Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Merchant Navy

23 December 1918 We Lost 233

Image result for Captain William John Decent

Capt William John Decent

Captain William John Decent (S S Gitano) is killed at age 57 when his ship is lost probably after striking a mine off the coast of Denmark. Her entire crew of 38 is lost.

Today’s losses include:

  • Families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Albert Victor Hawker (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of influenza at age 26. His brother died of wounds during the Somme offensive in July 1916.
  • Private Alistair Cameron (Gordon Highlanders) dies on service. He is the last of three brothers who lose their lives as a result the Great War.

Thursday 10 October 1918 We Lost 1,657

Royal Mail Ship S S Leinster (Captain William Birch) operated by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, serving as the Dublin-Holyhead mail-boat is torpedoed by the U-boat UB-123.  Having departed the Dublin ferry port at Kingstown (now re-named Dun Laoghaire) she is sunk just outside Dublin Bay at a point four miles east of the Kish light.  When she goes down 501 people perished — the greatest single loss of life at sea in the Irish Sea.  Despite many previous requests for a naval escort the Admiralty relied on the Leinster’s speed as her only protection from U-boat attack. She had been unsuccessfully attacked before but the torpedoes missed their target.

On her final morning she carries a crew of 77 and 694 passengers, of whom 500 are soldiers.  Initially UB-123 fires two torpedoes; one misses, passing harmlessly across the ship’s bow, but the other strikes the Leinster mid-ship forward of the bridge.  The ship begins to settle very slowly bow down in the water. In response to her distress call the British destroyers HMS Lively and HMS Mallard go to her assistance.  It is believed that at this stage she could have been saved by being towed back into Dublin or Dun Laoghaire harbour but the captain of the submarine decides to administer the coup de grace and finish her off with a third torpedo.  This he does as the Leinster continues taking on water and is disembarking her passengers into the lifeboats in rough seas. One hundred seventy-six of the 757 people on board are lost, including

  • Captain Birch who has been wounded in the initial attack and drowns when the lifeboat he is in swamps in heavy seas and capsizes while trying to transfer survivors to HMS Mallard. Others killed include
  • Lieutenant Commander George Richard Colin Campbell (Royal Navy Compass Department) age 34 the superintendent of the Magnetic Compass Department and inventor of the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass who is travelling with his wife and 4½ year old daughter. All are lost. He is the son of the Reverend Edward F Campbell.
  • Clerk shorthand typist Josephine Carr (Women’s Royal Naval Service) killed at age 19 after being in the service less than 30 days. She is the first WREN killed on active service.
  • Able Seaman David White (HMS Pembroke) is lost at age 41. His wife is pregnant and will name their son George Paul Leinster White.
  • Lieutenant Anchitel Edward Fletcher Boughey (Rifle Brigade) drowns at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Anchitel Harry Fletcher Boughey (Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge).
  • Captain Harold Locke (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the son of Frederick Locke DL JP.
  • Captain Robert Ernest Lee (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in action on Gallipoli in August 1915 and they are sons of the late Edward Lee JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Gilbert Hayward Aldworth (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Ernest Aldworth Vicar of Laverstock.
  • J Shaw-Jones dies of injuries received in the sinking. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and rejoined the army at the outbreak of the Great War and was wounded twice and invalided out. He then worked in the Factory Audit Department of the Ministry of Munitions and was returning from a business trip.
  • Corporal Samuel Eddy (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in action earlier this year.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The co-inventor or the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass with his wife and young son
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The first WREN (Women’s Royal Navy Service) member killed in action
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A twice wounded discharge veteran currently working in the Department of Ministry of Munitions
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Member of Parliament

