Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Dardanelles

30 December 1918 We Lost 192

Sir Alexander Beamish Hamilton

Brigadier General ‘the Honorable’ Alexander Beamish Hamilton CB (General Staff and King’s Own Scottish Borderers) dies of illness at home at age 58. He had served as the Controller of Embarkation, Southampton, in the Dardanelles and at Salonika.  He has also done “Special Service” in the Mediterranean, at home and in Canada.  His brother died of wounds commanding a battalion of the Durham Light Infantry in October 1915.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Brigadier General whose brother died of wounds in October 1915
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Another man whose brother was lost in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Frank Irvine Mackinnon (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies on service at age 63 in Damascus. He is the son of the Reverend John Mackinnon.
  • Lance Corporal Hector Albert Young (Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds and pneumonia at age 23. His brother was killed in action in September 1914.

Monday 28 January 1918 We Lost 233

John Alexander McCrae

Flight Lieutenant Cecil Gordon Bronson (Royal Naval Air Service) sets out to carry out a second attack on the Goeben.  He fails to find the ship and is shot down by machine gun fire and made a prisoner having flown low in search of the ship, which has been towed off. Another Short Seaplane is launched from HMS Empress on this morning it reports that the Goeben has disappeared and that there is no wreckage floating around the spot where she has been lying.

On the Western front the casualties for the day included two pilots and their observers killed and one pilot made a prisoner. One crew consists of

  • Second Lieutenant John Milne Milne-Henderson (Royal Engineers attached Royal Flying Corps) who is killed at age 23 with his observer
  • Second Lieutenant Edward A Cunningham when their Bristol F2b is shot down over Graincourt. His brother was killed in July last year.

Seven of thirteen Gothas dispatched attack Britain, as does one of two Giants. The Gothas come in between Harwich and the North Foreland, the first at 19:55 and the last some thirty minutes later. Three reach London, bombing from 20:30 to 21:45 while the others attack Ramsgate, Margate, Sheerness and the Sandwich neighborhood. The Giant makes landfall over Hollesley Bay at 22:25 and follows a course to reach central London at 00:15, its target being the Admiralty.  One of its two six hundred pound bombs causes the worst London incident of the war when it hits the Oldham Press building in Long Acre which is being used as a public shelter and has about five hundred civilians in the basement. The resulting casualties are thirty-eight dead and eighty-five injured, of the total casualties of sixty-seven killed and one hundred sixty-six injured.  Altogether 8,100 pounds of bombs are dropped. One Gotha flies in over the Naze at 20:00, skirting Clacton and follows a steady course to London, then instead of turning south for a major target, unloads its bombs on Hampstead at 21:45. Its return across northeast London is seen by searchlights which attract two of 44 Squadrons Camels flown by Lieutenant George H Hackwill and Second Lieutenant Charles C Banks, who independently sight the Gotha at about 10,000 feet over Romford by its exhaust flames. Banks attacks first, closing to about thirty yards under the left before opening fire with his guns. Meanwhile Hackwill moves in from the right and also engages. The battle goes on for about ten minutes, as progress is etched by tracer bullets in full view of the Noak Hill, Shenfield and Billericay anti-aircraft guns. The Gotha eventually is hit and comes down at Frund’s Farm, Wickford, at 22:10 and the crew is killed.  Hackwill and Banks will both be awarded the Military Cross for their shared victory. During the evening a barrage of 15,000 shells is put up by the defenders.

