Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Royal Naval Reserve

Monday 13 May 1918 We Lost 399

HMT Balfour

The armed trawler HMT Balfour is escorting the Lancs & Yorks Railway owned steamer Nidd to Dieppe. At 21:45 the master of the Nidd suddenly feels a large shock from beneath and immediately wonders what he has hit. A few minutes later a lookout shouts “submarine astern about 400 yards”.  It is obvious that the submarine has been forced to surface by the collision with Nidd’s keel.  The Captain orders the engine to full ahead and passes word to the gunners to fire at will. Their firsts shot appear to hit the submarine. On the Balfour the Captain puts his ship hard to starboard to enable an attack on the submarine. Men rush to their quarters, guns are manned and depth charges brought to the ready.  In fact so much attention is paid to the submarine that no thought is given to where the steamer Nidd is.  By the time a member of the Nidd’s crew first notices the approaching Balfour there is not enough time to take evasive action.  A moment later the Nidd’s bows are embedded in the port side of the Balfour and she is pushed through the water by Nidd. The steamer recoils but her master puts the engines ahead to plug the hole and allow the men of the Balfour to climb about the Nidd.  The Balfour sinks quickly with no loss of life.

H M Trawler Loch Naver (Skipper Edmund Artis Butler, Royal Naval Reserve) is sunk by a mine near Mandili Point in the Aegean Sea.  Her skipper is killed at age 45.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Count
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Gerald Robert Spencer (Royal Defence Corps) dies in England at age 63. He is the son of the Honorable Robert and Lady Spencer.  He retired twenty years prior but rejoined at the outbreak of the war.
  • Lieutenant Louis Paul Bryant D’Etchegoyen (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 21. His is the son of Count Paul D’Etchegoyen of Mayenne, France.
  • Private Alexander Redford McIntosh (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) dies of wounds received in action at age 31. His brother will die of influenza in 1919.
  • Private Eldred Waite (Labour Corps) dies of wounds at age 37. His younger brother was killed in November 1914.

Tuesday 23 April 1918 We Lost 2,461

At Zeebrugge, Sergeant Norman Augustus Finch (Royal Marine Artillery) is second in command of the pom-poms and Lewis gun in the foretop of HMS Vindictive.  At one period Vindictive is being hit every few seconds, but Sergeant Finch and the officer in command keep up a continuous fire, until two heavy shells make direct hits on the foretop killing or disabling everyone except Sergeant Finch who is, however, severely wounded.  Nevertheless he remains in his battered and exposed position, harassing the enemy on the Mole until the foretop receives another direct hit, putting the remainder of the armament completely out of action.  Captain Edward Bamford (Royal Marines) lands on the Mole from HMS Vindictive with three platoons of the Royal Marines storming force in the face of great difficulties.  When on the Mole and under heavy fire, he commands his company with total disregard of personal danger and shows a magnificent example to his men.  He first establishes a strong point on the right of the disembarkation and when satisfied that it is safe, leads an assault on a battery to the left.  Both men will be awarded the Victoria Cross for their efforts on this day.

Lieutenant Commander Arthur Leyland Harrison VC (HMS Lion, serving HMS Vindictive, Royal Navy) is killed while in the immediate command of the Naval Storming Parties embarked in HMS Vindictive.  Immediately before coming alongside the Mole Lieutenant Commander Harrison is struck on the head by a fragment of a shell which breaks his jaw and knocks him senseless.  Recovering consciousness he proceeds on the Mole and takes over command of his party, who are attacking the seaward end of the Mole.  Though in a position fully exposed to the enemy’s machine gun he gathers his men together and leads them to the attack.  His is killed at the head of his men all of whom are either killed or wounded.  For his actions he is awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously. He had been a member of the England Rugby Football Team in 1914 and dies at the age of 32.

Lieutenant Commander George Nicholson Bradford (Royal Navy) becomes the third brother in his family to be killed in action. He is in command of the naval storming parties embarked on HMS Iris II and they find there is great difficulty in placing the parapet anchors when the ship comes along the Mole.  Although securing the ship is not part of his duties he climbs a derrick which is projecting out over the Mole and under heavy fire with the derrick crashing against the Mole because of the violent tossing of the ship he picks a moment and jumps with the anchor.  Just as he places it in position he is killed at age 30. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross; the second won by his family, his brother Roland Boys Bradford who was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1916 was killed in action last November.

