Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Chunuk Bair

Thursday 12 August 1915 – We Lost 688

Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp

Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp

This morning three infantry battalions of the 163rd Brigade (1st/5th Norfolk, 1st/5th Suffolk and 1st/8th Hampshire) are occupying trenches, running south from the right of the 10th Division.  They have occupied these positions since the early morning yesterday, and they have experienced artillery fire and a certain amount of sniping; they are also suffering from a shortage of water and great difficulty has been experienced in getting water to them. At 13:15, orders are received at Brigade HQ, which is still situated at the beach, to advance and clear the area around Anafarta Spur of snipers. Brigade is informed that the advance is to commence at 16:00 and instructions are sent to Colonel ‘Sir’ Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp 6th Baronet CB (Commanding Officer of the 1st/5th Norfolk – who is in local command of the Brigade in the trenches) to order the Brigade to be ready at 16:00.  By 15:25 Brigade Headquarters has moved from the beach and established itself on the forward line of trenches near the Headquarters of the Suffolk Regiment.  Here Staff Officers are dismayed to hear that the orders to be ready to advance at 16:00 have not been received by the Suffolk or the Hampshire Regiments. Not with standing this breakdown in communication, the planned naval bombardment commences precisely at 16:00.  The Brigade attack commences at 16:40, units advancing in a line running approximately north and south in the following order: from north to south Suffolk Regiment – with the Norfolk Regiment in support in rear of the Suffolk Regiment then the Hampshire and remaining members of the Norfolk Regiment.

The attack is delayed but the bombardment, predominantly naval, is on time – though largely ineffective as heavy explosives rather than shrapnel is employed, and the targets have not been clearly specified, though the noise would certainly have been comforting for the waiting British troops.  The advance starts at approximately 16:45 and almost immediately the Norfolk Regiment makes a half-turn to the right resulting in a separation of forces and confusion.  After about 1,000 yards advance across the plain (difficult, thorny scrub, ditches and dry watercourse) the Brigade is subjected to devastating enfilade fire (machine guns and small arms from the left, from the direction of Kidney Hill, and shelling, shrapnel from the right, from the direction of the W Hills; but the firing is less ferocious from the front allowing the advance to progress, although many men fall to sniper fire from well concealed positions hidden in the scrub and low well-leafed trees(stunted oaks).  Some elements of the Norfolk Regiment on the right outpace the Hampshire Regiment in the center and the Suffolk Regiment on the left.  The confusion is increased by the scrub being set on fire by shell fire and the chaotic advance continues unsupported through thick smoke, component forces getting split, disorientated and attacked by defending Turks; resulting in many casualties killed and wounded. The men, weak through lack of sleep and water become exhausted and the attack slows. Some (notably a number of the Norfolks) press on and, getting beyond the Turkish line are dealt with by the defending forces.  The attack halts and a rallying position is established in the sunken track near the Anafarta wells Anafarta Plain looking towards Tekke Teppe.

The advance of the 163rd Brigade fails for familiar reasons: inadequate preparation, complete absence of reconnaissance, failure to identify objectives, ineffective artillery bombardment, lack of experience of the troops, inefficiency – indeed possible incompetence of leaders and, very importantly, the resolute resistance of the Turkish defenders.  As a result of the failure of the Brigade’s attack the major offensive towards Tekke Teppe by the 54th Division, planned for dawn tomorrow is cancelled.

Bauchop’s Hill, Table Top, and a considerable salient covering Argyl Dere have all been captured by the Allies.  At the south end of the line Lone Pine is secured by the 1st Australian Division but Baby 700, Chunuk Bair and Hill 60 (on the Suvla side) are still in enemy hands.

Flight Commander Charles H K Edmonds (Royal Naval Air Service) flies from the Gulf of Xeros (HMS Ben my Chree) to attack Turkish shipping and becomes the first man to torpedo and sink shipping from the air.

Production on the first tank is begun: No 1 Lincoln or Tritton Machine will be called ‘Little Willie’.

The government orders 1,000 Stokes mortars the first 20 of which will be delivered on 6th September and sent to France on 11th September.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet and his nephew
  • Two sons of Baronets
  • Two battalion commanders
  • The first mountaineer to scale Mount Aspiring in New Zealand
  • Two members of the premier sail making family in England
  • A film actor and director
  • The father of actress Dorothy Holmes-Gore
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A bronze medal Olympic rower
  • A staff member of the Winnipeg Telegraph
  • A rugby footballer
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A man who will lose three brothers in service of King and Country
  • Multiple men who will have two brothers killed in the Great WSar
  • Three brothers killed together
  • Multiple examples of men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Among those killed in the attack of the 163rd Brigade are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp CB the 6th Baronet and his nephew Second Lieutenant Montagu Barclay Granville Proctor-Beauchamp (Norfolk Regiment) age 22 son of the Reverend ‘Sir’ Montagu H Proctor-Beauchamp the 7th
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Morriss Armes (commanding 5th Suffolk Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Brothers Captain Edward Randall Cubitt (Norfolk Regiment) and Lieutenant Victor Murray Cubitt are both killed. Edward dies at age 30, while Victor is only 27. They are the sons of E G Cubitt JP who will lose another son in April 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Randall Burroughs a cousin of the Cubitts is also killed. Captain Frank Reginald Beck MVO is killed at age 54. He was instrumental in the formation of the Sandringham Company of Volunteers.
  • His nephew Lieutenant Albert Edward Alexander Beck MC (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. His brothers will be killed in April and August 1917.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Martyr Ward (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend John Martyr Ward Rector of Gressenhall.
  • Lieutenant Marcus Francis Oliphant (Norfolk Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Francis George Oliphant.
  • Another set of brothers Captains Donald White Ratsey age 31 and Clayton Ratsay (Hampshire Regiment) age 29 are also killed at Suvla Bay. They command C and D companies respectively.  Their younger brother Lieutenant Stephen Gilbert Ratsey will be killed in April 1917 in Palestine.  For hundreds of years the family has been considered the premier sail makers in England.
  • Captain Arthur Holmes-Gore (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is a film actor and director and father of the actress Dorothy Holmes-Gore. He is an actor/director on both the stage and movies in Great Britain and the United States. He appeared in a total of eight movies including The Prisoner of Zenda and directed three movies in 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Laurence Charles Watson (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of wounds in April 1917.
  • Also killed in the Hampshire Regiment today are three brothers serving together. Riflemen Edward George Urry (35) and his younger brothers Frederick Albert (21) and William Henry Urry (26) are killed as they advance across Kuchak Anafarta Ova on Gallipoli. The family’s tragedy on this day does not end with their deaths as Edward’s brother-in-law Rifleman William Richardson of the same Regiment is killed in the same action at age 21.
  • Rifleman Reginald Robert Sibbick (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last month also on Gallipoli.
  • Rifleman Philip Gilbert (Hampshire) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Rifleman Adolphus Roy Ballard (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He has three cousins (all brothers) who will be killed later in the War.

Also lost on Gallipoli

  • Major Bernard Head (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 39. He is a mountaineer who was the first to scale Mount Aspiring New Zealand in 1909 which is the central figure feature of Mount Aspiring National Park.
  • Major De Lacy Woolrich Passy (Punjabis attached Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Edmund Maurice Buckley (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 29. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Edmund Buckley the 2nd
  • Company Sergeant Major Andrew Thomas Cumming (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at sea off Gallipoli at age 25. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Charles Bray (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. His brother will die at home in June 1918.
  • Private James Henry Harding (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the service of their King the next two are killed in the Great War and the last in the sinking of the submarine M1 lost in a collision with a Swedish steamship in November 1925 with no survivors.
  • The 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers is attacked while repairing damaged trenches on Gallipoli. They suffer one casualty Private John Herbert Harris a well known local Rugby player being killed.

