Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: South African Army

Monday 4 November 1918 We Lost 2,767 – Highest loss before the war’s end

Lieutenant Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (London Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) the world renown war poet is caught in a German machine gun attack and killed at the Olse Canal, north of Ors, France age 25. He is on the Continent teaching until he visits a hospital for the wounded and is deeply affected by this and decides then and there, in September 1915, to return to England and enlist. Owen describes his decision to enlist in the following “I came out in order to help these boys – directly by leading them as well as an officer can; indirectly, by watching their sufferings that I may speak of them as well as a pleader can. I have done the first”. Owen is injured in March 1917 and sent home and when he is deemed fit for duty returns to the front in August of this year. His poems include The Dead Beat, Dulce Et Docorum Est, The Sentry, Anthem for the Doomed Young, Exposure, The Parable of the Young Man and the Old and Strange Meeting. The bells will be ringing on 11 November in Shrewsbury to celebrate the Armistice when the doorbell rings at his parent’s home bringing them the telegram telling them he has been killed.

Asleep

Uder his helmet, up against his pack,

After so many days of work and waking,

Sleep took him by the brow and laid him back.

There, in the happy no-time of his sleeping,

Death took him by the heart. There heaved a quaking

Of the aborted life within him leaping,

Then chest and sleepy arms once more fell slack.

And soon the slow, stray blood, came creeping

From the intruding lead, like ants on track.

Whether his deeper sleep lies shaded by the shaking

Of geat wings, and the thoughts that hung the stars,

High-pillowed on calm pillows of Gods making,

Above these clouds, these rains, these sleets of lead,

And this winds’ scimitars,

-Or whether yet his thin and sodden head

Confuses more and more with the low mould,

His hair being one with the grey grass

Of finished fields, and wire-scraggs rusty-old,

Who knows? Who hopes? Who troubles? Let it pass!

He sleeps. He sleeps less tremulous, less cold,

Than we who wake, and waking say Alas!

Killed along side Owen this day is Lieutenant James Kirk of the same regiment who will later be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions today while attempting to bridge the Oise Canal. To cover the bridging of the canal Lieutenant Kirk took a Lewis gun, and, under intense machine-gun fire, he paddles across the canal on a raft, and at a range of ten yards expends all his ammunition. Further ammunition is paddled across to him and he continuously maintains a covering fire for the bridging party from a most exposed position till he is killed at his gun.

Another Victoria Cross winner Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) James Neville Marshall (Irish Guards commanding 16th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery, determination and leadership in the attack on the Sambre-Oise Canal, near Catillon. When a partly constructed bridge comes under concentrated fire and is broken before the advanced troops of his battalion can cross Lieutenant Colonel Marshall goes forward and organizes parties to repair the bridge. The first party are soon killed or wounded, but by personal example he inspires his command, and volunteers are instantly forthcoming. Under intense fire and with complete disregard of his own safety, he stands on the bank encouraging his men and assisting in the work, and when the bridge is repaired he attempts to rush across at the head of his battalion and is killed while so doing.

Captain Allen Hepburn and his observer Alexander Tranter (Royal Air Force) score their last two victories of the Great War when they destroy two Pfalz DIII in the Mainvault-Faucaumont area.

The Battle of Vittoria-Veneto ends with the Armistice on the Italian Front.  During the battle, the 14th British Corps has captured over 28,000 prisoners and two hundred nineteen guns.

  • Captain Thomas Charles Richmond Baker DFC MM (Australian Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 21. He is a twelve-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend George William Jones (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Henry Michael de Bathe (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at Sleaford at age 29. He is the grandson of the late General ‘Sir’ Henry de Bathe Baronet KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant John Douglas Lightbody (Royal Air Force) a five-victory ace is killed in action at age 19.
  • Cadet Geoffrey William Auden (Royal Air Force) dies at home at age 18 of pneumonia. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Auden, Church Broughton Vicarage.

