club
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of two members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A Humane Society Bronze Medal winner
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A New Zealand Rugby Union footballer
  • The Captain of the “Original All Blacks”
  • A popular footballer and member of the Auckland City Fire Brigade
  • An Irish International Rugby player
  • A professional cycling champion and world record holder
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • A man shot at dawn for mutiny
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • An Assistant Scout Master

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Cecil Robert Arthur Pye DSO (commanding 18th Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 27.
  • Major Philip Llewellyn Howell-Price DSO MC (Australian Infantry) becomes the third of three brothers to be killed in action within a year during the Great War. He dies at age 23.  All three are awarded the Military Cross and are sons of the late Reverend John Howell-Price.
  • Lieutenants Frank, 26, and John Rigby MM, 29, Australian Infantry are killed together.
  • Another set of brothers Michael, 28, and Patrick Starr, 22, are killed serving the Australian Infantry.
  • Second Lieutenant John Oliver Ethell (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred William Ethell Rector of Laidley.
  • Corporal Thomas Jepson Gascoyne (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 40. He is a professional cycling champion and world recorder holder for both 25 miles and the flying start quarter-mile. He also holds the English record for two miles on a tandem.
  • Lance Corporal Reginald Percy Bartram (Australian Infantry) becomes the last of three brothers who are killed this year when he loses his life at age 36.
  • Private Ernest Briggs (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed last January.
  • Eric, 21, and Joseph Burgess, 25, are killed serving with the Australian Field Artillery. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves at The Huts Cemetery, Dickebusch.
  • Private Gavin Gordon Bulkeley Gavin age 25 and Lance Corporal James Tinnock Bulkeley Gavin age 23 (Australian Infantry) are killed together.
  • Private Norman Richard Wight (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal for attempting to save a soldier who fell over board from a transport at Sierra Leone on 22nd November 1916 but he could not save him.
  • Private Clement Henry Gamble (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in four days.
  • Private Winton Merlin Langtry (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in December of this year.
  • Private Thomas Miller McCluskey (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. An Australian Rules Footballer he played in 9 games in 1910 and 1911.
  • Private William John Cumming (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother died of wounds in August 1915.
  • Captain Hugh Townshend Boscawen (Wellington Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the grandson of the Reverend Honorable John Townshend Boscawen and the Reverend John W Conway Hughes.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Guy Spencer Bryan-Brown (New Zealand) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the late Reverend Willoughby Bryan-Brown.
  • Sergeant David Gallaher (Auckland Infantry) is killed at age 41. He is a New Zealand rugby union footballer, best known as the captain of “The Originals” the first New Zealand national rugby union team to be known as the All Blacks. Born in Ramelton, County Donegal, Ireland, Gallaher’s family emigrated to New Zealand in 1878. Originally settling in Katikati in the Bay of Plenty, they moved to Auckland in the 1890s and it was there that Gallaher played his provincial rugby. Gallaher played 26 representative matches for Auckland, including the first ever Ranfurly Shield defense, and 36 for the All Blacks, including 6 tests. Gallaher’s All Black career spanned from 1903 to 1906, the highlight being the captaincy of the “Originals” tour in which he played 26 matches including 4 tests. Gallaher proved to be an outstanding leader and one of the deepest thinkers of the game in his era. Gallaher fought in the South African War serving as a corporal in the New Zealand Contingents of Mounted Rifles. Although exempt from conscription due to his age, Gallaher volunteered to fight in the Great War, and apparently altered his date of birth to 31st October 1876. He saw action at Ypres, and is killed during the Passchendaele He is buried at Nine Elms Cemetery, Poperinge, where his gravestone bears the silver fern. Two of Gallaher’s brothers were also killed in France. He is a member of the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame.
  • Corporal George William Worner (Auckland Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He was a well-known football player, having played for the City Rovers and Grafton Athletic clubs.  He was also a member of the Waitemata Boating Club and a member of the Auckland City Fire Brigade.
  • Corporal Ronald Burnsall Twisleton (Wellington Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in August 1915 at Gallipoli.
  • Private Guy Genge (Otago Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Jeoffreys Carmichael (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Charles Gow (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is an Assistant Scout Master in Timaru.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Hamilton Dix MC (Leinster Regiment commanding 12th/13th Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Neville Reay Daniell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry commanding 9th King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 28.
  • Major Albert Lewis Stewart (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 28. He is an Irish International Rugby player.
  • Captain Roy Grote Cordiner MC (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Reverend Robert Charles Cordiner.
  • Lieutenant Alexander Egan Barrow (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the late Reverend Kingston Egan Barrow.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Cecil Ainger (Royal Scots attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 22 when his Spad is shot down. He is the son of the late Reverend Francis Edward Ainger rector of St John’s Jedbugh Roxburghshire.
  • Lieutenant George Samuel Vincent (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother died of wounds last year.
  • Lieutenant Oliver St. Michael Jones (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at Poelcappelle at age 40. He is the only child of the late Captain Henry Mitchell Jones VC late of the Diplomatic Service. Lieutenant Jones on leaving Harrow went to Argentina, and on the outbreak of the South African War proceeded to Durban where he joined Thornycroft’s Mounted Infantry, being subsequently given a commission in the 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers). He was severely wounded by a shell. After several years’ service he resigned his commission and became a world traveler. In August 1914 he was in Mexico ill. He returned home to be medically treated and then entered the Sherwood Foresters.
  • Second Lieutenant Duncan MacKenzie MacRae (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend D M MacRae.
  • Second Lieutenant William Ward Odell MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Odell.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Stanley Martin (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Leslie Lowth (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Stephen Clarke (attached Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed.
  • Corporal Frederick John James (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lance Corporal Jesse Robert Short (Northumberland Fusiliers)) is shot at dawn at age 30 for his role as an Etaples Mutineer.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Gill (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at Salonika. His brother was killed in September of last year.
  • Lance Corporal Edwin John Burnell (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in action becoming the third brother to die in the Great War.
  • Acting Corporal James Oag (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in July 1915.
  • Private Alfred Thomas Pettman (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in February 1916.
  • Private Leonard Brown (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private David Alexander Malcolm (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Private George Georgeson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Albert Victor Gurr (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private John Youlden (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Private Robert Wallis Heaven (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in January of this year.
  • Private Reginald Harold Couzens (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother died of wounds less than two months ago.
  • Private Walter Tugwell (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed at the end of next month.
  • Private John Fletcher Boughey (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed on HMS Defence at Jutland and they are grandsons of the Reverend Benjamin Lucas Cubitt and ‘Sir’ John Fenton Boughey 2nd

