Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Category: Victoria Cross

6 March 1919 We Lost 200

Today’s losses include:

  • A well-known Rugby International
  • A family that lost three sons in service including a Victoria Cross winner killed in the South Africa War
  • A military Chaplain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Commander Guy Fowell Parsons (HMS Nigella Royal Navy) dies of injuries after falling down steps and fracturing his skull at age 37. He is a well-known Rugby International and he has had two brothers fall in the service of their king.  Lieutenant Commander Raymond S Parsons (Royal Naval Division) was killed in 1915 on Gallipoli and Lieutenant Francis Newton Parsons VC (Essex Regiment) was killed in the South Africa War in March 1900 after going to the aid of Private Ferguson on 15th February 1900 which will reward him the Victoria Cross.
  • Chaplain David Jenkins dies on service at home at age 32.

31 December 1918 We Lost 179

Image result for William Leefe Robinson VC

William Leefe Robinson VC

Captain William Leefe Robinson VC (Royal Air Force) dies at the Stanmore home of his sister, the Baroness Heyking, from the effects of the Spanish flu pandemic after his release from a prisoner of war camp. On the night of 2nd/3rd September 1916 over Cuffley, Hertfordshire, Lieutenant Robinson, flying a converted BE2c night fighter, sighted a German airship – one of 16 which had left bases in Germany on a mass raid over England. The airship was the wooden-framed Schütte-Lanz SL11 Robinson made an attack at an altitude of 11,500 ft approaching from below and, closing to within 500 ft, raked the airship with machine-gun bullets. As he was preparing for another attack, it burst into flames and crashed in a field behind the Plough Inn at Cuffley, killing the crew of 16. For his actions he was awarded the Victoria Cross. His wife’s first husband died of wounds in November 1914.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner whose wife lost her first husband to wounds in November 1914
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose father died das a prisoner of war in November 1915

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Meredyth Mangin (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies in India at age 51. He is the son of the Reverend James Mangin of King’s School Canterbury.
  • Captain Alexander Ralph Abercrombie DSO MC (Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of influenza at home at age 22. His father died of wounds as a prisoner of war in November 1915.

28 December 1918 We Lost 187

Image result for John Wilfred Beatham

Beatham family headstones

Today’s losses include:

  • A family that will lose three sons to the Great War including a Victoria Cross winner

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Sergeant John Wilfred Beatham (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) dies on service in Turkey at age 29. He is the last of four brothers to die on service this year including Robert Matthew Beatham a winner of the Victoria Cross who was killed last August.

Friday 5 December 1918 We Lost 407

Image result for Charles Edward Haydon Parker VC

The recently arrived Light Cruiser Cassandra is mined off the Gulf of Finland and sinks with 11 dead.

Battery Sergeant Major Charles Edward Haydon Parker VC (Royal Field Artillery) dies in London at age 49.  On 31st March 1900 at Sanna’s Post, South Africa ‘Q’ and ‘U’ Batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery are ambushed with loss of most of the baggage column and five guns of the leading battery.  When the alarm is given, ‘Q’ Battery went into action 1,150 yards from the post until the order to retire was received, when Major Phipps-Hornby, commander of ‘Q’ Battery, ordered the guns and their limbers to be run back by hand to a safe place.  For his actions Sergeant Parker was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Multiple families that will lose two son in the Great War
  • A Military Chaplain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Philip Edmund Vaughan DSO (Worcestershire Regiment) dies on service at home at age 40. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Lieutenant Hubert Burgoyne Davey (South Wales Borderers) dies on service at age 28. His brother was killed last October.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Frederick William Ainley dies on active service.

