Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Mesopotamia

Wednesday 30 October 1918 We Lost 1,185

Jack Lindsay Doubleday

Lieutenant Frederick Stanley Gordon (Royal Air Force) achieves his last victory when he shoots down an enemy balloon over Quaremont. Lieutenant V Voss and Sergeant Ernest Antcliffe (Royal Air Force) achieve a victory over a victory a Fokker D.VII in their BF2b north of Beciers, while Lieutenant J Baird and Sergeant Charles Hill of the same squadron achieve a victory over a Fokker at Herquegnies.

The Armistice between the Entente Powers and Turkey is signed at Mudros on the island of Lemnos.

HMCS Galiano (Lieutenant Robert Mayes Pope RNCVR) goes down in the Pacific Ocean with a loss of thirty-eight officers and men. The wireless station at Triangle, British Columbia, receives an urgent message from Galiano requesting immediate assistance. A heavy southeast gale is raging in Barkley Sound at the time. As soon as the message is received, all ships in the immediate vicinity and approaching the direction of Galiano, are notified, but nothing further is seen or heard of her.

Today’s losses include:

  • Two families that will lose FIVE sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in October 1940
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose father was killed in August 1916
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A Midlands Rugby XV player versus the All-Blacks

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Henry Wyndham Francis Blackmore Farrer MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son the Reverend Canon Farrer. He played for the Midlands Counties Rugby XV versus the New Zealand All Blacks and was wounded six times previously.
  • Captain George Reinhold Barclay (General List, formerly Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas Barclay Kt.
  • Captain Norman Langley Buckham (Royal Army Ordnance Corps) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Thomas Buckham.
  • Dentist and Lieutenant Jack Lindsay Doubleday (Australian Dental Corps) a former Australian rules footballer who played 43 games scoring 21 goals for University and Melbourne dies of influenza at sea en route to the front at age 28.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Arthur Hamilton Sharp (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. His father was killed in August 1916 and he is the grandson of the Reverend J P Sharp.
  • Second Lieutenant Augustus Paget DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed in action in Italy at age 20. He was a three-time victor over enemy aircraft, brought down one enemy kite balloon and sent one machine down out of control before his death.  Two of his four brothers have been previously killed in the Great War.
  • Sapper Walter Henry Nudds (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 20. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Writer 1st Class Herbert Francis Prior (HMS Pembroke, Royal Navy) becomes the last of six brothers to die in the service of their country when he dies at Chatham. Four of his brothers were killed in the Great War while the eldest was accidentally killed in 1912 while serving on HMS King Edward VII.
  • Private Arthur Edward Lewis (Canadian Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at age 46. He is the son of the Very Reverend Evan Lewis the Dean of Bangor.
  • Private Daniel Munn (Highland Light Infantry) dies of wounds in Baghdad at age 34. He is the last of five brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Stephen Alfred Twyman (Labour Corps) is killed at age 38. His son will be killed in October 1940.

Monday 28 October 1918 We Lost 1,255

Captain Robert North Chandler (Royal Air Force) attacks enemy troops with great success and silences an anti-tank gun.  Later he silences two enemy machine guns and inflicts heavy casualties on infantry in shell holes. While so engaged his machine is hit in the engine and he forced to land.  Prior this officer has destroyed three enemy aircraft and driven two others down out of control.  He has also displayed marked courage in attacking enemy troops on the ground.  When on an offensive patrol, Second Lieutenant Sydney MacGillvary Brown (Royal Air Force) in company with three other machines, attacks nine Fokkers; three of the latter being destroyed. Lieutenant Frederick Stanley Gordon (Royal Air Force) achieves two victories, his seventh and eighth, when he shoots down two enemy Fokker D.VII in the area of Wortegem.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the novelist Reverend Joseph Hocking
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Edward Cuthbert Hocking (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the novelist the Reverend Joseph Hocking.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Eustace Blomfield (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 34 in Italy. He is the son of the Reverend John Blomfield and was the foreign language master on HMS Conway before he joined the Army in 1914.
  • Lieutenant Peter Hopcraft (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed on Queen Mary at Jutland.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Stark Douglas (Black Watch) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Andrew Douglas United Free Church Invergordon Ross-shire.
  • Corporal Tudor Ceitho Worthington (South Wales Borderers) is killed. He is the son of David Worthington Vicar of Llangeitho.
  • Driver Robert Wooden (Canadian Field Artillery attached Tank Corps) is accidentally killed driving a tank in England at age 22. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak after serving in the forces.
  • Private John Edward Taylor (Worcestershire Regiment) dies as a prisoner of war at age 28. His brother was killed in action last month.
  • Private Dennis Lavender (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in Baghdad. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Bombardier John Alfred Olivry (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private George Kennington (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the last of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Trooper Harold Denham (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in March 1915.
  • Private Herbert Turley Haywood (Army Service Corps) dies of pneumonia at age 28. He is one of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.

