Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Coldstream Guards

Saturday 13 April 1918 We Lost 2,120

During the German spring offensive, when his platoon is surrounded Second Lieutenant John Munro (Seaforth Highlanders) leads them to fight their way out, delaying the enemy long enough for the rest of the battalion to regroup and mount a successful counter-attack. For his efforts on this day Lieutenant Munro, a Scottish Poet will be awarded the Military Cross. Three days later he will be killed in action at age 28. He wrote in his native Gaelic as Iain Rothach and came to be ranked by critics alongside other Great War Poets.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • A battalion commander
  • A Norwich City footballer
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three, four and five son in the Great War
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man who lost two brothers in the Great War and another brother in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Robert Clements Gore CB CMG General Officer Commanding 101st Brigade 34th Division is killed in action at age 51. The headquarters of both the 101st and the 74th Brigades are occupying the same cellar in a farm on the Mont de Lille (southeast of Bailleul) when it is blown in.  The explosion kills General Gore and his Signaling Officer, Major F G Avery.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Cyril Robert Studd DSO (East Kent Regiment commanding 22nd Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 37 when a shell falls on his dugout.
  • Captain Vivian Sumner Simpson MC (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He was a professional club football player with the Norwich City Football Club.
  • Captain Thomas Tannatt Pryce VC MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 32 performing the deeds that will win him the Victoria Cross. Two days ago at Vieux-Berquin, France, Captain Pryce lead two platoons in a successful attack on the village. Early yesterday he is occupying a position with some 40 men, the rest having become casualties. He beats off four enemy attacks during the day, but by evening the enemy is within 60 yards of his trench. A bayonet charge led early this morning by Captain Pryce drives them back some 100 yards, but he has only 17 men left with no ammunition when yet another attack comes. He again leads a bayonet charge and is last seen engaged in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle against overwhelming odds.
  • Commander William Henry Farrington Warren DSO (HM TBD Parramatta, Royal Australian Navy) drowns in Italy at age 40. He is the son of the late Reverend John Maturin Warren.
  • Captain Kenneth Edward Brown (Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry) dies os wounds as a prisoner of war at age 22. He is the third of four brothers who lose their lives in the Great War, the final one being killed tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Henry Kenyon Bagshaw (Army Service Corps attached Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Fosbery Bagshaw.
  • Lieutenant Montague Hearfield Bingham (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Edward Leonard Bingham JP.
  • Lieutenant William Herbert Hamilton Steele-Nicholson (Royal Engineers) dies at home at age 43. His brother was killed in action in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edward Alex Shepherd (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds received in action. He is the son of the Reverend Edwin Thomas Shepherd Vicar of Longsleddale.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Barnes (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Charles Lionel Abrahams (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Lionel and Lady Abrahams.
  • Second Lieutenant Hubert Merefield Parsons (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 24. His only brother Mervyn was killed at Ypres in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Cyprian Lott MC (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend R C, sometime Vicar of De Aar, Cape Colony and Rector of Croughton, Northants.  He was educated at Trinity College, Oxford.
  • Sergeant Sidney Wedd DCM (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 23. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Sergeant Amos Brewster (Grenadier Guards) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Corporal Rolland Miller Neilson (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 26. He is the last of three brothers who will die in the first world war and who have a younger brother who though too young to fight in this war is killed in the Gordon Highlanders in June 1940.
  • Lance Corporal Sidney Parkhouse (Middlesex Regiment) dies on service at age 31. His brother was killed in November 1915.
  • Private Stanley Cregeen (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother was killed two years earlier in April 1916.
  • Private Frederick Stooke (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 20. His is one of four brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Walter Obadiah Lee (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed less than three weeks ago.
  • Private David James Blyth Egdell (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Alfred Stewart (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the last of five brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Percy Taylor (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.

Tuesday 9 April 1918 We Lost 2,207

Joseph Henry Collin VC

The Coldstream Guards are in the front line at Boiry St Martin when a German artillery shell lands in the trenches killing Lieutenant Horatio Spencer Walpole at age 36.  His brother the heir presumptive to the Baronies of Walpole was killed in September 1915.

All the Camels of 208th Squadron are burned at La Gorgue aerodrome to avoid capture by the advancing enemy when they are caught in a fog bank before the area is evacuated.