On the Western Front

  • Major Hugh Speke (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend Benjamin Speke Rector of Dowlish Wake and a veteran of the South Africa War.  He is an ordained Deacon and Priest of the Church of England and a mission priest in Western Canada who returned to join the forces in October 1914.
  • Lieutenant Edward Gordon Williams (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 27. He was on the Bronze Medal winning 1908 Olympic men’s eight crew and rowed for Cambridge in the Boat Race from 1908 to 1910.

Non-combat losses today

  • Lieutenant Gilbert Thomas Richardson Pettigrew (Herefordshire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England. He is on the staff of the Winnipeg Telegraph and formerly of the Montreal Daily Mai and is the former Private Secretary of the Minister of Public Works for Manitoba.
  • Private Albert T Williams (Canadian Infantry) dies on service at home at age 21. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Tuesday 10 August 1915 – We Lost 1,569

Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley

Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley

At 03:00 the 38th Brigade 13th Division is heavily attacked by the enemy and subjected to severe rifle fire at Chunuk Bair.  This attack is beaten back.  At 05:00 the enemy delivers another attack and succeeds in driving our troops back on the right flank for a short distance.  The position they take renders it impossible to hold on to the hill above “The Farm” and the brigade is forced to retire. Just before retiring Brigadier General Anthony Hugh Baldwin, General Officer Commanding 38th Infantry Brigade 13th Division is killed at age 51.

From the Suvla landing the 53rd (Welsh) Division attacks Scimitar Hill, suffering heavy casualties.

Hill 10 is taken by the 9th Lancashire Fusiliers and 11th Manchester Regiment early in the morning.

Today’s losses include:

  • A potential Nobel Prize winner in physics
  • A General
  • The son of a General
  • The grandson of a General
  • Six battalion commanders
  • The son of a Judge of the Supreme Court in South Africa
  • The father of the 9th Baron Langford
  • The son of the 2nd Lord Glanusk
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • A Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War
  • The brother of a future Rear Admiral
  • Three men who will have sons lose their lives on service in the Second World War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in July 1917

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

Second Lieutenant Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at Gallipoli when he is shot through the head by a sniper at age 27.  He is the discoverer of the “Law of Moseley in physics” and his obituary will be published in German newspapers.  Many have speculated that he would have been awarded the Nobel Prize for his work with the quantitative justification of the concept of atomic number in Moseley’s law, advanced chemistry and provided independent support for the Bohr model of the Rutherford/Antonius Van den Broek nuclear atom containing positive nuclear charge equal to atomic number.  It is because of Moseley’s death in the War that the British and many other world governments begin a policy of no longer allowing their scientists to enlist for combat.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Mervyn Henry Nunn (commanding 9th Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 50. He served on the Nile in 1897 and in the South Africa War.  Colonel Nunn was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment from the Middlesex Militia in 1886. He was employed with the Egyptian Army in 1896-7 and served in the Nile Expedition in 1897, receiving the Egyptian Medal with clasp. During the latter part of the South African War he was in command of the Imperial Yeomanry in Natal during 1902, and held the Queen’s Medal with clasp. In 1906 he retired and joined the Reserve of Officers, but he rejoined his old Regiment on the outbreak of the War and was given command of the 9th Worcestershire Regiment in January 1915. He went with his Regiment to the Dardanelles in June 1915.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry George Levinge (Norfolk Regiment commanding 6th North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 49. He is the eldest son of Harry Corbyn Levinge JP DL late of Knockdrin Castle, Mullingar Westmeath and grandson of the 6th Colonel Levinge joined the Norfolk Regiment in 1885, and served with them and the Mounted Infantry in the South African War. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, promoted Brevet-Major, and awarded the Queen’s and the King’s Medals with five clasps. On the outbreak of the War he was serving with the Norfolk Regiment and in November 1914 was appointed Lieutenant Colonel to command the 10th Battalion from which he was transferred to the command of the 6th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. In June 1915 he proceeded with his Regiment to Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Basil Edwin Philips (commanding 5th Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 51. Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Richard Cole-Hamilton (Commanding 6th East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at Sari Bahr at age 56. His nephew will be killed in a flying accident in July 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Carden CMG (commanding 5th Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the late Commandant of the Northern Rhodesia Police.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Bauchop CMG (commanding Otago Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds on board HMHS Delta at age 44.
  • Major William Sandbach (Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 50. He is the son of the Reverend Gilbert Sandbach Rector of Upper Sapey and his son will be killed in December 1941 at age 34 at El Alamein.
  • Major John Gilderdale Jennings (Punjabis attached Royal Dublin Fusiliers) dies of wounds received two days earlier leading an attack on Chocolate Hill Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Robert Melvill Jennings KCB.
  • Major E W Boyd-Moss DSO (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action. His son Major Deryck Frank (Tank Regiment) will be killed in action on 28th October 1942 at age 29.
  • Major Charles Woodward Crofton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action in Gallipoli at age 50. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Woodward Crofton Chaplain at Rangoon.
  • Major Geoffrey Seymour Rowley-Conwy (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of Conwy Grenville Hercules Rowley-Conwy JP DL. He is the father of the 9th Baron Langford of Summerhill. His brother Rafe Grenville Rowley-Conway (Royal Navy) will later serve as a Rear Admiral.
  • Captain John Wilfrid Mather (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is the son of the Reverend Frank Albert Mather Vicar of Yatton.
  • Brothers Captain Horatio Gordon Mann and Second Lieutenant Horace Walpole Mann (North Lancashire Regiment) are killed in action on Gallipoli. Horace dies at age 29 and their brother will be killed in Mesopotamia in 1916.
  • Captain George William Rolph (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. His brother will be killed October.
  • Captain Alfred Heywood Howard JP (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 45.
  • Captain Arthur Charles Davies (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Richard Davies MP for Anglesey 1869-86.
  • Captain Edward Wynne Lloyd-Jones (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at 27 on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in March 1917, they are sons of the late Reverend David Lloyd-Jones and he earned his BA and LLB at Cambridge.
  • Captain Andrew Gordon Reed (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Reed Rector of Llangyniew.
  • Captain Gerald William Nugent (General List, Headquarters 29th Infantry Brigade) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 28. He is the son of the 3rd
  • Captain Austen Charles Sandham Belcher (Wiltshire Regiment) is also killed on Gallipoli at age 27. His brother was killed three days earlier and they are sons of the Reverend Gilbert Edward Rector of Chaldon Belcher.
  • Captain Edward William Britten (Middlesex Regiment) is killed on Galilpoli. His brother died on service in February.
  • Lieutenant Ian Calcutt Findlay (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the ‘Honorable Sir’ John and Lady Findlay.
  • Flight Lieutenant David Keith- (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed in action during an air duel at Ostend at age 20. His brother will be killed in an air accident in September.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Peter Guillebrand (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend J A Guillebrand.
  • Second Lieutenant Maurice William Pretyman (Royal Engineers) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in July 1917 being the only two Pretymans killed in the service of their King in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur John Kennedy McCausland (Border Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General John Kennedy McCausland.
  • Second Lieutenant George Albert Collingwood (Border Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be accidentally killed in July 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant William Lionel Gueritz Mortimer (Dublin Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 20 on Gallipoli. He is the son of Reverend Reginald Arthur Mortimer.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles George Cranleigh Fisher-Brown (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will die on service in June 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Sydney William King (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 20. His brother will be accidentally killed in May 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Oswald Stanley Whaley (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Oswald Whaley.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Sergison Bailey (Grenadier Guards) is killed by a bomb at age 22. He is the son of the 2nd ‘Lord’ Glanusk CB CBE DSO (commanding 2nd South Wales Borderers) who will have a second son die on service in India two weeks before the Armistice.
  • Second Lieutenant Bertram Baker Silcock (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Second Lieutenant Philip Walter Jowett Bagnall (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. He is the only son of Captain Walter Bagnall JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Menzies Mocatta (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Elias Mocatta who has another son who will die on service in February 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Nicholls Hathorn (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the son of Kenneth Howard Hathorn Judge of the Supreme Court in South Africa.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur John Allan Britton (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. He is the son of the late Reverend W J Britton.
  • Corporal John William Arundell (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Within days of his brother being killed Lance Corporal Guy Stanley Overton (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is also killed on Gallipoli while serving in the same regiment. He dies at age 30 the messages announcing their deaths will be received by their parents within a few hours of each other.
  • Lance Corporal Anthony Hugh Hanmer (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Lance Corporal William Norris (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Walter James Griffiths (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Joseph Elwell (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His son will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Leslie Curtis (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay at age 17. His two brothers will be killed in the sinking of the Royal Edward in three days serving in the same regiment.
  • Private Wilfrid G Barrow (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend E P Barrow.
  • Private Griffith Edward Jones (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His son will be killed in the next war.
  • Private Thomas Abbots (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 28. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in June of this year.
  • Another set of brothers are killed on this day, one day after their brother was killed. John and Matthew Fisher are killed while serving in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.
  • Brothers Rees 26, and Richard Evans 23, die while serving with the Welsh Regiment on Gallipoli.