 

  • Captain Adam Francis Burdett (South African Service Corps) dies on service in South Africa at age 36. He took part in the 1906-7 South Africa rugby union tour, the original ‘Springbok’ tour. He was awarded two caps for South Africa.
  • Captain Burleigh Leycester Muir (Army Service Corps attached III Corps Headquarters) is killed in action. He is the son of Sir Richard and Lady Muir.
  • Private John William Moulds (Army Service Corps) dies of illness at Woolwich. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Stephen Owbridge Parish (Army Service Corps) dies on service in Egypt at age 36. His son will be killed 16 September 1942 at Khartoum Airfield in the Sudan attempting to save the life of a passenger on a crashed aircraft and will be posthumously awarded the George Cross for his efforts.

Today’s losses include:

  • A world renown Great War Poet
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • A Battalion Commander
  • Flying ace
    • 12-victory ace
    • 5-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Grandson of a General and Baronet
  • A member of the original South African Rugby ‘Springbok’ tour
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father died on service and whose brother was killed
  • A man whose son was previously killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in September 1942 performing deeds which will win him a George Cross
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1944
  • A well known cricketer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Frank Harrison CMG DSO (Royal Engineers, Control of Chemical Warfare) dies at home at age 49. His son was killed in July 1916.
  • Major Cyril D’Albini Sykes-Banks MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of illness at home at age 29. His father died of illness on service in February 1916 and his brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Captain Robert Colvill-Jones MC (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in May.
  • Captain Francis Jones-Bateman (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action two and half years after his older brother has been killed in France. He dies at age 22.
  • Captain Rupert Ayrton Hawdon (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. He is the middle of three brothers to die in the war the first in 1916 the second later this month.
  • Lieutenant Robert Evelyn Sandford Poole (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother died of pneumonia in January 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Augustus Hughes MC (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend William Hughes of Hawnby Rectory, York who has already lost a son in the war and will lose another later this month.
  • Second Lieutenant John McNair Lamb (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend John Lamb.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Stewart White (Royal Field Artillery dies of wounds at age 20 at home. He is the son of the Right Reverend William Charles White Bishop of Honan China.
  • Private Martin Leslie Johnson (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Albert Charles Wilson (Labour Corps) dies on service at age 29. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Robert Heaford Dempster (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Robert Moody (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Royal Sussex Regiment). He was a well-known cricketer. Munitions Worker at the Aeroplane Works Richard Sutton Staines dies at home. His brother died of wounds in October of last year.
  • Private Percy W Billings (Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Birkett Stuart (Border Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the final of three brothers who lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private James Sallis (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Arthur Edmund Potts (Sherwood Foresters) dies on service at home at age 18. His brother was killed two months ago.
  • Private Percy Albert Russell (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Richard Leadbeater (South Wales Borderers) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Gunner Alexander Francis Lyall Houison (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Ellis (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action. His son will be killed in the Second World War in April 1944.
  • Private Samuel Needham VC (Bedfordshire Regiment) is accidentally killed by a gunshot at age 33 in Egypt. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last September at Kefr Kasim, Palestine.

Sunday 3 November 1918 We Lost 1,212

George Raymond Dallas Moor VC

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner previously killed
  • A member of the Editorial Staff of the Oregonian
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A nurse whose brother was previously killed and is the daughter of a member of the clergy
  • A man who unknown to him his wife died yesterday and his 11-year old son and name sake will die tomorrow
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose twin was killed earlier and whose son will be killed in June 1943