Sunday 27 October 1918 We Lost 1,422

Keith MacDonald Scobie

The decisive assault of the Allied armies across the Piave begins.  At 06:45 the 12th Durham Light Infantry begins the advance onto the Green Dotted Line.  Very deep swift water is found in the most northerly area of the Piave and while wading this, the battalion suffers heavily from machine gun fire, the leading company losing nearly half its strength.  The Companies reorganize and press forward only to be held up by uncut wire close to the objective, which is strongly held.  The wire is cut most gallantly by various parties.  The battalion presses on, and C Company captures the first objective Blue Dotted Line, (the road from C Padovan to C Benedetti).  Here orders are received that as the Italians on the left of the brigade have failed to cross the Piave, no further advance is to be made. The battalion suffers 29 officers and men killed, 114 wounded and eleven missing.

During the morning, Major William George Barker (Royal Air Force) observes an enemy two-seater over the Foret de Mormal.  He attacks this machine and after a short burst it breaks up in the air.  At the same time a Fokker biplane attacks him, and he is wounded in the right thigh, but manages, despite this, to shoot down the enemy airplane in flames.  He then finds himself in the middle of a large formation of Fokkers who attack him from all directions, and he is again severely wounded in the left thigh, but he succeeds in driving down two of the enemy in a spin.  He loses consciousness then, and his machine falls out of control.  On recovery he finds himself being again attacked heavily by a large formation and singling out one machine he deliberately charges and drives it down in flames. During this fight his left elbow is shattered and he again faints, and on regaining consciousness he finds himself still being attacked, but notwithstanding that he is now severely wounded in both legs and his left arm shattered he dives on the nearest machine and shoots it down in flames.  Being greatly exhausted, he dives out of the fight to regain our lines, but is met by another formation, which attacks and endeavors to cut him off, but after a hard fight he succeeds in breaking up this formation and reaches our lines, where he crash-lands.  This combat, in which Major Barker destroys four enemy machines (three of them in flames), brings his total successes to fifty enemy machines destroyed, and is a notable example of the exceptional bravery and disregard of danger which this very gallant officer has always displayed throughout his distinguished career.  For this action he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Earl Frederick Crabb (Royal Air Force) having crashed an enemy machine, then goes to the assistance of one of our own that is being attacked, and materially helps to shoot the enemy down.  In addition to the above he has accounted for three other machines and assisted in crashing a fourth.

Second Lieutenant Keith MacDonald Scobie (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 21.  His brother was killed in action in July 1916 and he is a Great War Poet.

Lunae

Have you ridden alone in the country ever

By the dusty light of the harvest-moon?

Cycled intent in a vain endeavor

To match your speed to your soul’s quick tune

When there’s never a sound to break the magic;

For the tyres; crisp whir on the powdered road

And the hoot of an oul in the distance, tragic,

Are pricking your heart with a fairy goad?

Then the hawthorn hedges, sweet dissembling,

Stealthily close on your path, till fear

Of their dense bulk looms; and your heartsick trembling

Shakes into stillness as you swing clear.

Then the high haw-hedges furious will bide,

Drawing back from the light of the moon:

But the black trees haste down the silver hillside.

