Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Australian Flying Corps

19 February 1919 We Lost 351

John Francis Innes Hay Doyle

Today’s losses include:

  • A Brigadier General and brother of ‘Sir” Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The brother of historian and writer Andrew Lang

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General John Francis Innes Hay Doyle (Royal Field Artillery) dies of pneumonia while on service in Flanders at age 45. He is the brother of ‘Sir’ Arthur Conan Doyle.
  • Major Constantine James Phipps DSO MC (Royal Engineers) dies on service at age 26. His brother was killed in July 1916 and they are sons of Canon Constantine Osborne Phipps Vicar of Lee Great Missenden.
  • Lieutenant Gerald Vivian Oldrey (Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) dies on active service in Egypt. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant James Gibson Grant (King’s Liverpool Regiment) dies of illness caused by hardship and exposure while on service. He was the brother of Andrew Lang, the historian and writer.
  • Sapper Henry Errington Kirby Byard (Royal Engineers) dies in France at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend H Kirby Byard.
  • Air Mechanic 2nd Class John Henry Toole (Australian Flying Corps) dies on service at age 29. His brother was killed last August.

22 January 1919 We Lost 156

Image result for Carrick Stewart Paul DFC

Today’s losses include:

  • A 5-victory ace
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Walter Ernest Thorburn (Royal Scots) dies on service. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Walter Thorburn.
  • Lieutenant Carrick Stewart Paul DFC (Australian Flying Corps) drowns at age 26 on his way home to New Zealand. He is a five-victory ace.
  • Lieutenant Arnold Francis Crossley Atkinson (Royal Engineers) is accidentally killed in India at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Atkinson.

Tuesday 5 November 1918 We Lost 1,324

Arthur John Palliser

During strong winds, HMS Campania begins to drag anchor in the Firth of Forth.  Soon it collides with another ship anchored nearby, HMS Royal Oak, which in turn collides with HMS Glorious.  A gaping hole is torn in the port side of the Campania and it begins to sink by the stern.  Just over three hours later it sinks stern first.

Today’s losses include:

  • A 7-victory ace
  • A former member of the All Blacks Rugby Club
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who had two cousins killed last year

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Harman James Lindale Willink (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Willink Vicar of Nackington.
  • Captain Arthur Brownlow Denham-Cookes (London Regiment) dies at home at age 27. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Mrs. Denham-Cookes.
  • Captain Robert Edward Watson Semple MC (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action on 22nd October at age 22. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ David Semple and his older brother has been killed in action in 1916.
  • Lieutenant Norman Royston (Royal Air Force Kite Balloon Section) dies of pneumonia at age 19. His brother died of wounds in October 1916.
  • Lieutenant Arthur John Palliser (Australian Flying Corps) a seven-victory ace is killed in action at age 28.
  • Lieutenant James Hyslop MM (London Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last March.
  • Corporal Edwin George Page (Warwickshire Regiment) dies at age 22. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Frederick Huckle (Bedfordshire Yeomanry) is killed in action at age 24. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Corporal Edward George Page (Warwickshire Regiment) dies at age 22. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Private Reuben Morris (East Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at Agra, India at age 32. He is the youngest and last of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Rifleman Alexander Joseph Ridland (New Zealand Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 36. He is a former member of the All Blacks Rugby Football Club.
  • Gunner James Jeffrey Huggan (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 30. His two cousins were killed last year.

Monday 4 November 1918 We Lost 2,767 – Highest loss before the war’s end

Lieutenant Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (London Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) the world renown war poet is caught in a German machine gun attack and killed at the Olse Canal, north of Ors, France age 25. He is on the Continent teaching until he visits a hospital for the wounded and is deeply affected by this and decides then and there, in September 1915, to return to England and enlist. Owen describes his decision to enlist in the following “I came out in order to help these boys – directly by leading them as well as an officer can; indirectly, by watching their sufferings that I may speak of them as well as a pleader can. I have done the first”. Owen is injured in March 1917 and sent home and when he is deemed fit for duty returns to the front in August of this year. His poems include The Dead Beat, Dulce Et Docorum Est, The Sentry, Anthem for the Doomed Young, Exposure, The Parable of the Young Man and the Old and Strange Meeting. The bells will be ringing on 11 November in Shrewsbury to celebrate the Armistice when the doorbell rings at his parent’s home bringing them the telegram telling them he has been killed.

