Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Thursday 14 June 1917 – We Lost 695

William Banwell remembered

Flight Commander John Edward Sharman (Royal Naval Air Service) while on an offensive patrol with three other scouts observes 5 Albatross Scouts. He dives on one of these, firing from his machine gun at about 50-feet range. The Scout then goes down in a spin. Commander Sharman will be dead in 5 weeks.

Private William Banwell (Otago Infantry, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces) is killed in action at age 34 when he shot as a German observation post near Sunken Farm (Warneton) is taken this night.  Only a few days before his death, he sent a poem to his wife at home with the title ‘A Soldier’s Dream’. It ends with the following verses:

There was just another vision. Dear wife, if I should die

Remember that I loved you: don’t grieve, sweetheart or cry,

For when our lads are grown, dear, your voice will thrill with pride

When telling them how your father for his country gladly died.

 

Today’s losses include:

  • A man who was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1897
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The brother of a Hearts of Midlothian FC player who was killed last year

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Colclough Watson VC (Royal Engineers) dies on service at age 50. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in the Mamund Valley on 16th September 1897.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster Gerald Owen Lydekker (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of myasthenia gravis on service in Egypt at age 29. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Gibson Speedie (Royal Scots) is killed in action at age 25. His younger brother, a former football player for the Hearts of Midlothian Football Club has been killed in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant James Brendan Lane-Mullins (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action. He is the only son of the Honorable J L Lane-Mullins.
  • Corporal Frank Lowe (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action. His brother died of injuries on service in March 1916.
  • Private William Henry Whalley (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in October 1918.

Wednesday 13 June 1917 – We Lost 560

Memorial Poplar Recreation Ground

The first daylight bombing attack on London by a fixed-wing aircraft took place on 13 June, 1917. Fourteen Gothas led flew over Essex and began dropping their bombs. It was a clear day and the bombs were dropped just before noon. Numerous bombs fell in rapid succession in various districts in the East End. In the East End alone; 162 people were killed, 154 seriously injured and 269 slightly injured.

The gravest of incidents that day, was the damage done to a Council school in Poplar. In the Upper North Street School at the time were a girl’s class on the top floor, a boy’s class on the middle floor and an infant class of about 50 students on the ground floor. The bomb fell through the roof into the girl’s class; it then proceeded to fall through the boy’s classroom before finally exploding in the infant class.

Eighteen students were killed overall. Sixteen of these were aged from 4 to 6 years old. The two teachers of the infant class acted like heroines as they got everyone out of the building before helping others who were rescuing bodies from the rubble. Panicked mothers searched for their children, desperately hoping they were not one of those caught in the blast. As quickly as possible, the bodies of the children who were killed were removed to the mortuary, and the injured were cared for by nurses and surgeons and taken to the hospitals.

About a week later, one of the biggest funerals in London was held for these infants. Fifteen children were buried in a mass grave at the East London Cemetery, while the other three children had private graves. Brothers and sisters of the children looked on with mournful faces, some having also been in the school at the time of the bombing.

A memorial in Poplar Recreation Ground, unveiled in June 1919, bears the names of the 18 Upper North Street School pupils that were killed on the first daylight air-raid on London.

The merchant man SS Kelvinbank (Herbert John Colley age 41) is sunk by a torpedo fired by U-69 100 miles north of Cape Wrath killing 16 including her master.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man whose son will be killed at Tobruk in September 1941
  • The son of a member of the clerlgy
  • Brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Cecil Horace Case Keevil (West Yorkshire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at home at age 36. His son will be killed at Tobruk in September 1941.
  • Captain Walter David Ruddock (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in May 1915 and they are sons of Archdeacon David Ruddock of Hawkes Bay New Zealand.
  • Sergeant John William Hallworth (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His two brothers will be killed next year.
  • Acting Lance Sergeant George Francis Baum (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother will die of wounds in April 1918.
  • Privates Allan and Ernest John Julius Holz are killed serving in the Wellington Regiment and are buried in adjacent graves in Motor Car Corner Cemetery, Ploegsteert.