Tuesday 25 November 1918 We Lost 496

Julian Royds Gribble VC

Captain Julian Royds Gribble VC (Royal Warwickshire Regiment) dies of influenza in German hands at age 21. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 23rd March 1918 at Beaumetz, Hermies Ridge, France when in command of a company which was ordered to hold on at all costs. They were eventually isolated and he could easily have withdrawn when the Battalion on his left was driven back, but he obeyed his orders to the letter and when his company was finally surrounded by the enemy he was seen fighting to the last before being wounded slightly in the scalp and captured.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The son of the Inspector General of Police and Prisons in Ceylon
  • A man whose brother will die in two days

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Hubert Henry Schomberg Laughton (Machine Gun Corps attached Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at home received at Le Cateau in October. He is the son of Professor ‘Sir’ John Knox Laughton.
  • Paymaster Lieutenant Guy Campbell (HMS Venerable) dies of illness at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Campbell KCMG, Inspector General of Police and Prisons Ceylon.
  • Private Herbert Barsby (Leicestershire Regiment) dies at home at age 27, two days before his brother dies at home.

Thursday 7 November 1918 We Lost 1,295

Arthur Moore Lascelles VC

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Two Military Chaplains
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of member of the clergy and a Major General
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The last ace killed in action in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A Lusitania sinking survivor
  • A man whose father dies the same day at home
  • A member of the Tring Town Band

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Louis De Moulin MC (Sussex Regiment commanding 1st East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 29.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Reginald Kirkpatrick Lynch-Staunton (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds in Baghdad received 26th October at age 38. He is the son of George S J P Lynch-Staunton JP.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Arthur Tryon MC (commanding 4th King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur William Tryon Vicar of Middle Rasen and the grandson of Major General Tryon and the Reverend Thomas Wimberley Mossman Rector of West Torrington.
  • Major Arthur Hugh Aglionby MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds received at Monvaux at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Francis Keyes Aglionby DD, of Newbold Pacey Vicarage, Warwick.
  • Victoria Cross winner Captain Arthur Moore Lascelles VC MC (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 38. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last December at Masnieres.
  • Captain Claud Harry Stokes DFC (Royal Aiir Force) is killed at age 34. He is a five-victory ace and the last ace killed prior to war’s end when he is shot down by anti-aircraft fire.
  • Captain Clive Andrews Brown (Royal Engineers) dies on service at age 28. His brother was killed last September.
  • Captain Reginald Claude Moline Gee MC (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Claude Valentine Gee Vicar of Castletown.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Neville Wells (Horse Transport and Supply, Army Service Corps) dies on service at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Harry Wells.
  • Lieutenant Christopher William Griffiths (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds received in action 29th October at age 35. He survived the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Benjamin Dowell Skelton (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last month.
  • Chaplains John Watters (attached 115th Brigade Headquarters) dies and William Gerard Cheese (attached Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds on active service. Cheese dies at age 35 while Watters is only 26.
  • Company Quarter Master Sergeant Eric William Parker Stamper (Sherwood Foresters attached Labour Corps) dies on service at age 27. His brother was killed in March of this year and they are sons of the Reverend William Parker Stamper Vicar of Stonebroom.
  • Private James B Gowler (West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He had been in France only five weeks and his father dies of influenza on the same day at home.
  • Private Frederick Edward Clarke (Eastern Counties Labour Corps) dies of pneumonia at home. He was a member of the Tring Town Band.
  • Able Seaman John Phililp Hill (Drake Battalion, Royal Naval Division) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in March 1917.
  • Drummer James Cash (Dublin Fusiliers) dies at home at age 22. His brother will die on service next February.

Monday 4 November 1918 We Lost 2,767 – Highest loss before the war’s end

Lieutenant Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (London Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) the world renown war poet is caught in a German machine gun attack and killed at the Olse Canal, north of Ors, France age 25. He is on the Continent teaching until he visits a hospital for the wounded and is deeply affected by this and decides then and there, in September 1915, to return to England and enlist. Owen describes his decision to enlist in the following “I came out in order to help these boys – directly by leading them as well as an officer can; indirectly, by watching their sufferings that I may speak of them as well as a pleader can. I have done the first”. Owen is injured in March 1917 and sent home and when he is deemed fit for duty returns to the front in August of this year. His poems include The Dead Beat, Dulce Et Docorum Est, The Sentry, Anthem for the Doomed Young, Exposure, The Parable of the Young Man and the Old and Strange Meeting. The bells will be ringing on 11 November in Shrewsbury to celebrate the Armistice when the doorbell rings at his parent’s home bringing them the telegram telling them he has been killed.