The submarine E14 (Lieutenant Commander Geoffrey Saxton White age 31) fires a torpedo at a Turkish ship in the Dardanelles at 08:45. Eleven seconds later an enormous explosion shakes E14 as either a torpedo detonates early or she is depth charged.  Whatever the cause she is severely damaged with water pouring in unchecked and the submarine is forced to surface where she is met with a barrage of gunfire.  After half an hour it is clear that the best hope for survival is to beach the submarine.  Soon afterwards the boat becomes out of control and as the air supply is nearly exhausted, Lieutenant-Commander White decides to run the risk of proceeding on the surface. Heavy fire is immediately opened from both sides, and, after running the gauntlet for half-an-hour, being steered from below, E14 is so badly damaged that Lieutenant-Commander White turns towards the shore in order to give the crew a chance of being saved. He remains on deck the whole time himself until he is killed by a shell. While attempting this move the submarine receives a direct hit and sinks with the loss of 23 of her crew including her commander. For his efforts this day Commander White will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

The torpedo boat HMS Hazard is sunk as a result of a collision off Portland Bill. Four of her crew are lost.

Another sector of the Italian front is taken over by British forces.

Today’s losses include:

  • A family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A Great War poet
  • A family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A teacher at the Macclesfield School of Art

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae (Canadian Army Medical Corps) dies of pneumonia at age 45.  He is a Great War Poet of “In Flanders Fields”, and “The Anxious Dead”. Early in the war McCrae is appointed as a field surgeon in the Canadian artillery and is in charge of a field hospital during the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915. McCrae’s friend and former student, Lieutenant Alexis Helmer is killed in the battle, and his burial inspires the poem, In Flanders Fields, which is written on 3rd May 1915 and first published in the magazine Punch.

Sunday 20 January 1918 We Lost 617

Harry Beauchamp Duff

During the war, the Mesopotamian Campaign was under the responsibility of the Indian Army until the disaster surrounding the surrender at Kut. The campaign started well with the landing in Basra in November 1914, but the attack on Baghdad by 9,000 troops of the 6th Indian Division commanded by General Townshend in 1915 ended in catastrophe when the remnants of the British invasion force were surrounded in Kut El Amara, and three attempts to relieve the trapped British and Indian troops also ended in failure, at the cost of 23,000 lives. The surrender on 29 April 1916 has been described as one of the worst military disasters of the British Army.  Consequently the Commander in Chief India, General ‘Sir’ Harry Beauchamp Duff was relieved of command on 1 October 1916. In 1917, the Mesopotamia Commission of Enquiry was damning in its conclusions. While General Townshend was exonerated, the Commission was harsh towards the Government of India and Duff together with the Viceroy, Lord Hardinge. Both were found to have showed little desire to help and some desire actually to obstruct the energetic prosecution of the war. General Nixon, the Commander-in-Chief of the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force, was also held responsible for the failed campaign. Unable to live with the shame, Duff committed suicide today.

Air fighting on the Western Front is light and the only British casualty of the day is a wounded pilot.

Goeben and Breslau leave the Dardanelles to attack Imbros sinking the monitors Raglan (6,150 tons) and M28 (540 tons).  One hundred twenty-seven sailors are killed including

  • Lieutenant H L Bacon (HMS Raglan) whose brother will die on service in 1920. They are both sons of the Reverend Dr. Bacon DD.

While heading for Mudros, Breslau strikes four mines in quick succession to the northwest of Rabbit Island and sinks.  Five Turkish destroyers endeavor to reach the point, but are driven off by two British destroyers.  Goeben also strikes two mines, and then another trying to re-enter the Dardanelles, and finally runs aground off Nagara Point.

The escort ship HMS Mechanician is torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine eight miles west of St Catherine’s Point.  The armed boarding steamer HMS Louvain is torpedoed and sunk by another German submarine in the Eastern Mediterranean, killing seven officers and two hundred seventeen men.

  • Stoker Petty Officer Arthur Farrar (HMS Louvain) age 33 is drowned while leaving the ship. His brother was killed in action in April 1917.
  • Trimmers and brothers from Malta Gaetano age 36 and Francesco Carabott (HMS Louvian Mercantile Marine Reserve) are killed also.

British mines sink two German submarines, UB-22 and U-95.

