Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tuesday 9 October 1917 We Lost 3,733

Sarah Aaronsohm

Duncan MacKinnon

The Coldstream Guards attack the German defenses south of the Houthulst Forest and in spite of appallingly thick mud, take and hold their objective.

  • Captain Claude Stewart Jackson (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the attack from the Broembeke to Houthulst Forest at 05:200 at age 25. He is the fourth son of ‘Sir’ Thomas Jackson 1st Baronet and the son-in-law of the Honorable William Pearson.  Captain Jackson received a Commission in the Coldstream Guards in February 1912. He went to France with the original Expeditionary Force on 12 August 1914. He was through the Retreat from Mons, and in the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne, and was severely wounded in the head in September 1914. For distinguished services at Landrecies he was mentioned in Dispatches. After recovering from his wound he held several Staff appointments in France and rejoined his Battalion in September 1917.
  • Lieutenant Ralph Vivian Babington (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the attack at age 19. His brother will die on service in November 1919.
  • The third of four sons of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Maxwell-Stuart of Dorset to die in the Great War, Second Lieutenant Henry Joseph Ignatius Maxwell-Stuart (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 30.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Denis Bertram Sydney Buxton (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 19. He is the third and surviving son of the 1st Viscount and Viscountess Buxton, (later Earl and Countess Buxton).
  • Second Lieutenant George Denis Harvey a brother in law of Baronet Churchman is killed.
  • Lance Corporal Frank Bryant (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 23. His brother was killed in April of this year.
  • Private Harry Monnery (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in August of this year.

Jewish spy Sarah Aaronsohn working for the British and sister of notable botanist Aaron Aaronsohn shoots and kills herself using a pistol concealed in the prison where she is held by the Turks.  She was arrested four days previously after her carrier pigeon with a message to the British was intercept by the Turks and the message it was carrying decrypted.  She endured torture for the four days she was held prior to her suicide and she died at age 27.

At Poelcapelle, Belgium when an advance is checked by intense machine gun fire from concrete blockhouses and by snipers Corporal William Clamp (Yorkshire Regiment) attempts to rush the largest blockhouse. His first attempt fails and the two men with him become casualties but he collects some bombs and two more men and dashes forward being the first to reach the blockhouse where he hurls his bombs killing many of the occupants. He then enters the blockhouse capturing a machine gun and about 20 prisoners whom he brings back under heavy fire.  He goes forward again encouraging his men until he is killed by a sniper at age 25. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

  • Captain William Victor Trevor Rooper (Denbighshire Yeomanry attached Royal Flying Corps) is at age 20. His brother will be killed serving in the French Red Cross Society in May 1918.
  • Lieutenant Arthur James Dashwood Torry MC (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in aerial combat at age 30. He is the only son the Reverend Alfred Freer Torry Rector of Marston Morteyne, Beds.
  • Second Lieutenant Edgar Daniel Gibson (Royal Flying Corps) is killed when his FK8 recon bomber goes into a spin at 200 feet while he is performing engine tests at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1915 they are sons of ‘Sir’ Walter Matthew Gibson Kt CVO ISO Secretary of the Privy Purse to His Majesty the King.

Today’s losses include:

  • A spy who will commit suicide in prison after being caught by the Turks
  • The sister of a well known botanist
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The son of the 6th Earl of Airlie who was killed at the Diamond Hill, Pretoria 1900
  • The son of the 9th Earl of Carlisle
  • The only son of the 1st and last Viscount Buxton
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The brother-in-law of a Baronet
  • A 1908 Olympic Gold Medalist in rowing
  • The son of a Member of Parliament and future Mayor of Bradford
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • A father and son killed together
  • Brothers killed today serving in different regiments
  • Brothers killed together
  • A man whose son will be executed by the Japanese after escaping as a prisoner of war in February 1943 after being recaptured
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • The Deputy Organist at Gloucester Cathedral
  • An Australian Rules Footballer
  • The husband of novelist and suffragette Emily Hilda Young
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • The son of the Secretary to the Privy Purse to His Majesty the King
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of an Alderman
  • A Great War Poet

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Harry Moorhouse DSO and his son Captain Ronald Wilkinson Moorhouse MC (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) are both killed. Captain Moorhouse is mortally wounded and taken to headquarters where his father insists on going to find a doctor, even after those with him and his son beg him not to go due to the nature of the machine gun/rifle fire at the time. Colonel Moorhouse then leaves and shortly after leaving the dugout is hit and killed.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Robert Arthur Hudson DSO (commanding 8th West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 37.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Patrick Julian Harry Stanley Ogilvy MC (Irish Guards) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the late David William Ogilvy, 6th Earl of Airlie (Lieutenant Colonel XII Royal Lancers, who was killed in action at Diamond Hill, Pretoria, 1900 during the South Africa War).
  • Captain Gerald Castleton Blandy (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother died of wounds last April.
  • Captain Cecil Llewelyn Norton Roberts (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Pryor Roberts Vicar of St Margaret’s Birmingham who lost another son on Gallipoli in July 1915.
  • Captain John William Egerton-Green (Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother Charles was killed on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916.
  • Captain Martin Bowen MC (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed in January 1918.Captain Arthur Norcross (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in July 1916.Captain Alfred Ernest Mander (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Alderman H Mander of Spon House Coventry.
  • Captain Eric Fitzwater Wilkinson MC (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is a Great War Poet.