Monday 9 August 1915 – We Lost 2,714

Poet Nowell Oxland

Poet Nowell Oxland

General Godley remains at his headquarters near the beach, largely ignorant of the state of the fighting on Chunuk Bair. His plan for today is to take Hill Q. The main force for the assault is the 38th Brigade of the 13th Division commanded by Brigadier General Anthony Baldwin. Baldwin but the situation is so confused that the force he leads toward Hill Q contains only one of his normal battalions, the 6th East Lancashire Regiment. He also has the 9th Worcestershire Regiment and 9th Warwickshire Regiment from the 39th Brigade and the 5th Wiltshire Regiment from the 40th Brigade (who would later be redirected to reinforce Chunuk Bair). Plus he leads two 10th (Irish) Division battalions; the 10th Hampshire Regiment and 6th Royal Irish Rifles from the 29th Brigade.

This force will climb to Hill Q from the Farm. At the same time the New Zealanders on the right from Chunuk Bair and units of General Vaughn Cox’s Indian Brigade on the left will also attack the hill. The plan falls apart when Baldwin’s battalions become lost in the dark trying to find the Farm which they do not reach until after dawn around 06:00. The only force to reach Hill Q is Allanson’s battalion of Gurkhas. They suffer the same fate as Colonel Malone, shelled by their own artillery, and their stay on the hill is brief. With the offensive once again stalled, the New Zealanders on Chunuk Bair have to endure another day of Turkish harassment. As night falls the remaining New Zealanders move back to the Apex and are replaced by two New Army battalions, the 6th  North Lancashire Regiment and some of the 5th Wiltshire Regiment from Baldwin’s force.

At about 05:00 this morning, a series of determined attacks is made by the enemy on an isolated sap, where six officers are killed or severely wounded, a portion of the sap being lost.  Lieutenat William John Syons (Australian Infantry) then leads a charge and retakes the sap, shooting two Turks with his revolver.  The sap is under hostile fire from three sides and Lieutenant Symons withdraws some fifteen yards to a spot where some overhead cover can be obtained, and in the face of heavy firfe, builds up a sand barricade.  The enemy succeeds in setting fire to the fascines and woodword of the head-cover, but Lieutenant Symons extinguishes the fire and rebuilds the barricade.  For his actions this day and yesterday he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

At Lone Pine the enemy makes a determined counter attack on the center of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Frederick Harold Tubb, two corporals Alexander Stewart Burton and William Dunstan (Australian Infantry) and a few men.  The enemy blow in the sandbag barricade leaving only a foot standing, but the lieutenant and the two corporals repulsed the enemy and rebuilt the barricade.  Twice more the enemy blows in the barricade and on each occasion they are repulsed and the barricade rebuilt, Corporal Burton is killed while most gallantly building up the parapet under a hail of bombs.  All three men will be awarded the Victoria Cross for their actions on this day.

During a heavy bomb attack by the enemy on the newly captured position at Lone Pine, Private John Hamilton (Australian Infantry), with utter disregard of personal safety, exposes himself under a heavy fire on the parados, in order to secure a better fire position against the enemy’s bomb throwers.  His coolness and daring example has an immediate effect.  The enemy is driven off with heavy losses.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

During the morning Captain Alfred John Shout (Australian Infantry) at Lone Pine trenches and with a small party charges down trenches strongly occupied by the enemy and personally throws four bombs among them, killing eight and routing the remainder.  In the afternoon from the position gained in the morning he captures a further length of trench under similar conditions but as he is holding three bombs the final one, having thrown the other two, bursts in his hand destroying his right hand and shattering the left side of his face and body.  Carried to the rear he dies two days later on board HMHS Euralia.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

The march by 32nd Brigade from Suvla Bay to Tekke Tepe ridge, in darkness over unfamiliar, rough terrain, is difficult and the brigade will not approach the summit until 04:00. Turkish reinforcements have reached the ridge shortly before them and meet the exhausted British infantry with a bayonet charge. The 32nd Brigade is virtually annihilated in a matter of minutes and the remnants of the battalions scatter back towards the beach. Around midday the gunfire set scrub alight on Scimitar Hill.

A battalion of Gurkhas from the Indian Brigade, commanded by Major Cecil Allanson, reach a secondary objective, the neighboring summit of Hill Q, today but are forced to retreat shortly afterwards.

The destroyer HMS Lynx (Commander John Francis Herbert Cole, Royal Navy) strikes a mine in a field off Moray Firth laid by the German auxiliary minelayer Meteor.  There are seventy casualties including her commanding officer while there are twenty-six survivors.

Today’s losses include:

  • A member of the New Zealand Parliament
  • A Great War Poet
  • A relative of the architect Edwin Lutyens an architect of many WWI memorials
  • Two battalion commanders
  • A son of the 1st Baron Hewart
  • A brother of the 8th Earl of Dartmouth
  • A son of the 10th Baron Middleton
  • The son of a Baronet
  • A son of a General
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple examples of sons of members of the clergy
  • Two brothers killed together by ‘friendly fire’
  • Multiple examples of two brothers killed together
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A man who will have his two brothers killed tomorrow in the same regiment
  • Multiple examples of men who will have a brother killed in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father was killed in November 1914 as the fleet surgeon of HMS Good Hope
  • A man whose brother will be killed in North Africa in 1941
  • The ‘father’ of actor David Niven
  • An Australian Rugby International
  • Two Rosslyn Park Rugby footballers
  • A member of the All-Blacks
  • A player for the Workington Central Football Club