  • Major Charles Edward Campbell Eagles DSO (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at Zeebrugge at age 34. He is the only son of the Reverend Canon C F Eagles Vicar of Coughton and a nephew of General Eagles.
  • Captain Henry Crosby Halahan DSO (Royal Navy) is killed on HMS Vindictive at age 34. His brother was lost in the Baltic in submarine E18 in June 1916.
  • Lieutenant Charles Theodore Paynter (HMS North Star) is killed at age 22 when his ship gets lost in the smoke during the Zeebrugge raid and is sunk by shore batteries. He is the son of Canon Francis Samuel Paynter Rector of Springfield.
  • Lieutenant George Spencer DSC (HMS Iris, Royal Naval Reserve) dies of wounds received at Zeebrugge. He is the son of the late Reverend A Eagles, the vicar of Accrington and was an officer of the White Star Line when war broke out and he immediately transferred to the Royal Naval Reserve.
  • Wing Commander Frank Arthur Brock OBE (Royal Navy) is killed on the Mole at Zeebrugge. He was the inventor of the Brock anti-Zeppelin bullet, color filter, Dover flare, and the smoke apparatus used to cover the ships in the raid.
  • Able Seaman Frederick William Bowlt (HMS Vindictive) is killed at age 19. His brother died on service in September 1915.
  • Private Frederick Thomas Swan (Royal Marines Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed last July.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • A member of the England Rugby football team in 1914
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The nephew of a General
  • The Inventor of the Brock Anti-Zeppelin bullet, color filter, Dover flare and smoke laying apparatus
  • An 8-victory ace
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace and stepson of a General
  • A medical student
  • A son of the 8th Duke of Grafton
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Edric C O Ross (Merwara Infantry) dies of wounds received in action in the Middle East at age 36. He is the son the late Reverend George Gould Ross, the Rector of Michaelstow, St Teath, Cornwall.
  • Captain Kenneth William Junor MC (Canadian Machine Gun Corps) an 8-victory ace is killed at age 24.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Lancelot Usher (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Usher Rector of Fovant.
  • Lieutenant James Cairnes (Army Service Corps) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles John Dawson-Greene (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds received in action at age 20. He is the son of Henry Dawson-Greene JP and stepson of Brigadier General Cecil Monck.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald Mitchell Woodside (Highland Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 20. He was a medical student at Glasgow University, a son of the Reverend David Woodside DD and had two brothers killed in 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘Viscount Ipswich’ William Henry Alfred Fitzroy (Coldstream Guards attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed in Wiltshire at age 33. He is a son of the 8th Duke of Grafton.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Leslie Symons (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 19. His only brother will die on service in February 1919.
  • Corporal Ivan Cecil Whtielaw MM (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the third of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Frederick James Whitehead (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be gassed to death in October of this year.
  • Private John Shields (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Private Alexander Plummer (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 30. His two brothers were killed in 1916.
  • Gunner D G Gilbert (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in August 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Private Frederick Charles Metcalfe (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action. His son will be lose his life in the Second World War.

Saturday 20 April 1918 We Lost 823

Reginald Harry Myburgh Hands

Major Richard Raymond Barker MC (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 23 near Bois de Hamel when his Sopwith Camel is shot down by Manfred von Richthofen.  He is the Red Baron’s 79th victim and his body will never be found.  He is a 6-victory ace.

Skipper George Hillam (HM Trawler Numitor, Royal Naval Reserve) is killed when his ship is sunk by a mine off Orfordness at age 52.  His son had been killed in April 1915 while service in HMS Cornwallis at age 16.