Asleep

Uder his helmet, up against his pack,

After so many days of work and waking,

Sleep took him by the brow and laid him back.

There, in the happy no-time of his sleeping,

Death took him by the heart. There heaved a quaking

Of the aborted life within him leaping,

Then chest and sleepy arms once more fell slack.

And soon the slow, stray blood, came creeping

From the intruding lead, like ants on track.

Whether his deeper sleep lies shaded by the shaking

Of geat wings, and the thoughts that hung the stars,

High-pillowed on calm pillows of Gods making,

Above these clouds, these rains, these sleets of lead,

And this winds’ scimitars,

-Or whether yet his thin and sodden head

Confuses more and more with the low mould,

His hair being one with the grey grass

Of finished fields, and wire-scraggs rusty-old,

Who knows? Who hopes? Who troubles? Let it pass!

He sleeps. He sleeps less tremulous, less cold,

Than we who wake, and waking say Alas!

Killed along side Owen this day is Lieutenant James Kirk of the same regiment who will later be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions today while attempting to bridge the Oise Canal. To cover the bridging of the canal Lieutenant Kirk took a Lewis gun, and, under intense machine-gun fire, he paddles across the canal on a raft, and at a range of ten yards expends all his ammunition. Further ammunition is paddled across to him and he continuously maintains a covering fire for the bridging party from a most exposed position till he is killed at his gun.

Another Victoria Cross winner Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) James Neville Marshall (Irish Guards commanding 16th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery, determination and leadership in the attack on the Sambre-Oise Canal, near Catillon. When a partly constructed bridge comes under concentrated fire and is broken before the advanced troops of his battalion can cross Lieutenant Colonel Marshall goes forward and organizes parties to repair the bridge. The first party are soon killed or wounded, but by personal example he inspires his command, and volunteers are instantly forthcoming. Under intense fire and with complete disregard of his own safety, he stands on the bank encouraging his men and assisting in the work, and when the bridge is repaired he attempts to rush across at the head of his battalion and is killed while so doing.

Captain Allen Hepburn and his observer Alexander Tranter (Royal Air Force) score their last two victories of the Great War when they destroy two Pfalz DIII in the Mainvault-Faucaumont area.

The Battle of Vittoria-Veneto ends with the Armistice on the Italian Front.  During the battle, the 14th British Corps has captured over 28,000 prisoners and two hundred nineteen guns.

  • Captain Thomas Charles Richmond Baker DFC MM (Australian Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 21. He is a twelve-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend George William Jones (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Henry Michael de Bathe (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at Sleaford at age 29. He is the grandson of the late General ‘Sir’ Henry de Bathe Baronet KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant John Douglas Lightbody (Royal Air Force) a five-victory ace is killed in action at age 19.
  • Cadet Geoffrey William Auden (Royal Air Force) dies at home at age 18 of pneumonia. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Auden, Church Broughton Vicarage.

 

  • Captain Adam Francis Burdett (South African Service Corps) dies on service in South Africa at age 36. He took part in the 1906-7 South Africa rugby union tour, the original ‘Springbok’ tour. He was awarded two caps for South Africa.
  • Captain Burleigh Leycester Muir (Army Service Corps attached III Corps Headquarters) is killed in action. He is the son of Sir Richard and Lady Muir.
  • Private John William Moulds (Army Service Corps) dies of illness at Woolwich. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Stephen Owbridge Parish (Army Service Corps) dies on service in Egypt at age 36. His son will be killed 16 September 1942 at Khartoum Airfield in the Sudan attempting to save the life of a passenger on a crashed aircraft and will be posthumously awarded the George Cross for his efforts.