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Major Frank Hadfield Statham (Otago Regiment) and his brother Corporal Clive Heathcote Falk Statham (Otago Regiment,) a Member of Parliament in New Zealand are both killed about 05:00 when a Turkish attack on their position is at its height.  Three high explosive howitzer shells coming from the right rear land near their position killing the brothers and seven or eight other men. The shell almost certainly comes from one of the howitzer batteries inside the old ANZAC line. They are killed by ‘friendly’ fire.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Glanville Allen Moore (commanding 6th East Yorkshire Regiment) is murdered at age 50 after being taken prisoner by the Turks when he is stabbed and bayoneted through the back, he dies about 10 minutes later. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Dawson Moore former Vicar of Hornby.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Franklin MacAulay Gillespie (commanding 4th South Wales Borderers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 42.
  • Major Henry Pulleine John Cowell (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) dies of wounds on a hospital ship off Gallipoli at age 34. He is the son of Major General the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ John Clayton Cowell KCB PC and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Major James McGregor Elmslie (Wellington Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds at age 38. He is a South African War veteran and football player and his brother will die of wounds in Egypt in 1917.
  • Another Major in the Wellington Rifles Norman Frederick Hastings DSO commanding the 6th Squadron dies of wounds at age 35. He is also a South Africa War veteran and one of only 14 members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces to be awarded the Legion of Honour by the President of France.
  • Captain Robert Maxwell Pike (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of Robert Lechy Pike DL.
  • Captain Percival Leathley Browne (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 32. He is the son of the late Reverend S B Browne and his brother will die of wounds next April received in the Easter Rising.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Gerald Legge (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 33. He is the brother of the 8th Earl of Dartmouth and son of the 6th His nephew will be killed in the Second War.
  • Captain Francis George Godfrey Willoughby (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the 10th Baron Middleton and has a brother who will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.
  • Captain Charles Graeme Lutyens (East Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Sari Bahr on Gallipoli at age 28. His brother will die of wounds in January 1918 and the brothers are related to the architect Edwin Lutyens who will design many Great War Memorials.
  • Captain Robert Dewar Squires (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Alfred Squires Vicar of St Peter’s St Albans.
  • Captain Cuthbert Arthur Verge (Medical Officer 6th Australian Light Horse) dies in Egypt of dysentery contracted on Gallipoli at age 35. He played international rugby for Australia against Great Britain in 1904.
  • Captain Ralph Hawksworth Legard (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 40. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer and his brother will die of wounds in 1924 while serving as Headmaster at Bow School, Durham that he received in the war
  • Lieutenant Kenneth John Wyatt Peake (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War, one in 1915 the other in 1916.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Pennell Walsh (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 22. His father was Fleet Surgeon James Joseph Walsh (HMS Good Hope) when she went down in November 1914.
  • Lieutenant Richard Parker Gilbanks (Border Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend William Foster Gilbanks Rector of Gt Orton.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Debenham (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at Chunak Bair at age 26 when he is shot through the heart while leading an attack. He is the son of the Reverend John Wilmot Debenham.
  • Lieutenant Nowell Oxland (Border Regiment) is killed in action two days after landing at Suvla Bay at Gallipoli at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend William Oxland (Royal Navy) Rector of Alston and one of the minor Great War Poets. He showed promise of becoming a writer of distinction and his poem “Outward Bound” is first published in The Times later this year while his Poems and Stories will be published in 1917. He played rugby football for Rosslyn Park, Richmond, Middlesex and Cumberland. He is a friend and contemporary of William Noel Hodgson who will be killed on the Somme in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Stanley Charles Squire (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother is wounded in the same action and they are sons of the Reverend Charles Henry Squire Vicar of Southrop.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Graham Niven (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed in action at Scimitar Hill at age 37. He is the father of the actor David Niven.
  • Lieutenant William John Osborne (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds received in action two days prior in the same action that his younger brother was killed.
  • Lieutenant Hubert Hartnell-Sinclair (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at Kaiajik Aghala, near Hill 971 north Anzac at age 30. His brother will be killed in France serving in the British Army next month.
  • Lieutenant William Louis Jennings Longbourne (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 27. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Ernest Gent (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of the late Albert William Gent JP.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Giles Prichard (East Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at home at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Collwyn Prichard Vicar of Alresford who lost another son in April of this year.
  • Lieutenant George Herbert Davies (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next July and they are sons of the Reverend John Bayley Davies Rector of Waters Upton.
  • Lieutenant E M Harper (Munster Fusiliers) is killed in the Dardanelles. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Trench Wilson (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Engineers) is killed at age 30 on the Western Front. He is the son of the late Reverend Alfred Wilson, Vicar of St Michaels Bedford Park London.
  • Lieutenant Michael Vallancey Molloy (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Eben Molloy Vicar of Shenstone.
  • Second Lieutenant Gordon Morley Hewart (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hewart.
  • Second Lieutenant Aubrey William Fyldes (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend William Fyldes Vicar of Witton.
  • Second Lieutenant Culcheth Holcroft (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Harry Holcroft 1st Baronet who will have another son killed in 1941 in North Africa.
  • Second Lieutenant William Charles Mayo (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. James Mayo of Trinity College Cambridge who will lose another son in August 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant John Digby Cartwright (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend William Cartwright Rector of Aynhoe who will lose another son killed in September 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Bassett Morgan (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli three months after his brother was killed also on Gallipoli. A third brother will be killed in a flying accident in May 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Longbottom (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 21. His brother was killed ten days ago.
  • Sergeant Henry Dewar (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 33. He is a prominent and popular rugby footballer and was a member of the All Blacks that toured California in 1913.
  • Sergeant Geoffrey Gibbings Wacher (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lance Sergeant Harold Ernest Sanby (Rifle Brigade) is killed. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Brothers Lance Sergeant Henry and Corporal Albert Cottrell (Sherwood Foresters) are killed together.
  • Lance Corporal Harry Wise (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed in May 1917 when HMS Derwent strikes a mine. Private Benjamin Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private Charles Alfred McKee (Border Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Joseph Morgan (South Wales Borderers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 29. His younger brother died of wounds in Egypt received in action on Gallipoli ten weeks earlier.
  • Private Francis William Fletcher (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. His two brothers will both be killed later in the war the first next December and the second in 1917.
  • Privates Albert & Arthur Wadkin (West Yorkshire Regiment) are killed together on Gallipoli. Albert dies at 22 while his younger brother dies at age 20.
  • Private Benjamin Nutter (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Albert Fisher is killed in action serving with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment on Gallipoli. His two brothers will be killed serving in the same regiment tomorrow.
  • Private Laurence Barnard Carlton (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Carlton.
  • Private Joseph Lilliman (Sherwood Foresters) is killed. He is the middle of three brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Private Ernest Baguley (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Private Percy George Sprott (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 22 on Gallipoli. His brother will die of wounds in November.
  • Private Albert Iceton (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. He was a prominent footballer for Workington Central Football Club.
  • Trooper Thomas Lewis Douglas (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 26 the day after his brother was killed.
  • Trooper Richard Murphy (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action Chunuk Bair, Anzac serving alongside his brother Trooper Michael Murphy who is also killed. A third brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Trooper Francis Darbyshire Twisleton (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in action in October 1917.
  • Trooper James Ernest Walkley (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed. He is one of Manawaitu’s finest fullbacks.
  • Private Luke Knight (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Brothers Albert, 21, and Allen Harper, 23, die while serving with the Lincolnshire Regiment and Edward 26, and Percy Stennett, 19, are also killed while serving in the same battalion.

Sunday 8 August 1915 – We Lost 1,953

Lemon Squeezer hat

Lemon Squeezer hat

Four days into her second patrol E11 (Lieutenant Commander Martin Nasmith) sinks the Turkish battleship Heireddin Barbarossa.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS India (Commander William George Ainslie Kennedy) is sunk by U-22 in the Norwegian Sea while on the Northern Patrol.  There are one hundred sixty casualties including AB Walter James Farrier who is one of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War, while one hundred forty-one survive. Engine Room Artificer Robert Beaumont Stone is also lost just six days after his brother was killed on the Western Front. The Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Ramsey (Lieutenant Harry Raby RNR) intercepts a steamship flying the Russian flag, but which is actually the German Auxiliary Minesweeper Meteor. After being crippled by point-blank gunfire, Ramsey is struck amidships by a German torpedo and sinks. Five Officers, including the Commanding Officer and fifty-four ratings are lost, and a further four officers and thirty-nine ratings taken prisoner. Tomorrow the Meteor will encounter superior British forces and scuttle herself, Ramsey’s crew returning home in the Undaunted.

Shortly after 03:00 following a naval bombardment of the peak, the Wellington Infantry followed by the Gloucestershire Regiment reach Chunuk Bair virtually unopposed. The preceding barrage has driven most of the Turkish defenders away as the ground is too hard and rocky for deep entrenchments. Chunuk Bair will prove hard to defend. It is only possible to scrape shallow trenches among the rocks. The peak is exposed to fire from the main Turkish line on Battleship Hill to the south and from Hill Q to the north. If the original plan for the offensive had worked, Hill Q would have been in Allied hands. Lieutenant Colonel CecilAllanson’s battalion of Gurkhas reached it briefly the following day but they are in no position to offer relief to the troops on Chunuk Bair.