Today’s losses include:

  • A 6-victory ace killed by the Red Baron
  • A man whose 16 year old son was killed in 1915 on HMS Cornwallis
  • A Rhodes Scholar
  • A Rugby International
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose twin was killed five days earlier
  • A family that will lose five sons in the Great War
  • A footballer who played with three different clubs

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Reginald Harry Myburgh Hands (South African Heavy Artillery attached Royal Garrison Artillery) a Rhodes Scholar and international rugby football player dies of wounds at age 29. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Hands KBE.
  • Captain Eric Tatton (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend D Tatton.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Alington Royds (General List attached Royal Air Force is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Nathaniel Royds Rector of Little Barford.
  • Corporal Eustace Godfrey Kenny (Australian Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Robet Kenny York Peninsula Mission South Australian.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Sydney Flatt (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Private Archibald Buchanan McMillan (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action at age 25. He was a football player of class repute having played outside left with Croy Celtic, Rob Roy Celtic and Ayr United.
  • Private Alfred Souls (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 31, five days before his twin brother will meet the same fate. Three others brothers are also killed in the Great War.
  • Private Joseph Allen (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed last month.

Thursday 4 April 1918 We Lost 1,098

The destroyer HMS Bittern (Lieutenant Ernest K Loring RNR) is sunk after a collision in the fog off Portland Bill with the SS Kenilworth. Seventy-five members of the crew are killed.

Brigadier General George Norman Bowes Forster CMG DSO General Officer Commanding 42nd Brigade 14th Division is killed in action at age 45.

Lieutenant Colonel Percy Archer Clive DSO (Grenadier Guards commanding 1st/5th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 35. He is the son of Lady Catherine Clive and the Member of Parliament for South Herefordshire except for 2 years since 1900. His eldest son Major Meysey George Dallas Clive will be killed serving in the Grenadier Guards on 1st May 1943. Another son Lewis Clive will win a rowing gold medal in the 1932 Olympics and was a member of the International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War being killed in action in 1938.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Member or Parliament who will have one son killed in the Second World War and another who will win an Olympic Gold Medal in 1932 be killed as a member of the International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War
  • A General
  • The son of a General
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the cleryg
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • The winner of the 1913 Public Schools Middleweight Boxing Competition
  • The son of the 1st Baron Avebury and the father of the 3rd

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Robert Edward Dewing DSO (Royal Engineers commanding 8th Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Richard Stanley Dewing Vicar of Badwell Ash.
  • Captain Ivan Clarkson MacLean DSO MC (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 36. He is the son of Major General H I MacLean and has a brother who will be killed in action in five days with the Royal Engineers.
  • Captain William Arthur Crebbin (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 23. He was the winner of the Public Schools Middleweight Boxing Competition in 1913.
  • Lieutenant James Mudie Couper (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Harold Fox Pitt Lubbock (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of the 1st Baron and father of the 3rd Baron Avebury. His younger brother was killed in action in March 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Harold Sowerby Ruston (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son-in-law of the late Reverend Frederick Charles Marshall, the former rector of Doddington and grandson of the Reverend Michael Augustus Gathercole vicar of Chatteris.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor Walker (Gloucestershire Regiment attached Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He is one of six brothers who served, three of which fell. Second Lieutenant Frederick George Norris (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20.  He was an exhibitioner Elect of Jesus College, Oxford. Second Lieutenant Lewis Charles Bagot Chester (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend John Greville Chester Vicar of Gilling who lost another son in October 1914.
  • Lance Corporal Sidney George Crane (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Bert Miller (Essex Regiment) is killed in action one day before his brother meets the same fate.
  • Private John Wightman (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 23. His brother Major James Wightman (East Surrey Regiment) is mortally wounded the same day and will die in five days.
  • Private Shepley Vickers Smith (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry attached the Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 20. His brother also fell.
  • Private Fred Joseph Budgett MM (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will die on service in May 1919.
  • Private Thomas Barlow (Suffolk Regiment) is killed. He has two brothers who will also be killed in the Great War and another brother who will die as a result of his service in 1919.
  • Private Hugh Grahame Henderson (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 18. His brother will be killed in five days.
  • Private Edward Alton Buckley (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in twelve days.
  • Driver Sidney John Hill (Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last December.
  • Private Ernest Stanley Lewis Eddy (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October of this year.