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Greville Havergal Shaw (Canadian Engineers) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in April 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend William Henry Shaw Rector of Stapleton.
  • Captain Walter Adam (Royal East Kent Yeomanry attached Machine Gun Corps) dies at home. His brother was killed in January 1916.
  • Captain Tom G M Parker (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies on service at home. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Lieutenant George Raymond Dallas Moor VC MC (Hampshire Regiment) dies of Spanish Influenza at Mouvaux, France at age 22. He was awarded the Victoria Cross on Gallipoli in 1915.
  • Lieutenant John McClelland Adie (Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Nurse Margaret Carew (Voluntary Aid Detachment) dies on service at age 28. Her brother was killed in October 1914 and they are children of the Reverend Henry William Carew Vicar of Rattery.
  • Nurse Gwynedd Violet Llewellyn (Voluntary Aid Detachment) dies on service of influenza at age 19. She is the daughter of Lieutenant Colonel A OBE and Lady Llewellyn.
  • Ordinary Seaman Walter Daniel Fairbrass (Royal Navy, HMS Pembroke) dies at home at age 18. He is the third brother to die in the Great War of six who served.
  • Private George Francis Stoney (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 46. He was a member of the Editorial Staff of “The Oregonian”, of Portland, Oregon.
  • Driver Thomas Ernest Scotcher (Royal Engineers) dies in a military hospital at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1914.
  • Private David Beaumont Kester (Northamptonshire Regiment) dies on service at home at age 28. His twin brother was killed in September 1917 and his son will be killed in June 1943 at age 26.
  • Private Leon Guy Austen (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies at home at age 38. His brother died on service in India in August 1916.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 29. Unknown to him his wife died yesterday of pneumonia and his 11-week old son, his namesake, will die tomorrow.
  • Private Frederick William Beatham (Army Service Corps) dies on service at age 32. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives this year including Robert Matthew Beatham a Victoria Cross winner who was killed last August.
  • Private William Edward Hermon (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19. His brother was killed last August.
  • Sapper John Latimer Owen (Canadian Railway Troops) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John Robert Blayney Owen Rector of Bradwell on Sea.
  • Driver William Smith (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private George H Rolfe (Australian Army Medical Corps) dies on service at sea at age 31. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Gunner Edward Steer (South African Field Artillery) dies on service at age 19. His brother was killed in December 1917.

Thursday 17 October 1918 We Lost 1,114

Charles Gordon White

Today’s losses include:

  • A South African cricket international
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The daughter of a member of the clergy
  • A family that will lose two sons and a daughter
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • A nephew of the Vice General of the Isle of Man
  • The son of a Baronet

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Leonard Montague Greenwood DSO (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend T Greenwood.
  • Captain Joshua Bower Hughes-Games MC (Durham Light Infantry) dies of pneumonia at home at age 30. He was seriously wounded on 1st October 1916 and spent 20 months in hospital prior to being discharged in July of this year. He is the son of the late Reverend Joshua H Wynn Hughes-Games and nephew of the Vice General of the Isle of Man. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Captain and Dental Surgeon Lawrence Charles Crockett (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies at home at age 37. His brother was killed in August 1916 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ James Crockett Kt.
  • Lieutenant Charles Wilfred Kidson (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Charles Eyre Kidson of Holy Trinity Church Sittingbourne.
  • Lieutenant Charles Leonard Davey (Machine Gun Corps) is killed. His brother will die on service in December.
  • Lieutenant Gordon Charles White (Cape Corps South African Forces) dies of wounds in Gaza at age 36. He was a South African cricketer who played in 17 Test matches from 1906 to 1912.
  • Lieutenant George William Edendale Whitehead (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is killed at age 23. His brother will die on service of influenza in March 1919. They are sons of ‘Sir’ George Hugh Whitehead 2nd Baronet and grandson of ‘Sir’ James Whitehead Baronet and ‘Sir’ William Ascroft.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Crewdson Pitt Pitts (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. His brother was killed in August of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Lionel William Halse (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend William Halse Vicar of Holy Trinity Bridlington.
  • Second Lieutenant Oliver Charles Ballard (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 26. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in a year.
  • Flight Cadet Spencer Harold Millard (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Luke Holland Millard Vicar of St Aidan’s Carlisle.
  • Sergeant J H Douglas (Seaforth Highlanders) becomes the last of four brothers do lose his life in the Great War when he dies at home.
  • Sapper John Robert Hall (Royal Engineers) dies in Antwerp as a prisoner of war. He is one of three brothers who served, two of whom fell.
  • Private William Godson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in July 1915.
  • Trooper Bernard Guthrie Whishaw (New Zealand Mounted Machine Gun Squadron) dies on service in Egypt at age 26. His brother was killed in July 1916 while his sister will die on service next month.
  • Private Allen Victor Sallis (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 19 becoming the first of two brothers who are both killed in the last month of the war.
  • Staff Nurse Annie Elinor Buckler (Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service) dies on service at age 43. She is the daughter of the Reverend John Findlay Buckler rector of Bidston Cheshire.