Today’s losses include:

  • A General who commits suicide
  • A man whose brother will died on service in 1920
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Brothers killed together

Friday 2 November 1917 We Lost 1,141

British forces capture positions north of Beersheba in the 3rd Battle of Gaza.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Frere Lambert (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action in Palestine at age 38. He is the son of Major General Lambert CB and had served in the South African War.
  • Captain Joshua Robert Rowley (Highland Light Infantry attached Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 24 while leading his men into action at the Battle of Gaza. He is the second son of ‘Sir’ Joshua T Rowley, the 5th Captain Rowley joined the Suffolk Regiment in 1912 and was mobilized with his Regiment on the outbreak of the War and accompanied the Suffolk Regiment to the Dardanelles, landing at Suvla Bay in July 1915. He went through the Gallipoli campaign and for his services received a Commission as Captain in the Highland Light Infantry but continued to serve with his old Regiment. In December 1915 he went to Egypt.
  • Lieutenant William Steele Young (Royal Engineers) is killed in Palestine at age 24. His brother was killed in June 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant William Ranald Ware McCarthy (Border Regiment attached Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 19 in Gaza. He is the only child of the Reverend William McCarthy missionary of Anking, China.
  • Second Lieutenant Ralph Thomas Boddington (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 32 in Palestine. He is the son of Samuel Boddington JP.
  • Private L W Maudlin (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action in Palestine. His brother will die in February 1919.
  • Private Charles Ernest Albery (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in Gaza at age a4. He is a Boy Scout of the 1st Salisbury troop passing through various grades eventually becoming an Assistant Scout Master.
  • Private George Ebenezer William Naismith (Royal Scots) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend R Naismith.

On the Tigris the British rout the Turks near Dur 85 miles above Baghdad.

The merchant ship SS Cape Finisterre is sunk 1 mile south southeast of Manacles Buoy by a torpedo.  Among the 35 dead is her Master James Lochead killed at age 53.

In Kattegat, British destroyers sink a German auxiliary cruiser and 10 armed patrol craft taking 64 prisoners.

The Balfour Declaration is established proclaiming support for a Jewish State in Palestine.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a General
  • The son of a Baronet
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple grandson of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • An Assistant Scout Master
  • The son of an Alderman
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Ashcombe

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Henry Hall Griffith (Royal Flying Corps is killed at age 26 when his two-seater crashes into the Medway while training. He is the son of Alderman Arthur Foster Griffith and grandson of the Reverend Dr. Griffith former Principal of Brighton College. His brother was killed at Jutland.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Alick George Cubitt (Hussars) is killed in action at age 23. He is the second son of the 2nd Baron Ashcombe and he has previously lost a brother in action and a third brother will be killed in 1918.
  • Lieutenant Henry Norman Johnson (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother died of wounds in August 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Mark Aldersey (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He is the grandson both the Reverend George Becher Blomfield and the Reverend Canon Francis Coulman Royds and his elder brother will be killed on 10th March next year.
  • Sergeant Edward Alexander Keid (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Petty Officer Arthur James Davidge (Howe Royal Naval Division) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Sapper James Black (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 34. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918 as a prisoner of war.
  • Private F W J Gardner (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in Egypt at age 20. His brother will be lost in the sinking of the paddle minesweeper Ascot the last ship sunk in the war next November.
  • Private Walter Beard (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.