Today’s losses include:

  • A world renown Great War Poet
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • A Battalion Commander
  • Flying ace
    • 12-victory ace
    • 5-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Grandson of a General and Baronet
  • A member of the original South African Rugby ‘Springbok’ tour
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father died on service and whose brother was killed
  • A man whose son was previously killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in September 1942 performing deeds which will win him a George Cross
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1944
  • A well known cricketer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Frank Harrison CMG DSO (Royal Engineers, Control of Chemical Warfare) dies at home at age 49. His son was killed in July 1916.
  • Major Cyril D’Albini Sykes-Banks MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of illness at home at age 29. His father died of illness on service in February 1916 and his brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Captain Robert Colvill-Jones MC (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in May.
  • Captain Francis Jones-Bateman (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action two and half years after his older brother has been killed in France. He dies at age 22.
  • Captain Rupert Ayrton Hawdon (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. He is the middle of three brothers to die in the war the first in 1916 the second later this month.
  • Lieutenant Robert Evelyn Sandford Poole (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother died of pneumonia in January 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Augustus Hughes MC (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend William Hughes of Hawnby Rectory, York who has already lost a son in the war and will lose another later this month.
  • Second Lieutenant John McNair Lamb (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend John Lamb.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Stewart White (Royal Field Artillery dies of wounds at age 20 at home. He is the son of the Right Reverend William Charles White Bishop of Honan China.
  • Private Martin Leslie Johnson (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Albert Charles Wilson (Labour Corps) dies on service at age 29. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Robert Heaford Dempster (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Robert Moody (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Royal Sussex Regiment). He was a well-known cricketer. Munitions Worker at the Aeroplane Works Richard Sutton Staines dies at home. His brother died of wounds in October of last year.
  • Private Percy W Billings (Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Birkett Stuart (Border Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the final of three brothers who lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private James Sallis (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Arthur Edmund Potts (Sherwood Foresters) dies on service at home at age 18. His brother was killed two months ago.
  • Private Percy Albert Russell (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Richard Leadbeater (South Wales Borderers) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Gunner Alexander Francis Lyall Houison (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Ellis (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action. His son will be killed in the Second World War in April 1944.
  • Private Samuel Needham VC (Bedfordshire Regiment) is accidentally killed by a gunshot at age 33 in Egypt. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last September at Kefr Kasim, Palestine.

Sunday 3 November 1918 We Lost 1,212

George Raymond Dallas Moor VC

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner previously killed
  • A member of the Editorial Staff of the Oregonian
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A nurse whose brother was previously killed and is the daughter of a member of the clergy
  • A man who unknown to him his wife died yesterday and his 11-year old son and name sake will die tomorrow
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose twin was killed earlier and whose son will be killed in June 1943

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Greville Havergal Shaw (Canadian Engineers) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in April 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend William Henry Shaw Rector of Stapleton.
  • Captain Walter Adam (Royal East Kent Yeomanry attached Machine Gun Corps) dies at home. His brother was killed in January 1916.
  • Captain Tom G M Parker (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies on service at home. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Lieutenant George Raymond Dallas Moor VC MC (Hampshire Regiment) dies of Spanish Influenza at Mouvaux, France at age 22. He was awarded the Victoria Cross on Gallipoli in 1915.
  • Lieutenant John McClelland Adie (Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Nurse Margaret Carew (Voluntary Aid Detachment) dies on service at age 28. Her brother was killed in October 1914 and they are children of the Reverend Henry William Carew Vicar of Rattery.
  • Nurse Gwynedd Violet Llewellyn (Voluntary Aid Detachment) dies on service of influenza at age 19. She is the daughter of Lieutenant Colonel A OBE and Lady Llewellyn.
  • Ordinary Seaman Walter Daniel Fairbrass (Royal Navy, HMS Pembroke) dies at home at age 18. He is the third brother to die in the Great War of six who served.
  • Private George Francis Stoney (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 46. He was a member of the Editorial Staff of “The Oregonian”, of Portland, Oregon.
  • Driver Thomas Ernest Scotcher (Royal Engineers) dies in a military hospital at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1914.
  • Private David Beaumont Kester (Northamptonshire Regiment) dies on service at home at age 28. His twin brother was killed in September 1917 and his son will be killed in June 1943 at age 26.
  • Private Leon Guy Austen (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies at home at age 38. His brother died on service in India in August 1916.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 29. Unknown to him his wife died yesterday of pneumonia and his 11-week old son, his namesake, will die tomorrow.
  • Private Frederick William Beatham (Army Service Corps) dies on service at age 32. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives this year including Robert Matthew Beatham a Victoria Cross winner who was killed last August.
  • Private William Edward Hermon (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19. His brother was killed last August.
  • Sapper John Latimer Owen (Canadian Railway Troops) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John Robert Blayney Owen Rector of Bradwell on Sea.
  • Driver William Smith (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private George H Rolfe (Australian Army Medical Corps) dies on service at sea at age 31. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Gunner Edward Steer (South African Field Artillery) dies on service at age 19. His brother was killed in December 1917.