Tuesday 12 June 1917 – We Lost 535

 

Thomas Richard Chetwynd Birkin

The Armed trawler HMS Sea King (Commander G Herbert) sinks the German submarine U-66.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of a Baronet
  • Multiple son of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Viscount

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Robert Dunlop Smith (Punjabis) is killed south of Kilwa Kiwinji East Africa at age 24. He is the son of the Very Reverend ‘Sir’ George Adam Smith (Principal of the University of Aberdeen) and Lady Smith JP. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Richard Chetwynd Birkin (Dragoon Guards attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in France at age 22. He is the eldest son of the 2nd Baronet ‘Sir’ Thomas Stanley Birkin and nephew of Viscount Chetwynd. His two brothers will turn to racing after the war, one being killed on a motor cycle in 1927.
  • Second Lieutenant Hugo Cholmondeley Arnold (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Abel Arnold Rector of Wolsingham.
  • Flight Sub Lieutenant Langley Frank Willard Smith (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally killed when his Camel loses a wing and breaks up while attempting to intercept 16 Gotha bombers.
  • Second Lieutenant John James Erskine Brown Stewart (Royal Scots) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Stewart DD Minister of New Greyfriars Parish Church Edinburgh.
  • Sergeant Arthur William Joseph Searle (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of abdominal wounds received 5 days earlier on his 22nd He was the first boy from Hemel Hempstead to be awarded a silver watch for 8 years perfect attendance at school and never being late during that period.
  • Private John Hopkins (Cambridgeshire Regiment attached Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Gunner Christopher Thomas Honey MM (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 32. His brother died of wounds last April.
  • Gunner Albert Jarvis (Australian Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in May 1916 in Mesopotamia.
  • Private Hugh Morris (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Monday 11 June 1917- We Lost 583

John Edward Raphael

The Cunard liner Ausonia is torpedoed off the southern coast of Ireland while traveling from Montreal to Avonmouth, but is able to reach port. One is killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • An England Rugby International
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • An ADC to a General
  • A Scout Master
  • Families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Edward William Lanchester Foxell (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He is the son of Reverend William James Foxell of St Swithin’s Rectory and a fellow of the Chemical Society.
  • Lieutenant John Edward Raphael (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) ADC General Commanding 41st Division dies of wounds received on 7th June at Messines at age 35. He is an England International Rugby football player winning nine caps for England and a double blue at Oxford.
  • Second Lieutenant Edwin Francis Medcalf (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is a Scout Master of the 1st Forest Hill Troop.
  • Private John Charles Wrench (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 34 as the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private George Verrall (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed on the last day of next month.
  • Private Frederick William Fowler (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 26. His son will be killed in the Second World War.

Sunday 10 June 1917 – We Lost 775

Second Lieutenant George Wallace Bollinger (Wellington Regiment, NZEF) dies of wounds received two days prior at age 27. His brother was killed in March 1915 making only the second Bollinger to die in the service of the King in the Great War. They have eight cousins who will be killed in the German army in the War.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man who has eight cousins killed serving in the German Army in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will two and three sons in the Great War
  • An Enderby Town footballer
  • A man whose brother and father were killed together in October 1915

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Leslie Reginald Probyn Hindson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend John Hutchinson Hindson Vicar of Wyrardisbury and the Honorable Mrs. Hindson.
  • Private Arthur De Boynton (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. Last year within a two-week period he lost two brothers in the service of the King.
  • Private Edgar Mansfield (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Cecil Alfred Charlton (Leicestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 26. He was a member of the Enderby Town Football club.
  • Private David Livingstone Anderson (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. His father and brother were killed serving together in October 1915.
  • Private Donald McIntyre (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother died on service at home in June 1916.
  • Private Arthur Sibbring (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last August.

