Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Indian Army

11 May 1919 We Lost 81

In the 3rd Afghan War on the Northwest Frontier of India the battle of Bagh Springs, Landi Khotal is fought.  British and Indian troops recapture to town and push on into Afghanistan.

Corporal Leonard Walter (Royal Field Artillery) dies on service at age 37. His brother was killed in November 1916.

1 May 1919 We Lost 92

Captain Arthur Carlile Sturdy MC

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose brother was killed in April 1918

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Arthur Carlile Sturdy MC (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Indian Army) dies on service in Bombay at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend H C Sturdy.
  • Corporal George Edgar Budgett (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) dies on service at age 24. His brother was killed in action in April 1918.

4 April 1919 We Lost 105

Captain Alfred Christopher Pearson (Warwickshire Regiment attached Indian Political Department) is killed in Zakho Kurdistan at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Pearson Bishop of Burnley.

18 March 1919 We Lost 136

British troops are involved in the suppression of riots and public demonstrations seeking Egyptian independence. Eight unarmed men aboard a train traveling south of Cairo are set upon by successive mobs waiting at each station. Attempts are made by the men to get off the train after the driver abandons it but eventually they are all beaten or stabbed to death. One of the eight is Major Cecil Jarvis DSO MC (Deccan Horse) who is the last of five brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.

                                                              Today’s losses include:

  • Families that will lose two and five sons to the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Private Albert Roland Kerridge (Norfolk Regiment) dies on service at agae 22. His brother was killed in September 1918 and they are sons of the Reverend Albert Alfred Edward Kerridge Rector of Hawksworth.

15 March 1919 We Lost 135

While some Turkish prisoners of war are bathing at Beirut, Lebanon under the guard of British soldiers, one of them gets into difficulties.  Two members of the escort go to his assistance but fail to rescue him.  On hearing of the man’s danger Trumpeter Mangal Sain (Indian Lancers) at once swims out through the surf and eventually with great difficulty brings him to shore.  Shortly afterwards two British soldiers who are bathing are seen to have been caught in a current and to be in danger of drowning and Mangal Sain, although still exhausted from his rescue of the first man again swims out to the assistance of the two others.  He succeeds in bringing one man ashore and then immediately starts without hesitation to the rescue of the other soldier.  He is, however, called back, as it is seen that the man has drifted so far out that it is impossible to save him.  Both men who are rescued are in the last state of collapse and inevitabley would have drowned had it not been for the gallantry displayed by Mangal Sain who incurred great risk in rendering the services, owing to the violent surf and dangerous currents beyond.  For his efforts Mangal Sain will be awarded the Albert Medal.

                                                              Today’s losses include:

  • A retired Admiral whose son was killed in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Two families that will lose two sons to the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Admiral (ret) Herbert Lyon CB (Royal Navy) dies of illness. His son was killed commanding the destroyer HMS Marmion when it was in a collision in October 1917.
  • Captain John Severn Fuller (Royal Field Artillery) dies on service in Hong Kong at age 23. He is the son of the Richard Henry Fuller Rector of Emmanuel Loughborough.
  • Driver A Bosher (Royal Field Artillery) dies on service at age 35. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Private Leon N Chaloner (Motor Transport Army Service Corps) dies of malaria at age 28. His brother was killed in August 1916.

6 February 1919 We Lost 231

Image result for Bevil Brian Quiller-Couch

Major Bevil Brian Quiller-Couch

Today’s losses include:

  • A man whose brother was killed in October 1917
  • The fiancé of VAD member and poet May Wedderburn Cannan

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Douglas Harry Acworth MC (Cokes Rifles) dies at Port Said, Egypt at age 33. His brother had been killed in action in October 1917.
  • Major Bevil Brian Quiller-Couch DSO MC (Royal Field Artillery) dies in Cologne, Germany at age 28. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur and Lady Quiller-Couch and had served continuously in Flanders and France from August 1914, and the fiancé of Poet and member of the VAD May Wedderburn Cannan

29 January 1919 We Lost 172

Lieutenant Geoffrey D’Oiler MacLear MC (Garhwal Rifles) dies of dysentery at age 31. His brother was killed in July 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend Canon George Frederick Maclear Warden of St Augustine’s College Canterbury.