By 05:00 the Turks are counter-attacking against the Wellington Infantry. The slope of the hill is so steep that the Turks can get within 20 metres of the trenches without being seen. The New Zealander fight desperately to hold off the Turks, firing their rifles and those of their fallen companions until the wood of the stock is too hot to touch. When the Turks get up to the trenches the fighting continues with the bayonet. The Turks overrun part of the New Zealand trench and take prisoners. In full daylight, reinforcements are only reaching the summit at a trickle. The fight rages all day until the trenches are clogged with the New Zealand dead. Around 17:00 The Turks have recaptured the east side of the summit and are reinforced from Helles. As darkness falls the fighting subsides and the Wellington Infantry is relieved. Out of the 760 men of the battalion who have reached the summit, 711 have become casualties. Malone had resisted sending his men on a suicidal charge when told to follow the Auckland Battalion on 7th August. A day later the outcome is the same. The New Army battalions have suffered also with 417 casualties among the Welsh Regiment troops and 350 in the Gloucestershire Regiment including all the officers of the battalion. For the wounded the suffering is only beginning. Some take three days to travel from the higher reaches of Rhododendron Spur to the beach, a little over a kilometer away.

At Suvla Bay Stopford is satisfied with the results of the first day. This morning he signals Hamilton: “Major-General Hammersley and troops under him deserve great credit for the result attained against strenuous opposition and great difficulty. I must now consolidate the position held.”  The British staff has estimated that it will take the Turkish divisions at Bulair 36 hours to reach Suvla — they could be expected to arrive this evening. Hamilton is dismayed by the lack of progress so far and the absence of any drive from Stopford or his subordinates. He has already dispatched Captain Aspinall to discover first-hand what is happening at Suvla. Aspinall is accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Maurice Hankey, Secretary to the Committee of Imperial Defence, who is to report on the progress of the campaign to the British Cabinet. When he receives Stopford’s signal, Hamilton decides to see Suvla for himself, travelling on the yacht HMS Triad.

Aspinall and Hankey initially find the ease and inactivity at Suvla encouraging assuming it means the fighting is now moved to the hills. Once on the beach, they are warned to keep their heads down as the front line was only a few hundred yards away — and that Stopford is still aboard the Jonquil. Aspinall finds Stopford “in excellent spirits”, well satisfied with progress. When Aspinall points out that the men have not reached the high ground, Stopford replied, “No, but they are ashore.” Aspinall and Hamilton both converge on the light cruiser HMS Chatham, the flagship of Rear-Admiral John de Robeck who commands the landing fleet. Finally, this afternoon nearly two days after the landing, Hamilton gains a clear picture of events. Accompanied by Aspinall and Commodore Roger Keyes, he crosses to the Jonquil to confront Stopford who had finally been ashore to consult with Hammersley. Stopford and Hammersley plan to order an advance the following morning but Hamilton insists that an advance be made immediately so at 18:30 the 32nd Brigade is ordered to march two and a half miles to the Tekke Tepe ridge.

When his detachment is relieved after twenty-four hours under continuous attack Lieutenant (Acting Captain) William Thomas Forshaw (Manchester Regiment) volunteers to continue the direction of the operations in the north-west corner of ‘The Vineyard’.  Three times during this night he is again heavily attacked, and once the Turks get over the barricade, but after shooting three with his revolver, he leads his men forward and recaptures it.  When he rejoins his battalion he is choked and sickened by bomb fumes, badly bruised by a fragment of shrapnel, and can barely lift his arm from continuous bomb throwing.  It is due to his personal example, magnificent courage and endurance that this very important corner is held.

For the most conspicuous bravery on this night at Lone Pine Trenches Lieutenant William John Symons (Australian Infantry) will be awarded the Victoria Cross.  He is in command of the right section of the newly captured trenches held by his battalion and repels several counter-attacks with great coolness.  (See 9th August)

At Lone Pine Lance Corporal Leonard Keysor (Australian Infantry) successfully bombs the enemy out of a position from which temporary mastery over his own trench has been obtained.  He is again wounded in this action.  Although marked for hospital, he declines to leave and volunteers to throw bombs for another company that has lost its bomb thrower.  He continues to bomb the enemy until the situation is relieved.  For his actions on this and the previous day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man killed trying to recover his Colonel’s body
  • Three battalion commanders
  • A man killed by ‘friendly fire’
  • A man who will have two sons killed, one each World War
  • The inventor of the ‘lemon squeezer’ hat which will be adopted by the entire New Zealand Army later in the war
  • An All-Blacks Rugby player
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A champion runner
  • The Assistant Master at Wanganui Technical College
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Jurist
  • The oldest ANZAC killed on Gallipoli
  • A 15-year old boy
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple examples of men who will have two brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple examples of man who will have one brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel William George Malone (Wellington Infantry) is killed in action at Chunuk Bair at age 53. He is a barrister and senior partner at Malone, Anderson and Johnston and had unsuccessfully stood for parliament on one or two occasions. He invented the “lemon squeezer” hat which was made the regimental hat in 1911. It mirrored the outline of Mount Taranaki/Egmont and allowed rain to run off it. In September 1916 the hat will be adopted by the entire New Zealand army. It is now believed that Colonel Malone was killed by ‘friendly fire’; a shell fired either from a British warship, or from within the old Anzac lines.  He has two sons who will lose their lives in the service of their King and Country. The first Lieutenant Edmond Leo Malone will be killed in April 1918 the second Captain William Bernard Malone will be killed in December 1943.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frank Milton Rowell (commanding 3rd Australian Light Horse) dies at sea on HMHS Gloucester Castle of peritonitis at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William George Malone (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 53.
  • Private Arthur Vivian Carbines (Wellington Infantry) is killed trying to recover the body of his Colonel.
  • Major Charles John Venables DSO (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 50. He is the son of Addington Venables, the Bishop of Nassau 1893-1876. He served in the South African War where he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.
  • Major Frank Chapman (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed in action at Rhododendron Ridge on Gallipoli. At age 57 he is the oldest member of the Anzac to be killed at Gallipoli.
  • Captain Edward Berry Carpenter (Plymouth Battalion Royal Marines Light Infantry) died of wounds off Gallipoli at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Stanley Carpenter Vicar of Highcliffe and Private Secretary to ‘Sir’ Laurence Guillemard of the Home Civil Service.
  • Captain Charles Percy Gwyer (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Lieutenant Clement Marshall Cazalet (New Zealand Infantry and staff officer to Brigadier General Johnston) dies of wounds. He is an interpreter in French, German and Russian. His Brigadier will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Joseph Bagnall Lee (Munster Fusiliers) dies of wounds received the previous day on Gallipoli at age 27. His brother will be killed in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918.  They are sons of the late Edward Lee JP.
  • Lieutenant George Leonard Purcahs Brookfield (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of wounds next June.
  • Lieutenant John Sinclair Bain (Wellington Infantry) dies of wounds. His brother was killed previously.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Marshall Percy Grace (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 25. He played Rugby for the Maori team against Australia in 1912.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Gawan-Taylor (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 22. His is the son of His Honour Judge H Gawan-Taylor. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Ewart Jones (Welsh Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend William Jones.
  • Sergeant Walter Cecil Riley (Auckland Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in October of next year.
  • Sergeant Albert Joseph Downing (Wellington Infantry) who played five Test Matches and twenty-six games for the All Blacks Rugby team is killed in action at age 31. He is the first New Zealand rugby player killed in the Great War.
  • Sergeant Sydney Melville Okey (Wellington Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in September of next year.
  • Sergeant Bertrand Innes Auchterlonie (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. He has two brothers, one of whom will be killed on Gallipoli in October of this year the other will be killed in August 1918.
  • Corporal Frank Te Kauru Best (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the grandson of ‘the Honorable’ William Swanson.
  • Corporal John Geoffrey Persse (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother will die on service as a Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Navy at sea in November 1918.
  • Lance Corporal John Auguste Emile Harris (Australian Infantry) is killed at Lone Pine. His father writes after the war that he was fifteen years old.
  • Lance Corporal Archibald Taylor (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the assistant master at the Wanganui Technical College.
  • Two Privates serving in the Wellington Infantry will be killed today and lose brothers in September 1916. Privates Henry Guy Fearon and Private Thomas William Robinson (age 21) are both killed.
  • Privates and brothers Alfred Harphan (age 24) and Franklin Corlett (age 22) are killed together.
  • Brothers and Privates Harold and Herbert Wheeler (Australian Infantry) are killed while serving together on Gallipoli.
  • Private Edward Denslow (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 28. His two brothers will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private James Tod Aitken (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33. He is a former Australian Rule footballer who played for Geelong.
  • Trooper Alex Duncan McKay (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of J M McKay JP.
  • Trooper George Lloyd (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed. He is the running champion of both the Auckland and Wellington Civil Service Clubs.
  • Trooper Charles Benjamin Harrison (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed. His brother was killed last month.
  • Trooper George Alexander Douglas (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private Sydney Herbert Stokes and his brother Private James Fawcett Stokes (Wellington Infantry) are killed in action at Chunuk Bair, Anzac. Sydney is killed at age 26 while James is a year younger.
  • Another set of brothers killed today in the Wellington Infantry are Lance Corporal Clement Mellor killed at 21 and Private Arthur Foster Mellor killed at 30.
  • Private Henry Capel Pritt (Auckland Infantry) is killed at age 46. He is the son of the late Reverend Lonsdale Pritt Archdeacon of Waikato.
  • Private Edward Clement Andrews (Auckland Infantry) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Rifleman Arnold Edwin Fearson (New Zealand Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Private John Spicer (Welsh Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother was killed last May. Private Charles Ernest Beard (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Victor Lawson Wellavise (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private George Harry Elliott (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private Frederick John Bush Parker (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Talbot Parker Vicar of Knowle.
  • Private Frederick Sanger (London Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed last May.