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel George Ernest Beaty-Pownall DSO (Border Regiment commanding 1st King’s Own Scottish Borderers) dies of wounds at age 41. His brother has been killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Philip Edward Kelly (Royal Irish Fusiliers commanding 9th (North Irish Horse) Royal Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Bissett DSO MC (commanding 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 28.
  • Major Leonard Coulthard Hill MC (Royal Field Artillery attached Fourth Army Artillery School) is accidentally killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Percival Oakley Hill.
  • Captain Kenneth Sutherland Rudd (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Prebendary Eric John Sutherland Rudd Rector of Souldern.
  • Captain George Goldon Dilliway (Army Service attached Camel Transport Corps) is killed in Palestine at age 28. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Captain Robert Chaworth-Musters MC (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies at home. His two brothers have previously been killed in action in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John Hackett (HMS Nimrod) dies of illness at home. He is the son of the Reverend John Hackett Rector of Orlingbury.
  • Lieutenant Richard Henry Hocken (Canadian Light Horse Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of H C Hocken MP.
  • Lieutenant John Carruth (Dublin Fusiliers attached Irish Rifles) dies of wounds. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor James French (Irish Guards) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Somerset French KCMG.
  • Driver George Lawrence (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of pneumonia at age 20. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Private Frederick William Knight (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Maurice Rudolph Hannam (Royal Air Force) dies on service in Canada at age 18. His brother was killed in November 1916 and the boys came from Brooklyn New York.
  • Private James Samuel Griffiths (Manchester Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Herbert Bennett (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 33. One brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in August 1917 while a second died of wounds at home in September 1916.

Thursday 3 October 1918 We Lost 1,666

Charles Julian Mann

The 1st King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry capture Prospect Hill.

  • Private William Hubert Darwin (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in July 1915.

Lieutenant Robert Allan Caldwell (Royal Air Force) drops four bombs into Beauvois and then descends to 100 to 200 feet, firing 400 rounds into the enemy trenches which we are attacking south of Cambrai.

The submarine L10 (Lieutenant Commander Alfred Edward Whitehouse age 30) is in the vicinity of a German convoy which had been attacked by British destroyers the previous night.  This afternoon a number of German ships are spotted searching the area for survivors and L10 signals her intention of attacking the German squadron which consists of the destroyers S33 and S34 and two torpedo boats heading from Zeebrugge to Germany.  S34 strikes a mine with the result that the other ships were forced to ignore the danger of mines to rescue the sinking destroyer’s crew.  L10 moves in and fires a torpedo at S33 which severely damages the destroyer but initial thoughts of another mine are dispelled by the Germans when L10’s conning tower broaches the surface. S33 manages to bring her guns to bear and sinks the submarine through shelling.

The tanker S S Eupion is torpedoed and sunk ten miles west of Loop Head, River Shannon and sunk. Eleven of the crew survive the sinking but die in a lifeboat afterwards including

  • Third Officer Christopher Clark who is one of three brothers and their brother in law who all lose their lives in the Great War

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A 21-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the cleryg
  • A Military Chaplain
  • The son of a Baronet

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Charles Robert Reeves Hickey DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed in a midair collision with Second Lieutenant Schomberg Edward Matthey when he dives through a cloud southwest of Ramscapelle. Captain Hickey dies at age 21. In April of this year he forced down a Rumpler C near Wulpen and after landing beside it, was attempting to protect his prize from Belgian citizens when the German aircraft exploded killing several bystanders and injuring Hickey.  Hickey was a twenty-one-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend Frederick Wystans Hipkins MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 32. He is the Rector of Bamford-in-the Park and the son of the Reverend Frederick Charles Hipkins.
  • Captain Humphrey Stuart King MC (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at Le Catelet at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend John King Rector of Crock and was a June 1914 graduate of Durham University as a Divinity Student.
  • Lieutenant Jack Aubrey Sykes (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 19. His two brothers lost their lives last year in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John D C Gould-Taylor DFC (Australian Flying Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend W Gould-Taylor.
  • Lieutenant Charles Julian Mann (Hussars) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Mann, the 1st Baronet and had been educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge.
  • Lieutenant George Richard Lancelot Baillie (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend William Baillie.
  • Lieutenant John MacKay (Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry) dies of wounds. His two brothers were killed in 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Homer Harding (Indian Army Reserve of Officers) dies in India. He is the last of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War. A final brother will be lost in the sinking of submarine M1 in November 1925 as a result of collision with a Swedish steamship.
  • Chaplin the Reverend Charles Robertson is killed at age 39. Chaplain Eric Oswald Read (Doresetshire Regiment) is killed at age 30.
  • Sergeant Alex Polson MM (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother died on service at home in January 1915.
  • Private Zaccheus Simpson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Herbert Howden (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in January 1917.
  • Private George Alfred Beard (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Private William Ethelbert Abbott (Australian Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John Thomas Henry Abbott Vicar of Mulllaghdun Enniskillen.
  • Private George Borthwick (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed on Salonika at age 26. His brother was killed July 1916.
  • Private Hugh eland Clatworthy (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in January 1916.