Friday 11 October 1918 We Lost 1,603

Wallace Lloyd Algie VC

Brigadier General Stuart Campbell Taylor DSO (93rd Brigade, 31st Division) dies of wounds received in action ten days prior at age 45.  While on an inspection tour of his battalions he is seriously wounded in the head and body by shellfire.  He took part in the operations on the North West Frontier in 1897-98 and fought in the South African War in the advance on Kimberley and actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein.

When with attacking troops northeast of Cambrai which come under heavy enfilade machine-gun fire from a neighboring village Lieutenant Wallace Lloyd Algie (Central Ontario Regiment) rushes forward with nine volunteers. He shoots the crew of an enemy machine gun, and, turning the machine on the enemy, enables his party to reach the village. He then rushes another machine gun, kills the crew, captures an officer and ten of the enemy and thereby clears the end of the village. Lieutenant Algie, having established his party, goes back for reinforcements, but is killed when leading them forward. For his valor and personal initiative in the face of intense fire and saving many lives and enabling the position to be held he will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • A 13-victory ace
  • A man whose son will die on service in 1945
  • A Military Chaplain
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain John Herbert Towne Letts MC (Lincolnshire Regiment attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 21. He is a 13-victory ace.
  • Lieutenant Ernest Edward Tuckett (Royal Naval Volunteer Resereve) dies on service at age 27. His son will die on service in 1945 and is buried in the same cemetery in Yorkshire.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Cecil Vernon (General Depot Staff, South African Forces) dies in South Africa at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend James Campbell Vernon.
  • Second Lieutenant Samuel Richard Ernest Walker (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Philip James Walker.
  • Chaplain Frederick Walter Cleveland MC (attached North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received one week ago at age 30. He was the Curate at Christ Church, Tunstall.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Watson Ballard (Northamptonshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 28. His brother was killed in July 1915.
  • Lance Corporal E B Stittle (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in June 1915.
  • Private Alfred Whalley (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action. His brother was killed in June 1917.

Thursday 12 September 1918 We Lost 915

Arthur George Percival Heywood

SS Galway Castle is torpedoed and sunk one hundred sixty miles from Fastnet out in the Atlantic.  At least twenty-seven are killed. Nursing Sister Constance Addison (South African Military Nursing Service) is killed when she gives up her place in a lifeboat to another passenger. She goes down with the ship. She has two brothers who have been previously killed in the Great War.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Baronet
  • A Nursing sister
  • A family that will lose three children in the Great War
  • A man whose father has previously died of wounds in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Arthur George Percival Heywood (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Percival Heywood the Baronet.
  • Second Lieutenant Duncan Francis Charles Adamson (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His father died of wounds received in action as a CQMS in the London Regiment in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Merton Alfred Rose MC (Royal Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 24. His brother will die of disease in Egypt in September 1919 on service.
  • Rifleman Thomas Mitchell Abernethy (New Zealand Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Christopher Abernethy and his brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Rifleman Frederick William Farrant (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 18. His brother died of wounds in November 1916.
  • Private Alfred Cecil Callister (Army Service Corps) dies at home. His brother was killed in April 1918.

Thursday 25 July 1918 We Lost 545

Richard Charles Travis VC

Colonel Ralph Harold Austin-Sparks (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed when his Bristol F2 spins into the ground at Lilbourne.  He had been wounded in July 1915 while flying over Ypres and has been Colonel in Command of the Royal Air Force (Midland Area) for a month prior to his death.  He is a member of the Thames Rowing Club, Belsize Boxing Club and the London Scottish Rugby Football Club.

Sergeant Richard Charles Travis VC DCM MM (Otago Regiment) known as the “Prince of Scouts” and “King of No Man’s Land” is killed one day after performing acts that will win him a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A member of the Thames Rowing, Belsize Boxing and London Scottish Football Rugby Clubs
  • A family that will lose five sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two son in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant John Lee Abbiss (East Surrey Regiment attached Motor Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action in Mesopotamia at age 21. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Galloway Cordiner (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Martin Durrant (Cape Corps, South African Forces) is accidentally killed by the premature explosion of a shell in Mozambique. He is the son of the Reverend Charles A Durrant, late vicar of Wetherly.
  • Driver William Cranston (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 34 becoming the last of five brothers who have lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Michael Ernest Wileman (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed in May last year.