Saturday 7 August 1915 – We Lost 2,330

The Nek Cemetery

The Nek Cemetery

The Nek is a ridge fifty yards wide at the Anzac line, narrowing to only thirty yards at the Turkish front.  The opposing trenches at this point are only twenty yards apart and at least five Turkish machine guns cover the ground between.  A half hour bombardment of the Turkish positions by all available land guns as well as naval gunfire precedes a planned attack by the 8th and 10th Australian Light Horse regiments on the Nek.  For reasons never known, the bombardment stops at 04:23, seven minutes earlier than planned.  In the silence of the next seven minutes the Turks move to man the trenches two deep in readiness for the attack.

At 04:30 the men of the 8th Light Horse Regiment climb out of their trenches and charge the Turks.  This is met by a hail of Turkish machine gun fire which cuts down the entire Australian line within 10 yards of their trenches.  All officers are killed, including the commander, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Henry White, who has insisted on leading his men into action, after saying goodbye to his troops with “Boys, you have ten minutes to live, and I am going to lead you”.  He dies at age thirty-three.  Lieutenant Eliot Gratton Wilson reaches the Turkish parapet where he is killed.  It is his 33rd birthday.  As soon as the first line clears the parapet the 2nd line takes their place.  Scrambling over the bodies of their fallen comrades, they meet the same fate.

Next comes the turn of the 10th Light Horse Regiment in the 3rd and 4th lines of the attack.  They know full well what has happened to their comrades in the previous two waves.  They also know most of them, if not all are going to certain death.  They shake hands with each other and quietly say goodbye.  Only a handful of the men reach the Turkish trenches where they are killed.  One light horseman, Private Wilfred Lukin Harper “is last seen running forward like a schoolboy in a foot race with all the speed he could compass”.  He too is cut down by gunfire and killed at age 25. This scene is highlighted in the movie “Gallipoli”. His brother Trooper Gresley Harper of the same battalion is killed at age thirty-one in the same charge. Also killed in the charge is Trooper Dudley Lukin whose brother will be killed in June 1918. The commander of the 10th, realizing that the objective cannot be taken, requests a cancellation of the attack. He is told the attack must be continued because of a report of a success. The slaughter continues. At the nearby Quinn’s Post, an entire line of 54 men from the 2nd Light Horse Regiment, except for one man, are killed or wounded within a few feet of their trenches.

When holding the north-west corner of ‘The Vineyard’, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) William Thomas Forshaw (Manchester Regiment) is attacked and heavily bombed by Turks, who advance time after time by three trenches which converge at this point, but he holds his own, not only directing his men and encouraging them by exposing himself with the utmost disregard to danger, but casually lighting bomb fuses with his cigarette, and personally throwing them continuously for forty-one hours.  (See 8th August 1915).

The opportunity for a swift victory at Chunuk Bair has been lost. The three battalions travelling along the north side of Rhododendron Spur are in position by 04:30 shortly before dawn. They advance to a knoll dubbed “The Apex” which is only about 500 yards from the summit where at the time there are only a handful of Turkish infantry. The Canterbury battalion on the south side of the spur is lost and delayed. Johnston makes the fatal decision to wait for the last battalion to arrive before making the attack. By 08:00 the Turks have started firing on the New Zealanders on the spur. In broad daylight, after an exhausting climb and faced by stiffening opposition, the prospects for a New Zealand assault against the peak looks slim. Nevertheless General Godley ordered Johnston to attack. Two hundred yards beyond where the New Zealanders are positioned on the Apex is another knoll called “The Pinnacle” from which it is a straight climb to the summit. Off the side of the spur to the north is a small, sheltered plateau known as “The Farm”.  Johnston orders the Auckland battalion to attack. About 100 men make it as far as the Pinnacle where they desperately try to dig in. Around 300 men fall as casualties between there and the Apex. Johnston tells the Wellington battalion to continue the attack. The battalion’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel William George Malone refuses, stating that he is not willing to order his men to carry out a hopeless attack. He says his battalion will take Chunuk Bair at night. During the day the New Zealanders are reinforced by two battalions from the British 13th (Western) Division: the 7th Gloucestershire Regiment and the pioneers of 8th the Welsh Regiment.

At Chunuk Bair Ridge after the New Zealand Brigade has attacked and established itself on the ridge, Corporal Cyril Royston Guyton Bassett (New Zealand Divisional Signal Company), in full daylight and under continuous fire, succeeds in laying a telephone line from the old position to the new one on Chunuk Bair.  He also does further gallant work in connection with the repair of telephone lines by day and night under heavy fire.  For his actions on this day Corporal Bassett will be awarded the Victoria Cross, becoming the first New Zealander to be awarded the Victoria Cross in the Great War.

At Suvla Bay progress is minimal. The two brigades of the 10th Division come ashore, adding to the confusion. In the heat of the day, the soldiers became desperate for drinking water. Towards evening two hills east of the salt lake are captured; these represented the sole gains for the first day ashore at Suvla. IX Corps has suffered 1,700 casualties in the first 24 hours, a figure exceeding the total size of the Turkish defenders. Stopford does not go ashore from the Jonquil and by the end of today the chain of command has completely broken down.

Battalions of the Lincolnshire Regiment and Border Regiment capture Green Hill and Chocolate Hill, while the West Yorkshire Regiment storm Lala Baba.