Asleep

Uder his helmet, up against his pack,

After so many days of work and waking,

Sleep took him by the brow and laid him back.

There, in the happy no-time of his sleeping,

Death took him by the heart. There heaved a quaking

Of the aborted life within him leaping,

Then chest and sleepy arms once more fell slack.

And soon the slow, stray blood, came creeping

From the intruding lead, like ants on track.

Whether his deeper sleep lies shaded by the shaking

Of geat wings, and the thoughts that hung the stars,

High-pillowed on calm pillows of Gods making,

Above these clouds, these rains, these sleets of lead,

And this winds’ scimitars,

-Or whether yet his thin and sodden head

Confuses more and more with the low mould,

His hair being one with the grey grass

Of finished fields, and wire-scraggs rusty-old,

Who knows? Who hopes? Who troubles? Let it pass!

He sleeps. He sleeps less tremulous, less cold,

Than we who wake, and waking say Alas!

Killed along side Owen this day is Lieutenant James Kirk of the same regiment who will later be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions today while attempting to bridge the Oise Canal. To cover the bridging of the canal Lieutenant Kirk took a Lewis gun, and, under intense machine-gun fire, he paddles across the canal on a raft, and at a range of ten yards expends all his ammunition. Further ammunition is paddled across to him and he continuously maintains a covering fire for the bridging party from a most exposed position till he is killed at his gun.

Another Victoria Cross winner Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) James Neville Marshall (Irish Guards commanding 16th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery, determination and leadership in the attack on the Sambre-Oise Canal, near Catillon. When a partly constructed bridge comes under concentrated fire and is broken before the advanced troops of his battalion can cross Lieutenant Colonel Marshall goes forward and organizes parties to repair the bridge. The first party are soon killed or wounded, but by personal example he inspires his command, and volunteers are instantly forthcoming. Under intense fire and with complete disregard of his own safety, he stands on the bank encouraging his men and assisting in the work, and when the bridge is repaired he attempts to rush across at the head of his battalion and is killed while so doing.

Captain Allen Hepburn and his observer Alexander Tranter (Royal Air Force) score their last two victories of the Great War when they destroy two Pfalz DIII in the Mainvault-Faucaumont area.

The Battle of Vittoria-Veneto ends with the Armistice on the Italian Front.  During the battle, the 14th British Corps has captured over 28,000 prisoners and two hundred nineteen guns.

  • Captain Thomas Charles Richmond Baker DFC MM (Australian Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 21. He is a twelve-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend George William Jones (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Henry Michael de Bathe (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at Sleaford at age 29. He is the grandson of the late General ‘Sir’ Henry de Bathe Baronet KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant John Douglas Lightbody (Royal Air Force) a five-victory ace is killed in action at age 19.
  • Cadet Geoffrey William Auden (Royal Air Force) dies at home at age 18 of pneumonia. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Auden, Church Broughton Vicarage.

 

  • Captain Adam Francis Burdett (South African Service Corps) dies on service in South Africa at age 36. He took part in the 1906-7 South Africa rugby union tour, the original ‘Springbok’ tour. He was awarded two caps for South Africa.
  • Captain Burleigh Leycester Muir (Army Service Corps attached III Corps Headquarters) is killed in action. He is the son of Sir Richard and Lady Muir.
  • Private John William Moulds (Army Service Corps) dies of illness at Woolwich. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Stephen Owbridge Parish (Army Service Corps) dies on service in Egypt at age 36. His son will be killed 16 September 1942 at Khartoum Airfield in the Sudan attempting to save the life of a passenger on a crashed aircraft and will be posthumously awarded the George Cross for his efforts.