Tuesday 16 May 1916 – We Lost 265

ANZAC troops storm the Turkish camp at Bayud in the Sinai.

Private David Sutherland (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed during a raid on the German trenches in the area north of Arras.  The experience of this raid had a profound effect on Lieutenant Ewart Alan Mackintosh and the death of Private Sutherland inspires him to write the poem “In Memoriam”.  Lieutenant Mackintosh will be killed on 21 November 1917.

So you were David’s father,
And he was your only son,
And the new-cut peats are rotting
And the work is left undone,
Because of an old man weeping,
Just an old man in pain,
For David, his son David,
That will not come again.

Oh, the letters he wrote you,
And I can see them still,
Not a word of the fighting,
But just the sheep on the hill
And how you should get the crops in
Ere the year get stormier,
And the Bosches have got his body,
And I was his officer.

You were only David’s father,
But I had fifty sons
When we went up in the evening
Under the arch of the guns,
And we came back at twilight –
O God! I heard them call
To me for help and pity
That could not help at all.

Oh, never will I forget you,
My men that trusted me,
More my sons than your fathers’,
For they could only see
The little helpless babies
And the young men in their pride.
They could not see you dying,
And hold you while you died.

Happy and young and gallant,
They saw their first-born go,
But not the strong limbs broken
And the beautiful men brought low,
The piteous writhing bodies,
They screamed “Don’t leave me, sir”,
For they were only your fathers
But I was your officer.

  Today’s Losses Include:

  • A victim of Max Immelmann
  • A grandson of a Baronet and member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant Morden Maxwell Mowat (Royal Flying Corps) dies of wounds received in action as a prisoner of war when his Bristol C Scout is shot down by Max Immelmann while on an offensive patrol. He is Immelmann’s 15th victim and is barely alive when troops of the German infantry reach him he dies in captivity within a few minutes. His brother will die on service in January 1919.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Lumley Hammick (Carnatic Infantry) dies on service in India at age 26. His brother will die on service in October 1918 and they are grandsons of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick 2nd
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Herbert Jewell (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in January.
  • Rifleman Alfred Walter Elvy (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in September next year.
  • Private Sidney Arthur Crundwell (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in November 1914.