Lance Corporal Leonard Keysor (Australian Infantry) is in a trench at Lone Pine that is being heavily bombed by the Turks.  He picks up two live bombs and throws them back at the enemy at great risk to his own life.  Although wounded himself, he continues to throw bombs at the enemy, thereby saving a portion of the trench that is deemed too vital to hold.  For his actions on this and the next day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man whose sister and her daughter will be killed in February 1941 during the Blitz
  • Seven battalion commanders
  • A Rhodes scholar
  • The son of the 6th Viscount Melville
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • The amateur heavyweight boxing champion of New Zealand
  • A New Zealand Rugby international
  • Multiple Australian Rules footballers
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose brother-in-law was killed yesterday
  • Multiple men who will have two brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers who are killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother also killed in the Great War
  • Multiple men who will have a cousin killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Richard Dalton Waterhouse (commanding 8th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 31.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Horace James Johnston DSO (commanding 8th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Robert Scobie (commanding 2nd Australian Infantry) is killed at Lone Pine at age 44.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Albert Meill (commanding 9th Australian Light Horse) is killed at Russell’s Top at age 45.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Samuel Brown (commanding 3rd Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at Lone Pine at age 40.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Augustus Heathcote Allenby (commanding 7th Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 52. He is the son of Major R Allenby JP.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Henry Chapman (commanding 6th Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 40.
  • His cousin serving in the same regiment Captain Wilfred Hubert Chapman is also killed at age 35.
  • Major D’Arcy MacKenzie Fraser (75th Carnatic Infantry, Indian Army) is killed in action on Gallipoli. He is the son of Lieutenant General Hastings Fraser.
  • Major Percy John Overton (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed in action in the Aghyl Dere below Chunuk Bair on Gallipoli at age 38. His younger brother will be killed in three days serving in the same regiment.
  • Staff Captain Gerald Lysley Derriman (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late Admiral Derriman.
  • Captain Henry Frederick Rycroft (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Richard Henry Charles Rycroft 3rd
  • Captain Alfred Victor Clegg (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 30 at Gallipoli. His younger brother will be killed serving in the Border Regiment at Gallipoli in fifteen days.
  • Captain Morton Brown Paton (South Lancashire Regiment attached Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 44. He is Cotton Merchant in Liverpool and former Bailliol student and the son of the Reverend Dr. John Brown Paton.
  • Captain Hugh Eaton Frederick Travers (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 21. He is the son of Brigadier General Joseph Oates Travers CMG DSO.
  • Lieutenant Leslie Hall Osborne (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. His brother, who is wounded in the same action, will die of those wounds on a hospital ship in two days.
  • Lieutenant Robert Douglas Foster (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Lawrence Talbot Lisle Foster (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Albert John Foster Vicar of Wooton.
  • Lieutenant Horace Curtis (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 26. He has two brothers that are also killed in the war.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Holmes Nisbet (Otago Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces) is killed in action at age 23. His is the son of the Reverend Dr. Thomas Nisbet DD.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Kenneth Robert Dundas (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action on by an aerial bomb dropped by a German aircraft at Suvla Gallipoli at age 33. He is the son of the 6th Viscount Melville. He is a fluent German speaker and had been a former district commissioner in German East Africa.
  • Lieutenant Humphrey Gilbert Belcher (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 22. His brother will be killed serving in the same regiment in three days and they are sons of the Reverend Gilbert Edward Belcher Rector of Chaldon.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Marson (Welsh Regiment is killed at age 19. He is the only son of the Reverend Claud Latimer Marson Vicar of Hambridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Phipps Turnbull (Australian Light Horse) is killed at the Nek. He is a Rhodes Scholar.
  • Second Lieutenant Amiraux Silver Fletcher (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Gurkha Rifles) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend J A Fletcher.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Robert Johnson (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Brothers Duncan age 27 and Robin Hook age 24 are killed together serving as commissioned officers in the Lancashire Regiment. They are buried in adjacent graves in Hill 10 Cemetery, not far from where they landed at the Salt Lake on Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Duckworth (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of James Duckworth JP. The Redoubt Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery contains an oak tree planted by the parents of Second Lieutenant Duckworth in 1922; but his body was never found. This memorial is unique in the peninsula as the only private memorial located within a CWGC cemetery.
  • Sergeant William Ernest King (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 29. He is the brother in law of Everard Digges La Touche who died of wounds yesterday and the son of the Reverend Canon William J King Vicar of Kilcolman who will lose another son next April.
  • Sergeant John Leslie Connor (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 30. His cousin will die of wounds off Gallipoli next month.
  • Sergeant Sydney John O’Neill (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 27. He was an Australian Rules footbalerl who played one game for Fitzroy in 1909.
  • Sergeant Thomas Roughton Worthington (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His sister Agnes Mary Bennison and her daughter will be killed in February 1941 during the Blitz.
  • Corporal Andrew Bernard Smith (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in six weeks.
  • Lance Sergeant Eric Cecil Chute (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Brothers serving in the Australian Light Horse are killed in action serving together. Lance Corporal Lindsay Lewis Stirling Chipper is killed at age 28, while his brother Trooper Ross Richard Vivian Chipper dies at age 31.
  • Another set of brothers serving in the Australian Light Horse are also killed serving together on the attack on Quinn’s Post and Pope’s Hill. Troopers Frederick Herbert and Harold Samuel Sherwood are both killed.  Frederick dies at age 29 while Harold dies at age 25.
  • Trooper George Frederick Henry Sandy (Australian Light Horse) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 26. His younger brother will be killed on Gallipoli in seventeen days.
  • Trooper Arthur Jones (Australian Light Horse) an Australian Rules Footballer is killed at age 23. He scored 3 goals in 7 games for Fitzroy in 1914.
  • Trooper Frank Laird Villis (Australian Light Horse) and his brother Trooper Stanley Villis are killed together near Pope’s Hill. Frank dies at 25 while Stanley is 23.
  • Trooper Arthur Wellesley Oakes (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the Archdeacon of Bathurst George Spencer Oakes Rector of Kelso New South Wales.
  • Private Henry Cullinan (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. His brother will be killed on the last day of this year.
  • Private Charles Savoury (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the Amateur Heavyweight boxing champion of New Zealand and a Rugby International.  He also was a member of the Australiasian Northern Union team that toured England.
  • Private Herbert Charles Wicking (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will be killed together in 1917.
  • Private Harry Richard Wildig (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next July.
  • Private William Mather (Otago Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private Hugh McGlade (Royal Irish Fusiliers) is killed in action at Gallipoli. He has two brothers that will be killed in action during the war, one in 1916 the other in 1917.
  • Rifleman George Alfred Dolman (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private William Joseph Cooke (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother was killed last May.
  • Private William Chester Yates (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli less than one month after his brother died of wounds on Malta also received on Gallipoli. He is killed at age 18.
  • Private Edward Lawrence Goodall (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed next July.

Friday 6 August 1915 – We Lost 1,718

Lone Pine Cemetery

Lone Pine Cemetery

On the second day of her second patrol in the Sea of Marmora submarine E11 sinks the Turkish gunboat Berki Satvet.

During night at the same time as the British IX Corps begins landing at Suvla to the north a breakout from the Anzac sector is made by units of the New Zealand and Australian Division under the command of General Alexander Godley. Two columns of troops are directed at two peaks of the dominating ridge which are expected to be captured by dawn tomorrow. Both columns are preceded by a covering force to clear the Turkish outposts and protect the flanks of the main assaulting force. The left, or northern, column of the Australian 4th Infantry Brigade and the 29th Indian Brigade are heading for Hill 971, the highest point on the Sari Bair range. They have the furthest to travel over completely unfamiliar terrain and never get close to their objective.

The right, or southern, column is heading for Chunuk Bair. Though lower than Hill 971, this peak overlooks the north of the Anzac perimeter and is used as a base for an artillery battery. The main Sari Bair ridge extends from Chunuk Bair down into the Anzac sector via Battleship Hill and Baby 700. From Baby 700 the ridge branches towards the beach via the Nek and south to Lone Pine via the line of tenuous Anzac positions known as Quinn’s, Courtney’s and Steele’s Posts. The capture of Chunuk Bair would provide considerable relief to the Anzac sector.  The approach to the peak is made along Rhododendron Spur which runs from the beach to the peak of Chunuk Bair. The Turks have outposts along the spur at the Table Top, Destroyer Hill and nearest the beach at Old No. 3 Outpost. There is also a Turkish outpost on Bauchop’s Hill to the north. All these outposts have to be cleared by the covering force, the four regiments of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, before the main assault column can proceed up the spur to the summit. The Auckland regiment clears Old No. 3 Outpost and the Wellington regiment takes Destroyer Hill and the Table Top. The Otago and Canterbury regiments capture Bauchop’s Hill, named after the Otago regiment’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Bauchop who will die of wounds received during the attack. In all the New Zealanders lose about 100 men in clearing the outposts and while their efforts are successful, the plan is now running two hours behind schedule, making it difficult to reach the summit before first light.