Sunday 29 September 1918 We Lost 3,228

Australian Corps attacks at St Quentin supported by approximately 150 tanks of the 4th and 5th tank brigades. American divisions launch the initial attack, with the Australian 3rd and 5th Divisions intended to “leapfrog” through the American forces. The inexperienced Americans do not clear German positions as effectively as they might have (due to the confusion created during the attack on 27th September). This forces the advancing Australians to fight for the ground that the Americans had planned to have already taken. In the confusion of battle, some American pockets that had been left without effective leadership willingly went along with the Australians as they advanced and there are documented accounts of soldiers from both nations fighting alongside each other in ad-hoc mixed outfits. The British 46th Division crosses the St Quentin Canal (defended by fortified machine gun positions), capturing 4,200 German prisoners (out of a total for the army of 5,300).

Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Frederick Warrington Gillet (Royal Air Force), when on a low line patrol, attacks three Fokkers, driving down one, which falls in flames. Lieutenant John Rose observes an enemy scout attacking some of our machines.  He engages it, drives it down from 15,000 feet to 6,000 feet, when it falls in flames.  On his return journey he attacks and destroys an enemy two-seater.

The merchant ship S S Nyanza (Master Finlay Kerr) is sunk by a German submarine torpedo fourteen miles northeast from the Maidens.  Her crew of 13 is killed including her master who dies at age 54.

  • Fourth Engineer Officer William Evitt is killed at age 20. His father was killed in September 1917 also serving in the Merchant Marine.

At Terhand, Belgium, when the right flank of his company was held up by enemy machine-guns, Lance-Corporal Ernest Seaman (Inniskilling Fusiliers) goes forward under heavy fire with his Lewis gun and engages the position single-handed, capturing two machine-guns and 12 prisoners, and killing one officer and two men. Later in the day he again rushes another enemy machine-gun post, capturing the gun under very heavy fire. He is killed immediately afterwards, but it was due to his gallant conduct that his company was able to push forward to its objective. For his efforts he will be posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

During the attack at Bellenglise and Lehaucourt Lieutenant Colonel Bernard William Vann (commanding 1st/6th Sherwood Foresters) leads his battalion with great skill across the Canal du Nord through a very thick fog and under heavy fire from field and machine guns. On reaching the high ground above Bellenglise the whole attack is held up by fire of all descriptions from the front and right flank. Realising that everything depends on the advance going forward with the barrage Colonel Vann rushes up to the firing line and with the greatest gallantry leads the line forward. By his prompt action and absolute contempt for danger the whole situation is changed, the men are encouraged and the line swept forward. Later, he rushes a field-gun single-handed and knocks out three of the detachment. The success of the day is in no small degree due to the splendid gallantry and fine leadership displayed by this officer. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross as he will be killed near Ramicourt by a sniper on 3rd October when leading his battalion in attack.  He is an ordained minister who played football for Northampton Town, Burton United FC and Derby County from 1906-7.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Battalion commander
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose uncle will be killed in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A church organist and music critic for the Southern Reporter
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • A schoolmaster
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1942
  • A member of the Vancouver Police Department
  • The grandson of Chief Sitting Bull the victor over General Custer as the Battle of Little Big Horn