Today’s losses include:

  • A world renown Great War Poet
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • A Battalion Commander
  • Flying ace
    • 12-victory ace
    • 5-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Grandson of a General and Baronet
  • A member of the original South African Rugby ‘Springbok’ tour
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father died on service and whose brother was killed
  • A man whose son was previously killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in September 1942 performing deeds which will win him a George Cross
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1944
  • A well known cricketer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Frank Harrison CMG DSO (Royal Engineers, Control of Chemical Warfare) dies at home at age 49. His son was killed in July 1916.
  • Major Cyril D’Albini Sykes-Banks MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of illness at home at age 29. His father died of illness on service in February 1916 and his brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Captain Robert Colvill-Jones MC (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in May.
  • Captain Francis Jones-Bateman (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action two and half years after his older brother has been killed in France. He dies at age 22.
  • Captain Rupert Ayrton Hawdon (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. He is the middle of three brothers to die in the war the first in 1916 the second later this month.
  • Lieutenant Robert Evelyn Sandford Poole (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother died of pneumonia in January 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Augustus Hughes MC (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend William Hughes of Hawnby Rectory, York who has already lost a son in the war and will lose another later this month.
  • Second Lieutenant John McNair Lamb (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend John Lamb.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Stewart White (Royal Field Artillery dies of wounds at age 20 at home. He is the son of the Right Reverend William Charles White Bishop of Honan China.
  • Private Martin Leslie Johnson (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Albert Charles Wilson (Labour Corps) dies on service at age 29. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Robert Heaford Dempster (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Robert Moody (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Royal Sussex Regiment). He was a well-known cricketer. Munitions Worker at the Aeroplane Works Richard Sutton Staines dies at home. His brother died of wounds in October of last year.
  • Private Percy W Billings (Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Birkett Stuart (Border Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the final of three brothers who lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private James Sallis (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Arthur Edmund Potts (Sherwood Foresters) dies on service at home at age 18. His brother was killed two months ago.
  • Private Percy Albert Russell (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Richard Leadbeater (South Wales Borderers) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Gunner Alexander Francis Lyall Houison (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Ellis (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action. His son will be killed in the Second World War in April 1944.
  • Private Samuel Needham VC (Bedfordshire Regiment) is accidentally killed by a gunshot at age 33 in Egypt. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last September at Kefr Kasim, Palestine.

Thursday 3 October 1918 We Lost 1,666

Charles Julian Mann

The 1st King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry capture Prospect Hill.

  • Private William Hubert Darwin (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in July 1915.

Lieutenant Robert Allan Caldwell (Royal Air Force) drops four bombs into Beauvois and then descends to 100 to 200 feet, firing 400 rounds into the enemy trenches which we are attacking south of Cambrai.

The submarine L10 (Lieutenant Commander Alfred Edward Whitehouse age 30) is in the vicinity of a German convoy which had been attacked by British destroyers the previous night.  This afternoon a number of German ships are spotted searching the area for survivors and L10 signals her intention of attacking the German squadron which consists of the destroyers S33 and S34 and two torpedo boats heading from Zeebrugge to Germany.  S34 strikes a mine with the result that the other ships were forced to ignore the danger of mines to rescue the sinking destroyer’s crew.  L10 moves in and fires a torpedo at S33 which severely damages the destroyer but initial thoughts of another mine are dispelled by the Germans when L10’s conning tower broaches the surface. S33 manages to bring her guns to bear and sinks the submarine through shelling.

The tanker S S Eupion is torpedoed and sunk ten miles west of Loop Head, River Shannon and sunk. Eleven of the crew survive the sinking but die in a lifeboat afterwards including

  • Third Officer Christopher Clark who is one of three brothers and their brother in law who all lose their lives in the Great War

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A 21-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the cleryg
  • A Military Chaplain
  • The son of a Baronet