Saturday 9 June 1917 – We Lost 925

Frederick James Harry Thayre

S S Harbury (Master William Craig age 56) is torpedoed and sunk 170 miles west of Ushanti. The crew of 12 including her Master is lost.

Today’s losses include:

  • 20 and 19 victory aces killed together
  • The son of an Engineer Rear Admiral
  • The brother of a future Air Marshall
  • A brined of author Vera Brittain
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose three brothers were killed on 25 September 1915

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain and pilot Frederick James Harry Thayre MC (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 22. He is a 20-victory ace while his gunner Captain Francis Richard Cubbon MC a 19-victory ace is killed at age 24.
  • Captain Clive Alan Whittingham (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of shell wounds received at Messines at Battalion Headquarters at age 24. He is the brother of Air Marshal ‘Sir’ Harold Whittingham and son of Engineer Rear Admiral William Whittington.
  • Lieutenant Victor Richardson (Sussex Regiment attached King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds in London received in the attack on “The Harp” east of Arras on 9 April. The 22-year old is a friend of Vera Brittain, who will become a famous writer.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Anthony Barton (Australian Infantry) is killed attacking a German pillbox at Messines Ridge at age 32. His brother was killed last August.
  • Company Sergeant Major J B Cross (Canadian Machine Gun Corps) is killed at Arras. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Lance Corporal William Tomlinson (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 32. His two brothers were killed late last year.
  • Private Thomas Flynn (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 22. His twin brother will be killed in October.
  • Private Herbert Alexander Bice (Australian Infantry) is killed in action two weeks after his brother died in England.
  • Private Andrew Mochrie (Cameronians) is killed at age 28. His three younger brothers were all killed serving in different Regiments on 25 September 1915.

Friday 8 June 1917 – We Lost 1,305

Thomas Grey Culling

Brigadier General Charles Henry Jeffries Brown DSO General Officer Commanding 1st New Zealand Brigade, New Zealand Division (New Zealand Staff Corps) is killed in action at Messines.  He is killed by a shell while talking to the Divisional Commander Major General Russell near the Moulin de l’Hospice.

Today’s losses include:

  • A General
  • .Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • A 6-victory ace
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose brother-in-law is killed
  • Multiple brothers killed together
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1943
  • A member of the Melbourne Cricket Club and an Australian Rules footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain William Thomas Bryan (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 35. He is the first student enrolled at Christian Brothers College in Perth. He was dux of the college in 1897 and 1898 and served as president of the Old Boys Association from 1907-1914. At Aquinas College he has a student house (faction) named after him called “Bryan House” as a mark of respect for what he did for Christian Brothers College. Captain Reuben Henry Gregory MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry Gregory Rector of Kedleston.
  • Captain Edward Ernest Wynne (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Horace Wynne Rector of Guestling and a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Captain Ralph Anderson (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Ernest Augustus, Bishop of Riverine New South Wales.
  • Lieutenant Ernest John Norwood (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed in action at age 41. He is the son of the Reverend William George Norwood and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Flight Lieutenant Thomas Grey Culling (Royal Naval Air Service) a 6-victory ace is killed at age 21.
  • Second Lieutenant Keith Gaster Williams (New Zealand Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Owen Williams.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Elmslie Hawkins (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Walter Hawkins.
  • Corporal Francis Watts Viles (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 26. His brother was killed yesterday.
  • Lance Corporal George Austin (York and Lancaster Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother-in-law was killed near Ypres in April 1915 and his brother was wounded at Ypres in 1915 and will never fully recover dying in 1920.
  • Brothers killed this day include Thomas and William Hamblyn who are killed with the Wellington Regiment and Albert, 21, and Ernest Raison, 22, who are killed with the Australian Infantry.
  • Private Leslie Edward Lee (Australian Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 22. He is a member of the Melbourne Cricket Club and an Australian Rules Footballer who played two games for Richmond.
  • Private Colin Victor Cameron (Auckland Infantry) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Albert Kennington (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 27. His son will be killed in February 1943 and he is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.