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John McDonnell (Leinster Regiment commanding 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 40.
  • Captain Stanley Walter Neale MC (Australian Infantry) is killed by a shell at age 24. He is an Australian rules footballer who played 28 games with University in 1913-14.
  • Captain Herbert Rendell (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant John Neville Beeman MC (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at Villers Hill near Gouzeaucourt at age 20. His uncle was killed in October 1914.
  • Lieutenant Nicholson Stuart Boulton (Royal Air Force) a six-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19 east of Caudry by German ace Josef Mai.
  • Lieutenant Vernon Douglas Stuart MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Canon E A Stuart.
  • Lieutenant John Cuthbert Backhouse Brown (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Brown.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Henry May (Tank Corps) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed last June.
  • Lieutenant John Ledge Bromley (Army Service Corps attached Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Crabbe Park (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at age 29. He is the organist at Bowden Parish Church and the music critic for the Southern Reporter.
  • Flight Cadet Hector Campbell Wright (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 18. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P A Campbell Rector of Fladbury.
  • Cadet John Henry MacLaurin (Royal Air Force) is killed in an accident at home. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Robert Twiss MacLaurin Rector of Killaloe.
  • Chaplain Cyril Barnard Wilson Buck (attached Leicestershire Regiment) dies on active service at age 38,
  • Chaplain Umberto Michael Bertini dies on active service at age 33.
  • Lance Corporal Herbert William Carpenter (West Surrey Regiment) the schoolmaster of Abinger Council School is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in the Royal Air Force in May 1942.
  • Private Joseph Taylor (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His older brother will die as a prisoner of war next month.
  • Private William Morrison (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He is a member of the Vancouver Police Department.
  • Private Arthur Leslie James (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in June 1916.
  • Private Alfred Jenkins (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. His brother was killed earlier this year.
  • Gunner Francis Sepitmus Evert (Australian Field Artillery) is killed. His brother was killed last September.
  • Private Frank Ernest Sidney Cox (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Thomas W Ballard (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 32 just 4.5 kilometers from where his brother was killed earlier this month.
  • Private Charles Carr (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will die as a result of war service in 1921.
  • Private Anthony Rudd (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 25. His brother died of wounds in March of last year.
  • Able Seaman William Marshall Neiass DSM (HMS Cumberland) dies on service. His brother died on service last December.
  • Private Robert Wilfrid Longmore (Canadian Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1918 and they are sons of the Reverend Francis Longmore Rector of Carman Manitoba.
  • Private John Charles Crane (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Standing Buffalo (Manitoba Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is the grandson of Chief Sitting Bull who led the Sioux into the Battle of the Little Big Horn and defeated George Armstrong Custer at that battle. He is the son of Chief Julius Standing Buffalo of the Lakota Sioux tribe.

Monday 16 September 1918 We Lost 589

At about 18:00 this evening an explosion occurs on board HMS Glatton while she is lying in Dover Harbor.  This is followed by a severe fire involving the whole of the amidship part of the ship.  Efforts are made to deal with the fire by means of salvage tugs. The foremost magazines are flooded but it is found impossible to flood the after magazines. The initial explosion and fire cut off the after part of the ship killing or seriously injuring all the officers who are on board with one exception and there is danger of a further explosion which might cause severe damage to the town and to other vessels which are in close proximity loaded with oil and ammunition. At the time of the explosion Surgeon Lieutenant Commander Edward Leicester Atkinson DSO (Royal Navy) is at work in his cabin. The first explosion renders him unconscious.  Recovering shortly thereafter he finds the area outside his cabin filled with smoke and fumes. He makes his way to the quarter deck by means of a ladder during this time he brings two unconscious men on to the upper deck.  He now returns to the flat and is bringing up a third man when a smaller explosion occur while he is on the ladder.  This explosion blinds Atkinson and at the same time a piece of metal is driven into his left leg in such a manner that he is unable to move until he has himself extracted it. Placing the third man on the upper deck he proceeds forward through the shelter deck. By feel being totally unable to see he finds two more unconscious men both of whom he brings out. He is found on the upper deck in an almost unconscious condition so wounded and burned that his life was in peril for some time.  Lieutenant George Devereux Belben DSC, Sub Lieutenant David Hywel Evans (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve), Petty Officer Albert Ernest Stoker and Able Seaman Edward Nunn are in boats rescuing men who have either been blown or jumped overboard.  They then board Glatton on their own initiative and enter the super structure which is full os dense smoke and proceed down to the deck below.  They succeed in rescuing seven or eight badly injured men from the mess deck in addition to fifteen who they find and bring out from inside the ship.  They continue their efforts until all chances of rescuing others has passed and the ship is ordered to be abandoned. For their efforts Lieutenant Commander Atkinson, Lieutenant Belben, Sub Lieutenant Evans, Petty Officer Stoker and Able Seaman Nunn will all be awarded the Albert Medal.  At about 20:00 the ship is torpedoed and sunk.  Seventy-nine are killed or die as a result of the explosion including Lieutenant Commander Reginald James Blakeney Drew the son of the late Inspector General W B Drew killed at age 30.