To a Choir of Birds

Green are the trees, and green the summer grass,

Beneath the sun, the tinest leaf hangs still:

The flowers in languor droop, and tired men pass

All somnolent, while death whines loud and shrill.

fine, full throated choir invisible,

Whose sudden burst of rapture fills the ear!

Are ye insensible to mortal fear,

That such a stream of melody ye spill,

While murk of battle drifts on Auber’s hill,

And mankind dreams of slaughter? What wild glee

Has filled your throbbing throats with sound, until

Its strains are poured from every bush and tree,

And sad hearts swell with hope, and fierce eyes fill?

The world is stark with blood and hate – but ye –

Sing on! Sing on! In careless ecstasy. 

  • Lieutenant Andrew John Hay Hobson (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend John Philip Hobson Vicar of Legourne.
  • Lieutenant Benjamin Bollingham (Australian Infantry is killed. His step-brother will be killed next April.
  • Lieutenant Bryon Fitzgerald Nicholas MC (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last November.
  • Lieutenant Eric Joseph Woods (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the late Reverend Francis Henry Woods Rector of Bainton and grandson of the Reverend C E Pritchard.
  • Lieutenant Charles Cedric Gordon Allom (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 21 at Rouen. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Charles Allom.
  • Lieutenant Duncan MacKinnon (Scots Guards) is killed at age 30. He was a member of the British boat that won the Men’s coxless fours gold medal at the 1908 Summer Olympics.
  • Second Lieutenant Hubert Ratcliffe Felton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Walter Felton Vicar of St John’s Walsall.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Charles Organ (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He was the one time Deputy Organist at Gloucester Cathedral.
  • Second Lieutenant Aylmer Eade (Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25 at Poelcapelle. He is the son of the Reverend Charles John Aylmer Eade.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Charles Vaughan Smith (East Yorkshire Regiment attached Duke of Wellington’s Regiment is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next January and they are sons of the Reverend Walter Edward Smith Vicar of Andover.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Robert McDowell (Australian Infantry) is killed. He played two first grade games for Newtown in 1915.
  • Company Sergeant Major Robert Rayner (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in successive Octobers.
  • Sergeant Samuel Ernest Burley (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Corporal Bernard Palin (Army Cyclist Corps) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son a Member of Parliament and the future Lord Mayor of Bradford.
  • Lance Corporal Harry Fitzroy (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action nine days short of one year after his brother has been killed as a member of the Liverpool Regiment. He is 19-years old.
  • Lance Corporal John Burke Houghton (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in February 1916.
  • Privates and brothers Charles Herbert (age 30) and Reginald Herbert (age 29) are both killed on Passchaendale Ridge while serving in different regiments. Charles is in the Australian Infantry while Reginald is serving in the Lancashire Fusiliers. Their younger brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Another set of brothers killed this day are Privates Albert and Joseph Godson (Royal Warwickshire Regiment).
  • Private Raymond William Eggleton (Gloucester Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will die of illness in February 1919.
  • Private Thomas Palmer (Middlesex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 35. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private ‘The Honorable’ Michael Francis Stafford Howard (Honorable Artillery Company) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the 9th Earl of Carlisle and a South Africa War veteran. His son will be executed by the Japanese after escaping a POW camp in February 1943 and being recaptured.
  • Private George Baker (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in two months.
  • Rifleman Percival Buckle (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. Private James Henry Davis (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 17. His brother will die of wounds in April 1918.
  • Private Raymond William Eggleton (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will die on service in February 1919.
  • Private George Harris Pitchford (Machine Gun Corps) is killed. His brother will drown in the sinking of the transport Aragon on the next to the last day of this year.
  • Private Wesley Watts (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Leaten Simms (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed last July.
  • Private George S Clarke (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next April.
  • Private Frank Columbus (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother died on service two years ago on the same day.
  • Private Samuel Oldham (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed less than two weeks earlier.
  • Private Shorrock Ashurst (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action. His son will be killed in March 1944.
  • Private William Knock (Worcestershire Regiment) is the second of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Arthur Daniell (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed. He is the husband of Emily Hilda Young the novelist and supporter of the suffragette movement.