Friday 1 November 1918 We Lost 1,568

Alleyne Kingsley Conan Doyle

Before Valenciennes a platoon of the Saskatchewan Regiment has a machine-gun open up on it. Without hesitation Sergeant Hugh Cairns DCM seizes a Lewis gun and single-handed in the face of direct fire he rushes the post killing the crew of five and capturing the gun. Later when the line is held up by machine gun fire he again rushes forward killing 12 enemy and capturing 18 and two guns. Subsequently when the advance is held up by more machine guns and field guns, although wounded, he leads a small party to outflank them, killing many, forcing about 50 to surrender and capturing all the guns. After consolidation he accompanies a battle patrol to exploit Marly and forces 60 of the enemy to surrender. While disarming this party he is severely wounded. Nevertheless, he opens fire and inflicts heavy losses. Finally he is rushed by about ten enemy and collapses from weakness and loss of blood. He will be awarded the last Canadian Victoria Cross earned in the war and will die of his wounds tomorrow.

Captain Alexander Beck (60 Royal Air Force) scores his squadrons last victory of the war, shooting down a Fokker D.VII.

The submarine G7 (Lieutenant Charles Arthur Campbell Russell) is reported lost when she fails to arrive at her base at Blyth, Northumberland. The last communication with the boat was on 23rd October.  Her entire crew of 31 is lost.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of Arthur Conan Doyle
  • A man fatally wounded winning the Victoria Cross
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A professor of English at the University of Bristol
  • An Australian Rules footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Charles Henry Vernon Smith (Canadian Army Medical Corps) dies of pneumonia at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend William Smith.
  • Captain Alleyne Kingsley Conan Doyle (Hampshire Regiment) dies of influenza at home aggravated by wounds received in action at age 24. He is the son of the Arthur Conan Doyle.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Rowland Skemp (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 36 at Le Cateau. He is a professor of English at the University of Bristol and the son of the Reverend T R Skemp.
  • Lieutenant William Holmes St John Lyons (Middlesex Regiment) dies in England at age 29. He is the son of the late Right Honorable W H H Lyons.
  • Chaplain 4th Class the Reverend Harold William Wood (attached Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of pneumonia as a result of influenza at age 31. He is the Vicar of Norton and son of the Reverend Arthur Wood Rector of St John’s Clerkenwell.
  • Chaplain Basil Robert Streeten (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies on service.
  • Driver Samuel Hainsworth (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. His brother was killed in April.
  • Driver Albert Woodey (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 18. His brother was killed in the Navy in July 1918.
  • Private Arthur Moulson (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 28. He was taken prisoner on 27th May at Crayonne, on the Chemin des Dames. His brother was killed in action in November 1917.
  • Private Albert O’Connell (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Wales received on service two months earlier. He is a former Australian rules footballer who played with St Kilda.
  • Private Leonard John Redler (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Edwin Burchett (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private Peter Downs (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.

Sunday 27 October 1918 We Lost 1,422

Keith MacDonald Scobie

The decisive assault of the Allied armies across the Piave begins.  At 06:45 the 12th Durham Light Infantry begins the advance onto the Green Dotted Line.  Very deep swift water is found in the most northerly area of the Piave and while wading this, the battalion suffers heavily from machine gun fire, the leading company losing nearly half its strength.  The Companies reorganize and press forward only to be held up by uncut wire close to the objective, which is strongly held.  The wire is cut most gallantly by various parties.  The battalion presses on, and C Company captures the first objective Blue Dotted Line, (the road from C Padovan to C Benedetti).  Here orders are received that as the Italians on the left of the brigade have failed to cross the Piave, no further advance is to be made. The battalion suffers 29 officers and men killed, 114 wounded and eleven missing.