Second Lieutenant Joseph Henry Collin (King’s Own Lancaster Regiment) is killed one day short of this 25th birthday. At Givenchy, France, after offering a gallant resistance against heavy odds in the Keep held by his platoon, Second Lieutenant Collin, with only five of his men remaining, slowly withdraws, contesting every inch of ground. Single-handed, he then attacks a machine-gun and after firing his revolver into the enemy, he seizes a Mills grenade and throws it into the hostile gun team, putting the gun out of action, killing four of the team and wounding two others. He then takes a Lewis gun and engages a second hostile machine-gun, keeping the enemy at bay until he is mortally wounded. Lieutenant Collin will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions on this day.

At Givenchy, France, Second Lieutenant John Schofield (Lancashire Fusiliers) leads a party of nine men against a strong-point and is attacked by about 100 of the enemy, but his skillful use of men and weapons results in the taking of 20 prisoners. Having made his party up to ten he then proceeds towards the front line, where he meets large numbers of the enemy, on whom his party opens fire. He climbs on the parapet under point-blank machine-gun fire and by his fearless demeanor forces the enemy to surrender. As a result 123 of them, including several officers, are captured. He himself is killed a few minutes later. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • Multiple sons of Aldermen and Justices of the Peace
  • The son of Baron Walpole
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Brothers killed today while serving in different regimetns
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The Master of the East Sussex Foxhounds
  • A Scout Master
  • The son of a Counsellor and Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A open exhibitioner at Cambrdige
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A player for the All Blacks Rugby team against Australia
  • A man whose son will be killed in North Africa in 1941
  • A man whose son will be killed serving in the RAFVR in December 1944

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major William Ellis MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son of Alderman John Ellis JP.
  • Major James Wightman (East Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received in action five days earlier. His brother was killed in action on that day serving in a different regiment.
  • Captain E F S Mather (Manitoba Regiment) is killed in action at age 29. He passed the Cambridge Staff College course with honors.
  • Captain Wilfred Roderick Powell (Dorset Regiment) is killed in action at the Battle of Berukin, twenty miles east of Jaffa. He is the son of the Reverend Morgan Powell Vicar of Aberaman.
  • Captain Ralph Hopton Baskerville (Glamorgan Yeomanry attached Welsh Regiment) is killed in action at age 35. He is the Master of the East Sussex Foxhounds.
  • Captain Percival Warburton Hawkes (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 34. He was a scout master.
  • Captain Michael Meade MC (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Right Honorable Joseph Meade.
  • Captain George Beaumont MC (East Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 29. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Grahame Henderson MC (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 25 at Gentelles while extricating his platoon from their billets, during an artillery bombardment. His brother was killed five days ago.
  • Lieutenant Walter Haliburton Routledge Crick (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the only son of the Reverend Walter Crick Vicar of Oving Deir.
  • Lieutenant George Crompton Owen (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of Councellor C Crompton JP.
  • Lieutenant Alex Clarkson MacLean (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of General H J MacLean (Rifle Brigade) who lost his elder son five days earlier.
  • Lieutenant Mark Christopher Ball (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Noel Goodricke Addison MC (King Edward’s Horse) is killed in action at age 25. He had two brothers who have been previously killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Bernard Cecil Blake (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 35. His is the son of J W Blake JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Campbell Connal (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds as a prisoner at age 19. His older brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Proelss Perry (Middlesex Regiment) killed in action at Neuville Vitasse at age 21. He was an Open Exhibitioner (Mathmatics) at Christ College, Cambridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Arnold Bothamley (West Kent Yeomanry attached Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in September 1916. Chaplain the Reverend John J McDonnell is killed at age 41.
  • Sergeant Hubert Sydney Turtill (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 38. He played one test for the All Blacks Rugby Club versus Australian. His son will be killed in November 1941 serving in North Africa.
  • Corporal Albert Sidney Rasmus (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 27 at Ploegstreert. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Sidney James Pratt (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother died of diphtheria in November 1915 at home at age 16.
  • Lance Corporal Duncan McLennan (Royal Scots) is killed in action at age 21. His brother died of wounds in October 1917.
  • Lance Corporal John A Johnson (King Edward’s Horse) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Able Seaman Edward John Price (Anson Battalion Royal Naval Division) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Private Arthur Waller MM (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He dies eight days short of the one-year anniversary of the death in action of his brother.
  • Private Ronald Victor Ralli Robertson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the late John Robertson DD the former Vicar of Bradford and the Honorable Canon of Ripon.
  • Driver Edward Hadaway (Army Service Corps) is killed in action at age 30. His brother died of wounds in January 1917.
  • Private Harold Cain (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the son of Alderman Benjamin Cain JP and his brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Private George Henry Godfrey (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Frank Hodge (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in ten days.
  • Private Thomas William Hamlyn (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 18 becoming the last and youngest of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Noel Griffith Williams (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in January 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Griffith Williams Rector of Corwen.
  • Private George Tallent (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Gunner Joseph Charles Trull (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 34. His son will lose his life in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in December 1944.