Saturday 23 March 1918 We Lost 3,302

Tennyson Brothers

The drifter New Dawn (Ash Jeremiah Woolston Royal Naval Reserve age 37) is sunk by a mine at the entrance to Needles Channel.  Her skipper is killed.

West of St Quentin Canal and north of Tergnier Temporary Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Bushell DSO (Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment) personally leads a company of his battalion who are cooperating with an Allied regiment in a counter-attack.  In the course of this attack he is severely wounded in the head but continues to carry on walking in front of both British and Allied troops encouraging them and visiting every portion of the lines in the face of terrific machine-gun and rifle fire.  He refuses to go to the rear and has to be removed to a dressing station in a fainting condition. For his actions Lieutenant Colonel Bushell will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of Alfred ‘Lord’ Tennyson
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Tennyson
  • A descendant of Lt Gen Shrapnel inventor of the shell that carries his name
  • A Great War ‘almost’ Poet
  • A song writer
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man recommended for the Victoria Cross
  • A schoolmaster
  • The son of the Finance Minister of British Columbia
  • The Science Master at Loretto and Abington
  • A Baronet
  • A Victoria Cross
  • A man handed a feather while home recovering from a previous wound and went back to the front before being fully recovered
  • A Norwich City footballer
  • A Margate Thursday footballer
  • A Manchester City Police officer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Ponsonby Sneyd Hunt CMG DSO (Royal Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 40 near Manancourt, while leading his men with great gallantry, and for his courage and work on the two days prior to his death he will be recommended for the Victoria Cross. Lieutenant Colonel Hunt joined the Royal Berkshire Regiment in 1897 and saw service in the South African War, during which time he was Commandant at Wildfontein he received the Queen’s Medal with three clasps, and the King’s Medal with two clasps. He was promoted to the rank of Captain while in Egypt and was then posted to the Depot at Reading. He afterwards returned to his battalion in India and was at Jhansi when mobilization was ordered. He went to France with his battalion in 1914 and was wounded early in 1915. When Colonel Finch was killed at the Battle of Fromelles, he took command of his old battalion and was promoted temporary Major in June 1915. He was with his Battalion in the severe fighting at Bois Grenier, in the Battle of Loos. In December 1915 he was appointed to command a Territorial Infantry Brigade, with the temporary rank of Brigadier General, and was shortly afterwards made a CMG. In 1917 he again took over the command of a Battalion of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, which distinguished itself in the severe fighting towards the end of the year. He was awarded the DSO and was mentioned in Despatches.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alan Francis Field (commanding 13th South Wales Borderers formerly commanding 13th Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 42.
  • Acting Major Harold Brown (commanding 4th Yorkshire Regiment) is killed. He is a schoolmaster.
  • Major John Garnett Tatlow (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the late R G Tatlow Finance Minister of British Columbia.
  • Major Sydney Harold Baker (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 37. He was a Science Master at Loretto and Abingdon.
  • Captain Jacob Kruse Muller Hessler (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. Two months later his older brother will also be killed in action while serving in the same regiment.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Alfred Aubrey Tennyson (Rifle Brigade attached Staff) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in January 1916 and they are sons of the 2nd Baron Tennyson and grandsons of Alfred ‘Lord” Tennyson.
  • Captain Reginald Stafford Saumarez MC (London Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Arthur Saumarez.
  • Captain Victor George Fleetwood Shrapnel (East Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He is a descendant of Lieutenant General Shrapnel the inventor of the shell which bears his name. At seventeen he won an open scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford.
  • Captain Llewelyn Albert Edwards (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Jeremiah John Edwards Vicar of Berrow.
  • Captain Theodore Percival Cameron Wilson (General List and Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 29. He is almost an unknown Great War Poet – ‘His Magpies in Picardy’ and other war verse are published but attracted little or no attention until his work is rescued from the oblivion of many years when Field Marshall Lord Wavell included some of the poet’s verse in his own wartime anthology. He is the son of the Reverend Theodore Cameron Wilson Vicar of Little Eaton. His grandfather is the novelist Thomas Percival Wilson. He once wrote in a letter to his mother “War is indescribably disgusting.” His poetry includes, Song of Amiens, A Soldier, during the Bombardment and Heaven.