Monday 8 May 1916 – We Lost 264

S S Cymric

S S Cymric

The Cunard liner Cymric is torpedoed three times by the German submarine U-20 at 16:00 one hundred forty miles from Fastnet.  The ship sinks in the early hours of the following morning.  Five members of the crew are killed while the rest are saved.

ANZAC troops enter the front line in France.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Gerald Evelyn Shuldham Sewart (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. He is the only son of the Reverend Anthony Wilkinson Sewart Rector of Brignall.
  • Lieutenant Ernest Edward Brown (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Edward Brown Vicar of Alstonefield who will lose another son in July 1916.
  • Private John Miller (Seaforth Highlanders attached Army Service Corps) dies in an accident at home at age 21. His brother will be killed in October 1918.

Tuesday 28 March 1916 – We Lost 246

During a violent gale and snowstorm on this night the whaler of HMS Melpomene with a crew of six men is driven by the weather on to the mud about ¾ of a mile up the river above the Parkstone Jetty, Harwich.  Lieutenant Robert Arthur Startin on hearing that the whaler is missing sets out alone to search along the river.  After wading through deep mud at times up to his armpits for a distance of about 300 yards he eventually finds the whaler half full of water aground in the mud with her crew lying helpless in the boat having given up hope of being rescued.  He only succeeds in rousing them by beating them with his stick one man having to be forcibly dragged all the way to short by Lieutenant Startin and the coxswain of the boat.  After dragging him for about an hour a distance of about 40 or 50 yards has been covered when a light is seen moving inshore.  Lieutenant Startin orders the crew to remain where they are while he goes to the light which proves to be carried by a search party with a rope. This rope is taken backwards and forwards personally by Lieutenant Startin from the shore to the boat’s crew until each one has been rescued, this exhausting and dangerous task in the deep mud being performed under the most trying conditions.  All the crew is saved, though two afterwards will die from the effects of exposure.  Lieutenant Startin will be awarded the Albert Medal for his actions. He is the son of Admiral ‘Sir’ James Startin who lost a son on Gallipoli last year.

Also lost in the storm is the trawler H M Saxon Prince (Skipper Geroge Albert Rose) RNR sunk off Dover with a loss of all hands. A whaler from HMS Conquest founders in the storm while returning from shore leave. Thirty nine of crew are drowned including Able Seaman James O’Hara who drowns at age 39. His brother was lost at sea in September 1914.

The troopship Sarovia departs Alexandria, Egypt for Marseilles.

2nd Anzac Corps is formed in Egypt.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a General
  • A man whose brother was lost in September 1914
  • A man who had two brothers killed in the South African War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Gerald Edgar Oliver Fortescue Lambart (Royal Scots Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 30. He is the son of Brigadier General Edgar Alan Lambart CB.
  • Captain Percival St George Findlater (Army Service Corps) is killed at age 34. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Huffington Findlater.

Saturday 25 December 1915 – We Lost 211

William Fitzgerald Levin

William Fitzgerald Levin

The Western Frontier Force moves out today to attack the Senussi.  The Senussi flee in the direction of Unjella and Bir Tunis having suffered 370 killed and 82 prisoners taken by the British in addition to the loss of many animals and much material. The Western Frontier Force has lost 14 other ranks killed and 3 officers and 47 ranks wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the speaker of the New Zealand Legislative Council
  • The son of the Inspector of Constabulary Jamaica
  • The son of an Admiral
  • A man who has two brothers-in-law killed in the Great War
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major William Fitzgerald Levin (Wellington Mounted Rifles attached New Zealand Divisional Headquarters, Beach Commandant ANZAC) dies of wounds in Alexandria at age 36. He is the son in law of ‘Sir’ Charles John Johnston Kt Speaker of the New Zealand Legislative Council who will lose two sons later in the War.
  • Major Nathaniel Bridges Tyrwhitt (London Regiment) is killed in action. He is the only son of the late Admiral P Tyrwhitt.
  • Captain Harry Reid Thomas (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed as the first of three sons of Herbert T Thomas Inspector of Constabulary Jamaica who will be killed in the Great War while a fourth son will be killed in the crash of the airship R-38 in 1921.
  • Captain Arnold Bosanquet Thompson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Sergeant Richard Clayton (Highland Light Infantry) dies after being discharge for wounds at home. He is the second of four brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private George Mounsey Cartmel (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in June 1918.