Wednesday 19 November 1918 We Lost 562

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Arthur Maughan Humble-Crofts (Royal Field Artillery) dies of pneumonia following influenza at age 35. His brother was killed in action in June 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend William John Humble-Crofts Rector of Waldron.
  • Lieutenant William Hughes (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed in Egypt. He is the third son of the Reverend William Hughes Rector of Hawnby to be killed in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Russell Wilkie Brown (Punjabis) dies on service at age 20 in Egypt. He is the son of the Reverend William Elmslie Wilkie Brown.
  • Lance Corporal Alfred Smith (Suffolk Regiment) dies of pneumonia and influenza at age 20. His brother died of wounds in October 1917.

Sunday 27 October 1918 We Lost 1,422

Keith MacDonald Scobie

The decisive assault of the Allied armies across the Piave begins.  At 06:45 the 12th Durham Light Infantry begins the advance onto the Green Dotted Line.  Very deep swift water is found in the most northerly area of the Piave and while wading this, the battalion suffers heavily from machine gun fire, the leading company losing nearly half its strength.  The Companies reorganize and press forward only to be held up by uncut wire close to the objective, which is strongly held.  The wire is cut most gallantly by various parties.  The battalion presses on, and C Company captures the first objective Blue Dotted Line, (the road from C Padovan to C Benedetti).  Here orders are received that as the Italians on the left of the brigade have failed to cross the Piave, no further advance is to be made. The battalion suffers 29 officers and men killed, 114 wounded and eleven missing.

During the morning, Major William George Barker (Royal Air Force) observes an enemy two-seater over the Foret de Mormal.  He attacks this machine and after a short burst it breaks up in the air.  At the same time a Fokker biplane attacks him, and he is wounded in the right thigh, but manages, despite this, to shoot down the enemy airplane in flames.  He then finds himself in the middle of a large formation of Fokkers who attack him from all directions, and he is again severely wounded in the left thigh, but he succeeds in driving down two of the enemy in a spin.  He loses consciousness then, and his machine falls out of control.  On recovery he finds himself being again attacked heavily by a large formation and singling out one machine he deliberately charges and drives it down in flames. During this fight his left elbow is shattered and he again faints, and on regaining consciousness he finds himself still being attacked, but notwithstanding that he is now severely wounded in both legs and his left arm shattered he dives on the nearest machine and shoots it down in flames.  Being greatly exhausted, he dives out of the fight to regain our lines, but is met by another formation, which attacks and endeavors to cut him off, but after a hard fight he succeeds in breaking up this formation and reaches our lines, where he crash-lands.  This combat, in which Major Barker destroys four enemy machines (three of them in flames), brings his total successes to fifty enemy machines destroyed, and is a notable example of the exceptional bravery and disregard of danger which this very gallant officer has always displayed throughout his distinguished career.  For this action he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Earl Frederick Crabb (Royal Air Force) having crashed an enemy machine, then goes to the assistance of one of our own that is being attacked, and materially helps to shoot the enemy down.  In addition to the above he has accounted for three other machines and assisted in crashing a fourth.

Second Lieutenant Keith MacDonald Scobie (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 21.  His brother was killed in action in July 1916 and he is a Great War Poet.

Lunae

Have you ridden alone in the country ever

By the dusty light of the harvest-moon?

Cycled intent in a vain endeavor

To match your speed to your soul’s quick tune

When there’s never a sound to break the magic;

For the tyres; crisp whir on the powdered road

And the hoot of an oul in the distance, tragic,

Are pricking your heart with a fairy goad?

Then the hawthorn hedges, sweet dissembling,

Stealthily close on your path, till fear

Of their dense bulk looms; and your heartsick trembling

Shakes into stillness as you swing clear.