Thursday 28 March 1918 We Lost 3,749

Bernard Matthew Cassidy VC

A nine plane offensive patrol from 43rd Squadron Royal Flying Corps under the command of Captain John L Trollope is attacked at 09:30 by a flight of Albatros D.V’s in the Albert area.  Five of the Sopwith Camels of 43rd Squadron are shot down. Captain Trollope, Lieutenant Robert J Owen and Second Lieutenant W J Prier are captured, while Second Lieutenant C R Maasdorp and Second Lieutenant H T Adams are killed.  Prior to their being shot down Capt Trollope destroys a kite balloon and two enemy aircraft while Lieutenant Owen also shoots down one enemy airplane.  Captain Trollope’s wounded arm is so badly damaged that his hand will be amputated and he will be repatriated in June. Eventually his left arm will be amputated at the shoulder.

SE5a pilots of 40th squadron depart at 13:30 to patrol an area around Arras.  They find the main Arras-Cambrai road and most of the side roads full of troops and transport, with the Douai main roads similarly congested.  These targets are attacked from heights down to three hundred feet and panic and stampedes are reported.

At Arras at a time the flank of his division is in danger, Second Lieutenant Bernard Matthew Cassidy (Lancashire Fusiliers) is in command of the left company of his battalion. He is ordered to hold on to the position at all costs and he carries out his instructions to the letter.  Although the enemy attacks in overwhelming numbers he continues to rally and encourage his men under a terrible bombardment until the company is eventually surrounded and he is killed at age 25.  For his actions Second Lieutenant Cassidy will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Major (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) Oliver Cyril Spencer Watson VC DSO (Middlesex Hussars commanding 2nd/5th King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41 at Rossignol Wood, north of Hebuterne, France. A counter-attack has been made against the enemy position which at first achieves its objective, but as they were holding out in two improvised strong-points, Lieutenant Colonel Watson sees that immediate action is necessary and he lead his remaining small reserve to the attack, organizing bombing parties and leading attacks under intense fire. Outnumbered, he finally orders his men to retire, remaining himself in a communication trench to cover the retirement. The assault he leads is at a critical moment and without doubt saves the line, but he is killed covering the withdrawal. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. He previously served in Tirah and during the Boxer Rebellion.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A member of the clergy
  • An Eton and Oxford rower
  • An Irish International cricketer
  • A man whose brother was taken prisoner in the same action
  • A Poet
  • A great grandson of Admiral ‘Sir’ Nathaniel Dance hero of the 1804 Battle of Pulo Aura
  • The brother of novelist John Barnett killed previously in the Great War
  • A grandson of the 12th Baron Petre
  • The former Headmaster of Oval Road School
  • The Intelligence Officer of the 198th Infantry Brigade