Tuesday 23 July 1918 We Lost 978

Cap badge of the Tank Corps

The 9th Tank Corps battalion is in a position near Moreuil. For the first time British tanks will co-operate with French infantry and although the action seems to be a success the loss of life is heavy.  The objective is to seize St Ribert Wood and capture the village of Aubervillers.  The battalion leaves Rosiel with 42 tanks but due to mechanical failures only 35 are able to make it to the starting point of these only 21 will see action.

After the laying of an initial barrage the tanks set off for their objective but are fired on by German artillery located in the south end of St Ribert Wood.  Several tanks are hit by direct fire and put out of actions their crews being killed or wounded.  The fighting is intense but the level of co-operation is good and the French troops soon move into the wood to assault the well entrenched German infantry where they capture the objectives. The cost is high with the tank crews sustaining 72 casualties.

Today’s losses include:

  • A member of the 1912 South African Military Rifle Olympic team
  • A member of the Penarth Rugby Club
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Ernest Albert Isaac Taylor (Royal Field Artillery) dies of multiple shell wounds at Salonika. He is the only son of the Reverend Isaac John Taylor, Vicar of Linstead, Suffolk.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Steven Bain Taylor (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 22. His brother died of pneumonia in August 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest James Keeley (South African Infantry) is killed in action. He was a member of two Rifle Teams in the 1912 Stockholm Olympics.  The 200 + 400 + 500 + 600 meter South African Military Rifle team finished fourth, while the Free Rifle team finished sixth.
  • Corporal Henry John Shelford (Tank Corps) is killed at age 23. His brother killed in July 1917.
  • Private Robert Cowell (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 27. His brother in law was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Alfred Dyke (Herefordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private George Edward Baskerville (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Private Ernest Taplin (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed last October.
  • Private Edwin Thomas Murray (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 31. He is a member of the Penarth Rugby Club.
  • Private Edward Grigor Scott (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend William Scott.

Monday 22 July 1918 We Lost 435

Near Armentieres, Major Edward Corringham Mannock destroys an enemy tri-plane from a height of 10,000 feet.

Today’s losses include:

  • The first Indian flying ace ever and only one of the Great War
  • A 19-victory ace
  • A 15-victory ace
  • A Military Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A suicide

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John Henry Morris Arden DSO (Worcestershire Regiment attached Royal Air Force) commits suicide at age 43 in Cairo. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Arden a missionary author. He served in the South African War and the Sudan Campaign of 1912. He was awarded the DSO for conspicuous gallantry at Neuve Chapelle on 12th March 1915.
  • Captain Harold Thomas Mellings (Royal Air Force) is killed in action south of Ostend after recording his last two victories this morning. The fifteen victory ace dies at age 20.
  • Lieutenant Gilbert Richard Barnard (Cape Forces South African Infantry) is killed at age 19 in Jerusalem. He is the son of the Reverend Gilbert William Barnard.
  • Second Lieutenant Francois Joseph Belley MC AFC (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 24. He is the son of the Honorable L G Belley KC.
  • Second Lieutenant Indra Lal Roy (Royal Air Force) is killed in action when his plane goes down in flames over Carvin during a dogfight. The only Indian ace of the Great War dies at age 19 scoring ten victories in two-week period earlier in this month.
  • Chaplain Charles Watson dies on service in the Middle East at age 51.

Friday 19 July 1918 We Lost 654

William Alexander Cosgrove

At 03:14 three Sopwith Camels take off from HMS Furious in the first ever air raid launched from an aircraft carrier. The raid on the Zeppelin sheds at Tondern has been delayed for some weeks due to bad weather.  Each aircraft carries two specially made 60-pound Cooper bombs.  The second flight of four aircraft departs HMS Furious at 03:22 but only three reach Tondern as one aircraft suffers severe engine trouble and is forced to return to the fleet where the pilot is successfully picked up, though is aircraft is destroyed when the rescuing destroyer runs in over.  There is no protecting enemy fighter aircraft at the base, although ground fire is intense.  Two Zeppelins, L54 and L60, are destroyed in huge explosions in one of the three sheds at the base.  Clouds and poor visibility may be a contributing factor to only one other aircraft returning safely to a British ship.  One pilot drowns when he presumably runs out of fuel and has to ditch. Three other pilots are forced to land or ditch in Denmark where they are interned.