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Charles Robert Reeves Hickey DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed in a midair collision with Second Lieutenant Schomberg Edward Matthey when he dives through a cloud southwest of Ramscapelle. Captain Hickey dies at age 21. In April of this year he forced down a Rumpler C near Wulpen and after landing beside it, was attempting to protect his prize from Belgian citizens when the German aircraft exploded killing several bystanders and injuring Hickey.  Hickey was a twenty-one-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend Frederick Wystans Hipkins MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 32. He is the Rector of Bamford-in-the Park and the son of the Reverend Frederick Charles Hipkins.
  • Captain Humphrey Stuart King MC (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at Le Catelet at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend John King Rector of Crock and was a June 1914 graduate of Durham University as a Divinity Student.
  • Lieutenant Jack Aubrey Sykes (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 19. His two brothers lost their lives last year in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John D C Gould-Taylor DFC (Australian Flying Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend W Gould-Taylor.
  • Lieutenant Charles Julian Mann (Hussars) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Mann, the 1st Baronet and had been educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge.
  • Lieutenant George Richard Lancelot Baillie (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend William Baillie.
  • Lieutenant John MacKay (Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry) dies of wounds. His two brothers were killed in 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Homer Harding (Indian Army Reserve of Officers) dies in India. He is the last of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War. A final brother will be lost in the sinking of submarine M1 in November 1925 as a result of collision with a Swedish steamship.
  • Chaplin the Reverend Charles Robertson is killed at age 39. Chaplain Eric Oswald Read (Doresetshire Regiment) is killed at age 30.
  • Sergeant Alex Polson MM (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother died on service at home in January 1915.
  • Private Zaccheus Simpson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Herbert Howden (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in January 1917.
  • Private George Alfred Beard (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Private William Ethelbert Abbott (Australian Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John Thomas Henry Abbott Vicar of Mulllaghdun Enniskillen.
  • Private George Borthwick (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed on Salonika at age 26. His brother was killed July 1916.
  • Private Hugh eland Clatworthy (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in January 1916.

Saturday 24 August 1918 We Lost 1,588

Samuel Forsyth VC

Lieutenant Louis Bennett (Royal Air Force) is shot down by anti-aircraft fire while attacking a balloon at Hantay. He crashes near Marquallas and is dragged from the wreckage, dying soon after of his injuries.  His twelve victories in only twenty five sorties is perhaps the most rapid rate of scoring by any Allied pilot of the Great War.

The Cunard steamship Flavia is torpedoed twice by the German submarine U-107 thirty miles northwest by west from Tory Island, Ulster.  Although the ship will remain afloat for two hours it sinks with the loss of one life.

Sergeant Samuel Forsyth (No. 3 Field Company, New Zealand Pioneers attached Auckland Infantry) is shot by a sniper and killed at age 25.  On nearing the objective, his company comes under heavy machine-gun fire. Through Sergeant Forsyth’s dashing leadership and total disregard of danger, three machine-gun positions are rushed and the crews taken prisoner before they can inflict many casualties on our troops. During a subsequent advance his company comes under heavy fire from several machine guns, two of which he locates by a daring reconnaissance. In his endeavour to gain support from a tank, he is wounded, but after having the wound bandaged, he again gets in touch with the tank, which in the face of very heavy fire from machine guns and anti-tank guns he endeavours to lead with magnificent coolness to a favorable position. The tank, however, is put out of action. Sergeant Forsyth then organizes the tank crew and several of his men into a section, and leads them to a position where the machine guns can be outflanked. Always under heavy fire, he directs them into positions which brings about a retirement of the enemy machine guns and enables the advance to continue. It is at this moment he is killed by a sniper. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Colonel John Hay Maitland Hardyman DSO MC (commanding 8th Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 23.  He is the youngest battalion commander killed in the Great War.

On Leave

The mad breeze laughs the clouds along,
The young ash shouts his clean-limbed song,
Nibbling green and chocolate slopes
Silvery brown the old hedge gropes,
I with wakening nature cry,
“Why should I die?” “Why should I die?”

Out there its different: we don’t fear to die;
We kill, yet hate not, live, yet wonder why,
Till, worn with waiting, spent with ceasless strain,
With present issues each man drugs his brain;
The daily letter’s homely happenings,
Life’s three and twenty unimportant things,
The third-back dug-out’s need of strengthening,
How the deep mine is slowly lengthening,
Poor Freddie’s death, the latest hand-grenade –
Of such is life in mud-bound Flanders made.