You know in your hear that you laughed too soon.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War Poet
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a Field Marshall
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A former police constable
  • A man whose wife is widowed a second time by the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Ashton Alexander St Hill DSO (commanding 11th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in Italy at age 44.
  • Major James Boswell Egerton (Indian Cavalry) is killed in action at age 38 in Mesopotamia. He served in the Somali Expedition and on the North West Frontier of India and is the son of the late Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Charles Egerton who also lost a son in April of this year.
  • Captain George Pomeroy Sterling DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action in Italy at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Sterling of the CMS Gaza Palestine.
  • Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Guy Wilbraham Wareing DFC (Royal Flying Corps) a seven-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lukyns Williams (Indian Cavalry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private Percival Henry Onyett (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25 in Italy. His brother died of wounds in Eygpt in November 1917.
  • Gunner Alfred James Hyder (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of influenza at age 29. He is a former police constable.
  • Private William Hall (Newfoundland Regiment) dies on service. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Bryen Sidney Smither (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Italy at age 20. His widow was widowed in March 1915 when her then husband was killed.
  • Private John Morris (Devonshire Regiment) dies on service after a serious operation. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman James J Toole (HMS Lion) dies of pneumonia at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Driver Alf Rayner (Royal Field Artillery) becomes the third brother to be killed in successive Octobers.

Friday 25 October 1918 We Lost 1,614

Oliver Walter Sichel

East of Maing, France the 1st/6th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders face an enemy counter attack that turns their left flank. As the enemy continues to advance and his company’s ammunition is exhausted Lieutenant William Davidson Bissett mounts a railway embankment under heavy fire and calls for a bayonet charge which drives the enemy back with heavy loss. After another charge his establishes his line saving a critical situation. For his actions Lieutenant Bissett will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Regimental Commander in the Royal Engineers
  • The brother of the composer Patrick Hadley who lost a let in the Great War
  • The son of a member of Parliament
  • The grandson of a member of Parliament
  • A man whose father will fund the Oliver Schel Award for singing at Harrow
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who will lose two half-brothers in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Military Chaplain
  • The son of the Headmaster at Uppingham School
  • The husband of the Headmistress of a Catholic School in Glasgow who will miscarry twins upon receiving the news of his loss

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Colonel Arthur Houssemayne Du Boulay DSO (commanding Royal Engineers) dies of influenza at Fillevres. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Captain Peyton Sheldon Hadley (Northamptonshire Regiment) dies at age 23 of influenza having been seriously wounded and invalided home. His younger brother is the composer Patrick Hadley who will also be wounded in the closing weeks of the war, losing a leg, but surviving.
  • Captain Oliver Walter Sichel (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at Vendegies at age 26. His brother was killed in February 1915. His father will fund the Oliver Sichel Prize for singing at Harrow after his death. They are grandsons of John Holms MP for Hackney.
  • Lieutenant Thistle Robinson MC (Royal Fusiliers) the son of ‘Sir’ Richard and Lady Jeanie Robinson is killed in action at age 26.
  • Lieutenant George Vinvent Carus Selwyn (Royal Field Artillery) dies of pneumonia at age 21. He is son of the Reverend Edward Carus Selwyn DD Headmaster of Uppingham School and has two half-brothers who have been killed previously in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant Ross Martin (Tank Corps) dies of wounds at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend D J Martin.
  • Temporary Paymaster Sub Lieutenant William Percy Brace (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) dies of pneumonia at age 26. He is the son of the Right Honorable William Brace MP.
  • Second Lieutenant John Wyatt (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 26. His brother died on service five weeks ago.
  • Chaplain Basil Jones (attached Royal Garrison Artillery) dies on service at age 32.
  • Sergeant Thomas Kirk Dennis (Leicestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 32. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Sergeant James W Watt (Black Watch) is killed at age 31 by a sniper. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Private Bernard Burns (Highland Light Infantry) is killed in action in Mesopotamia at age 35. He is the husband of the headmistress of a Catholic School in Glasgow.  His wife has a miscarriage of their twins when she receives the new that he is “missing, presumed dead”.
  • Private Harry Richard Foulger (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in November 1914.
  • Private Arthur Perry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Nelson Charles Burton (Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds at 47th Casualty Clearing Station at age 27. His younger brother was killed on Gallipoli in December 1915.
  • Private Frank Leslie Parker (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed last October.
  • Private Alfred Andrew (East Kent Regiment) is killed near St Souplet at age 18. His two older brothers were killed earlier in the war.
  • Private Charles D Roberts (Northumberland Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He is the son of the late Reverend T N Roberts.
  • Private Fred Pickford (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23 received two days before. His brother was killed less than three weeks before.