Monday 8 October 1917 We Lost 864

S S Richard De Larrinaga

The steamer Richard De Larrinaga (Master George James Bonner) is torpedoed and sunk by U-57 fifteen miles southeast of Ballycottin Island while travelling in ballast.  Her master is among the thirty-five casualties. The steamer Greldon (Master D H Jones) is torpedoed and sunk seven miles east northeast of the North Arklow Light Vessel St George Channel by U-96. Her master is among the twenty-eight killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Marylebone Cricketer
  • The son of the former Captain of the English National Cricket Team
  • Multiple families that will two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Sidney George Smith (commanding 7th Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 51 in Mesopotamia.
  • Captain Francis Mourilyan Butler (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at Passchendaele at age 41. His only son Francis will be killed in 1940 serving in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve at age 25.
  • Lieutenant Allan Ivo Steel (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age. He played one first class cricket match for MCC and one for Middlesex in 1912. His brother will drown when washed overboard en-route to take command of HMS Munster in April 1918. They are sons of Allan Gibson Steel KC Recorder of Oldham and former English National Cricket Captain in 1886.
  • Second Lieutenant Eustace Blackborne Ritson (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend William Ritson.
  • Private Frank Crawley (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in May.
  • Stoker 1st Class Ernest George Watson (HMS Marshall Ney) dies on service at home at age 25. His brother was killed in the explosion of HMS Vanguard in July.
  • Private James Pennycuick (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed last April. Driver Horace Ward (Royal Field Artillery) is killed. His brother will be killed ten days before the Armistice next year.
  • Private Edwin Edward Bunyan (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 26. His brother died of wounds earlier in the year and a cousin was killed five days earlier.
  • Private Robert James Gamble (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 34 four days after his brother met the same fate

Sunday 7 October 1917 We Lost 834

         Rev Cecil Barclay Simpson

The merchant ship S S Aylevarroo (Chief Officer John Olivet) is sunk off the south coast of Ireland when she is torpedoed. Twenty are killed including her master.

Lieutenant James Cromwell Bush MC (Dorsetshire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 26 when he and his observer Lieutenant William Wetherall Chapman (East Kent Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) are shot down near Kruishoek.  Bush is the eldest son of the Reverend Herbert Cromwell Bush, grandson of the late General Reynell Taylor CB CSI and Canon Bush of Cornwall and a six-victory ace. Lieutenant Chapman is killed at age 21 and his brother was killed on 1st October.

Today’s losses include:

  • A member of the clergy
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The grandson of a General and a member of the clergy
  • A 6-victory ace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose son will die on service in November 1944

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Second Lieutenant the Reverend Cecil Barclay Simpson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He was proceeding down the communication trench, when he was struck by a shell and killed instantaneously.
  • Lance Corporal William Strang (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private John Alfred Merryweather (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 41. His brother will be killed in January 1918.
  • Private Frank William Gent (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of pneumonia in Baghdad at age 20. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Private William Smith Michelson (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action. His son will die on service in November 1944.
  • Private Herbert William Reeves (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed four months earlier.
  • Private Thomas Zeller (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 30 His brother will die of wounds in April 1918. A third brother who served and made it home will be killed in 1919 when a branch falls on his car killing him.

Saturday 6 October 1917 We Lost 834

Donald McLeod

Enemy artillery fire is directed primarily against British new positions on the ridge from Broodseinde and southwards.

The fleet sweeping sloop Begonia (Lieutenant Commander Basil Stratford Noake) disappears in Atlantic to SW of England and is declared lost today. Her crew of ninety-five all become casualties of the Great War. Among those lost:

  • Probationary Surgeon Wesley Cope Holdsworth whose brother will die of wounds as a prisoner of war next June.
  • Leading Stoker Hellawell Bentley is lost at age 23. His brother was killed in the loss of submarine E47 last August and they are sons of the Reverend J Forster Holdsworth.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A schoolmaster and liturgical student
  • A Scottish International footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Francis Brainall Metcalfe (Australian Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds at age 24. His brother will die of wounds next April also serving in the Army Medical Corps.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Amyot Steward (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of Canon Edward Steward.
  • Chaplain John Richard Duvall (attached Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds at Salonika at age 28.
  • Lance Corporal George Harry Hillier Crowther (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds received in action. He is a schoolmaster and was training to take Holy Orders.
  • Gunner Donald McLeod (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action at age 38. He played for the Celtic Football Club from 1902-1908 appearing in 155 games and was a Scottish International.
  • Private Ernest John Wheeler (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed when the Bulwark exploded in November 1914.
  • Gunner Herbert Scowcroft (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in August.

Friday 5 October 1917 We Lost 1,117

Clarence Jeffries VC

Rain resumes on the Western front and it is not a shower but a steady soaking downpour.  Haig however, encouraged by recent success, ignores the rain and decides to make a further attempt to break the Germans on the Ridge.  He orders the Anzacs to take Passchendaele on 9th October even though the wind and rain had now developed into a gale force storm. He appears to be quite unaware of the appalling conditions on the front or that the wire has not been cut and the Germans have replaced their soldiers with fresh support troops in their relatively dry pillboxes. His reason for persisting is to allow his troops to winter on the ridge, without the Germans overlooking them, and with drier conditions once the front line is out of the swamp.