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Frederick William Robson DSO (Yorkshire Regiment commanding 6th Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in less than 3 weeks.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Richard Hall Ireland MC (Leinster Regiment commanding 2nd Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action.
  • Major Walter Greville Bagot-Chester MC (Gurkha Rifles) is killed in action in Palestine at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Algernon Stewart Mackenzie Bagot-Chester and had been severely wounded at Loos.
  • Captain George Ouvry William Willink MC (Royal Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He rowed in the Eton eight, the Oxford trial eights and the college boat club.
  • Captain James Michael Cunningham (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of William Cunningham DD.
  • Captain Arthur Cyril Bateman MC (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. He is an Irish cricketer who played two first class matches for Ireland against Scotland. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Captain Adam Currie (Royal Scots) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Adam Currie JP. Captain John Stewart Calder MC (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Captain John Herbert Victor Willmott MC (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Herbert Willmott Rector of Rivenhall and his brother is taken prisoner in the same action.
  • Captain Eric Wollaston Rose (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Percy Wollaston Rose Vicar of Norton-by-Daventry.
  • Lieutenant Rowley Moody Nicholson Bourner (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 27. He is the great grandson of the late Admiral Sir Nathaniel Dance, a noted hero of 1804.
  • Lieutenant Basil Joseph Bernard Butler-Bowdon (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. He is the grandson of the 12th Baron Petre.
  • Lieutenant Walter Hugh Whetstone (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 20 by a shell a few miles south of Arras. He is the second son of Lady Hiley. Lieutenant Whetstone was gazetted to the Coldstream Guards in December 1915 and went to the Front in the following July. He was severely wounded in the Battle of the Somme in September 1916, but returned to the Front a year later and took part in the fighting at Cambrai and the recapture of Gouzeaucourt in December 1917.
  • Lieutenant Sidney Collier (Manchester Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed while flying near Vimy at age 22. He is the son of Reverend Samuel F Collier and his brother was killed six days earlier.
  • Lieutenant Gordon Francis Collingwood (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Major General Clennell Collingwood.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Noel Storrs Fox (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Noel Storrs Fox Rector of Holy Trinity, Yorks.
  • Second Lieutenant Sydney Beaumont MC (East Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Framerville at age 38. He is the Intelligence Officer of the 198th Infantry Brigade and former Headmaster of Oval Road School, Croydon, Surrey.
  • Second Lieutenant Kenneth D’Ombrain Husband (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Edgar Bell Husband Vicar of St Luke’s.
  • Second Lieutenant Innes D’Auvergne Stewart Stitt (London Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Stewart Stitt and wrote a poem called The Last Leave, which can be read in the Stretham church where his father the Reverend was Rector.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold William Stagg (Machine Gun Corps) is killed. His brother the novelist John Barnett (his pseudonym) was killed in September 1916
  • Lance Corporal Frank Jenkins (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at age 24. His brother will die of wounds next September.
  • Lance Corporal Stanley Boon (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action in Palestine. His brother was killed in December of last year.
  • Private James Sutherland (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 41 at Arras. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Driver Thomas E Crowe (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action at age 26. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Frank Wooding (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother was killed in November 1914.
  • Private George Geary (King’s Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 29. His brother will die on active service in November of this year.
  • Private Harry Thompson (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother died of wounds last September.
  • Private George Whitbread (Middlesex Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in December 1916.
  • Private Ewart Leslie Andrew (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in March 1917.
  • Private Samuel Thomas Elcock (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in April last year.
  • Bombardier Thomas Hallworth (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 29. He is the middle of three brothers who are lost in the Great War.
  • Private Patrick O’Brien (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed. His son will be killed in May 1940.
  • Rifleman Oliver Hope Robertson (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He is a clergyman.
  • Private George Tolworthy (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last October.

Sunday 24 March 1918 We Lost 3,071

Maurice Edmund Mealing

The enemy advance continues. They overcome the defences of Monchy and converge on the old Somme battlefields from Bapaume to Peronne. Peronne is lost while Ham and Chauny are evacuated. South of Peronne the Germans cross the River Somme while north of the city attack along the River Tortille.

Captain John L Trollope (Royal Flying Corps) becomes the first man to shoot down six enemy aircraft in two engagements in the same day.  The total air fighting claims by the Royal Flying Corps are twenty-four shot down on the Third Army front and seventeen on the Fifth Army front.

British aircraft drop a ton of bombs on the railway station at Thionville. A moving train is derailed and a fire started.

Brigadier General Randle Barnett Barker General Officer Commanding 99th Brigade 2nd Division is killed in action at age 47 along with his Staff Captain Edward Inkerman Jordan Bell MC (Middlesex Regiment) grandson of a Victoria Cross winner in the Crimea War who is a professional football player for Crystal Palace, Southampton and Portsmouth and who dies at age 32. .