Second Lieutenant Harold Leslie Edwards, while on patrol with nine other machines, engages twelve enemy scouts.  In the combat that ensues he destroys one, his pilot accounting for a second, and they take part in the destruction of a third.

The armed merchantman S S Acadian (Master J Snowden) is torpedoed and sunk by the U-boat UB-117 eleven miles west south west from Trevose Head. Twenty-five are killed including her master. There is one survivor.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great war
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Archibald Denys Irivng (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds when he is struck by a piece of shell while leading an ammunition column at Saulcourt. He is the grandson of the late Reverend Thomas Bray.
  • Chaplain ‘the Reverend’ Matthew Vincent Prendergast died on service in Cairo at age 37.
  • Sergeant Richard Speakman (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother died of pneumonia on service in February 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Henry Watson (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Gunner Wilfrid Norminton (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 29. His son will be killed in the Second World War.

Saturday 14 September 1918 We Lost 584

Alexander George Boteville Thynne MC

While on a bombing raid Second Lieutenant James Gordon Dennis is engaged in a formation, which is attacked by twenty of the enemy, and during the ensuing fight he is severely wounded.  He at once signals his observer, Lieutenant H G Ramsey to take charge of their machine, but the observer has also been wounded and is unable to comply.  Lieutenant Dennis decides that his duty demands that he should remain with the formation to the end of the battle, and does this, notwithstanding the loss of blood from his wounds. He succeeds in bringing his machine back to our lines – a distance of over forty miles – a feat that surprised even his commanding officer.

The steamer S S Gibel Hamam is torpedoed and sunk by UB-103 while on a voyage from Swansea to France with a cargo of coal.  Twenty-one including the master are killed.

Before dawn a Turkish artillery barrage strikes everywhere along the 14-mile long front at Baku.  Eight to 10 Turkish battalions cross the railroad tracks and roll over the Russian defenders gaining control of the cliffs overlooking Baku.  The 39th Brigade rushes to stem the tide but lack the strength to thrown the Turks from the heights. Lieutenants McKay and Pope finding their Martinsydes unserviceable so burn them and join the infantry.  With scattered artillery fire pounding Baku and his last line of defenses breached, Dunsterville decides that further resistance is futile and accordingly he orders the Royal Navy to prepare to evacuate the Dunsterforce and with Baku lit by flames and its streets beginning to ring with the din of combat the force heads out to sea.  The mission to Baku has cost Dunsterforce 180 men dead, wounded and missing.  The Turkish casualties are put at 2,000.