The Australians attack and at Augustus Wood, near the Tyne Cot, Captain Clarence Jeffries organizes a party and attacks a pillbox, capturing four machine guns and 35 prisoners. He leads another charge on the next blockhouse where he is killed by machinegun fire. He will be awarded the posthumous Victoria Cross. Incredibly, and mainly because of the valour of Captain Jeffries, 20 men reach the rubble that used to be Passchendaele church. Unfortunately the British troops on their right are unable to support them and the Australians are forced to retreat all the way back to the mud holes that had been their front line. By now, their artillery is running out of ammunition and their shells are burying themselves in the liquid mud and expending themselves relatively harmlessly in a cloud of steam and a fountain of water.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The son of a city councilor
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A man whose nephew will be killed next year
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • A well known ornithologist

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major John Edward Blakemore MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late Councillor Edwin Blakemore.
  • Captain Lawrence Henry Jones (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Canon Gustavus John Jones Rector of Crayford.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Fitzgerald Sargent (Irish Regiment attached Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John Fitzgerald Sargent Vicar of Saltcombe.
  • Private Michael Logan (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 34. His nephew will be killed in May 1918.
  • Private Ernest Edward Parker (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in the Ypres area at age 21. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private John Edmunds (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 30. His two brothers lost their lives last year.
  • Private David Phillpott MM (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 31 becoming the middle of three brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Christopher James Alexander (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 30. He is a well known ornithologist.

Thursday 4 October 1917 We Lost 4,997

David Gallaher

The Battle of Broodseinde Ridge is a British attack on an eight mile front from the railway north of Langemarck to Tower Hamlets Ridge on the Ypres-Menin Road. The main attack is conducted by the I Anzac, II Anzac Corps and XVIII Corps, with flanking attacks supporting the main attack conducted by the X Corps, IX Corps and XIV Corps. Additionally, fourteen tanks are also used. The attack is timed to start at 06:00 hours. The northernmost corps (XIV Corps) encounters a bog during its advance – resulting in it losing the protection of the creeping barrage. The XIV Corps encounters machine gun fire from defences along the edge of Houlthulst Forest and suffers 1,700 casualties while gaining very little ground. The northern corps of the main attack (XVIII Corps) manages to capture all of its objectives at a cost of 2,000 casualties. German artillery fire and counter attacks later resulted in the Germans recapturing the northern half of the village of Poelcappelle.

The I ANZAC Corps now has one of the most unique experiences of the war. When it was preparing to attack, a German artillery bombardment falls on it causing 1 in 7 of the attacking forces to become casualties. When the Australian forces starts to attack, the cause of the German artillery fire became apparent, when they are met by a German regiment in no-man’s land. Due to the superior numbers involved, the Australians quickly rout the Germans and continue the attack. Despite hard fighting to defeat the fortifications of the Flandern I line, the Australians reach the first objective (the “Red Line” a line 100 to 200 yards short of the crest of the ridgeline) by 07:20. During the hour long halt at the first objective, parts of the 1st Australian Division has to fight German pillboxes positioned along the crest of the ridgeline. The Australians consolidate just short of the second objective due to defensive fire from German positions along the edge of “Daisy Wood”.  This effort costs the Australian divisions approximately 4,500 casualties. Initially, the II ANZAC Corps has an easier time than its neighbouring ANZAC units. During the advance to the second onjective (the “Blue Line” a line 200 to 400 yards beyond the crest of the ridgeline), it has to advance through parts of the Flandern I line. Despite this, the second objective is reached by 09:00, at a cost of 3,500 casualties (including 1,853 New Zealanders). the attack by the X Corps achieves most of its objectives (advancing 800 yards), although unsubdued German artillery fire from behind the Ghevulelt Plateau causes large numbers of casualties (8,000 casualties in the three attacking divisions). The southernmost corps (the IX Corps) experiences the same problems as the X Corps and makes little headway against the German defences.

After the attacking units reach their final positions, Allied artillery fires an interdiction barrage for an additional two and a half hours, allowing the attacking troops to establish defences (trenches, outposts, defensive wire entanglements, etc.). As a result, when the Germans counter-attack, most of the counter-attacks are dispersed purely through the use of Allied artillery. The attack is a stunning attritional success, with an average advance of over 1,000 yards and the Australian 3rd Division advancing up to 1,900 yards. Capture and retention of ground is varied, with limited (or no) advance maintained by the southernmost Corps, to moderate gains between Menin Road and Polygon Wood and all objectives at Broodseinde Ridge. By mid-afternoon it is decided that no further attacks will take place.