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose sister died in the VAD
  • A man whose brother-in-law is killed
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Nephew of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A man recommended for the Victoria Cross
  • A General
  • The son of a General
  • An England Rugby International
  • A Crystal Palace, Southampton and Portsmouth footballer
  • An International tennis player
  • The son of Baron Ashcombe
  • The son of a Baronet
  • Uncle of a Baronet who will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Great War Poet
  • The brother of a future Admiral and future General
  • An Assistant Master at Sir Walter St John’s School
  • A Great War Poet
  • The son of an Admiral
  • An author and song writer
  • A 14-victory ace
  • A Military Chaplain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Mark Tuite (Munster Fusiliers commanding 26th Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 30.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Kendall Priaulx DSO (commanding 11th King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at Voyennes in the St. Quentin offensive, being first shot through the shoulder and then killed by a shell at age 40. Lieutenant Colonel Priaulx received his Commission in 1898, and joined the 60th He served throughout the South African War, being present at the Battles of Colenso, Spion Kop, Tugela Heights, Laing’s Nek, and at the Relief of Ladysmith. He was mentioned in Despatches and in 1900 was promoted Captain. After peace was declared he went to India. He left for France in August 1914 with the 1st Division and was dangerously wounded on the Marne in September. The following year he was again severely wounded at Loos. In 1916, while commanding the 9th Battalion, which captured the village of Metz, he was present at the operations near Langemarck, Crevecoeur, and Cambrai.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Sydney Charles Peyton MC (commanding 2nd Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Algernon the 6th Baronet and has a nephew, a son of the 7th Baronet who will be killed in action on 13th April 1945 at age 26.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Reginald Henry Napier Settle DSO MC (Hussars commanding 21st Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 26 while making a last stand with a small group of officers and men. He is the only son of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Henry Settle KCB DSO.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Walter Blackall (East Kent Regiment commanding 4th South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 42. He served in the South Africa War, is an actor in both England and the United States and is a Great War poet.

Their Dug-Out

The Company Sergeant-Major

And the Company Q.M.S.

Have the snuggest little dug-out

And a most superior mess.

And if anything you’re needing,

It’s always to be found

In their handy little, sandy little

dug-out underground….

  • Lieutenant Colonel Frank Henry Heal DSO (commanding 1st South African Infantry) is killed at age 37.
  • Major Hugh Nares Davenport (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of James Clutterbuck Vicar of Long Wittenham and his brothers will go on to become Vice Admiral Robert Clutterbuck Davenport RN and Brigadier James Salter Davenport. His brother died of wounds in September 1916.
  • Major Frank Eardley Cochran DSO (South African Infantry) an international tennis player is killed in action at age 35.
  • Major Home Peel DSO MC (London Regiment) is killed in action. His sister has previously died serving with the VAD in December 1917.
  • Major Horace Armytage Jameson MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend T E Jameson.
  • Major Charles Selwyn Awdry DSO (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed. He is the nephew of the late Reverend William Awdry Bishop of Tokyo (Second Master 1868-73).
  • Captain Theodore Cecil Ormond Williams MC (Sherwood Foresters) dies of wounds at Clery at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Theodore Williams.
  • Captain Thomas Ainsworth Townsend MC (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed in action. He is the son of T S Townsend JP.
  • Captain Kearsley Mathwin Drummond MC (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ David and Lady Drummond.
  • Captain Charles William Tone Barker (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action five days before his brother is killed in the same battle.
  • Captain William Henry Madden (Royal Irish Rifles) dies of wounds at age 33. He is the son of the Very Reverend Samuel Owen Madden (Dean of Cork).
  • Captain Harold Augustus Hodges (Monmouthshire Regiment attached South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 32 after he entered a small factory on a road between Ham and Eppeville hope to make contact with a British battalion. He instead encountered enemy troops and was shot dead. He earned two rugby caps for in England in 1906 and played first class cricket for Nottinghamshire and is the son of William A Hodges JP.
  • Captain Albert Frank Robson (West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the Assistant Master at ‘Sir’ Walter St John’s School and his brother in law was killed in August of last year.
  • Assistant Commandant Charles Ernest Wynn Molesworth (Burma Military Police) is killed in action during the Chin Hill operations at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend E H Molesworth.
  • Lieutenant George Berry Milligan (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at Royelles at age 29. He will be recommended for the Victoria Cross for his actions this day and his brother will be killed in September.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable” William Hugh Cubitt (Dragoons) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Henry Cubitt, the 2nd Baron Ashcombe, who has previously lost two others sons during the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Richard Brereton Marriott-Watson MC (Irish Rifles) is killed in action. He is one of the Great War poets, his most well known work is entitled “Kismet”. He is the son of the poet Graham R Tomson the pseudonem of Rosamund Bell.
  • Lieutenant Paul Douglas Farmer (South African Infantry) is killed in action at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Canon E Farmer.
  • Lieutenant Noel Graham Lake (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Admiral Atwell Lake.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Harry Bovill (Coldstream Guards) the author of many popular reviews dies of wounds at age 39 received in action three days prior when a shell bursts while he is leading rehearsal for a revue he is putting on. As a songwriter he collaborated with future Academy Award winner Jerome Kern in 1908 for the Broadway musical Fluffy Ruffles. This is one of six Broadway productions which he contributed musical lyrics.
  • Second Lieutenant Maurice Edmund Mealing MC (Shropshire Light Infantry attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 24. His is a 14 victory ace.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Teesdale Dent (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in April of last year.
  • Second Lieutenant Marcus Ernest Young (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in less than two months.
  • Second Lieutenant Alastair Mackenzie (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 24. He is a teacher of Hygiene and Physical Culture.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Thomson Caird (Royal Scots) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend David Caird Minister of Morningside Congregational Church Edinburgh.
  • Second Lieutenant William Erskine Watson (Liverpool Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend J M Watson
  • Second Lieutenant Philp Bevan Tree (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 23. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Cadet George Robinson Johnston (Australian Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Johnston.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Henry Heaton Lawson (attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 29.
  • Sergeant Alexander Edwards VC (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 32. He was awarded the Victoria Cross last year.
  • Lance Sergeant Fred Barlow (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Arnold James Goudie (South African Infantry) is killed at age 35. His brother died of wounds in December 1916 in Macedonia.
  • Private George Alexander Clarke (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Able Seaman Charels Biggs (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last July.
  • Private Francis Spencer Byard (Liverpool Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother died of wounds last December.
  • Private John Arthur Hurdley (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in January 1915.
  • Private Thomas Nicholls (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Friday 22 March 1918 We Lost 4,242