Then the high haw-hedges furious will bide,

Drawing back from the light of the moon:

But the black trees haste down the silver hillside.

You know in your hear that you laughed too soon.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War Poet
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a Field Marshall
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A former police constable
  • A man whose wife is widowed a second time by the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Ashton Alexander St Hill DSO (commanding 11th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in Italy at age 44.
  • Major James Boswell Egerton (Indian Cavalry) is killed in action at age 38 in Mesopotamia. He served in the Somali Expedition and on the North West Frontier of India and is the son of the late Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Charles Egerton who also lost a son in April of this year.
  • Captain George Pomeroy Sterling DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action in Italy at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Sterling of the CMS Gaza Palestine.
  • Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Guy Wilbraham Wareing DFC (Royal Flying Corps) a seven-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lukyns Williams (Indian Cavalry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private Percival Henry Onyett (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25 in Italy. His brother died of wounds in Eygpt in November 1917.
  • Gunner Alfred James Hyder (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of influenza at age 29. He is a former police constable.
  • Private William Hall (Newfoundland Regiment) dies on service. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Bryen Sidney Smither (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Italy at age 20. His widow was widowed in March 1915 when her then husband was killed.
  • Private John Morris (Devonshire Regiment) dies on service after a serious operation. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman James J Toole (HMS Lion) dies of pneumonia at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Driver Alf Rayner (Royal Field Artillery) becomes the third brother to be killed in successive Octobers.

Saturday 26 October 1918 We Lost 1,380

Chaplain Charles A Sparling

Lieutenant Jules Edward Ferrand (Royal Air Force) takes part in an engagement with a large hostile formation. Singling out a Fokker he attacks it at close range, driving it down to crash.  Being isolated from his companions he turns to regain our lines but is at once attacked by seven Fokkers, who keep up a running fight for many miles. He maintains a stout defense against these long odds, crashing two of the enemy machines, and eventually reaching our lines with all his ammunition exhausted.

The 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment advances after a barrage at Le Cateau and is immediately met with opposition from machine gun posts.  Many men do not make it out of our trenches.

  • Private Thomas Blakey MM (Royal Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. His brother died on service in March 1915.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • The son of the 1st Lord Glanusk
  • A 12-victory ace
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A member of the Dickinson Silver Band
  • A man whose son will be killed in June 1942
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Hyla Napier Holden DSO (Indian Cavalry commanding 1st Lancers Indian Army) dies in Beirut at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend Oswald Mangin Holden Rector of Steeple Langford and served on the North West Frontier in 1908.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ John Lancelot Bailey (South Wales Borderers) dies on service in India at age 39. He is the son of the 1st Lord Glanusk and his brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Lieutenant Henry Coyle Rath DFC (Royal Air Force) a twelve-victory ace is accidentally killed when he collides with Lieutenant Roderick Sutherland Gunn MacLean over Tournai less than two weeks after being part of an action that will win him the Distinguished Flying Cross. Lieutenant MacLean will die of his injuries tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Neville Meredith MC (Mysore Lancers Indian Army) dies on service at Beirut at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry Fitzgerald Meredith Vicar of Neen Savage.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Charles A Sparling (Canadian Army Chaplains Department) dies on service at home at age 37.
  • Gunner Sydney Herbert Goodman (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is a member of the Dickinson Silver Band.
  • Private Thomas Fairclough Hall (Lancashire Regiment) died of wounds received two days prior at age 24. One of his brothers was killed in April 1917 while his first committed suicide the day after war was declared.
  • Private Allen Pettengell Whitfield (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in April 1916.
  • Private T D Thomas (Welsh Fusiliers) dies at Gibraltar at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John Thomas.
  • Boy 1st Class (HMS Carnarvon) dies of illness at age 16. His brother was killed on HMS Good Hope in November 1914.
  • Private Arthur Roberts (South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of pneumonia at age 23. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Private James Cross Holcroft (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 27. His son will be killed in June 1942.