Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Dardanelles

Friday 5 November 1915 – We Lost 268

HMS Tara

HMS Tara

The Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Tara is torpedoed and sunk while the transport Moorina is sunk by gunfire from the German submarine U-35 in the eastern Mediterranean. Tara suffers ten casualties while the Senussi who are fighting the Italians inters the ninety-five survivors along with those of the Moorina. Four of the survivors will die during their captivity that will end when they are rescued by a column of the Duke of Westminster’s armored car squadron that will make a one hundred twenty mile dash across the desert from Bir Hakim.

Submarine E20 negotiates the Dardanelles Narrows for a rendezvous with the French submarine Turquoise in the Sea of Marmora. Unfortunately, the Turquoise has been abandoned leaving behind confidential books, which gave the enemy information regarding the rendezvous.  UB-14 is waiting for the British submarine and promptly sinks her with one torpedo. Nine survivors, including her commander Lieutenant Commander Clyfford Harris Warren are picked up by the German submarine and made prisoners. Twenty-seven of her crew members are killed.

The Newfoundland Regiment advances its front line to the ridge that has been held through the previous night by two small patrols and place machine guns in commanding positions. The ridge will be known afterwards as Caribou Hill.

The Germans surrender Banyo Cameroon to the British.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • A man whose son will die in the influenza outbreak of 1918 on service
  • Multiple men who will have brothers lose in the Great War
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Alexander William Abercrombie (commanding 2nd Connaught Rangers) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 50. His 22-year old son will die of wounds December 1918 during the influenza outbreak.
  • Major Ralph Henry Leeke (Rifle Brigade attached King’s Africa Rifles) dies of black water fever at Mzima, Tsavo River in British East Africa at age 31. His brother will be killed next April and they are sons of Colonel and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Leeke.
  • Captain Richard Bowie Gaskell Glover (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 31. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Captain William Harald Barker (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds received on Gallipoli at age 34. He is the only son of William Chichester Barker the Canon of Dromore.
  • Lieutenant Henry Sigismund Oppe (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 35. His brother will be killed in action in May 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Noel Tuff (East Kent Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds on Malta received 23rd October on Gallipoli. He is the son of Charles Tuff JP and his brother was killed in April of this year.
  • Private Frederick Morgan (Welsh Regiment) dies on Malta of illness contracted on Gallipoli at age 20. His brother will die of wounds in August 1918.

Thursday 4 November 1915 – We Lost 199

Cap badge of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry

Cap badge of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry

The transport Mercian is shelled off the Algerian coast.  The Mercian is carrying approximately 500 members of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry of whom twenty three will be killed during the shelling including Captain Thomas Carew Trollope (3rd Baron Kesteven) (Lincolnshire Yeomanry) will die of wounds received the following day at Oran. He is 24 years old. Lance Corporal Harold Thomas Springthorpe (Lincolnshire Yeomanry) is also killed. He is an English International footballer who played for Northampton and Grimsby.

On Gallipoli a patrol is sent out by the Newfoundland Regiment under Lieutenant J J Donnelly which occupies a ridge midway between the trenches occupied by the enemy and those held by our forces.  From this ridge the Turks have been causing trouble every night for some time.  The patrol has scarcely reached the ridge before it is opposed by the enemy who outnumber our men by about seven to one.  The sound of the firing from the ridge indicates to the Commanding Officer that our patrol is being attacked and suspecting that it is greatly outnumbered he immediately dispatches six men under Lieutenant Ross and Sergeant Green to reinforce the patrol.  As this small party is slowly making its way across No Man’s Land it encounters a large party of Turks who are rapidly surrounding our men who are holding the ridge.

In the skirmish that follows only Sergeant W M Greene and Private R E Hynes escape without being wounded.  The rapid fire that these two men deliver at close range completely deceives the Turks who greatly exceed them in numbers.  The enemy finally retires to his own trenches and the attempt to surround the original patrol is foiled.  This timely aid enables Lieutenant Donnelly and his men to hold the ridge all night, even though every man in the party has been wounded, some several times.

General Cunliffe’s Allied force attacks Banyo Mountain, Cameroon. One Company of the Nigerian Regiment under Captain Cedric Gray Bowyer-Smith (Gloucestershire Regiment attached) finds a weak point in the enemy lines and captures the summit of the mountain. However, a mist that had helped the British suddenly clears and Bowyer-Smith is killed by the enemy’s reserves and the remnants of his company are forced back down the mountain.