John Crawford Buchan VC

Continuing the fight of the previous day thick fog greets dawn and the London Regiment resists the continuing German attacks. During lulls in the fighting the men of the  2nd/2nd London Regiment crawl out of Travecy Keep in ones and twos into the ruins of St Quentin village and fire on enemy machine gun teams nearby. By midday the fog lifts and the men of A Company take the opportunity to fire on a column of enemy transport seen on the St Quentin to La Fere road. They even fire on a group of German Staff Officers and a working party on the Travecy to Achery road. The Londoners are rewarded with an attack by a German aircraft which drops two bombs on the Keep. Later in the afternoon further aircraft bomb the Keep, one of which is shot down by a Lewis Gun. At 19:30 Captain Harper holds a council of war with his remaining officers and CSM. Their ammunition has virtually run out, they are completely cut off and there is no hope of a counter attack. The London men are exhausted, hungry and outnumbered at least 50 to 1. Their wounded are exposed to enemy fire and need treatment. Captain Harper decides it will be futile to resist further. He gives orders to destroy all maps and plans together with the remaining 2 Lewis Guns and trench mortars. Shortly after midnight the Germans began another attack. Captain Harper goes out to meet them and surrenders, 44 hours after the initial German bombardment had commenced. A Company has fired over 18,000 rounds of ammunition, launched over 200 trench mortars and has thrown more than 400 hand grenades. With the capture of the remaining 44 men (including the wounded) the losses of the 2nd/2nd London Regiment stands at 570 men of 610 ranks. More than 60 are dead.

British troops cross the River Jordan at El Ghoraniyeh, a short distance from the Red Sea.  They move northeastward into the hills through the gorge as Wadi Shaib and capture Es Salt, an important depot on the track running from Shechem to the railway.  The force then moves down the track to Amman on the railway line, which is found to be very strongly held.  Seven hundred Turkish and German prisoners are captured in these operations.  The entire column eventually marches back to the Jordan, followed by the Turks.

HMS Gaillardia is sunk by a mine off the Orkney Islands while carrying out buoying operations in the newly Northern Barrage. Among those killed in the sinking is

  • Acting Commander John Sharpey Schafer killed at age 36. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Sharpey Schafer Kt.
  • Stoker 1st Class Albert Hawkes is also killed. His brother died on service as a Stoker in March 1915.

Captain William Calder (SS Trinidad, Merchant Marine) is killed when his ship is sunk by a submarine twelve miles east of the Codling Light Vessel.   His brother was killed in action in November 1917.