Thursday 10 May 1917 – We Lost 740

Daniel Joseph Sheehan

Lieutenant Daniel Joseph Sheehan (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 22. While on a scouting expedition, a superior body of German aircraft engaged the British and Sheehan is shot down by Lothar von Richthofen. He manages to land the damaged plane in an open field, near Noyelles, before he dies in the cockpit of his Sopwith Pup. He is the eldest son of Captain Daniel Desmont (known as D D) Sheehan, MP. He was educated at Christian College, Cork, and Mount St. Joseph’s College, Roscrea, Co. Tipperary. He played for Munster two years in the Senior College Inter-Provincial Rugby Championships and was considered the best three-quarter back in Ireland. He joined the Devitt and Moore’s Ocean Training Ship Medway as a Cadet in 1912, winning first prize for Navigation and General Seamanship. He transferred to HMS Hibernia as midshipman RNR, for training with a view to a permanent commission in the Royal Navy. After serving with the 3rd Battle Squadron in the North Sea, on the outbreak of the War he transferred to the Royal Naval Air Service, obtaining his aviator’s certificate in 1915. He was wounded while flying in Belgium, and, being regarded as unfit for further service with the RNAS, received permission to transfer to the Royal Flying Corps. He was engaged for a time as an instructor at Oxford before returning to active service.  Sheehan’s two younger brothers are Lieutenant Martin Joseph (Royal Air Force) who will be killed on 1 October 1918 and Michael Joseph Aloysius Sheehan (1899-1975). Born in Skibbereen, Co. Cork Ireland, he left St. Finbarr’s College, Farranferris, Cork to join the 7th  Leinster Regiment on 20 April 1915. He is transferred on 25 September 1915 to the Royal Munster Fusiliers as a Second Lieutenant and aged 16 is the youngest commissioned officer on the Western Front. He is promoted lieutenant on 1 July 1917 and was wounded twice. After the war he embarked 18 September 1919 for the British Indian Army and was promoted captain on 20 October 1920.  In World War II, he served on the Headquarters of the 14th Army (UK) in Burma, reaching the rank of Brigadier. He was awarded Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1944, later advanced to Commander (CBE) in 1946, in recognition of his distinguished services during the Burma Campaign.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the 6th Count & Countess of Magawly Cerati de Calry
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A Celtic Club footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) Valerio Awly Magawly de Calry DSO (Dragoons commanding 7th Rifle Brigade) is killed by a shell near Wancourt Arras. The 34 year old is the son of the 6th Count and Countess Magawly Cerati de Calry. He went to France in November 1914, and served with the Cavalry until 1916, when he is given command of the 7th Rifle Brigade. He fought in the Battles of the Somme and Arras, is twice mentioned in Dispatches, and receives the DSO and the Croix de Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.
  • Lieutenant David Keith Finnimore (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at Aldershot Military Hospital at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Kington Finnimore.
  • Second Lieutenant Trevor Webb (London Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 21. His brother will die of wounds next March.
  • Company Sergeant Major Charles Edward Skeer (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies at home on service at age 41. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Sergeant Walter Bond (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action while on a photo recon. His brother was killed last October.
  • Private John McLaughlin (Highland Light Infantry) dies of wounds received 23 April at the Battle for Cavelry Farm. He is a football player for the Celtic Football Club.
  • Private William Joseph Harrington (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 33 having been captured near Armentiers. His brother will die of wounds in August of this year.
  • Private Evan MacDonald (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will die on service in July 1919.
  • Private William Edward Beable (Royal Marines) dies of wounds at age 30. His brother was killed in action last December.

Monday 4 September 1916 – We Lost 1,166

Duncan Frederick Campbell

At 07:00 the submarine E7 dives to 100 feet in an attempt to break through the anti-submarine nets at Nagara Point in the Dardanelles. The attempt fails when the starboard propeller becomes entangled in the nets. All attempts to free the vessel fail and the activity draws the attention of Turkish craft in the area. After numerous attacks E7 is forced to surface. After the crew has been removed to safety, the vessel is scuttled.

The hired trawler Jessie Nutten (Skipper Oscar John Pitcher) is sunk by a mine off Lowestoft. Her crew of five is lost including her skipper.