Monday 14 October 1918 We Lost 1,754

James McPhie VC

Second Lieutenant James Herbert Grahame (Royal Air Force) when bombing Herseaux aerodrome, obtains two direct hits on a hangar, completely demolishing it. Four members of 29 Royal Air Force engage a large number of enemy scouts shooting down five, Lieutenant Henry Coyle Rath accounting for two of the victories.  For this action he will be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, though he will be killed in a flying accident less than two weeks after this action.

Major General Louis James Lipsett CMG General Officer Commanding 4th Division is killed in action at age 44.  He becomes the last British General to be killed in the Great War when he is mortally wounded in the front of his own line, while engaged in a reconnaissance.

At the Canal de la Sensée near Aubencheul-au-Bac, Nord, France, Corporal James McPhie VC (Royal Engineers) is with a party of sappers maintaining a cork float bridge, which when our infantry starts to cross it just before dawn begins to break away and sink. Corporal McPhie jumps into the water and tries to hold the cork and timbers together but this proves impossible so he swims back and collects the materials for repair. Although it is daylight and the bridge is under close fire he then leads the way to the bridge, axe in hand. He is severely wounded and dies almost at once. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • The last General killed in the Great War
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commandree
  • Aces
    • 15-victory
    • 8-victory
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The elder brother of anthropologist, social scientist and linguist Gregory Bateson

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Claude Swanwick Worthington DSO (Manchester Regiment commanding 5th Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 41.
  • Captain John Edmund Greene DFC (Royal Air Force) a 15-victory ace killed at age 24. He is Canada’s first ace and was shot down 10 days before being fatally shot down today.
  • Captain Humphrey French Flowers (Royal Air Force) is shot down and killed over Ledeghem at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend John French Flowers Vicar of Gt Carlton and his brother was killed last April.
  • Captain Edward Aubrey Persse (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 37. His younger brother has been killed in June of this year.
  • Captain Sacheverel Darwin Wilmot (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of influenza in Karachi Military Hospital at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Darwin Wilmot.
  • Captain Denman Lambert Henry Baynes MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at Ypres at age 32. He is the son of Admiral Henry Compton Baynes.
  • Captain William Sandilands Brown (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Very Reverend Dr Brown.
  • Lieutenant John Bateson (Royal Field Artillery) MC is killed at age 20. He is considered a naturalist of exceptional promise.  He is the elder brother of the anthropologist, social scientist and linguist Gregory Bateson.
  • Lieutenant Claude Melnot Wilson DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 20. He is an 8-victory ace.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Noel Buchanan (Royal Air Force) dies of pneumonia while on leave at home at age 33. He is the son of the Honorable ‘Sir’ John and Lady Buchanan and had served in Mesopotamia from 1914 to 1915, where he was a prisoner of war.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Aubrey Hastings Lloyd (Royal Air Force) received four days earlier at age 18. His brother was killed in April.
  • Private T H Dorsett (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. His brother died in October 1915.
  • Private Charles James W Martin (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 22. His older brother was wounded in October 1914 and will die from the effects of those wounds in June 1920.
  • Private Joseph Booth Hodgkin (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in October 1916.

Sunday 13 October 1918 We Lost 1,387

Claude Handley Trotter

Second Lieutenant Joseph William Gould (York and Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 31.  His brother was killed in September 1915. The following Privates of the York and Lancashire Regiment are killed on this day having also lost their brothers earlier in the Great War.