While fighting with his platoon in the forward position of the battle zone, Second Lieutenant John Crawford Buchan (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) although wounded early in the day insists on remaining with his men and continually visiting all his posts encouraging and cheering his men in spite of a most severe shell fire from which his platoon will suffer heavy casualties.  Later when the enemy is creeping closer and heavy machine gun fire is raking his position Second Lieutenant Buchan continues to visit his posts and though accidentally injured again he continues to encourage his men and visit his posts.  Eventually, when he sees that the enemy has practically surrounded his command, he collects his platoon and prepares to fight his way back to the support line.  At this point the enemy who have crept around to his right flank, rush towards him, shouting “Surrender” to which replied “To hell with surrender” and shoots the foremost of the enemy finally repelling the enemy advance with his platoon. He then fights his way back to the support line of the forward position where he will hold out until dusk.  At dusk he falls back as ordered but in spite of his injuries he again refuses to go to the aid post saying his place was beside his men.  Owing to the unexpected withdrawal of troops on his left flank it is impossible to send orders to Second Lieutenant Buchan to withdraw, as he is already cutoff and he is last seen holding out against overwhelming odds.  For his efforts during this and the previous day he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

At Hervilly Wood Private Herbert George Columbine (Machine Gun Corps) takes command of a gun and keeps firing it from 09:00 until 13:00 in an isolated position with no wire in front. During this time wave after wave of the enemy fail to get up to him, but at last with help of a low-flying aircraft he them manage to gain a strong foothold in the trench. As the position is now untenable Private Columbine tells the two remaining men to get away and although he is being bombed on either side he keeps his gun firing inflicting losses until he is killed by a bomb which blows up both he and his gun.  For his actions Private Columbine will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Rifleman Colin Mitchell (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action.  He is a Great War Poet.                                                                                                                  

Trampled Clay

…We went to seek the dead; with rough respect

To roll their mangled bodies down the shade

Of crater-lips that shrieking shells had made…

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Bradford City footballer
  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • The grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • A Candidate of Parliament
  • A Royal Academy Artist
  • A YMCA Chaplain
  • A Great War Poet
  • A man whose son is killed in the Great War
  • The brother of a Brigadier General
  • A man whose father was killed in the sinking of S S Persia in 1915
  • A Grandson of the 1st Baron St Leven
  • Nephew of Viscount Grey
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A Rugby Scottish International
  • The Assistant Master at Lancing College