Thursday 7 June 1917 – We Lost 3,888

The Battle of Messines perhaps the most successful local operation of the war, certainly of the Western Front is launched by General Herbert Plumer’s Second Army with the detonation of 19 underground mines underneath the German lines. The target of the offensive is the Messines Ridge, a natural stronghold southeast of Ypres, and a small German salient since late 1914. The attack is also a precursor to the much larger Third Battle of Ypres, known as Passchendaele, decided upon by the British Commander-in-Chief ‘Sir’ Douglas Haig following the collapse of the French Nivelle Offensive earlier in May 1917.

General Plumer began planning to take the Messines Ridge a year early in early-1916. Meticulously Plumer preferred to plan for limited successes rather than gamble all on a significant breakthrough. In preparing for the Messines battle he authorises the laying of 22 mine shafts underneath German lines all along the ridge, his plan being to detonate all 22 at zero hour at 03:10, to be followed by infantry attacks so as to secure the ridge from the presumably dazed German defenders, the infantry heavily supported by the use of artillery bombardments, tanks and the use of gas. Work on laying the mines began some 18 months before zero hour. One mine, at Petite Douve Farm, was discovered by German counter miners on 24th August 1916 and destroyed. A further two mines close to Ploegsteert Wood are not exploded as they are outside the planned attack area.

In the face of active German counter-mining, 8,000 metres of tunnel are constructed under German lines. Occasionally the tunnelers encounter German counterparts engaged in the same task and underground hand to hand fighting ensues. Heavy preliminary artillery bombardment of the German lines began on 21st May, involving 2,300 guns and 300 heavy mortars, ceasing at 02:50 this morning. The German troops, sensing imminent attack, rush to their defensive positions, machine guns ready, meanwhile sending up flares to detect British movement towards the ridge. Silence follows for twenty minutes until, at 03:10 when the order is given across the line to detonate the mines, which total 600 tons of explosive. Of the 21 mines laid 19 are exploded.

The evening before the attack General Plumer remarks to his staff. “Gentlemen, we may not make history tomorrow, but we shall certainly change the geography.”
The inevitable loss of surprise in the use of a preliminary bombardment is entirely offset by the effect of the mines, which blow the crest off the Messines-Wytschaete ridge. Audible in Dublin and by Lloyd George in his Downing Street study, the combined sound of the simultaneous mine explosions comprises the loudest man-made explosion until this point in history. The lighting up of the sky as the detonations run across the ridge is likened to a ‘pillar of fire’ and the effect of the mine explosions upon the German defenders is devastating. Some 10,000 men are killed during the explosion alone. In its wake nine divisions of infantry advance under protection of a creeping artillery barrage, tanks and gas attacks from the new Livens projectors which are designed to throw gas canisters directly into the enemy trenches. All initial objectives are taken within three hours. Reserves from General Gough’s Fifth Army and the French First Army reached their own final objectives by mid-afternoon.

German troops will counter-attack tomorrow, without success, in fact losing further ground as the attacks are repelled. German counter-attacks will then continue in diminishing form until 14th June by which time the entire Messines salient will be in Allied hands. The Messines battle, which greatly boosts morale among the Allies, signifies the first time on the Western Front that defensive casualties actually exceeded attacking losses: 25,000 against 17,000. Of the two mines which remain undetonated on today, the details of their precise location will be mislaid by the British following the war, to the discomfort of local townspeople. One of the mines will be detonated in a thunderstorm on 17th June 1955 the only casualty being an unfortunate cow. The second mine remains undetected, although in recent years its location is believed to have been pinpointed. No-one has as yet attempted its recovery.