Today’s losses include:

  • A General
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A Member of Parliament and son of a Marquis
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose a son and a daughter in the Great War
  • The man who scored the first goal ever for the Ayr United club

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Lumley Owen Williamses Jones DSO commanding officer 13rth Brigade 5th Division dies on service at age 41.
  • Lieutenant Colonel F H A Wollaston DSO (Rifle Brigade commanding 1st/5th Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 39.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) ‘Lord’ Alexander George Boteville Thynne DSO (Wiltshire Regiment commanding 6th Wiltshire Yeomanry) a Member of Parliament for Bath, is killed in action at age 45. He is the son of the Marquis and Marchioness of Bath. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and Somali 1903-4.
  • Captain Eric Minot Spinks (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Edmund Spink Vicar of Bakewell.
  • Lieutenant Harold Archibald Smith MC (Canadian Mounted Rifles) dies at age 25 in England. He had been a theological student before he enlisted at a stretcher-bearer in January 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Edgar Birch (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war, the other two being killed last year.
  • Lance Corporal Clifton Lionel Williams (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 19 becoming the youngest and last of four brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Adolphus Jenner (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in June 1916.
  • Driver Archibald Campbell (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds to his back and shoulder received in action at age 38. He played football for the Carlisle United, Ayr United and Albion Rovers clubs. He scored the first league goal ever for Ayr United in 1910.
  • Dursley War Worker Doris Mary Wyatt dies at age 23. Her brother will die of wounds next month.
  • Private Henry Bertram Clapperton (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother died of wounds in May 1917.

Thursday 12 September 1918 We Lost 915

Arthur George Percival Heywood

SS Galway Castle is torpedoed and sunk one hundred sixty miles from Fastnet out in the Atlantic.  At least twenty-seven are killed. Nursing Sister Constance Addison (South African Military Nursing Service) is killed when she gives up her place in a lifeboat to another passenger. She goes down with the ship. She has two brothers who have been previously killed in the Great War.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Baronet
  • A Nursing sister
  • A family that will lose three children in the Great War
  • A man whose father has previously died of wounds in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Arthur George Percival Heywood (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Percival Heywood the Baronet.
  • Second Lieutenant Duncan Francis Charles Adamson (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His father died of wounds received in action as a CQMS in the London Regiment in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Merton Alfred Rose MC (Royal Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 24. His brother will die of disease in Egypt in September 1919 on service.
  • Rifleman Thomas Mitchell Abernethy (New Zealand Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Christopher Abernethy and his brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Rifleman Frederick William Farrant (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 18. His brother died of wounds in November 1916.
  • Private Alfred Cecil Callister (Army Service Corps) dies at home. His brother was killed in April 1918.

Saturday 7 September 1918 We Lost 687

Master W Steel age 26 and his entire crew of eleven are killed when S S Ruysdael is sunk by a German submarine 228 miles west of Ushant while carrying coal to Taranto.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Wolverhampton Wanderers footballer
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Arthur Hamilton Young (Canadian Army Pay Corps attached 7th Brigade Headquarters Canadian Infantry Brigade) is killed. He is the son of Archdeacon Young.
  • Private John McCulloch (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Driver James Ingram (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Arthur Oldring (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend George Wright Oldring.
  • Private Harold Ingram Davidson (Gordon Highlanders attached London Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother was killed in March 1916.
  • Private Arthur Ernest Scott MM (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will die the day the Armistice takes effect during the Great Influenza outbreak.
  • Private John Shelton (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is a footballer who played for the Wolverhampton Wanderers from 1907 to 1911 making 94 appearances scoring 17 goals and played in the 1908 FA Cup victory for the Wanderers. He later played for Port Vale making 139 appearances until conscripted in the summer of 1917.

Saturday 24 August 1918 We Lost 1,588

Samuel Forsyth VC

Lieutenant Louis Bennett (Royal Air Force) is shot down by anti-aircraft fire while attacking a balloon at Hantay. He crashes near Marquallas and is dragged from the wreckage, dying soon after of his injuries.  His twelve victories in only twenty five sorties is perhaps the most rapid rate of scoring by any Allied pilot of the Great War.

The Cunard steamship Flavia is torpedoed twice by the German submarine U-107 thirty miles northwest by west from Tory Island, Ulster.  Although the ship will remain afloat for two hours it sinks with the loss of one life.