MAGPIES IN PICARDY

 

The magpies in Picardy

Are more than I can tell.

They flicker down the dusty roads

And cast a magic spell

On the men who march through Picardy,

Through Picardy to hell.

 

(The blackbird flies with panic,

The swallow goes with light,

The finches move like ladies,

the owl floats by at night;

But the great and flashing magpie

He flies as artists might.)

 

A magpie in Picardy

Told me secret things–

Of the music in white feathers,

And the sunlight that sings

And dances in deep shadows–

He told me with his wings.

 

(The hawk is cruel and rigid,

He watches from a height;

The rook is slow and sombre,

The robin loves to fight;

But the great and flashing magpie

He flies as lovers might.)

 

He told me that in Picardy,

An age ago or more,

While all his feathers still were eggs,

These dusty highways bore

Brown, singing soldiers marching out

Through Picardy to war.

 

He said that still through chaos

Works on the ancient plan,

And two things have altered not

Since first the world began–

The beauty of the wild green earth

And the bravery of man.

 

(For the sparrow flies unthinking

And quarrels in his flight;

The heron trails his legs behind,

The lark goes out of sight;

But the great and flashing magpie

He flies as poets might.)

  • Lieutenant Herbert Matheson (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. He will be remembered for his series of popular songs, written under the nom de guerre of Herbert Mackenzie, his most popular song is The Trail that Leads to Home which he wrote as a companion song to The Long Long Trail.
  • Lieutenant Richard Philip Hearson (Reserve Cavalry attached Lancers) is killed at age 24. His brother will die in September.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Stratford (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend William Thomas Stratford Vicar of Rillington.
  • Lieutenant Richard Conyers Norton (Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the late Edward Norton JP.
  • Lieutenant Cecil Harry Edmunds (London Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in May 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Vincent George Duckett (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed last March and a cousin was killed in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘Sir’ John Watson (Lancers) the 3rd Baronet is killed at age 20.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor Lionel Manning (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. His brother will die of wounds in September.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Frederick Beal (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action by a shell at age 35. He will be posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions the previous day.
  • Sergeant Ernest Thompson (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. His two brothers George and Francis John also fell.
  • Sergeant George McK Mowat (South African Infantry) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Corporal Oscar George Wale (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. His older brother was killed in June 1915 while his younger brother will die on service next year.
  • Corporal Alfred Burr MM (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend G F Burr whose other son was killed in March 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Conrad Alexander Douglas Hawkins (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. While convalescing at home from a previous wound and in civilian clothes he is reportedly handed a white feather. He is so mortified that he returns to his regiment before he is fully fit and is killed shortly thereafter.
  • Lance Corporal William Hornby (Border Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Lance Corporal William Herbert Feetham (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in April last year.
  • Private Simon Dunn (Durham Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 21. His brother was killed in action in June 1915.
  • Private Alexander Kay (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 37. He is a former professional football player with the Norwich City Club.
  • Private Frederick Arthur Holdstock (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Patrick George Proby (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Henry, 25, and Thomas Fleming, 21, are killed serving with the 93rd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps and are buried in adjacent graves in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery.
  • Gunner Albert Mark Giles (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother will die on service in at home in November 1918.
  • Driver Hubert Ernest Dines (Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Air Mechanic 1st Class Edward Bertram Dewhirst (Australian Flying Corps) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in June 1918.
  • Driver Peter Corcoran (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 22. His two brothers will also lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Arthur William Robins (South African Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed last April.
  • Private John Charles Rogers (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is a member of the Margate Thursday Football Club.
  • Private Harry James (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will die at home on service in June.
  • Private Harold Weekes (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in April 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend William Harvie Weekes.
  • Private Joseph Henry Frederick Pratt (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Private Ernest Harrop (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother was killed in January.
  • Private and Manchester City Police Officer John Skarratt (Manchester Regiment) becomes the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Heyworth (Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 32. His son will be killed in the Second World War.
  • Private Thomas Haywood (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 33. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Sunday 10 March 1918 We Lost 394

A German submarine attacks the British hospital ship Guildford Castle in the Bristol Channel at 17:35.  She is carrying four hundred thirty-eight wounded soldiers, is flying a large Red Cross flag and has her navigation lights burning.  Two torpedoes are fired and both are seen by the British ship’s skipper, Captain Thomas Martin Lang, Royal Naval Reserve. The second torpedo strikes the Guildford Castle, after the first misses. The hit is a sharp blow on the port side abreast the mainmast causing her to vibrate considerably fore and aft.  The torpedo does not explode and the Guildford Castle proceeds to port.