Captain Clement Robertson (West Surrey Regiment attached Tank Corps) is killed at age 28. At Zonnebeke, Belgium, Captain Robertson leads his tanks in attack under heavy shell, machine-gun and rifle fire over ground which has been ploughed by shell-fire. He and his batman have spent the previous three days and nights going back and forth over the ground, reconnoitering and taping routes, and, knowing the risk of the tanks missing the way, he now leads them on foot, guiding them carefully towards their objective, although he must have known that this action would almost certainly cost him his life. He is killed after the objective has been reached, but his skillful leading had already ensured success. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. Captain Robertson is a founding member of the Delgany Golf Club where his name is the first on the President’s Cup.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The only child of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A founding member of the Delgany Golf Club
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of two members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A Humane Society Bronze Medal winner
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A New Zealand Rugby Union footballer
  • The Captain of the “Original All Blacks”
  • A popular footballer and member of the Auckland City Fire Brigade
  • An Irish International Rugby player
  • A professional cycling champion and world record holder
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • A man shot at dawn for mutiny
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • An Assistant Scout Master

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Cecil Robert Arthur Pye DSO (commanding 18th Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 27.
  • Major Philip Llewellyn Howell-Price DSO MC (Australian Infantry) becomes the third of three brothers to be killed in action within a year during the Great War. He dies at age 23.  All three are awarded the Military Cross and are sons of the late Reverend John Howell-Price.
  • Lieutenants Frank, 26, and John Rigby MM, 29, Australian Infantry are killed together.
  • Another set of brothers Michael, 28, and Patrick Starr, 22, are killed serving the Australian Infantry.
  • Second Lieutenant John Oliver Ethell (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred William Ethell Rector of Laidley.
  • Corporal Thomas Jepson Gascoyne (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 40. He is a professional cycling champion and world recorder holder for both 25 miles and the flying start quarter-mile. He also holds the English record for two miles on a tandem.
  • Lance Corporal Reginald Percy Bartram (Australian Infantry) becomes the last of three brothers who are killed this year when he loses his life at age 36.
  • Private Ernest Briggs (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed last January.
  • Eric, 21, and Joseph Burgess, 25, are killed serving with the Australian Field Artillery. The brothers are buried in adjacent graves at The Huts Cemetery, Dickebusch.
  • Private Gavin Gordon Bulkeley Gavin age 25 and Lance Corporal James Tinnock Bulkeley Gavin age 23 (Australian Infantry) are killed together.
  • Private Norman Richard Wight (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal for attempting to save a soldier who fell over board from a transport at Sierra Leone on 22nd November 1916 but he could not save him.
  • Private Clement Henry Gamble (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in four days.
  • Private Winton Merlin Langtry (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in December of this year.
  • Private Thomas Miller McCluskey (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. An Australian Rules Footballer he played in 9 games in 1910 and 1911.
  • Private William John Cumming (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother died of wounds in August 1915.
  • Captain Hugh Townshend Boscawen (Wellington Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the grandson of the Reverend Honorable John Townshend Boscawen and the Reverend John W Conway Hughes.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Guy Spencer Bryan-Brown (New Zealand) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the late Reverend Willoughby Bryan-Brown.
  • Sergeant David Gallaher (Auckland Infantry) is killed at age 41. He is a New Zealand rugby union footballer, best known as the captain of “The Originals” the first New Zealand national rugby union team to be known as the All Blacks. Born in Ramelton, County Donegal, Ireland, Gallaher’s family emigrated to New Zealand in 1878. Originally settling in Katikati in the Bay of Plenty, they moved to Auckland in the 1890s and it was there that Gallaher played his provincial rugby. Gallaher played 26 representative matches for Auckland, including the first ever Ranfurly Shield defense, and 36 for the All Blacks, including 6 tests. Gallaher’s All Black career spanned from 1903 to 1906, the highlight being the captaincy of the “Originals” tour in which he played 26 matches including 4 tests. Gallaher proved to be an outstanding leader and one of the deepest thinkers of the game in his era. Gallaher fought in the South African War serving as a corporal in the New Zealand Contingents of Mounted Rifles. Although exempt from conscription due to his age, Gallaher volunteered to fight in the Great War, and apparently altered his date of birth to 31st October 1876. He saw action at Ypres, and is killed during the Passchendaele He is buried at Nine Elms Cemetery, Poperinge, where his gravestone bears the silver fern. Two of Gallaher’s brothers were also killed in France. He is a member of the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame.
  • Corporal George William Worner (Auckland Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He was a well-known football player, having played for the City Rovers and Grafton Athletic clubs.  He was also a member of the Waitemata Boating Club and a member of the Auckland City Fire Brigade.
  • Corporal Ronald Burnsall Twisleton (Wellington Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in August 1915 at Gallipoli.
  • Private Guy Genge (Otago Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Jeoffreys Carmichael (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Charles Gow (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is an Assistant Scout Master in Timaru.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Hamilton Dix MC (Leinster Regiment commanding 12th/13th Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Neville Reay Daniell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry commanding 9th King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 28.
  • Major Albert Lewis Stewart (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 28. He is an Irish International Rugby player.
  • Captain Roy Grote Cordiner MC (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Reverend Robert Charles Cordiner.
  • Lieutenant Alexander Egan Barrow (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the late Reverend Kingston Egan Barrow.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Cecil Ainger (Royal Scots attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 22 when his Spad is shot down. He is the son of the late Reverend Francis Edward Ainger rector of St John’s Jedbugh Roxburghshire.
  • Lieutenant George Samuel Vincent (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother died of wounds last year.
  • Lieutenant Oliver St. Michael Jones (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at Poelcappelle at age 40. He is the only child of the late Captain Henry Mitchell Jones VC late of the Diplomatic Service. Lieutenant Jones on leaving Harrow went to Argentina, and on the outbreak of the South African War proceeded to Durban where he joined Thornycroft’s Mounted Infantry, being subsequently given a commission in the 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers). He was severely wounded by a shell. After several years’ service he resigned his commission and became a world traveler. In August 1914 he was in Mexico ill. He returned home to be medically treated and then entered the Sherwood Foresters.
  • Second Lieutenant Duncan MacKenzie MacRae (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend D M MacRae.
  • Second Lieutenant William Ward Odell MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Odell.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Stanley Martin (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Leslie Lowth (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Stephen Clarke (attached Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed.
  • Corporal Frederick John James (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lance Corporal Jesse Robert Short (Northumberland Fusiliers)) is shot at dawn at age 30 for his role as an Etaples Mutineer.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Gill (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at Salonika. His brother was killed in September of last year.
  • Lance Corporal Edwin John Burnell (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in action becoming the third brother to die in the Great War.
  • Acting Corporal James Oag (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in July 1915.
  • Private Alfred Thomas Pettman (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in February 1916.
  • Private Leonard Brown (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private David Alexander Malcolm (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Private George Georgeson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Albert Victor Gurr (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private John Youlden (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Private Robert Wallis Heaven (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in January of this year.
  • Private Reginald Harold Couzens (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother died of wounds less than two months ago.
  • Private Walter Tugwell (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed at the end of next month.
  • Private John Fletcher Boughey (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed on HMS Defence at Jutland and they are grandsons of the Reverend Benjamin Lucas Cubitt and ‘Sir’ John Fenton Boughey 2nd