The Deputy Burgomaster at Dar es Salaam is received aboard HMS Echo to accept the terms of surrender of the city and troops, headed by the 129th Baluchis, enter the city.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Member of Parliament
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • A member of the Bedfordshire Constabulary
  • A member of the Isle of Ely Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Duncan Frederick Campbell DSO (Black Watch commanding 2nd/7th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of injuries at home sustained in a mine explosion at age 39. He was wounded at Ypres in November 1914, is a Member of Parliament for North Ayrshire from 1911 until his death and a veteran of the South Africa War.
  • Captain Richard Francis Newdigate (Border Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Henry Newdigate KCB.
  • Captain William Stapleton de Courcy Stretton (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the second of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Samuel Wyness Hutcheon (Highland Light Infantry) dies of tetanus following wounds received on 29th August in the first Battle of the Somme at age 29. He is the English master at Buckie Higher Grade School, Banffshire and he enlisted on 18th September 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Lewarne Teape (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in action at Ginchy at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Richard Teape Vicar of St Michael’s Devonport.
  • Sergeant Bennett Walter Keid (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 23 one day after his brother was killed. A third brother will be killed November 1917.
  • Sergeant Walter Frederick Surridge (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is a member of the Bedfordshire Constabulary.
  • Corporal Ernest Owen Peel (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) a member of the Wisbech Isle of Ely Constabulary is killed at age 29. He is the third and final member of the force to lose his life in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Cannell (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Joe Hodgkinson (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private Langton Benson-Brown (Manitoba Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Very Reverend William Henry Benson-Brown.
  • Private Albert Fordham Abbott (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in June 1915.
  • Private Ernest W Chandler (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He has two brothers who will die in the service of their King in 1918.
  • Private Harry Edward Gall (Cambridgeshire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 22. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Albert Edward Page (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in June 1918.
  • Private Gilbert Condick (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His two brothers have previously lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Henry Walter J Hill (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Private James David Thomas Nunn (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Private Samuel Vivian Veall (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 18 six weeks after his brother was killed.
  • Private Charles Alexander Baring (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private John Edward Bloom (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in January 1915.

Thursday 23 December 1915 – We Lost 181

Roland Leighton III

Roland Leighton III

Corporal Percy Fairborn Annis (Central Ontario Regiment) is instructing a class in the use of the trench catapult when a lighted bomb falls from the catapult into the trench.  Annis at once picks up the bomb and throws it away.  Along with a similar act performed in February of next year he will be awarded the Albert Medal.  He is the only Canadian winner of the award in the Great War.

HMHS Britannic departs Liverpool on her maiden voyage.  She is bound for Mudros on the isle of Lemnos where she will join in the Dardanelles service.

Lieutenant Roland Aubrey Leighton III (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19.  He is the fiancé of the post war author Vera Brittain and a war poet.

Hedauville

The sunshine on the long white road
That ribboned down the hill,
The velvet clematis that clung
Around your window-sill
Are waiting for you still.

Again the shadowed pool shall break
In dimples at your feet,
And when the Thrush sings in your wood,
Unknowing you may meet
Another stranger, Sweet.

And if he is not quite so old
As the boy you used to know,
And less proud, too, and worthier
You may not let him go –
(And daisies are truer than passion-flowers)

It will be better so.

Today’s losses include:

  • The fiancé of post war author Vera Brittain
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Lewis Charles Howard DSO (commanding 8th Somerset Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 34. His younger brother will be killed in action in April 1917.
  • Sapper Samson Farnell (Royal Engineers) dies on service at age 38. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War. His two brothers will be killed next year.
  • Gunner James Yoxall Twamley (Royal Field Artillery) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. His brother was killed last March.

Tuesday 23 November 1915 – We Lost 260

Alfred George Drake VC

Alfred George Drake VC

On the second morning of the Battle of Ctesiphon a weak Turkish attempt to counter-attack fails.  They try again in strength at night but again the British defence holds.

Lord Herbert Horatio Kitchener advises the government to withdraw all troops from Anzac and Suvla and warns them that casualties could be high in doing so.

Heavy losses are inflicted on the enemy at Yaunde in Cameroon.

British military operations against the Senussi commence.  Es Sollum is evacuated.