The Q-Ship HMS Pargust (Commander G Campbell VC) sinks the German submarine UC-29 south of Ireland.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A Member of Parliament and Irish Nationist
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of the Lord Mayor of London and 1st Viscount Bearsted
  • Multiple sons of member of the clergy
  • A man whose father was killed in action last year
  • A New Zealand Rugby International
  • A winning trainer of Labrador Retrievers
  • Multiple men whose brother-in-law is killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South Africa War in 1902
  • The son of the 6th Bishop of Barbados
  • Brothers killed on the same day in different regimetns
  • A man whose father died the same as a result of an action in Valpariso, Chile
  • The great grandson of the 13th the Earl of Derby
  • A cousin once removed of Lord Stanley who donated the cup to the winner of the North American Hockey Championships (now the NHL)
  • A man whose brother was killed as a Naval Chaplain in the explosion of HMS Goliath
  • A man whose brother drowned on S S Lusitania
  • The Captain of the Otahuhu Football Club

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John Hutton Bowes-Wilson (commanding 9th Yorkshire and Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 37. His older brother was killed in June two years ago.
  • Major William Hoeg Kearney Redmond (Royal Irish Regiment), a Member of Parliament, Irish Nationalist and brother of John, dies of wounds at age 56 during the battle of Messines Ridge.
  • Major D D H Campbell MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 33. He and his brother, who will be killed in September of this year, are the sixth successive generation of their family to serve in the military.
  • Captain Ralph Duncan Robinson (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of William Charles Robinson MBE JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald George Samuel (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son of Marcus Samuel 1st Viscount Bearsted (Lord Mayor of London) and Lady Bearsted.  He has a brother in law who was killed in 1915.
  • Lieutenant Alban John Benedict Hudson MC (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Henry Hudson. He was the Commoner of Magdalen College, Oxford.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Henderson (London Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Graham Henderson.
  • Lieutenant Randolph Edward Oswald Coates (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will die at home three days after the armistice.
  • Sergeant Frank Whitelaw (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Corporal Alan Gunn Hodgman (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed on the first day of landings on Gallipoli.
  • Private Charles Albert Clissold (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His father was killed in action in November 1916.
  • Private Keith McLean Viles (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private Robert James Lewis (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private William Cargill (Canterbury Infantry) is killed at age 32. His brother will die on service in September 1918.
  • Private Victor John Hodder (Auckland Infantry) is killed. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in November 1914.
  • Private William Samuel Bussell (Canterbury Regiment) is killed. He is a Rugby League player for both Canterbury and his country.
  • Captain Andrew Richard Buxton (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 37. He was was a successful trainer of Labrador Retrievers, winning, with Hunsdon Zulu, in 1910, the Championship in the International Gun-dog League Retriever Trials. When the War broke out Captain Buxton enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, and in January 1915, he was given a Commission in the Rifle Brigade and went out to France in the following July. His Battalion was in the salient of Ypres, and all through the winter he had many narrow escapes. In August, 1916, he led his Company into action at Guillemont. His health then broke down, and after a period of time in a rest camp he was attached to Brigade Headquarters. He was, however, always anxious to return to his Battalion, and this he succeeded in doing, a few days before his death.
  • Captain Archibald Bowers-Taylor (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend Bowers-Taylor.
  • Captain Capel Desmond O’Brien-Butler MC (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed in October 1914, his brother-in-law in December 1914 and another brother in January 1902 during the South Africa War.
  • Second Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Donald Campbell Rutter MC (Sussex Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Hugh Campbell Rutter JP.
  • Lieutenant Alfred FitzHardinge Murray Berkeley (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Alfred Pakenham Berkeley 6th Bishop of Barbados.
  • Sergeant James Irwin age 24 (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at age 24 the same day his brother Sergeant David Irwin age 21 (Irish Rifles) is killed.
  • Rifleman William Kennedy (Irish Rifles) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend S G Kennedy. His brother J Kennedy was also lost in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Archibald Bright (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Lieutenant Noel Gilbert Bryan King (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Gilbert Alfred King Rector of Easterton.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Henry Garnett (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Alfred Lionel Cumming (Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 25 the same day his father dies as a result of an accident in Valparaiso, Chile, where Second Lieutenant Cumming was born.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Stanley (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He is the great grandson of the 13th Earl of Derby who is the grandfather of the Lord Stanley who donated the Stanley Cup to the top ranking amateur hockey club in 1892 making John William Stanley the cousin once removed of Lord Stanley. Second
  • Lieutenant Reginald Silvester (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Sergeant Raymond Bartram (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the war this year.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Henry Reeves (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Lance Corporal Charles William Shone (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Lance Corporal John Scott (Border Regiment) is killed at age 32.  His brother was killed last November.
  • Private John Henry Shannon (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 33. His brother-in-law will be killed in action in Italy in September 1918.
  • Private Frederick Arthur Parsons (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Rifleman Charles F Rance (London Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed last March.
  • Private Robert Archer (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private Peter Garnett Cook (Australian Infantry) is killed nine days before his brother.
  • Private Elliott Glostilon Halford (Cheshire Regiment) is killed. His brother died of wounds last September.
  • Private Joseph Hockenhull (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private William Colman (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Private Herman Albert Nordstrom (Canterbury Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Rifleman John Gordon Lewis (London Regiment) is killed in action. His brother was the Chaplain and killed on board HMS Goliath in 1915 and they are sons of the Reverend David Lewis Rector of Llanbede.
  • Private Henry Charles Neems (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother drowned in the torpedoing of S S Lusitania in May 1915.
  • Private John Christopher Robertson (Otago Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Gilbert Knowles Bazett (Canterbury Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in October.
  • Private Angelo William Thomas Gill (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the Captain of the Otahuhu Football Club who won several medals for shooting.
  • Private Cecil Wallace Ayling (London Regiment) dies of wounds at age l9. His brother will be killed in exactly six months.
  • Private Edward Perrin (East Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1914.