Today’s losses include:

  • Two Victoria Cross winners
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • The youngest battalion commander killed in the Great War
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • The father of the Deputy Leader of the 1953 Mount Everest Expedition the first to conquer the mountain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Richard Francis Montague Buller (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He is the son of the late Reverend Richard Buller and has a brother who will be killed in September 1918.
  • Captain Roger Joseph Tebbutt (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in March 1915.
  • Captain Harold Edward Pope MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action while acting as Heavy Artillery Liaison officer for the 32nd Division at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Frederick Pope Vicar of Tring and he took first in Chemistry at New College, Oxford.
  • Captain Philip Rolfe (Army Service Corps attached Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend George Wilkinson Rolfe.
  • The fourth son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Maxwell-Stuart of Dorset to die in the Great War, Lieutenant Alfred Joseph Maxwell-Stuart (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds at age 20.
  • Lieutenant Leonard Gustav Byng MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 30. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Charles Evans (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 36. His son with the same name will be Deputy Leader of the 1953 Mount Everest Expedition which will lead to the first conquering of the mountain by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Oswald Mansfield (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in October and they are sons of the former Member of Parliament for Spalding Lincolnshire.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Douglas Rawson (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the late Reverend E O, formerly vicar of Ince, Cheshire.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Harold Clayton (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Prestwood Clayton.
  • Cadet Roy Nelson Pillow (Australian Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England at age 23. His brother was killed in action six days ago.
  • Sergeant Harold Jackson VC (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for actions performed earlier this year.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Lowe (London Regiment) is killed at age 20 less than three months after his older brother was killed.
  • Private Ernest White (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in August 1918.
  • Private Fred Rawnsley (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Arnold Lightbound (King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother died on active service in November 1915.
  • Private Albert E White (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed in action. He brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Arthur Harry Edis (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed last March.
  • Private Charles Henry Morgan (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at Albert. His brother died of illness in November 1915.

Sunday 18 August 1918 We Lost 533

Lance Corporal Henry Louie Norwest MM (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. The Native Canadian Metis Indian achieved a sniping record of one hundred fifteen fatal shots as a sniper during the Great War. While Norwest was an outstanding marksman, the thing that set him apart from others was his superb stealth tactics and his expertise in the use of camouflage.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Canadian Native Indian sniper
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A son of the Assistant Master at Eton
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Richard Thelluson Carter MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed next month and they are sons of the Assistant Master of Eton College and grandsons of the Reverend Thomas Thelluson Carter.
  • Captain William Fredeick Matthews (South Wales Borderers attached East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed last October.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Abbott Ferguson (Australian Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England at age 29. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Henry Fenton Pillow MM (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 25. His brother will be accidentally killed in six days.
  • Private W C H Heathorn (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother was killed in April of this year.
  • Private William Liddell (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 25 becoming the third brother to lose his life in the Great War.

Wednesday 14 August 1918 We Lost 441

Clifford Charles Burge

Second Lieutenant Reginald Francis Clements MC (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26.

Immortality

I may not wait to hear

What says the wind that sweeps across the lea,

And yet I know it speaks, and in its voice

There is some word to make my heart rejoice,

Some message speeding on eternally

That God has not made clear!

I may not wait to find

The secret of the seething sea that flows

Nor ever rests; yet must thre b some plan

Above the most exalted thought of man,

Some destiny that none but Heaven knows,

And Heaven keeps me blind!

I may not wait to know

The secret of the towering mountain height

That makes my little self so small and frail

And bids me rest awhile behind the veil,

Because so far beyond it shines the light

And God would have it so!

 

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War poet
  • A 14-victory ace
  • Two 6-victory aces
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A man whose father died on service in 1915

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Leonard Vivien Drummond-Hay MC (Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 23. His brother will be killed in action in September 1918.
  • Captain Herbert Ruska Gould MC (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 26. He is a 6-victory ace.
  • Captain James Fitz Morris MC (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed serving as an instructor in Cincinnati, Ohio at age 21. He is a 14-victory ace.
  • Lieutenant David Esplin Smith (Royal Air Force) a six-victory ace is killed in action at age 19.
  • Lieutenant Clifford Charles Burge (Australian Infantry) is killed at Villers-Bretonneux at age 24. He is a former Australian rules footballer who played with Melbourne.
  • Private Thomas Nuttall (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action. His parents will lose two other sons during the Great War.
  • Airman 2nd Class Lindsay Gordon Cubbins (Australian Flying Corps) dies of illness in England at age 21. His brother will be killed in October of this year.
  • Driver Walter Thomas Brazier (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 21. His father died on service in Aden in September 1915.