For most conspicuous bravery, initiative and absolute disregard of personal safety in Egypt, Private Harold Whitfield (King’s Shropshire Light Infantry) will be awarded the Victoria Cross.  During the first and heaviest of three counterattacks made by the enemy on the position which has just been captured by his battalion, Private Whitfield, single-handedly, charges and captures a Lewis gun which is harassing his company at short range. He bayonets or shoots the whole gun team, and turning the gun on the enemy, drives them back with heavy casualties, thereby restoring the whole situation in his part of the line. Later he organizes and leads a bombing attack on the enemy who have established themselves in an advanced position close to our lines, and from which they are enfilading his company. He drives the enemy back with great loss, and by establishing his party in their position saves many lives and materially assists in the defeat of the counter-attacks.

After a brief artillery barrage at 05:00 a party of over 30 members of the Welsh Guards slip into No Man’s Land at Fampoux, near Arras to carry out a trench raid.  They quickly capture a single prisoner and begin to make their way to the British lines. At this point they are attacked by German troops who have been hiding in a shell hole near their own trenches. The attack is beaten off, but a number of the Guardsmen are wounded and their return slowed down.  An artillery barrage comes from the German positions and a shell lands near the German prisoner and the two Guardsmen bringing him in killing all three.

Chief Petty Officer Henry Ernest Wild (HMS Biaritz) dies of typhoid in Malta at age 38. As a member of Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition he will be awarded a posthumous Albert Medal in 1923 for his efforts to save two members of that expedition who were lost.

Today’s losses include:

  • A member of Shcakleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition
  • An Albert Medal winner
  • The brother of a Baronet
  • The son of another Baronet
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Malcolm Cosmo Bonsor (Yeomanry attached Norfolk Regiment), brother of the Baronet is killed in action at age 39.
  • Captain Hugh Aldersey (Cheshire Yeomanry) son of the Baronet at age 29. His brother was killed on 2nd November 1917.
  • Lieutenant George Ralph Miles MC (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 34. His brother was killed last October. He went to South Africa and took a farm under Lord Milner’s Settlement Scheme. Lieutenant Miles served in Commando against the Rebels, and also served as a machine gunner with the Bechuanaland Mounted Rifles, in German South West Africa. After the conquest of German South West Africa and the consequent disbandment of the forces, he came to England and entered a Cavalry Cadet School, obtaining a Commission in the Dragoon Guards. He went to France in December 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Hugh Francis (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother died of wounds in April 1917.
  • Private Arthur Merryweather (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. His two older brothers have been previously killed during the Great War.
  • Private Eric Arwyn Atkins (Northamptonshire Regiment attached Labour Corps) dies on service at home. He is the son of the Reverend Horace John Atkins Rector of Harrington, Bridgeforth.
  • Private Alfred William Goldsmith (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in less than two weeks.

Friday 1 March 1918 We Lost 294

HMS Calgarian

The armed merchant cruiser HMS Calgarian is torpedoed by the German submarine U19 off Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. The crew manages to isolate the damage but the U boat captain presses home the attack even though the cruiser is surrounded by destroyers and other ships, and torpedoes her again, and she sinks. Forty-nine men are killed including

  • Engineer Sub Lieutenant Hugh Rownley Jarvis (Royal Naval Reserve) who is killed at age 28. He is one of five brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Today’s losses include:

  • A family that will lose five sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant Lawrence Norris Gaskell (General List attached Royal Flying Corps) dies of wounds received from anti-aircraft fire on 27th February at age 19. His had been a scholar of St Paul’s School, Kensington and an Exhibitioner of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.
  • Head chemist Herbert Wallace-Roberts OBE dies in Italy at age 35. He is the Head Chemist at HM Explosives Factory, Queens Ferry, Flintshire and is attached to General Savile’s Mission. He was the son of the Reverend Charles Wallace-Roberts.