Wednesday 6 June 1917 – We Lost 489

Voss versus Fabian Reeves

Flight Lieutenant Raymond Collishaw (Royal Naval Air Service) shoots down two Albatross scouts in flames and kills the pilot of a third.  Flight Sub Lieutenant Ellis Vair Reid (Royal Naval Air Service) attacks and drives down one of four hostile scouts this machine dives nose first into the ground and is destroyed.

Flight Lieutenant Fabian Pember Reeves (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Fabian socialist and suffragist Magdalene Stuart Robinson. He is the 34th victim  of the German Ace Werner Voss.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of Fabian Socialist and suffragist Magdalene Stuart Robinson
  • A Fellow of the Royal Geological Survey
  • A victim of Werner Voss
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The grandson of both a member of the clergy and a General
  • A family that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Horas Tristram Kennedy (Royal Scots Fusiliers attached Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 28. He had been appointed to the Geological Survey of Ireland in 1913 and was a Fellow of the Royal Geological Society.
  • Second Lieutenant Humphrey Warwick Arden (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action at Balleul at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry Arden, vicar of Whiteparish, Salisbury.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Gibbons (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the grandson of both the Reverend Robert Gibbons and General Albert Henry Bamfield.
  • Lance Corporal Samuel Davidson Ferguson (Royal Scots) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in August 1918.

Tuesday 5 June 1917 – We Lost 780

Flight Lieutenant Raymond Collishaw (Royal Naval Air Service) shoots down a two-seater Albatross in flames.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a three time Prime Minister of New Zealand
  • A man whose son will be killed in June 1941
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Richard Bolster MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34. His son will be killed in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in June 1941.
  • Captain Samuel Arnold Atkinson (New Zealand Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Harry Albert Atkinson KCMG three-time Prime Minister of New Zealand.
  • Captain Gerald Ogilivie Laing (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 30 at Greenland Hill. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Archibald Edward Jones (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Enoch Edward Jones Rector of Shawel.
  • Private William Huggan (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed. His brother will be killed in November and their cousin will die of wounds less than one week before the Armistice next year.
  • Private George Williams (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war received last month. His brother was killed last October.