Wednesday 3 October 1917 We Lost 731

The Battle of Broodseinde begins at dawn. The waiting Australian troops are bombed by mortars in their trenches by the enemy and as they go over the top they are surprised to see German troops advancing under cover of the mortar bombardment; by chance the opposing troops have each launched an assault on each other at the same time!  The Germans are eventually driven back by an Australian bayonet charge however a German machine gun causes heavy casualties and holds up part of the attack.  Sergeant Lewis McGee, armed only with a revolver, runs 50 yards across bullet swept ground, shoots some of the crew and captures the gun.  He reorganizes the advance and will be awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding leadership during the week’s fighting; he will be killed on 12th October without knowing of his award.

After the bayonet charge, the Germans retreat to their trenches where they, and their reserves, are caught by the British creeping barrage which causes many casualties. When the Australians reach the Ridge, they are able to see the German rear lines stretching before them the only obstacle to their success being the German occupied village of Passchendaele to their north.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a General
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The son of a Baronet
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • A man who will have two cousins, who are brothers, killed
  • A Humane Society Bronze Medal winner

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Charles Elles Stuart Beatson MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 26. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ Stuart Beatson KCB KCSI KCVO.
  • Lieutenant Francis Clement Thompson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is the son of Reverend George Thompson.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Burton Robert Williams (Devonshire Regiment) the 6th Baronet is killed at age 28. He is the son of the late ‘Sir” William Robert Williams.
  • Sergeant James McCheyne (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed in action at age 26. He is one of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Sergeant James McCheyne (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 26. He is the third of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Claude Ogle (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Leslie Victor Poll (Australian Infantry) is killed in action. His two cousins, who are brothers, will be killed in 1917, one in just 5 days.
  • Private Albert George Handcock (West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Driver Douglas Bonter (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received 29 September. His brother will die of wounds next August.
  • Gunner Frederick Powner (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action in Mesopotamia at age 24. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal earlier in the year for attempting to save a man on 4th March when the man was thrown into the Tigris when his mule tripped in a hole while watering. Unfortunately he is unable to find the man.

Tuesday 2 October 1917 We Lost 713

Justin Morell McKenna

The cruiser HMS Drake is several miles off the north-west tip of Rathlin Island after carrying out routine escort duties with convoy HH24 inbound from Norfolk, Virginia. The U-79 locates HH24 in the early morning and finds the Drake in her sight and fires one of her torpedoes, the resulting explosion kills 19 seamen though the cruiser remains afloat. After the attack and as normal procedure, the convoy disperses – the remaining naval and auxiliary escorts including the HMS Brisk, a type H (Acorn) destroyer, are deployed to follow up on the dispersed ships, some through Rathlin Sound and others in the North Channel. The 2,372 ton SS Lugano, loaded with cotton and steel from Virginia comes into the Sound and is hit on her starboard side by a torpedo fired from U-79, the explosion ripping a large hole in the hull resulting in her sinking rapidly, though with no loss of life. Shortly afterwards HMS Brisk following up on her charges makes a sweep up the Sound and is hit by a torpedo amidships causing a catastrophic explosion which breaks her in two, the bow section sinking in the Sound while the stern section is eventually towed into Londonderry – the explosion killing thirty-one seamen.