Sergeant Samuel Forsyth (No. 3 Field Company, New Zealand Pioneers attached Auckland Infantry) is shot by a sniper and killed at age 25.  On nearing the objective, his company comes under heavy machine-gun fire. Through Sergeant Forsyth’s dashing leadership and total disregard of danger, three machine-gun positions are rushed and the crews taken prisoner before they can inflict many casualties on our troops. During a subsequent advance his company comes under heavy fire from several machine guns, two of which he locates by a daring reconnaissance. In his endeavour to gain support from a tank, he is wounded, but after having the wound bandaged, he again gets in touch with the tank, which in the face of very heavy fire from machine guns and anti-tank guns he endeavours to lead with magnificent coolness to a favorable position. The tank, however, is put out of action. Sergeant Forsyth then organizes the tank crew and several of his men into a section, and leads them to a position where the machine guns can be outflanked. Always under heavy fire, he directs them into positions which brings about a retirement of the enemy machine guns and enables the advance to continue. It is at this moment he is killed by a sniper. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Colonel John Hay Maitland Hardyman DSO MC (commanding 8th Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 23.  He is the youngest battalion commander killed in the Great War.

On Leave

The mad breeze laughs the clouds along,
The young ash shouts his clean-limbed song,
Nibbling green and chocolate slopes
Silvery brown the old hedge gropes,
I with wakening nature cry,
“Why should I die?” “Why should I die?”

Out there its different: we don’t fear to die;
We kill, yet hate not, live, yet wonder why,
Till, worn with waiting, spent with ceasless strain,
With present issues each man drugs his brain;
The daily letter’s homely happenings,
Life’s three and twenty unimportant things,
The third-back dug-out’s need of strengthening,
How the deep mine is slowly lengthening,
Poor Freddie’s death, the latest hand-grenade –
Of such is life in mud-bound Flanders made.

Today’s losses include:

  • Two Victoria Cross winners
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • The youngest battalion commander killed in the Great War
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • The father of the Deputy Leader of the 1953 Mount Everest Expedition the first to conquer the mountain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Richard Francis Montague Buller (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He is the son of the late Reverend Richard Buller and has a brother who will be killed in September 1918.
  • Captain Roger Joseph Tebbutt (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in March 1915.
  • Captain Harold Edward Pope MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action while acting as Heavy Artillery Liaison officer for the 32nd Division at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Frederick Pope Vicar of Tring and he took first in Chemistry at New College, Oxford.
  • Captain Philip Rolfe (Army Service Corps attached Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend George Wilkinson Rolfe.
  • The fourth son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Maxwell-Stuart of Dorset to die in the Great War, Lieutenant Alfred Joseph Maxwell-Stuart (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds at age 20.
  • Lieutenant Leonard Gustav Byng MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 30. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Charles Evans (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 36. His son with the same name will be Deputy Leader of the 1953 Mount Everest Expedition which will lead to the first conquering of the mountain by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Oswald Mansfield (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in October and they are sons of the former Member of Parliament for Spalding Lincolnshire.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Douglas Rawson (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the late Reverend E O, formerly vicar of Ince, Cheshire.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Harold Clayton (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Prestwood Clayton.
  • Cadet Roy Nelson Pillow (Australian Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England at age 23. His brother was killed in action six days ago.
  • Sergeant Harold Jackson VC (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for actions performed earlier this year.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Lowe (London Regiment) is killed at age 20 less than three months after his older brother was killed.
  • Private Ernest White (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in August 1918.
  • Private Fred Rawnsley (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Arnold Lightbound (King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother died on active service in November 1915.
  • Private Albert E White (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed in action. He brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Arthur Harry Edis (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed last March.
  • Private Charles Henry Morgan (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at Albert. His brother died of illness in November 1915.

Thursday 22 August 1918 We Lost 1,603

Oswald Cawley MP

Lieutenant Frederick Stanley Gordon (Royal Air Force) achieves his fifth victory when he shoots down an LVG C over Estaires.

Lieutenant Commander Victor James Bowden-Smith (HMML #403, Royal Navy) is killed at age 31 when his ship is blown up in Runswick Bay while endeavouring to salve a German torpedo.   He is the son of the late Reverend F H Bowden-Smith.