Lord Kitchener leaves England for the Dardanelles.  General ‘Sir’ Charles Monro is appointed to command the Salonika Force, while ‘Sir’ William Birdwood is appointed to command the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 3rd Baron Kesteven
  • An England International footballer
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  •  Captain Hugh Makins (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. His brother was killed in August of this year.
  • Lieutenant Philip Anthony Brown (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 29. His brother will be killed in April 1917.

Wednesday 3 November 1915 – We Lost 244

The newly constituted War Committee of the Cabinet, which replaces the Dardanelles Committee, holds it first meeting.

The steamer Woolwich is sunk 40 miles east southeast of Ceuta Crete carrying a cargo of phosphate and tin. The German submarine U35 will sink her with gunfire after removing the crew.  The German laid the mines that sank the hospital ship Marquette last month.

A combined British-French force takes Tibati Cameroon.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a member of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant Cuthbert George Llewellin Allen (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Llewellin Allen.

Saturday 4 September 1915 – We Lost 231

Submarine E7 becomes entangled in a net in the Dardanelles Narrows by Nagara Point and cannot break free.  The commotion on the surface caused by Lieutenant Commander A D Cochrane’s maneuvering of his submarine does not go unnoticed. The commanding officer of German U-boat UB-14 under repair at Chanak rows over to the spot and lowers a small explosive charge over the side.  When he makes contact he fires the charge and is rewarded with the sight of E7 coming to the surface.  Cochrane and his crew become prisoners of war.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a General
  • The nephew of Earl Fortescue
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A man who will have two brothers killed next year
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Major Ernest Sidney de Vere Bland-Hunt (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at ge 44. He is the son of Major General R W Bland-Hunt.
  • Captain Grenville Fortescue (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of Captain ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Fortescue (Coldstream Guards) and nephew of Earl Fortescue.
  • Captain Alexander Adam Seaton (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend John Abdiel Seaton Vicar of St John’s Clechkeaton.
  • Private Anthony Machutcheon (Scottish Horse) dies on Mudros at age 25. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private John Christian Herweg (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Cairo at age 17. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Archibald Greenlees (Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action. His two brothers will be killed next year.

Sunday 29 August 1915 – We Lost 296

Robert Reginald Pittendrigh

Robert Reginald Pittendrigh

The submarine C29 (Lieutenant William Robert Schofield age 27)  and the trawler Ariadne are carrying out anti U-boat duties off the Outer Dowsing Light Vessel off the Humber in the North Sea.  The submarine is under tow and in telephone contact with the trawler when it strays into a mined area and strikes a mine killing her crew of seventeen. The loss of C29 brings an end to trawler/submarine operations.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • The son of a Deputy Inspector General
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • One son of a family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • One son of a family that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose a second son in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Major John Noble Jephson (Royal Munster Fusiliers) dies of wounds on Mudros at age 50. He is the son of the late Deputy Inspector General William Holmes Jephson MD and on his own initiative captured an important post on the Dardanelles (afterwards called ‘Jephson’s Post’) where he was wounded.
  • Captain Walcot Harmood-Banner (South Wales Borderers) is killed in action at age 33. He is the son of ‘Sir’ J S Harmood-Banner, Member of Parliament.
  • Lieutenant Wilfrid Smyth-Osbourne (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed on HMS Invincible at the Battle of Jutland in 1916 they are sons of J S Smyth-Osborne JP DL.
  • Second Lieutenant Owen Whitaker MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is shot in the head by a sniper at age 20. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Sergeant Cyril Humphreys (Australian Light Horse) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Humphrey Humphreys Rector of Herllan.
  • Corporal Robert Reginald Pittendrigh (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received one week earlier when he and Chaplain Andrew Gillison have attempted to rescue a wounded man on Hill 60 when the bushes on the ground have caught on fire. Prior to joining the service he was a clergyman.
  • Private Patrick Conlon (Connaught Rangers) is killed. He is one of four brothers who will lose their lives in the war.
  • Private William Fishburn Donkin Smith (Canadian Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 26. He is the middle of three sons of Canon George Herbert Smith of Madras who will lose their lives.

Saturday 21 August 1915 – We Lost 1,657

John Peniston MIlbanke VC

John Peniston MIlbanke VC

The 11th and 29th Divisions and the 2nd South Midland Mounted Brigade attack Green Hill and Chocolate Hill.  Although pressed with great resolution, the front line does not move.