During the morning, Major William George Barker (Royal Air Force) observes an enemy two-seater over the Foret de Mormal.  He attacks this machine and after a short burst it breaks up in the air.  At the same time a Fokker biplane attacks him, and he is wounded in the right thigh, but manages, despite this, to shoot down the enemy airplane in flames.  He then finds himself in the middle of a large formation of Fokkers who attack him from all directions, and he is again severely wounded in the left thigh, but he succeeds in driving down two of the enemy in a spin.  He loses consciousness then, and his machine falls out of control.  On recovery he finds himself being again attacked heavily by a large formation and singling out one machine he deliberately charges and drives it down in flames. During this fight his left elbow is shattered and he again faints, and on regaining consciousness he finds himself still being attacked, but notwithstanding that he is now severely wounded in both legs and his left arm shattered he dives on the nearest machine and shoots it down in flames.  Being greatly exhausted, he dives out of the fight to regain our lines, but is met by another formation, which attacks and endeavors to cut him off, but after a hard fight he succeeds in breaking up this formation and reaches our lines, where he crash-lands.  This combat, in which Major Barker destroys four enemy machines (three of them in flames), brings his total successes to fifty enemy machines destroyed, and is a notable example of the exceptional bravery and disregard of danger which this very gallant officer has always displayed throughout his distinguished career.  For this action he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Earl Frederick Crabb (Royal Air Force) having crashed an enemy machine, then goes to the assistance of one of our own that is being attacked, and materially helps to shoot the enemy down.  In addition to the above he has accounted for three other machines and assisted in crashing a fourth.

Second Lieutenant Keith MacDonald Scobie (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 21.  His brother was killed in action in July 1916 and he is a Great War Poet.

Lunae

Have you ridden alone in the country ever

By the dusty light of the harvest-moon?

Cycled intent in a vain endeavor

To match your speed to your soul’s quick tune

When there’s never a sound to break the magic;

For the tyres; crisp whir on the powdered road

And the hoot of an oul in the distance, tragic,

Are pricking your heart with a fairy goad?

Then the hawthorn hedges, sweet dissembling,

Stealthily close on your path, till fear

Of their dense bulk looms; and your heartsick trembling

Shakes into stillness as you swing clear.

Then the high haw-hedges furious will bide,

Drawing back from the light of the moon:

But the black trees haste down the silver hillside.

You know in your hear that you laughed too soon.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War Poet
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a Field Marshall
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A former police constable
  • A man whose wife is widowed a second time by the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Ashton Alexander St Hill DSO (commanding 11th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in Italy at age 44.
  • Major James Boswell Egerton (Indian Cavalry) is killed in action at age 38 in Mesopotamia. He served in the Somali Expedition and on the North West Frontier of India and is the son of the late Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Charles Egerton who also lost a son in April of this year.
  • Captain George Pomeroy Sterling DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action in Italy at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Sterling of the CMS Gaza Palestine.
  • Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Guy Wilbraham Wareing DFC (Royal Flying Corps) a seven-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lukyns Williams (Indian Cavalry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private Percival Henry Onyett (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25 in Italy. His brother died of wounds in Eygpt in November 1917.
  • Gunner Alfred James Hyder (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of influenza at age 29. He is a former police constable.
  • Private William Hall (Newfoundland Regiment) dies on service. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Bryen Sidney Smither (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Italy at age 20. His widow was widowed in March 1915 when her then husband was killed.
  • Private John Morris (Devonshire Regiment) dies on service after a serious operation. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman James J Toole (HMS Lion) dies of pneumonia at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Driver Alf Rayner (Royal Field Artillery) becomes the third brother to be killed in successive Octobers.