The main force of the right column is the New Zealand Infantry Brigade under the command of Brigadier General Francis Johnston. The Brigade’s four battalions, reduced by sickness and battle, mustered about 2,800 men.. The advance is initially made up the valleys, on either side of Rhododendron Spur and once past the Table Top, the New Zealanders climb on to the ridge, leaving about 1,000 yards to travel to the summit.

As a diversion to the main assaults against the Sari Bair peaks of Chunuk Bair and Hill 971 the whistles blow for an assault on Lone Pine at 17:30 and the Australians of the 1st Infantry Brigade emerge yelling and shouting from underground tunnels which have been dug 50 yards beyond their own front.  They have 100 yards to dash and when they reach the Turkish front they discover the Turks have roofed over most of their advanced trenches with pine logs.  Some Australians drop their rifles and try to pry the logs away.  Others fire between the logs into the Turks below, while still others dash beyond to the communications trenches and attack the enemy rear.

A fierce close quarters battle rages as the Australians drop into the darkened passages below while the Turks, who have been sheltered from the artillery bombardment that preceded the attack, attempt to emerge from their tunnels. The Australians fight mainly with rifle and bayonet and sometimes with their hands. The preliminary attack has killed or wounded many of the Turks and the rest are either killed, driven out or captured by the Australians.

By 18:00, Lone Pine is in Australians hands. Many hours of attack and counterattack follow with the Turks eventually throwing their entire reserve into the battle.  The enemy uses close-in bomb fighting in their efforts to retake the lost positions. Many Australians catch bombs and throw them back, an audacious act, which ends when the Turks shorten the fuses on their bombs.  This results in quite a few Australians having their hands and arms blow off.

The 32nd and 33rd Brigades of the 11th Division began to come ashore at “B Beach” Suvla Bay south of Nibrunesi Point shortly before 22:00. In the first action fought by a New Army unit, two companies from the 6th Yorkshire Regiment drive the Turkish defenders off the small hill of Lala Baba which overlooks the beach. It is an inauspicious start as all but two of the Yorkshire’s officers become casualties as do one third of the men. Shortly afterwards the 34th Brigade attempts to land at “A Beach” within Suvla Bay but the landing goes awry from the start. The destroyers conveying the brigade anchor 1,000 yards too far south, facing shoal water and on the wrong side of the channel that drained the salt lake into the bay. Two lighters ground on reefs and the men have to wade ashore submerged up to their necks. The Manchester Regiment, having come ashore from the destroyer HMS Grampus has the greatest success of the landing, managing to find its way to the Kiretch Tepe ridge and fight its way some distance along it to the east with the loss of 200 casualties.

Elsewhere the landing is in chaos, having been made in the dark which results in confusion with units becoming mixed and officers unable to locate their position or their objectives. Later, when the moon rises, the British troops become targets for Turkish snipers. Attempts to capture Hill 10 fail because no one in the field knows where Hill 10 is. Shortly after dawn it is found and taken, the Turkish rearguard having withdrawn during the night.

It is agreed on this day that the Indian Expeditionary Force “D”, which in its advance inland has now reached Nasiriya, should advance on Kut.

Today’s losses include:

  • A classical actor
  • A member of the clergy
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A Gold Medal Skater
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • An Aylesbury footballer
  • The nephew of the Head Master of the South School Invercagill
  • A man whose brother and his wife’s brother will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Royal Air Force in 1944
  • A man who will have his three brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple men who will have to brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain Edwin Gerald Venning (Suffolk Regiment) is killed by a sniper shot to the neck while observing the German lines from his own trench at age 32. The regimental history stated “All ranks deplored the loss of a very valuable, gallant and popular officer. His body was conveyed to Locre the same evening and buried in the village churchyard.” He is the son of the late Reverend Edwin James Venning, British Chaplain at Cassel, Germany and is a well known classical actor.
  • Captain Harry Burnett Stevenson (Rajput Light Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Captain Nicolas Melville Gepp (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed on Hill 12 Gallipoli. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the Reverend Nicolas Parker Gepp Canon of Ely and Rector of Witchingham.
  • Captain Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker.
  • Captain Alec Vaughan Thomas (East Surrey Regiment attached Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed one day short of two years from today.
  • Lieutenant Lancelot Botry Pigott (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26 on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Eversfield Botry Pigott Rector of Ellisfield.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Alexander Ross Fitzmaurice (Sappers and Miners, Royal Engineers Lahore Division) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Judge of Dharwar, a scholar of Felsted School Essex and a government engineer at Bareilly, India.  He had been seriously wounded on 28th October 1914, returning to the front on 19th
  • Lieutenant Howard Field (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother was killed just over two months earlier.
  • Lieutenant Amyas Leigh Goldie (Gloucestershire Regiment attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Everard Digges La Touche (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in the intestine at Lone Pine at age 32. He is a Clerk in the Holy Orders (Clergyman) but had been unable to obtain a position as Chaplain so he enlisted as a private in the Infantry.  His brother will be killed in action in September 1915.  He was the youngest ever to earn a Letters Degree from Trinity College, Dublin.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander John Robertson (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 28. He played 10 Australian Rules Football games for Melbourne University in 1909.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Hobson Whidborne (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33 as the first of three sons of the Reverend George Ferris Whidborne who are killed in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Moor (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Lone Pine. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. Charles Moor Vicar of Barton on Humber & Canon of Lincoln.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker Rector of Quainton.
  • Second Lieutenant Gavin Campbell Arbuthnot (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend William Arbuthnot, Vicar of Lea Marston Warks.
  • Sergeant Robert Anthony Fleming (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 24. His ancestors claimed to have saved the flag bearing the legend “For Christ and Covenant” from the field of Bothwell Bridge in 1688.
  • Lance Corporal Alleyne Gordon Webber (Otago Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in February 1917 and they are nephews of the head master of the South School Inverecagill.
  • Trooper Stanley Maris Clark (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 35. He is a keen football player and well known in rowing circles.
  • Brothers and Privates Harold Benjamin and Edward John Victor Hennell (Australian Infantry) are killed together in the attack.
  • Trooper Alexander Forbes Hogarth (Australian Light Horse) dies of wounds in Egypt at age 27. He has two brothers who will die in the Great War, the first next year the second in March 1918.
  • Private Harold Forbes Clarke Winch (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Winch Vicar of OF Brompton.
  • Private Alan Gordon Till (Australian Infantry) is killed. His son will lose his life serving in the Royal Air Force in June 1944.
  • Private William Hall (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. He is a member of the Aylesbury Football Club.
  • Private Frederick Henry Wright (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of pneumonia in December 1917.
  • Private John Henry Tromans (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in January 1916 and his wife’s brother will also be killed in action.
  • Private William John Methven (Hampshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die on service in Mesopotamia in July 1919. Driver Robert Lynn (Royal Field Artillery) is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives as a result of Great War service when he is killed at age 30.
  • Private Charles Heaton (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 27 one month after his brother was also killed on Gallipoli.

Two hundred forty one members of the Essex Regiment are killed at Achi Baba, Gallipoli.

  • Lieutenant John Charles Gardom (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is a Gold Medal Skater of the National Skating Association in 1911.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard George Gabb (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in December 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Roper (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 24 and his brother Private Frederick Roper (Essex Regiment) are killed together.
  • Private Jesse Freshwater (Essex Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Privates and brothers Richard James (age 19) and Frederick Thomas Whall (age 23) are also killed.