The crippled Drake under the command of Captain S. H. Radcliffe is escorted into Church Bay by HMS Martin and other auxiliary ships where she will be anchored.  An attempt was made to beach her in Church Bay, but the degree of list becomes critical and she is abandoned to capsize in eighteen meters of water a few hundred meters from the shore.  There are no casualties as a result of the capsizing.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a military chaplain
  • The nephew of a Member of Parliament and former Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • An actor
  • A former Kent cricket player
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in The Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain John Bredel Matthews MC (North Staffordshire Regiment attached Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Fraser Mackintosh (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 27 while observing for artillery near Ypres. He is the son of Chaplain the Reverend William Teesdale Mackintosh and served as G Mathews. He was educated at The Wick, Furze Hill, and Brighton College. On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Forces, and he took part in the landing at Gallipoli, where he was shot through the throat and temporarily blinded. Returning to England for medical treatment, he received a commission in the Royal Field Artillery.
  • Lieutenant Justin Morell McKenna (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of the Right Hon. R McKenna MP former Chancellor of the Exchequer.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Ralph Gardiner Holmes (Royal Field Artillery) is killed by a bomb dropped by an enemy aircraft. He was formerly with the Anti-Aircraft Defences at Grove Park and was then in charge of the Wandsworth Common Station. He is former member of Miss Horoiman’s company of actors at the Gaiety.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Herbert Simpson (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 41 near Vlamertinghe from an aeroplane bomb being dropped. He played cricket for Kent in 1896.
  • Second Lieutenant Roger Thomas William Miles (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed while leading a counter-attack on Ploegsteert Wood at age 34. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and his brother will be killed in March 1918. Lieutenant Miles served in the Kimberley Regiment through the German South West African campaign. When that was over he came to England and entered a Cavalry Cadet School, but was laid up with measles through a great part of his training and failed to pass. He then served as a Trooper in the Hussars in France and was subsequently given a Commission in the Leicestershire Regiment. He went to the Front in July 1917.
  • Lance Corporal Walter Augustine Sangar (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the Reverend James Mortimer Sangar Rector of Elworthy.
  • Private Bernard Cantrell Davis (Canterbury Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in April next year and they are sons of the Reverend Henry John Davis Vicar of Hampden New Zealand.
  • Gunner Frederick James Shaw (Australian Field Artillery) is killed as the last of three brothers who are killed in the last year.

Monday 1 October 1917 We Lost 913

Philip Eric Bent VC

Allenby reorganizes his army of 92,000 into 3 groups: the Desert Column, the 20th Corps, and the 21st Corps. He increases his artillery to 400, receives Bristol airplanes that give him control of the air. He plans to surprise the Turks with a feint attack at Gaza, where the Turks expect the attack, and make his main thrust on his right toward Beersheba.

East of Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke, Belgium when the situation is critical owing to the confusion caused by a heavy enemy attack and intense artillery fire, Temporary Lieutenant Colonel Philip Eric Bent DSO (Leicestershire Regiment) collects a platoon that is in reserve and together with men from other companies and various regiments he organizes and leads them forward in a counter-attack which is successful and the enemy is checked.  The coolness and example of the colonel results in the securing of a portion of the line essential to the subsequent operation but is killed while leading a charge at age 26. For his actions he will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously.

Major Charles Meredith Bouverie Chapman MC (East Kent Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) a 7-victory ace dies of wounds at age 25.  Major Chapman, who on the outbreak of the War was in the East Kent Regiment at once applied to join the Expeditionary Force and went to France in September 1914. He served all through the early fighting and was for nine months in the trenches, when he was invalided home with trench fever. He had always been keenly interested in flying, and while on sick leave, in order to make sure of getting into the Royal Flying Corps he obtained the Aero Club’s qualification and was subsequently attached to the Royal Flying Corps. After obtaining his ‘Wings’ he flew to France on 1st April 1916, and served there until the following August, when he came home for a rest. He was awarded the Military Cross “For conspicuous gallantry and skill in action against hostile aeroplanes. On one occasion he attacked three LVG’s and one Fokker, shooting the latter down. Later, during an air battle with eleven enemy machines, he brought another Fokker down”. Subsequently he was made a Chevalier de I’Ordre de Leopold and received the Croix de Guerre (Beige).  While in England he was promoted Captain and Flight Commander, but was always trying to get back to France, even offering to forgo his rank if such a step would ensure his being posted to a Squadron at the Front. He was ultimately posted to a Squadron of Fighting Scouts in France.  He was then given a Staff Appointment in France, but this did not appeal to him, and he begged to be allowed to rejoin his Squadron. The opportunity came unexpectedly, as his old Squadron Commander was suddenly taken ill, and he was sent to take temporary charge and very shortly afterwards was appointed to the permanent charge with the rank of Major. He is mortally wounded while directing Anti-Aircraft fire during an enemy attack on his aerodrome at Poperinghe last night and dies a few hours afterwards. His younger and only brother, William Wetherall Chapman an observer in the Royal Flying Corps, will be killed in less than one week.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A 7 and a 6 victory aces
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A man whose son will be killed in February 1945
  • The grandson of the 1st editor of the Haranaki Herald and member of the 1st New Zealand Assembly