Australians take part in the First Battle of Hill 60. In the Battle of Scimitar Hill, the Suvla forces attack the hills immediately north of Hill 60. They succeed in capturing half of the hill.  Intense machine-gun, rifle and shellfire set fire to the bushes on the ground at Hill 60 across which the allies are attacking.  The flames, reaching some of the dead or wounded, ignite their clothing and explode their bombs and rifle ammunition, and the pieces of burning cloth or wood are flung about, starting more fires.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 5th Earl of Longford
  • Two Victoria Cross winners
  • A Brigadier General
  • A Baronet
  • Three battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A former Aide de Camp to John French
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of the Head Master of ‘Sir’ George Monoux School
  • An International Cricket player
  • A Norfolk Cricket player
  • A steeplechase and polo players
  • A member of the Eton Exelsior Rowing Club and Eton Football Club
  • A member of the Aylesbury Football Club
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Brothers killed together
  • A brother-in-law of the editor of the Christchurch Star

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • When the initial attack by the 29th Division fails the Yeomanry are ordered to advance in the open across a dry salt lake. Raked by shrapnel fire many of the brigades halt in the shelter of Green Hill but Brigadier General Thomas Pakenham, the 5th Earl of Longford, KP, MVO, General Officer Commanding 2nd (South Midland) Mounted Brigade, 2nd Mounted Division leads his brigade in a charge which captures the summit of the hill. He is killed at age 50.
  • Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Peniston Milbanke VC (Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) the 10th Baronet and winner of the Victoria Cross at Colensburg during the South Africa War on 5th January 1900 is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 42. He is the elder son of the late ‘Sir’ Peniston Milbanke 9th Baronet DL JP for Sussex, and of Elizabeth Margaret, daughter of the Honorable Richard Denman. He succeeded as 10th Baronet in 1899 and married in 1900, Amelia (Leila), only daughter of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Charles and Lady Madeline Crichton, and leaves two sons. Colonel Milbanke joined the Sussex Militia in 1890 and was gazetted to the Hussars in 1892. He served with them in Ireland until the outbreak of the South African War, during which he acted as ADC to ‘Sir’ John French. At Colesburg on 5th January 1900, just before the memorable occasion on which the Suffolks were captured, he was out with a reconnoitring party of the Hussars, when, the horse of one of the men having been ridden to a standstill, he, being already severely wounded, rode back through a heavy fire, picked up the man, put him on his own horse and brought him safely in. Unfortunately, on arrival, he was unconscious from loss of blood and could not communicate the information he had gathered.  For his actions, while home on sick leave after his wound, he was awarded the Victoria Cross by Queen Victoria. This was the last public duty she performed before her death. He was also mentioned in Despatches and received the Queen’s Medal and two clasps. After the South African War he served with the Hussars in India.  He retired from the Army in 1910 but rejoined on the outbreak of the War, taking over the command of the Sherwood Rangers in October 1914. He left England with the Regiment in April 1915, and is killed three days after arriving on the Peninsula. At the time of his death he had just received a communication offering him a Brigade.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Maxmillian David Francis Wood DSO (commanding 9th West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at ge 42. He played cricket for the Europeans versus India and for Hampshire.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Gurney Sheppard DSO (commanding Hertfordshire Yeomanry) dies of wounds at Chocolate Hill on Gallipoli at age 50. He is a South Africa War veteran where he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.
  • Major Ernest Reginald Woodwark (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son of the late Alderman Woodwark JP.
  • Captain Ambrose Moody (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Herbert Moody Rector of Bentley. Captain Hugh George Nevile (South Wales Borderers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 36. His brother will be killed next February.
  • Captain Charles Campbell Henderson-Hamilton (Cameronians) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. His brother will be killed next month and they are sons of Reverend Charles Greenhill Henderson-Hamilton late rector of St Mary’s Hamilton.
  • Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan VC (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) leads his company through a hurricane of fire onto the crest of Hill 70, only to be forced back by enfilading artillery fire. Some 400 yards beneath the hilltop he gathers together the survivors in a gully and urges them to make ‘one more charge for the honour of the Old Regiment’. According to the Inniskilling history, ‘every man who could, responded and a little band of fifty rushed against the crest. Of that band only one, a wounded sergeant, came back’. Gerald O’Sullivan’s 26 year old body will never be found and his name is engraved on the Helles Memorial.
  • Captain George Gardner (Empress of India’s Lancers, Indian Army attached Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Gardner.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Lewis Kennaway (Dorset Yeomanry) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Lewis Kennaway Vicar of Tarrant Crawford and he played for Norfolk in the 1904 Minor Counties Cricket Championship.
  • Lieutenant Wolfred Reeve Cloutman (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 25 rescuing a sergeant whom he carried on his shoulder 45 feet up a ladder from the bottom of a mine. As soon as the sergeant is lifted off the Lieutenant falls to the bottom overcome by gas.
  • Lieutenant John Reginald Lingard (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. He is the only child of Thomas Dewhurst Lingard JP for the County of Westmorland.
  • Lieutenant Frank Basil Goodall (Border Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of effects from gassing in November 1917. Lieutenant Lingard was gazetted to the Manchester Regiment on the outbreak of the war and was afterwards attached to the Lancashire Fusiliers. He went to Alexandria in June 1915, and after a few days proceeded to Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Philip Hugh Gore Roberts (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend William Walter Roberts.
  • Second Lieutenant Esmond Theodore Allpass (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Alfred Allpass former head of ‘Sir’ George Monoux School who will lose another son in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Hugh Bagnall Gething (Royal Gloucestershire Hussars) is killed at age 31. He is a well-known steeplechase rider and polo player. Lieutenant Gething was sent out with his Regiment first to Alexandria, and from there to the Dardanelles in this month being killed a few days after landing. His Regiment is ordered to advance across a stretch of about a mile and a half of open country. They have only just started when heavy shell fire is opened on them, and they begin to suffer heavy casualties. He survives almost the whole way across and has just faced forward again, after turning to say a few encouraging words to his men, when he is hit by shrapnel and killed instantaneously.
  • Second Lieutenant Percy Thomas Jordan (Inniskilling Fusiliers) who is killed at age 22. He is the son of Canon Jordan Rector of Magherafelt.
  • Sergeant Frederick Palmer (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 29. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Norman Atholston Robieson (Wellington Mounted Rifles) dies at sea on a hospital ship off Gallipoli at age 31. He is the brother-in-law of the editor of the Christchurch Star.
  • Lance Corporal Nolan Sustins age 25 and his brother Trooper Leon Sustins (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) age 21 are both killed at Hill 60, Anzac.
  • Private Edwin Allen (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. His brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Brothers Bertram (age 30) and Cyril (age 21) Legge both serving in the Dorsetshire Regiment are killed together on Gallipoli.
  • Trooper Herbert Henry Hiley (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. He is a well-known member of the Eton Excelsior Rowing Club and the Windsor & Eton Football Club.
  • Private James Fletcher (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Dennis Arthur Horne (Buckinghamshire Hussars) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is a member of the Aylesbury United Football Club.
  • Private Arthur Scott (York and Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25 two months after his brother died at home on service.