Second Officer Alfred Buchanan Cheetham (SS Prunelle, Mercantile Marine) is killed at age 51 when his ship is sunk after being torpedoed.  He was a member of several Antarctic expeditions and served as the third officer for both the Nimrod and the 1914 to 1917 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition.  His son William Alfred Cheetham was killed at sea when SS Adriatic disappeared in 1916.  Eleven others on the Prunelle including the master are also killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Member of Parliament
  • The son of Baron Cawley
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A member of multiple Antarctic expeditions
  • A man whose son was previously killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three son in the Great War
  • A man whose brother-in-law will lead the invasion of Tunisia in the Second World War
  • A 24-victory observer ace
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A Military Chaplain while conducting a burial service
  • A man who has three cousins killed in the Great War
  • A man whose mother was so distraught by his death that she requested his name not be included in the local memorial constructed after the war

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Oswald Cawley (Shropshire and Cheshire Yeomanry) is killed in action near Merville at age 35. He is the son of the 1st Baron Cawley of Prestwich a Member of Parliament. The Captain was elected Member of Parliament for Prestwich Division in February of this year to succeed his father and has had two brother previously killed in the Great War.
  • Captain John Kenneth Samuel Page MC (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Hedley John Goodyear MC (Central Ontario Regiment) becomes the third son of Josiah and Louisa Goodyear to be killed in the Great War. He dies at age 31 and his two brothers have been killed in 1916 and 1917.
  • Lieutenant John Algernon Wynyard Peyton (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. His younger brother has been killed in July of the previous year.
  • Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Ralph Dominic Gamble MC (Coldstream Guards) age 21 is killed in action while leading his company into heavy fog and taking an enemy position without the aid of the tanks allocated to support him at Moyenville. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Reginald Arthur Gamble and brother-in-law of General ‘Sir’ Kenneth Arthur Noel Anderson KCB MC commander of the First Army during Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of Tunisia.
  • Lieutenant Keith Herbert Clayton (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in the Second World War.
  • Lieutenant Francis Charles Plowden (Shropshire Yeomanry attached Shropshire Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 40. He is the son of Lady Plowden of Plowden Hall.
  • Lieutenant Tom Cecil Noel (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 20 when he and his pilot are shot down near Westroosebeke. He is a twenty-four victory observer ace.
  • Lieutenant Norman Dunlop Galbraith (Highland Light Infantry) becomes the third son of W B Galbraith JP to die in the War when he is killed at age 22.
  • Second Lieutenant M I Malton (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend William H C Malton.
  • Second Lieutenant Percy William Moss (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in March.
  • Second Lieutenant Percival James Flory (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action. He has two brothers who will die in service this year.  They are sons of the Reverend Henry William Flory Vicar of St Matthew’s Littleport.
  • Chaplain James Herbert Reginald Lendrum MC (attached Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed by a shell with three others while conducting a burial service at age 31. He was the Curate of Apsley End from 1913 until last year.
  • Corporal L G Moore (Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March 1917.
  • Lance Corporal Reginald Mustoe (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Rifleman Alfred Ernest Coomber (London Regiment) becomes the third son of George and Elizabeth Coomber to be killed in the Great War. He dies at age 40 and his two brothers have been killed in 1916 and 1917.
  • Private John Stanley (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 19. His older brother was killed in November 1914.
  • Private Ernest A Pettingale (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Stephen Lucas (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His mother is so distraught by his death she requests that his name not be included in the local memorial constructed after the war.
  • Private Edward John Avery (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Thomas Abbotts (North Staffordshire Regiment) dies at home at age 24. His brother was killed in action while serving in the same regiment in July 1915.
  • Private Sidney Francis Hatch (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 21. He has three cousins who will be killed in action.
  • Private Sydney George Bowden (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 21. His brother died of wounds in February 1917.
  • Private Charles Edward Kennedy (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in December 1914.
  • Private Charles Jackson MM (Royal Fusiliers) is killed. He is the middle of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Louis Brereton Jones (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed tomorrow.