Monday 20 December 1915 – We Lost 347

Henry Donald McNeile

Henry Donald McNeile

The last party leaves Anzac Cove at 04:10 and Suvla Bay at 05:10.  Two Australians are wounded at Anzac Cove and casualties at Suvla Bay are negligible.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • Families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Two brothers killed together

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Donald McNeile (commanding 1st Dragoons) is killed at age 43.
  • Sergeant Percy Longfield (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Private Percy Vickers (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. His two brothers will be killed on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Privates L S and R E Barrington (Lincolnshire Regiment) are killed together and buried side by side in Menin Road North Cemetery.
  • Driver Albert Edward Fiske (Royal Horse Artillery) is killed in action in Iraq at age 26. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

Sunday 19 December 1915 – We Lost 514

Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid

Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid

The final evacuation of Anazc begins after dark with 4,100 men leaving their posts by nightfall.  In order to deceive the Turks it is decided to hold all the front line posts, however lightly, until the last possible moment which at Anzac Cove was 01:30 after which the front is gradually uncovered.

Captain Malcolm McBean Bell-Irving (Royal Flying Corps) successfully engages three hostile aircraft between Lille and Ypres.  The first he drives off, the second he sends to the ground in flames, and the third nose-dives and disappears. He is then attacked by three other hostile machines from above, but he flies off towards Ypres, and a machine he sees in that direction.  He overhauls it and gets to within one hundred yards when he is wounded by a shell and has to return.

Lieutenant Norman Gordon-Smith and his gunner Second Lieutenant Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid (Royal Flying Corps) are shot down and killed over Oostkampe-Bruges. They were on a sixty mile trek to protect a reconnaissance machine and fought for half an hour enabling the reconnaissance aircraft to successfully return to base. Gordon-Smith’s brother will be killed in 1918 and Cunningham-Reid is the brother of Alec Straatford Cunningham-Reid a seven victory ace.

Today’s losses include:

  • The brother of a 7-victory ace
  • A member of the Wayside Football Club
  • Multiple families that will two sons in the Great War
  • The third son to die of a family that will lose four sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Colonel Ernest Octavius Wight (49th (West Riding) Division Assistant Director of Medical services, Royal Army Medical Corps) dies on active service at age 57. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society’s bronze medal for life saving from drowning.
  • Captain Henry Colver (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in June of this year.
  • Lieutenant Charles James Williams (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Lieutenant Albert Butler Heukensfeldt Clayton-Smith (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Alexander Cunningham (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action at age 20. He is a member of the Wayside Football Club.
  • Private Charles Craig (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private John McClelland (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 28. He is the third of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Harold Percy Saxton (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed next June.

Sunday 12 December 1915 – We Lost 218

The Britannic is commissioned ‘His Majesty’s Hospital Ship’ and arrives at Liverpool under heavily armed escort.

The troops at Suvla and Anzac are told the plan to evacuate.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of the member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant Claud Henry Whish Darling (Royal Irish Rifles) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Oliver Warner Darling who lost another son less than two months ago.
  • Corporal J Whaley (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies at home on active service. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend J B Whaley.
  • Rifleman George Mitchiner (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 19. His older brother will lose his life in the loss of HMS Hampshire next June.

Wednesday 8 December 1915 – We Lost 244

Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s poem In Flanders Fields is published in Punch Magazine. McCrae will die on service in January 1918.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields, the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below…

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved, and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields…

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands, we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields…

General Monro is ordered to evacuate Suvla and Anzac.

The Bulgarians attack Rocky Peak in a dense fog but are pushed back by the defenders at bayonet point.  Several machine guns are sighted on the Peak giving fire support with a mountain battery to a mass attack on the Connaught Rangers. At 14:00 an attack on the Hampshire Regiment results in a breach of the line and companies on the right fall back to the second line of defence at Crete Simonet.  With their right flank partially exposed the Connaught Rangers face a further determined attack. After fierce hand to hand fighting they are overwhelmed.  The Munster Fusiliers on the left are under less pressure and they retire when the Bulgarians occupy the Connaught Rangers trenches. The Dublin Fusiliers serving in reserve move up to Crete Simonet and with 31 Brigade straighten out the line and consolidate their position.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A first class Australian cricketer
  • Families that will two and three sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant Frank Thackery Howis (Essex Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Charles William Howis Vicar of Plesby.
  • Second Lieutenant Cyril Talbot Burney Croft (Somerset Light Infantry attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at home at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Otho Talbot Bourdois Croft Rector of South Cadbury.
  • Sergeant Matthew Stanley McKenzie (Australian Army Medical Corps) dies of appendicitis in Egypt at age 24. He is a first class Australian cricketer and Australian Rules Footballer.
  • Lance Corporal Clifford Kossuth Robinson (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds on Malta at age 26. He is the last of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War this year.
  • Private Percy Arthur Vidler (Royal East Kent Yeomanry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. His brother will be killed in less than a month at the Battle of Sheikh Saad in Mesopotamia.