Friday 30 July 1915 – We Lost 769

Burn-Merz Shield

Burn-Merz Shield

Units of the German Army launch an attack using flame throwers against the 14th (Light) Division holding front-line positions at Hooge in the Ypres Salient.  It causes large numbers of casualties to the British defenders and the front is pushed back. British infantry soon learn to deal with the slow-moving men carrying the cumbersome equipment. The British Army will not adopt the weapon.

The Australian Flying Corps suffers its first casualties. In an operation during the attack on Nasiriyeh the two CaudronG3’s are brought down. Lieutenant George Pinnock Merz and Lieutenant William Wallace Allison Burn are brought down among hostile Arabs and armed with only revolvers, they decide to make a stand and in the ensuing engagement one is wounded and the other stays to protect him. Both men are then reported to be captured and murdered. Their bodies are never found. The trophy for the annual Australia versus New Zealand Rugby League competition is known as the Burn-Merz shield.

German air forces again drop three bombs on St. Omer, this time at 05:45.

The enemy break through the center of our front trenches help by the Rifle Brigade and the position held by Second Lieutenant Sidney Clayton Woodroffe (Rifle Brigade) is heavily attacked with bombs from the flank and subsequently from the rear.  Still he manages to defend his post until all his bombs are exhausted and then skillfully withdraws his remaining men.  He then leads his party in a counter-attack under an intense rifle and machine gun fire until he is killed while in the act of cutting wire obstacles in the open.   For his actions on this day he will be awarded the posthumous Victoria Cross.  He dies at age 19 and is the second of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include:

  • The two men for whom the annual Australia versus New Zealand Rugby League competition is names
  • A grandson of the 4th Lord Lyttelton
  • The son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Latham
  • The son of the Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
  • The man whose memory is celebrated at Talbot House (Toc H)
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • An Australian and former Sussex cricketer
  • A man whose son was previously killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple men who are the sons of clergy
  • Multiple men who are the sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Charles Slingsby Chaplin (commanding 9th King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 52.
  • Major John John Bulkeley Jones-Parry (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in action. His son was killed in April serving on HMS Wolverine in the Dardanelles.
  • Captain Geoffrey Charles Walter Dowling (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 23. He is an Australian cricketer who played for Sussex from 1911 to 1913.
  • Captain Bertram Pawle (Rifle Brigade) is killed at Hooge at age 23. He is the son of George Strachan Pawle DL JP.
  • Lieutenant Gilbert Walter Lyttelton Talbot (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the Right Reverend, the Lord Bishop of Winchester and the Honorable Mrs. E S Talbot and grandson of the 4th Lord Lyttelton. His brother the Reverend Neville Talbot will found Talbot House (Toc H) in his memory.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Reverend’ Frederick Edward Barwick Hulton-Sams (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend G F Sams. He applied for a Chaplaincy but enlisted when he failed to obtain one.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Darwin Overton (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Arthur Overton Rector of East Barnet.
  • Lieutenant George Mitford Paddison (Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Francis Seymour (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 29. He is the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Lathom.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Benoni Nicholl (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Powell Nicholl Vicar of Ascot.
  • Second Lieutenant Richmond Fothergill Robinson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and his son will lose his life in the Second World War.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘The Honorable’ Gerald William Grenfell is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady Desborough and a Great War poet. He is the brother of Julian Henry Francis Grenfell another of the Great War Poets, who died of wounds in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Brandt Arnell (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of William Thomas Arnell JP and his older brother died of enteric fever contracted during the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Longbottom (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in ten days.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Bonar Macnicol (Royal Scots) dies of wounds at home at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend D C Macnicol of Grange Church Edinburg.
  • Private Thomas Cox (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private James H Campbell (Royal Scots Fusiliers) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Rifleman Bertie Raymond (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 26 the day after his brother was killed serving in a different battalion of the same Regiment.
  • Private Oliver Robinson (Border Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in November 1916. Rifleman William Denix Lauria (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend John Alexander Lauria Vicar of Emmanuel.

Tuesday 29 June 1915 – We Lost 391

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Turkish counter attacks at the Dardanelles are repulsed with heavy loss.

Mr. Walter Long of the British government introduces a National Registration Bill, the first step on the road from volunteers to compulsory military service. It provides for the registration of all people between 15 and 65 years of age in England, Scotland, Wales, the Scilly Isles and (with reservations) Ireland.

The 1st/7th Royal Scots are engaged in clearing the battlefield on Gallipoli.  On this night the Turks make another unsuccessful attack on Quinn’s Post and Pope’s Hill.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The Scottish Cross Country Champion in 1904 and 1905
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of an Alderman
  • Multiple men who were the sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple man who will have another brother killed in the Great War
  • The third member of St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Corporal John Ranken (Royal Scots) is killed at age 34. He has been awarded Scottish Athletic International Honors in 1900, 01, 03 and 1907 and the Scottish Cross Country Champion in 1904 and 1905. His brother will die of wounds in March 1916 and their family will create the Ranken Memorial Trophy to be awarded to the winner of the mile run at George Watson’s College.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Spottiswoode Robert Dunn (commanding 1st/4th Royal Scots) is killed on Gallipoli at age 52. He is a South African War veteran.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Bridgett Pritchard (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds on Gallipoli. He is the son of Alderman W B Pritchard.
  • Captain William Noel Atkinson (Gurkha Rifles, Indian Army) is killed in action by a sniper during a Turkish attack on Gallipoli at age 32. He was born in Calcutta and is the son of the Reverend Augustus William Atkinson of Mysore. He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and is buried at Twelve Copse Cemetery.
  • Lieutenant Malcolm Henry Young (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed less than three weeks ago.
  • Lieutenant Henry Mark Hugh Cooper (King Edward’s Horse) dies of wounds at age 19 at home received 13th He is the son of the Reverend Henry Samuel Cooper of St George’s Canterbury.
  • Second Lieutenant William Edward Balcombe-Brown (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 22. His younger brother will be killed in action with the Royal Air Force in May 1918.
  • Lance Sergeant William Stephen Keneally VC (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 28. He was one of six members of his battalion who are elected by his mates to receive the Victoria Cross on landing.
  • Private Michael David (Munster Fusiliers) who dies of wounds received in action on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the third member of the St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band to be killed in the first year of the Great War

Thursday 10 June 1915 – We Lost 260

Submarine E14

Submarine E14

As the British prepare for an all out assault on the Garua fort the Germans unexpectedly raise the white flag.  “It appears that the native soldiers got completely out of hand”, writes Gorges, “the firing of our heavier guns having played such havoc that they could no longer endure the strain”.  The garrison surrenders thirty seven Europeans, 220 Africans, five guns, ten Maxim machine guns, and large quantities of ammunition, equipment and stores.