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Dudley Ralph Turnbull DSO (Gordon Highlanders commanding 20th Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 25. He was awarded the DSO for conspicuous gallantry on 13th October 1914 in serving his maxin gun when the detachment were all wounded until he was also wounded in two places and his gun damaged by a shell. He subsequently recovered the gun and carried it away on his shoulder.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Alan Humphrey Scott DSO (commanding 56th Australian Infantry) is killed by a sniper at age 26.
  • Captain Audley Andrew Dowell Lee MC (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. William Benjamin Dowell Lee.
  • Captain Cuthbert John Burn (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Bishop of Quappelle.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Hugh Sloley (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 20 after achieving six victories in the air. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Herbert Sloley KCMG.
  • Lance Corporal Algernon Roland Lane MM (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. His son will be killed in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in February 1945.
  • Lance Corporal Stanley Evans (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed by a sniper. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Bates (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Donald John McLennan (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) dies of wounds received in action at age 21. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Sidney William Gall (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother died of wounds in September 1916.
  • Private John Jennings Crompton (Canterbury Infantry) is killed at age 34. He is the grandson of the 1st editor of the Taranaki Herald who was one of the 1st members of the General Assembly.  His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Harrop Landon (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in two weeks.
  • Private Frederick Cox (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Frederick James Mace (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Horace Haselock (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Driver Frederick Bennett (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in November 1916.

Sunday 30 September 1917 We Lost 803

In memory of Alexander Boswell Campbell

The enemy bomb British positions between Tower Hamlets and Polygon Wood and launch three attacks all of which are repulsed. The first attack is south of the Routelbeek, the second and third along the Ypres-Menin Road.

During an enemy air raid on St Omer on this night at a hospital base three bombs are dropped in the camp at 22:40, (2 on marquees for patients and 1 in the nurse’s compound). Of the two bombs which drop on the marquees, one strikes a marquee which is unoccupied while the other strikes a marquee occupied by patients and two nurses on duty. The bomb which falls in the nurse’s compound strikes a bell tent which is unoccupied as the nurses who sleep in the tent are on night duty. The casualties which have resulted are – nurses killed three, wounded three (one dangerously). Other ranks – killed 16, wounded 60. Of the other ranks wounded 14 are transferred to other hospitals and one of these will die. There is much damage to canvas and equipment. 54 marquees are damaged (two absolutely demolished, while the damage to the others varies from almost complete destruction to mere riddling). 21 bell tents are damaged (one completely destroyed by a bomb and 20 have been riddled). Many pieces of iron pierce the new corrugated iron sleeping hut for sisters. One piece pierces iron and three pieces of asbestos boarding. Numerous panes of glass are broken in the permanent buildings. One of the ablution houses has been damaged.

While flying over the enemy lines taking photographs Lieutenant Edward Horace Pember (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Flying Corps) is attacked by four enemy scout machines, which come down on him from a cloud.  He and his observer are killed when they are shot down over Gavrelle. The 19-year old is the son of ‘The Honorable’ Margaret Pember and a Mathematical Exhibitioner of Balliol College.  Lieutenant Pember obtained a Commission in the Royal Field Artillery in July 191 5. He trained at Ipswich and left England 5th November 1915 for Suvla Bay, where he served until the evacuation. He then served in Egypt until the autumn of 1916, when he volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps. He returned to England in November 1916 and trained at Oxford, Netheravon, and Dover.  Having obtained his wings in May 1917 he was sent to France as a pilot.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • A battery commander
  • The son-in-law of a Baronet
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of members of the clergy
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose nephew and name sake will be killed in 1943

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Robert Westbrooke Hewitt DSO (commanding 14th Hussars) dies in Baghdad at age 37.
  • Captain Alexander Boswell Campbell (Sussex Yeomanry) is killed in action. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Frederick Hardying Anson Hamilton Silverton the 7th
  • Lieutenant Frederick Arthur Airey (Otago Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the grandson of the late Reverend Robert Airey, vicar of Santon.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Butler Butler-Storey (Irish Guards) dies of wounds at home at age 42. He is the grandson of the Reverend Charles Kemble and his nephew and name sake will be killed in April 1943 at age 22.
  • Chaplain Walter E A Chadwick (East African Frontier Force) dies on service. He is the Venerable Archdeacon of Kavirando. He is the son of the Rt. Rev. George Alexander Chadwick, Bishop of Derry and Raphoe.
  • Driver Arthur Slorance (Army Service Corps) dies of wounds at age 35. His brother died on service in August 1916 while his brother in law died of wounds two days after his brother.