  • Thomas Daltry is killed at age 23. His seventeen-year old brother was killed last August.
  • R J Cranfield is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Frederick Bennett is also killed at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1917.

Lieutenant Claude Handley Trotter (Alberta Dragoons attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed while flying at night in Essex at age 23.  He is the son of the Reverend Canon John Crawford Trotter.  He was previously recommended for the Albert Medal for attempting to save his pilot’s life in an earlier crash.

Flight Sergeant Albert Edgar Warne AM (Royal Air Force) dies on service at home. He was awarded the Albert Medal for attempting to save life of a pilot who crashed in January of this year.

Today’s losses include:

  • An Albert Medal winner
  • A man recommended for the Albert Medal
  • A General
  • A man whose son will be born after his death and then killed in November 1944
  • A woman whose brother was killed in September 1915

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Colin Lawrence MacNab CMG dies of illness contracted on service at home at age 47.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Robert Robinson (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Robinson.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Gillon Christophers (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the last of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Sergeant Hugh G Matheson DCM MM (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Private Robert Miller (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. His brother died as a result of an accident at home in May 1916.
  • Private Edward John Poole (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 18. His older brother was killed at the third battle of Ypres in 1917.
  • Gunner Henry Davies (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William Alexander Fotheringham (Black Watch) is killed. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Edward Parker Wilkinson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Parker Wilkinson Rector of Longparish.
  • Private John Joseph Hobart (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action. His son and namesake who is born after his death will be killed in November 1944.
  • Member Edith Mary Tonkin (Volunteer Aid Detachment) dies on service at age 26. Her brother was killed in September 1915.

Thursday 10 October 1918 We Lost 1,657

Royal Mail Ship S S Leinster (Captain William Birch) operated by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, serving as the Dublin-Holyhead mail-boat is torpedoed by the U-boat UB-123.  Having departed the Dublin ferry port at Kingstown (now re-named Dun Laoghaire) she is sunk just outside Dublin Bay at a point four miles east of the Kish light.  When she goes down 501 people perished — the greatest single loss of life at sea in the Irish Sea.  Despite many previous requests for a naval escort the Admiralty relied on the Leinster’s speed as her only protection from U-boat attack. She had been unsuccessfully attacked before but the torpedoes missed their target.

On her final morning she carries a crew of 77 and 694 passengers, of whom 500 are soldiers.  Initially UB-123 fires two torpedoes; one misses, passing harmlessly across the ship’s bow, but the other strikes the Leinster mid-ship forward of the bridge.  The ship begins to settle very slowly bow down in the water. In response to her distress call the British destroyers HMS Lively and HMS Mallard go to her assistance.  It is believed that at this stage she could have been saved by being towed back into Dublin or Dun Laoghaire harbour but the captain of the submarine decides to administer the coup de grace and finish her off with a third torpedo.  This he does as the Leinster continues taking on water and is disembarking her passengers into the lifeboats in rough seas. One hundred seventy-six of the 757 people on board are lost, including

  • Captain Birch who has been wounded in the initial attack and drowns when the lifeboat he is in swamps in heavy seas and capsizes while trying to transfer survivors to HMS Mallard. Others killed include
  • Lieutenant Commander George Richard Colin Campbell (Royal Navy Compass Department) age 34 the superintendent of the Magnetic Compass Department and inventor of the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass who is travelling with his wife and 4½ year old daughter. All are lost. He is the son of the Reverend Edward F Campbell.
  • Clerk shorthand typist Josephine Carr (Women’s Royal Naval Service) killed at age 19 after being in the service less than 30 days. She is the first WREN killed on active service.
  • Able Seaman David White (HMS Pembroke) is lost at age 41. His wife is pregnant and will name their son George Paul Leinster White.
  • Lieutenant Anchitel Edward Fletcher Boughey (Rifle Brigade) drowns at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Anchitel Harry Fletcher Boughey (Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge).
  • Captain Harold Locke (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the son of Frederick Locke DL JP.
  • Captain Robert Ernest Lee (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in action on Gallipoli in August 1915 and they are sons of the late Edward Lee JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Gilbert Hayward Aldworth (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Ernest Aldworth Vicar of Laverstock.
  • J Shaw-Jones dies of injuries received in the sinking. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and rejoined the army at the outbreak of the Great War and was wounded twice and invalided out. He then worked in the Factory Audit Department of the Ministry of Munitions and was returning from a business trip.
  • Corporal Samuel Eddy (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in action earlier this year.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The co-inventor or the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass with his wife and young son
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The first WREN (Women’s Royal Navy Service) member killed in action
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A twice wounded discharge veteran currently working in the Department of Ministry of Munitions
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Member of Parliament