Lieutenant Commander Boyle goes through the Dardanelles in E14 for a second cruise this time sinking a brigantine, torpedoing a steamer in the harbor of Panderma and sinking a number of dhows.

The torpedo boats #10 (Greenfly) & #12 (Moth) (Lieutenant Edward W Bulteel) are torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine in the North Sea.  Forty five seamen are killed including the commander of #12. Also killed on Moth is Cook’s Mate Sidney Everest age 22. His brother will be killed in October 1916.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The son of a battalion commander who will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is:

  •  Captain Charles Eustace Fishbourne (Royal Engineers) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Alexander Fishbourne Rector of Gresford.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Turner Young (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 31. His brother will be killed in less than three weeks on the Western Front.
  • Lieutenant Gerald Francis Hadow (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed by shellfire while making his way back to headquarters to report at age 20. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Arthur De Salis Hadow (commanding 10th Yorkshire Regiment) who will be killed in September of this year.
  • Lieutenant Alan Edward Grey Hulton (Army Service Corps) dies at home at ae 29. He is the son of Rear Admiral Edward Grey Hulton.
  • Second Lieutenant Hugh Henry O’Sullivan (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Leslie St Lawrence Windsor (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Arthur Abbots (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Stoker Daniel Smith (Hood Battalion Royal Naval Division) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in September of this year.

Monday 7 June 1915 – We Lost 312

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The King takes the extraordinary step of sending a personal telegram to Reginald A J Warneford (one day after his action versus a Zeppelin in Belgium) conferring upon him the Victoria Cross.

The Dardanelles Committee assembles to review two proposals, both committed to holding the position on the Gallipoli peninsula.  Kitchener wants Hamilton to progress slowly, Churchill suggests a major reinforcement.  Kitchener accepts the later and Hamilton is informed that three ‘New Army’ divisions will be put at his disposal.

While flying a reconnaissance over the area of Staden Captain Amyas Eden Borton (Black Watch and Royal Flying Corps) is wounded in the head and neck by a bullet fired from an enemy airplane and although suffering severely from loss of blood he continues, with the assistance of his observer, Captain Anthony Marshall (Light Cavalry, Indian Army, Royal Flying Corps) to bandage his wounds and completes the reconnaissance on the prescribed course. Captain Marshall continues the observations after rendering all possible aid his pilot who is gradually losing consciousness all the time the German airplane continues its attack.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  An Olympic Bronze Medal winner
  • A brother of the 1st Marquess of Sligo
  • Son of the 2nd and father of the 3rd Viscount Bridport
  • Great grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • The son of a General
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A first class cricketer

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Captain Oswald Armitage Carver (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at age 28 on Gallipoli. He is a holder of the Olympic Bronze medal as a member of the 1908 eight-oared with coxswain rowing team. His widow will marry the future Field Marshall Bernard Law Montgomery. His younger brother will be killed in action next year.
  • Captain Christopher William Broderick Birdwood (Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds at Gallipoli received on the 4th. He is the son of General William Spiller Birdwood.
  • Lieutenant “The Honorable” Maurice Henry Nelson Hood (Hood Division) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 34. He is the only son of the late 2ndF Viscount Bridport and his son will become the 3rd
  • Second Lieutenant Albert Edward Stringer (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 27 on Gallipoli. He is the son of Edward Stringer JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Claude Lysaght Mackay (Worcestershire Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is a cricketer who made one first class appearance for Gloucestershire.
  • Sub Lieutenant William Denis Browne (Hood Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) known as the musician, is killed in action at Gallipoli. He was a friend of Rupert Brooke from their days at Rugby and Cambridge. A grandfather had been Dean of Emly (the cathedral was demolished in 1877), and a great-grandfather was a Member of Parliament for Mayo and younger brother of the 1st Marquess of Sligo.
  • Corporal Robert Handley (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His son will be killed serving in the same regiment in May 1917.
  • Private Hugh Latimer Tuke (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Laurence Tuke Archdeacon of Tauranga New Zealand and he represented the Hawke’s Bay Province at cricket and football.