Near Merville, Captain Edward Corringham Mannock, fires 80 rounds into an Albatross two-seater, which then goes to the ground in flames.

At 03:14 three Sopwith Camels take off from HMS Furious in the first ever air raid launched from an aircraft carrier. The raid on the Zeppelin sheds at Tondern has been delayed for some weeks due to bad weather. Each aircraft carries two specially made 60-pound Cooper bombs. The second flight of four aircraft departs HMS Furious at 03:22 but only three reach Tondern as one aircraft suffers severe engine trouble and is forced to return to the fleet where the pilot is successfully picked up, though is aircraft is destroyed when the rescuing destroyer runs in over. There is no protecting enemy fighter aircraft at the base, although ground fire is intense. Two Zeppelins, L54 and L60, are destroyed in huge explosions in one of the three sheds at the base. Clouds and poor visibility may be a contributing factor to only one other aircraft returning safely to a British ship. One pilot drowns when he presumably runs out of fuel and has to ditch. Three other pilots are forced to land or ditch in Denmark where they are interned.
Near Merville, Captain Edward Corringham Mannock, fires 80 rounds into an Albatross two-seater, which then goes to the ground in flames.
HMS Garry twice rams sinks the German submarine UB-110. For his actions during this affair her commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Charles Herbert Lightoller will be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. The damage to the Garry is so severe that she just bareGly gets back to dry dock. Commander Lightoller was the Second Officer of RMS Titanic on her maiden voyage in 1912.
The submarine E34 (Lieutenant Richard Ivor Pulleyne DSO DSC age 28) is lost with all thirty one hands in the North Sea through unknown causes.
The Turks and Germans mount a brief attack at Abu Tellul near the Jordan, but are defeated by Australian Light Horse regiments with heavy casualties to the Germans.

Today’s losses include:

• Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
• The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

• Captain William Alexander Cosgrave Hedley (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Hedley Vicar of Nackington.
• Lieutenant Donovan Joseph Trapp (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 23. He is the final of three brothers who die while serving in the Air Forces during the Great War.
• Second Lieutenant Francis Douglas (South African Infantry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in April 1917.
• Private Thomas Henry Quayle (South African Scottish) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed the previous month.

The submarine E34 (Lieutenant Richard Ivor Pulleyne DSO DSC age 28) is lost with all thirty one hands in the North Sea through unknown causes.

The Turks and Germans mount a brief attack at Abu Tellul near the Jordan, but are defeated by Australian Light Horse regiments with heavy casualties to the Germans.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

 

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

 

  • Captain William Alexander Cosgrave Hedley (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Hedley Vicar of Nackington.
  • Lieutenant Donovan Joseph Trapp (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 23. He is the final of three brothers who die while serving in the Air Forces during the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Douglas (South African Infantry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Thomas Henry Quayle (South African Scottish) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed the previous month.

Saturday 4 May 1918 We Lost 483

South African Infantry

British and Italian airmen fly to Cavedine, northeast of Riva (Trentino) and drop such a weight of explosives on the great water-power electricity station that it will be some time before it can again supply a considerable amount of current.  The central powerhouse is seen to be destroyed.  The attack lasts from 08:00 to 12:00.  An important effect of the raid will be the stopping of the electric railway from Trentino up the Val di Sole, to Fucine, which is an important link in the Austrian Army’s communications for the Adamello sector.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man who will lose both and brother and a sister in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed next October

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Ernest Colenbrander Addison (South African Infantry) is killed in action at age 23. His brother is also are killed in the Great War as is his sister who will be lost in the sinking of S S Galway Castle.
  • Lance Corporal James Henry Greenwood (West Surrey Regiment) dies at home at age 52. His son will be killed in the collision of HMS Otranto and the liner Kashmire next October.