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel George Ernest Beaty-Pownall DSO (Border Regiment commanding 1st King’s Own Scottish Borderers) dies of wounds at age 41. His brother has been killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Philip Edward Kelly (Royal Irish Fusiliers commanding 9th (North Irish Horse) Royal Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Bissett DSO MC (commanding 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 28.
  • Major Leonard Coulthard Hill MC (Royal Field Artillery attached Fourth Army Artillery School) is accidentally killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Percival Oakley Hill.
  • Captain Kenneth Sutherland Rudd (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Prebendary Eric John Sutherland Rudd Rector of Souldern.
  • Captain George Goldon Dilliway (Army Service attached Camel Transport Corps) is killed in Palestine at age 28. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Captain Robert Chaworth-Musters MC (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies at home. His two brothers have previously been killed in action in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John Hackett (HMS Nimrod) dies of illness at home. He is the son of the Reverend John Hackett Rector of Orlingbury.
  • Lieutenant Richard Henry Hocken (Canadian Light Horse Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of H C Hocken MP.
  • Lieutenant John Carruth (Dublin Fusiliers attached Irish Rifles) dies of wounds. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor James French (Irish Guards) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Somerset French KCMG.
  • Driver George Lawrence (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of pneumonia at age 20. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Private Frederick William Knight (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Maurice Rudolph Hannam (Royal Air Force) dies on service in Canada at age 18. His brother was killed in November 1916 and the boys came from Brooklyn New York.
  • Private James Samuel Griffiths (Manchester Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Herbert Bennett (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 33. One brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in August 1917 while a second died of wounds at home in September 1916.

Friday 4 October 1918 We Lost 1,206

Lieutenant Robert Allan Caldwell (Royal Air Force) destroys an enemy balloon in flames north of Bohain at 5,000 feet in spite of very heavy anti-aircraft fire. On the way home he descends to 50 to 100 feet and creates great confusion and does much damage to the enemy infantry, transport and artillery marching westwards to counter-attack, returning with his machine again much shot about.  While flying on a low bombing raid Lieutenant Wilfred James Jenner (Royal Air Force) is shot through both legs.  Although suffering great pain, he continues his flight and drops his bombs on the objective before returning to his aerodrome.

Lieutenant Horace George Eldon (Royal Air Force) achieves his final victory as an observer while flying with Lieutenant I G Fleming when they shoot down a Fokker V II southeast of Lille.  Lieutenant Gerald Anderson and Second Lieutenant Thomas Sydney Chiltern (Royal Air Force) also bring down their last victim when they shoot down a Fokker D VII at Quesnoy.

An attack is carried out by 23 Camels of 28 and 66 Squadrons at the training school of the Austrian Air Force at Campoformido with phosphorus and high explosive bombs causing a great deal of damage.  Some aircraft of the school which come up to attack the formation are also shot down.  Two of 28’s Camels are shot down and the pilots killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • A Baronet
  • A Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A Military Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A Scottish Rugby International8
  • The 1914 Australasian Tennis Open Champion
  • RAF Aces
    • An 8-victory ace
    • A 6-victory ace