Near the hamlet of La Brique a patrol of four men of the Rifle Brigade is reconnoitering towards the German lines when it is discovered close to the enemy who open fire with rifles and machine guns wounding the officer and one of the men. The latter is carried back to our lines by one of the unwounded men while the other Corporal Alfred George Drake stays with his officer bandaging his wounds in spite of the enemy’s fire. Later a rescue party finds the officer alive and bandaged but Corporal Drake is dead, his body riddled with bullets. For saving the life of his officer Corporal Drake will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. The officer Lieutenant (later Captain) Henry Tryon will be killed on 15th September next year.

The Entente Powers send a note to the Greek government demanding non-interference with Allied troops, and guaranteeing eventual restoration of occupied Greek territory.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A son of the 5th Earl of Antrim
  • A former Private Secretary to the Prime Minister at the turn of the century
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 16-year old soldier
  • Men who will lose one and two brothers in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major the Honorable ‘Sir’ Schomberg Kerr McDonnell KCB GCVO (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 54. He is the son of the 5th Earl of Antrim. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and served as Private Secretary fo the Prime Minister 1888 to 1902.
  • Captain Geoffrey Barham Johnson (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Barham Johnson.
  • Private Norman Crowther (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action by a bullet in the lungs while he is stepping down from a sentry post. He is killed at age 16.
  • Private William Arthur Cook (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He is the eldest of five brothers who serve in the Great War, two of whom are killed.
  • Rifleman Walter Frank Fowler (Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds at age 28. His brother will be killed in March 1918.

Wednesday 17 November 1915 – We Lost 371

HMHS Anglia

HMHS Anglia

The hospital ship Anglia is sunk by a mine off Dover killing 134.

An Anglo-French Conference is held in Paris to discuss aid to Serbia and the Dardanelles expeditions.  The project is approved in principle to appoint a Council of War to co-ordinate Allied actions.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a member of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  •  Lieutenant Edward Harold De Fontaine (London Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Hutchings De Fontaine Rector of Bletchingley.

Wednesday 10 November 1915 – We Lost 232

Harold William Medlicott

Harold William Medlicott

Lieutenant Harold William Medlicott (Royal Flying Corps) a 5-victory ace and his observer Second Lieutenant Arthur Whitten Brown fly a reconnaissance to Valenciennes when they are shot down northwest of Bapaume and made prisoners.  Lieutenant Medlicott will be shot after being re-captured after his tenth escape in May 1918, while Lieutenant Brown will be exchanged to Switzerland in January 1917. He will go on to navigate the first airplane to cross the Atlantic with Captain John Alcock to win the 10,000 pound prize offered by the London Daily Mail in on 14th/15th June 1919.

The Turks fire three aerial torpedoes at the composite 1/4th and 1/7th Royal Scots, but cause no damage.  The 1/1st Ayrshire Yeomanry is attached for instruction.

Lord Kitchener arrives at the Dardanelles.

Indian Corps begin to leave France for Mesopotamia.

The Ship Licensing Committee and the Requisitioning (Carriage of Foodstuffs) Committee are both formed.

The Order in Council prohibits voyages between foreign ports except under license and authorizes the requisition of ships for carriage of foodstuffs.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 8th Baron Vernon
  • A former Honorary Attache at Constantinople
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a Major General
  • A man whose brother will die on service in 1918

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain George Francis Augustus Venables-Vernon (Derbyshire Yeomanry) dies of dysentery at Malta contracted on Gallipoli at age 27. He is the 8th Baron Vernon. He is a former Honorary Attaché at Constantinople in 1908 and was attached to the Legation at Munich from 1909 until the outbreak of the war.
  • Lieutenant James Richardson Spensley (Royal Army Medical Corps attached East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend William Spensley.
  • Lieutenant Campbell Lindsay-Smith (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late Major General John Smith.
  • Private John Parkhouse (North Devon Hussars) is killed at age 21.His brother will die in April 1918.