Tuesday 26 February 1918 We Lost 400

The hospital ship Glenart Castle (Lieutenant Commander Bernard Burt Royal Naval Reserve retired) is torpedoed by UC-56 at 03:47 en route to Brest to load wounded and sinks in about seven minutes off Lundy Island.  There are only thirty-eight survivors from the 206 on board. Among the dead is her commander who is killed at age 55.

  • Chaplain Frank Harrison Edinger is killed at age 33. He is the former curate of St Mary’s Church Ashford Kent and the son of the Reverend Philip Edinger former Vicar of Mersham.
  • Chaplain lost is the Reverend John Joseph McIlvaine (attached Sherwood Foresters) is lost at age 39.
  • Matron Katy Beaufoy (Queen Alexandria’s Imperial Military Nursing Service) drowns. She is a veteran of the South Africa war and had been on board the hospital ship Dover Castle due to illness when it was torpedoed and sunk by UB-67 in May 1917 off the coast of Bona, Algeria.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Naval Chaplain
  • A Military Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Nursing Matron
  • The grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A #RhodesScholar

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Frederick Raymond Milholland (Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 22. He was the 1916 Jamaican Rhodes Scholar.
  • Flight Lieutenant Geoffrey Moore (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Samuel Storey former MP for Sunderland.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Cecil Doughty (Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed last August.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald William St George Cartwright (General List attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Twiss Prescott (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Peter Precott.
  • Sergeant William Cowper (Highland Light Infantry) dies on service in Glasgow at age 41. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Sergeant Louis Charles Higgins (Hussars attached Supply and Transport) dies on service in India. His two brothers will also lose their lives in the Great War.

Monday 11 February 1918 We Lost 292

The special service ship HMS Cullist (also known as HMS Westphalia) is torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-97 in the Irish Sea. Two Lieutenants killed have been previously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. A total of five officers, twenty seven ratings, two members of the Royal Marine Light Infantry and nine merchant marine reservists are lost in the sinking.

  • Sub Lieutenant George Hambrook Dean Doubleday DSC is killed at age 22. He is the third son of the Reverend John Doubleday.
  • Engineer Lieutenant Neil Shaw MacKinnon (Royal Naval Reserve) is also killed at age 40.

Also sunk today when torpedoed in the English Channel by U-53 is the steamer Merton Hall (Master A Cameron). Her crew suffers fifty seven fatal casualties including her master. Also lost is

  • Able Seaman Herbert Lawrence (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) whose son will be killed serving in the Royal Naval Air Force Reserve in the Second World War.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A member of the clergy
  • Two Naval Lieutenants both winners of the Distinguished Service Cross
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Neville Bowes Elliott-Cooper VC DSO MC (commanding 8th Royal Fusiliers) dies as a prisoner of war at age 29. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Elliott-Cooper KCB and was awarded his Victoria Cross for efforts last 30th
  • Lieutenant (Intelligence Officer) the Reverend Robert Hellier (Nyasaland Field Force attached King’s Own Africa Rifles) dies of wounds in Portuguese Africa at age 33.
  • Private Ernest Charles Day (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 24. His brother was killed in May 1917.

Friday 1 February 1918 We Lost 192

The hired trawler Cleon (Skipper Peter Campbell Sinclair RNR) is sunk by a mine off the Folkestone Gate Buoy.  The skipper is killed at age 30.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great Wara

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Francis Hugh Tilney Stonex (Dublin Fusiliers) dies of wounds at home at age 25. He is the son of Canon Francis Tilney Stonex.
  • Private Samuel Harry Devereux (Training Reserve) is accidentally killed at age 18. His brother was killed in action in August 1916.
  • Private Arthur Agnis (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will die of pneumonia in March 1919.