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Sir William Algernon Ireland Kay (commanded 3rd Infantry Brigade) CMG DSO, 6th Baronet, is killed in action at age 42. He and his Brigade Major, Captain William Fulton Somervail DSO MC are killed instantly by a gas shell near St Quentin while reconnoitering new areas.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Hills Nicholson DSO (commanding 3rd Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 38.
  • Major Arthur Holroyd O’Hara Wood (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 28 when his Camel collides with that of Second Lieutenant Lorn Lamond Saunders while on a patrol over Saint-Quentin. He is the 1914 Australasian Tennis Open Champion and he scored the first victory for 4th Australian Flying Corp on 24th January 1918. Lieutenant Saundres is also killed.
  • Captain Gerald Montague Hedley (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds. He is the son of the Reverend William Hedley Vicar of Felkirk.
  • Captain and Quartermaster W T Humphreys (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of Frederick Humphreys JP.
  • Lieutenant Charles Penruddocke (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed on Salonika in April 1917.
  • Lieutenant John Weston Warner DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed in action when his Sopwith Camel is shot down over Busigny. The 19-year old is an eight-victory ace.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Riddell Sutherland (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed by a stray shell on his 28th birthday. He was a Scottish rugby union footballer who gained 13 caps between 1910 and 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Percival Henry Manley MC (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Augustus Manley Vicar of St Dunstan’s Canterbury.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Guy Spencer Bryan-Brown (New Zealand Chaplains Department) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Willoughby Bryan-Brown of St Stephen’s Eastbourne.
  • Sergeant Louis McGuffie VC (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed by a shell. In December he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for actions performed near Wytschaete on 28th September.
  • Sergeant William James Middleton DFM a six-victory ace (Royal Air Force) dies of wounds received in action.
  • Gunner John Kenneth Groves (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private John Miller (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of malaria in Mesopotamia at age 32. His brother died of wounds in August 1917.
  • Private Claude Ogle (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 20. His brother will be killed next April.
  • Private William Kennedy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in March 1916.

Tuesday 17 September 1918 We Lost 657

Oswald Massey Samson

Today’s losses include:

  • A First Class cricketer for Somerset
  • A Great Britain International footballer
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A man whose brother was killed in April 1917
  • A man whose uncle was lost in January 1917

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Charles Young Adamson (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in Greece at age 43. He played four football matches for Great Britain on their Australian tour in 1899, but never for England, his home country.
  • Lieutenant Oswald Massey Samson (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 37. He is first class cricketer for Somerset from 1900 to 1013.
  • Lieutenant Harold Toulmin MC (Loyal North Lancashire Regiment attached Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 21 when his Sopwith Camel is shot down west of Bourlon Wood. He has previously served at Gallipoli and at Mesopotamia and lost a leg at the latter place and transferred to the Royal Flying Corps.
  • Second Liuetennt Richard Frank Hill MC (Royal Air Force) dies of appendicitis at age 19. He is a 7-victory ace.
  • Private Percy Sidney Doubleday (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Andrew Hill Rule MM (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed in action. His uncle was lost in the sinking of the troopship Ivernia in January 1917.

Thursday 25 July 1918 We Lost 545

Richard Charles Travis VC

Colonel Ralph Harold Austin-Sparks (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed when his Bristol F2 spins into the ground at Lilbourne.  He had been wounded in July 1915 while flying over Ypres and has been Colonel in Command of the Royal Air Force (Midland Area) for a month prior to his death.  He is a member of the Thames Rowing Club, Belsize Boxing Club and the London Scottish Rugby Football Club.

Sergeant Richard Charles Travis VC DCM MM (Otago Regiment) known as the “Prince of Scouts” and “King of No Man’s Land” is killed one day after performing acts that will win him a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A member of the Thames Rowing, Belsize Boxing and London Scottish Football Rugby Clubs
  • A family that will lose five sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two son in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant John Lee Abbiss (East Surrey Regiment attached Motor Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action in Mesopotamia at age 21. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Galloway Cordiner (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Martin Durrant (Cape Corps, South African Forces) is accidentally killed by the premature explosion of a shell in Mozambique. He is the son of the Reverend Charles A Durrant, late vicar of Wetherly.
  • Driver William Cranston (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 34 becoming the last of five brothers who have lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Michael Ernest Wileman (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed in May last year.