Tuesday 10 August 1915 – We Lost 1,569

Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley

Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley

At 03:00 the 38th Brigade 13th Division is heavily attacked by the enemy and subjected to severe rifle fire at Chunuk Bair.  This attack is beaten back.  At 05:00 the enemy delivers another attack and succeeds in driving our troops back on the right flank for a short distance.  The position they take renders it impossible to hold on to the hill above “The Farm” and the brigade is forced to retire. Just before retiring Brigadier General Anthony Hugh Baldwin, General Officer Commanding 38th Infantry Brigade 13th Division is killed at age 51.

From the Suvla landing the 53rd (Welsh) Division attacks Scimitar Hill, suffering heavy casualties.

Hill 10 is taken by the 9th Lancashire Fusiliers and 11th Manchester Regiment early in the morning.

Today’s losses include:

  • A potential Nobel Prize winner in physics
  • A General
  • The son of a General
  • The grandson of a General
  • Six battalion commanders
  • The son of a Judge of the Supreme Court in South Africa
  • The father of the 9th Baron Langford
  • The son of the 2nd Lord Glanusk
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • A Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War
  • The brother of a future Rear Admiral
  • Three men who will have sons lose their lives on service in the Second World War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in July 1917

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

Second Lieutenant Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at Gallipoli when he is shot through the head by a sniper at age 27.  He is the discoverer of the “Law of Moseley in physics” and his obituary will be published in German newspapers.  Many have speculated that he would have been awarded the Nobel Prize for his work with the quantitative justification of the concept of atomic number in Moseley’s law, advanced chemistry and provided independent support for the Bohr model of the Rutherford/Antonius Van den Broek nuclear atom containing positive nuclear charge equal to atomic number.  It is because of Moseley’s death in the War that the British and many other world governments begin a policy of no longer allowing their scientists to enlist for combat.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Mervyn Henry Nunn (commanding 9th Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 50. He served on the Nile in 1897 and in the South Africa War.  Colonel Nunn was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment from the Middlesex Militia in 1886. He was employed with the Egyptian Army in 1896-7 and served in the Nile Expedition in 1897, receiving the Egyptian Medal with clasp. During the latter part of the South African War he was in command of the Imperial Yeomanry in Natal during 1902, and held the Queen’s Medal with clasp. In 1906 he retired and joined the Reserve of Officers, but he rejoined his old Regiment on the outbreak of the War and was given command of the 9th Worcestershire Regiment in January 1915. He went with his Regiment to the Dardanelles in June 1915.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry George Levinge (Norfolk Regiment commanding 6th North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 49. He is the eldest son of Harry Corbyn Levinge JP DL late of Knockdrin Castle, Mullingar Westmeath and grandson of the 6th Colonel Levinge joined the Norfolk Regiment in 1885, and served with them and the Mounted Infantry in the South African War. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, promoted Brevet-Major, and awarded the Queen’s and the King’s Medals with five clasps. On the outbreak of the War he was serving with the Norfolk Regiment and in November 1914 was appointed Lieutenant Colonel to command the 10th Battalion from which he was transferred to the command of the 6th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. In June 1915 he proceeded with his Regiment to Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Basil Edwin Philips (commanding 5th Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 51. Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Richard Cole-Hamilton (Commanding 6th East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at Sari Bahr at age 56. His nephew will be killed in a flying accident in July 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Carden CMG (commanding 5th Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the late Commandant of the Northern Rhodesia Police.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Bauchop CMG (commanding Otago Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds on board HMHS Delta at age 44.
  • Major William Sandbach (Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 50. He is the son of the Reverend Gilbert Sandbach Rector of Upper Sapey and his son will be killed in December 1941 at age 34 at El Alamein.
  • Major John Gilderdale Jennings (Punjabis attached Royal Dublin Fusiliers) dies of wounds received two days earlier leading an attack on Chocolate Hill Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Robert Melvill Jennings KCB.
  • Major E W Boyd-Moss DSO (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action. His son Major Deryck Frank (Tank Regiment) will be killed in action on 28th October 1942 at age 29.
  • Major Charles Woodward Crofton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action in Gallipoli at age 50. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Woodward Crofton Chaplain at Rangoon.
  • Major Geoffrey Seymour Rowley-Conwy (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of Conwy Grenville Hercules Rowley-Conwy JP DL. He is the father of the 9th Baron Langford of Summerhill. His brother Rafe Grenville Rowley-Conway (Royal Navy) will later serve as a Rear Admiral.
  • Captain John Wilfrid Mather (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is the son of the Reverend Frank Albert Mather Vicar of Yatton.