Sunday 28 July 1918 We Lost 596

While returning from a raid on enemy rolling stock Lieutenant Gordon Sheppard Jones-Evans (Australian Flying Corps) observes an enemy two-seater machine below him.  Engaging it, the machine dives vertically and crashes.  He is then attacked by a second two-seater, into which he fires a very short burst and it also spins down and crashes. In this engagement Lieutenant Jones-Evans is wounded, but though faint from loss of blood, he succeeds in reaching our lines, where he crashes.

Lieutenant Robert Reginald Richardson sights a submarine at 54.45 north 0.20 west. Two bombs are dropped where the periscope has vanished, but both fail to explode.  A patrol vessel is summoned but its search proves fruitless.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose great grandfather served at Waterloo
  • A battalion commander

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel George Alexander Smith DSO (commanding 4th Gordon Highlanders) is killed by a shell.
  • Second Lieutenant Allan Gibbs Ridout (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed flying in England at age 19. His great grandfather served in the Peninsular Campaign and at Waterloo under Wellington.
  • Rifleman L Culley (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed two years and five days earlier.
  • Private G H Todd (Depot Machine Gun Corps) dies on service at age 22. His brother was killed in March 1918.

Tuesday 4 June 1918 We Lost 370

John Ernest Vivian Rathbone (middle & below)

At 02:30 the 10th Lancashire Fusiliers position in Beaumont Trench near the village Beaumont Hamel is subjected to a heavy artillery barrage under the cover of which the Germans launch a trench raid.  Eventually the attackers are driven off.

A group of five flying boats from Felixstowe and Yarmouth set off in the afternoon to investage wireless activity possibly coming from enemy airships. One is forced to land with a broken feed pipe and about this time the patrol is attacked by a small group of enemy airplanes.  These are driven off by a Curtiss H12 which is forced down in Dutch waters and the crew interned.

 Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • The son of the 3rd Earl Cawdor
  • The brother of the actor Basil Rathbone
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • The great grandson of a sailor at the Battle of Trafalgar
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Frederick William Lumsden VC DSO CB (General Officer Commanding 14th Brigade 32nd Division) is killed in action at Blairvill, near Arras, when he is shot through the head at age 41. Lumsden was born into a military family in Frizabad, India on 14th December 1872. At a young age he returned to Britain and attended Bristol Grammar School until he joined the Royal Marine Artillery as a junior officer. Serving in the Marine Service until 1907 he entered the Staff College in 1910. He then became the second staff officer at Singapore, not returning home until called home for war service in the months leading up to the outbreak of hostilities in August 1914. Between 3rd April and 4th April 1917 at Francilly, France, Major Lumsden undertook to bring in six captured enemy field-guns which had been left in dug-in positions 300 yards in front of the British troops. The enemy is keeping these guns under very heavy fire. Major Lumsden led four artillery teams and a party of infantry through the hostile barrage, and despite casualties they eventually got all the guns away. He himself made three journeys to the guns and then stayed there directing operations until the last gun had been taken back. This is the action for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Eric Octavius Campbell DSO (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of cerebral hemorrhage at home while undergoing treatment for an illness contracted on active service at age 32. He is the son of the 3rd Earl Cawdor.
  • Captain Claude Frank Lethbridge Templer (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He was on a raid to any enemy trench in December 1914 when he was captured. He made thirteen attempts at escape before finally succeeding and after returning to England received a private audience with His Majesty the King. He is now killed while returning from a successful raid on another enemy trench.
  • Captain John Ernest Vivian Rathbone (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He is the brother of the actor Basil Rathbone.
  • Lieutenant Leslie John Primrose (Australian Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 28. He is a former Australian rules footballer who played with University.
  • Lieutenant Brian Wilton Meadway (Northamptonshire Regiment attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at home while flying at age 22. His great grandfather George Wilton was on board HMS Agamemnon at the Battle of Trafalgar.
  • Private John W Cartmell (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother was killed on Christmas Eve 1915.
  • Private Ronald Adamson (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother died on service in Baghdad in October 1917.