  • Brothers Captain Horatio Gordon Mann and Second Lieutenant Horace Walpole Mann (North Lancashire Regiment) are killed in action on Gallipoli. Horace dies at age 29 and their brother will be killed in Mesopotamia in 1916.
  • Captain George William Rolph (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. His brother will be killed October.
  • Captain Alfred Heywood Howard JP (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 45.
  • Captain Arthur Charles Davies (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Richard Davies MP for Anglesey 1869-86.
  • Captain Edward Wynne Lloyd-Jones (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at 27 on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in March 1917, they are sons of the late Reverend David Lloyd-Jones and he earned his BA and LLB at Cambridge.
  • Captain Andrew Gordon Reed (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Reed Rector of Llangyniew.
  • Captain Gerald William Nugent (General List, Headquarters 29th Infantry Brigade) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 28. He is the son of the 3rd
  • Captain Austen Charles Sandham Belcher (Wiltshire Regiment) is also killed on Gallipoli at age 27. His brother was killed three days earlier and they are sons of the Reverend Gilbert Edward Rector of Chaldon Belcher.
  • Captain Edward William Britten (Middlesex Regiment) is killed on Galilpoli. His brother died on service in February.
  • Lieutenant Ian Calcutt Findlay (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the ‘Honorable Sir’ John and Lady Findlay.
  • Flight Lieutenant David Keith- (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed in action during an air duel at Ostend at age 20. His brother will be killed in an air accident in September.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Peter Guillebrand (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend J A Guillebrand.
  • Second Lieutenant Maurice William Pretyman (Royal Engineers) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in July 1917 being the only two Pretymans killed in the service of their King in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur John Kennedy McCausland (Border Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General John Kennedy McCausland.
  • Second Lieutenant George Albert Collingwood (Border Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be accidentally killed in July 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant William Lionel Gueritz Mortimer (Dublin Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 20 on Gallipoli. He is the son of Reverend Reginald Arthur Mortimer.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles George Cranleigh Fisher-Brown (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will die on service in June 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Sydney William King (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 20. His brother will be accidentally killed in May 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Oswald Stanley Whaley (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Oswald Whaley.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Sergison Bailey (Grenadier Guards) is killed by a bomb at age 22. He is the son of the 2nd ‘Lord’ Glanusk CB CBE DSO (commanding 2nd South Wales Borderers) who will have a second son die on service in India two weeks before the Armistice.
  • Second Lieutenant Bertram Baker Silcock (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Second Lieutenant Philip Walter Jowett Bagnall (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. He is the only son of Captain Walter Bagnall JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Menzies Mocatta (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Elias Mocatta who has another son who will die on service in February 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Nicholls Hathorn (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the son of Kenneth Howard Hathorn Judge of the Supreme Court in South Africa.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur John Allan Britton (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. He is the son of the late Reverend W J Britton.
  • Corporal John William Arundell (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Within days of his brother being killed Lance Corporal Guy Stanley Overton (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is also killed on Gallipoli while serving in the same regiment. He dies at age 30 the messages announcing their deaths will be received by their parents within a few hours of each other.
  • Lance Corporal Anthony Hugh Hanmer (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Lance Corporal William Norris (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Walter James Griffiths (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Joseph Elwell (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His son will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Leslie Curtis (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay at age 17. His two brothers will be killed in the sinking of the Royal Edward in three days serving in the same regiment.
  • Private Wilfrid G Barrow (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend E P Barrow.
  • Private Griffith Edward Jones (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His son will be killed in the next war.
  • Private Thomas Abbots (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 28. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in June of this year.
  • Another set of brothers are killed on this day, one day after their brother was killed. John and Matthew Fisher are killed while serving in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.
  • Brothers Rees 26, and Richard Evans 23, die while serving with the Welsh Regiment on Gallipoli.