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Mildred Clare Eardley-Wilmot will lose her husband Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Eardley-Wilmot DSO (York and Lancaster Regiment attached Suffolk Regiment) when he is killed in action at age 38. Twenty-six years later her son will be killed in action as a 34-year old Major in the Irish Guards.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Norman Stewart DSO (North Somerset Yeomanry commanding 6th Leicestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44. He is the brother of Brigadier General Ian Stewart.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Bernard Hedley Charlton MC (commanding 4th Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. He is the son of the late William Hyslop Charlton JP.
  • Major Morice Julian St Aubyn MC (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 25. His father was killed in the sinking of S S Persia in December 1915 and is brother will be killed in the sinking of HMS Strongbow in March 1942. He is the grandson of the 1st Baron St Leven.
  • Major Edward Hildred Hanbury Carlile (Hertfordshire Yeomanry) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of Colonel ‘Sir’ Hildred Carlile Baronet MP for Mid Herts, and of Lady Carlile, of Ponsbourne Park, Hertford. In the spring of 1917 he was adopted as the Conservative Candidate for the Mid Herts Division. Major Carlile, who spent ten years in the Yorkshire Dragoons and later transferred to the Hertfordshire Yeomanry, served with his Regiment in England from September 1914. He is subsequently attached to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and left for France in January 1918. Today he and all his men, with one exception, are killed near Peronne, having been sent forward to reinforce ‘if possible’.  He is shot with a revolver by a German Officer.
  • Captain Adrian Hubert Graves (Norfolk Regiment) a nephew of Viscount Grey is killed in action.
  • Captain Samuel Francis Collier (Manchester Regiment) is killed at Servacue Farm at age 27. He is the son of Reverend Samuel F Collier and his brother will be killed in six days.
  • Captain Frank Darley Livingstone (Army Service Corps) is killed in action at age 32. He is the son of Reverend Canon Richard and the Honorable Mrs. Livingstone and he was called to the Bar in May 1911 and was a member of the Inner Temple.
  • Captain William Ramsay Hutchison (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 29. He is a Scottish Rugby International who capped in 1911.
  • Captain Albert Higgs Vinson (Royal Flying Corps) is killed while serving at an instructor at Yatesbury at age 21. He is the son of Albert Vinson JP.
  • Captain Noel Burgess Michell (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 33. He is the Assistant Master at Lancing College and Bedales School.
  • Chaplain ‘the Reverend’ Thomas George Trueman (Australian Young Men’s Christian Association attached Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 30.
  • Lieutenant George Guest Lomas (Manchester Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend George Lomas.
  • Lieutenant William Victor Lancelot Mallett (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will die on service in February 1919.
  • Lieutenant William Ashcroft (Liverpool Regiment) is killed in action near St. Quentin at age 36. One brother was killed last year while another will die of wounds as a prisoner of war in May of this year.
  • Lieutenant David Sonnie Dewar (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 24. His is the son of the late Reverend David Dewar Vicar of Holy Trinity and had a brother who was killed in action in 1916.
  • Lieutenant Harry Chamen Linott (London Regiment) dies of wounds received in action. He is a Royal Academy artist who has been exhibited at most of the leading galleries in Great Britain and the United States.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Ferrier Charlton (Durham Light Infantry is killed in action at age 29. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Lieutenant Ulick A Moore (Connaught Rangers) is killed. He is the grandson of the late G H Moore MP.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Singleton Knott (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. He was the head boy of the Perse School, Cambridge and scholar-elect of St Peter’s College, Cambridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Anderson Hyslop MC (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Nettleship (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Sergeant William Arthur Woore (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in nine days.
  • Sergeant Sidney Fensome (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Corporal Charles Louis Thorne (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in July.
  • Corporal Frank Stranger (Australian Imperial Forces) is killed in action at age 35.  His brothers will both die within two months having both received their fatal wounds in the same action in April while serving in the Guernsey Light Infantry.
  • Corporal Sydney Clarence Porter (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 22. His brother died of wounds last July.
  • Lance Corporal James W A Dundas (Highland Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. His two brothers have been killed in the two previous years of the Great War.
  • Private Harry Ford (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. His brother will die while still in the service in February 1919.
  • Private Edward Foster (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private John Howard Payne (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother William Henry Dodson Payne also fell.
  • Private Ernest Crellin (London Regiment) is killed in action in Palestine at age 22. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Samuel Spillane (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. His brother James also fell.
  • Private James Shaw (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 33. His brother Ralph also fell.
  • Sapper Frederick Malpass (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. His brother Arthur also fell.
  • Driver G S Copland (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at age 24. His two brothers will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Private James William Hills (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed in action at age 25. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Thomas Frederick Grainger (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 21. His younger brother will be killed in July 1944 serving as a Guardsman in the Coldstream Guards.
  • Private Albert Moody (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed on 4th
  • Private Harry Potter (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. He played halfback for the Bradford City Football Club.
  • Private Frank Edward Cutts (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Private Robert Gimblett Paramore (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 26. He has two brothers who will also be killed in the War.
  • Private John Goldsmith (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed less than two days ago.
  • Private Edward Potter Coventry (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private John Bernard Gardner (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed last August.
  • Private David Baird (Highland Light Infantry) is killed in action. His son will be killed in June 1944 serving in Italy.
  • Private Adolphus Gallienne (Royal Guernsey Light Infantry) is killed at age 24. His twin brother was killed two days earlier and their older brother was killed in November 1917.
  • Private Donald Gow (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His son named after him will be killed at Nijmegan in 26 years at age 26.

Thursday 21 March 1918 We Lost 8,731

Wilfrith Elstob VC

At 04:50 a German bombardment begins on the British trenches, with one artillery piece firing for every 10 yards of the line. Gas shells and trench mortars also rain down on the British. The bombardment lasts until 07:00 and under its cover the enemy infantry cross the St Quentin Canal and assault the 2nd/2nd London Regiment positions in the Forward Zone. The Germans exploit the dense fog and are soon behind the Forward Zone positions. Two keeps (Japy and Brickstack) held by the London Regiment fall early but the Main Keep holds out until after midday before it is finally taken. At Travecy Keep the artillery bombardment lasts until 08:00, by which time all communication links have been severed and, in the thick fog, A Company is without support and completely isolated. As the barrage lifts the enemy attacks and takes a number of the forward posts and briefly penetrated the Keep’s outer defences to the north and south and heavy fighting develops on the right flank held by one platoon is reduced to 10 men and an officer. By 10:00 the surviving two men of this platoon fall back to the Keep. An hour later an attack, assisted by an aeroplane, develops to the north forcing two sections of A Company back to the Keep which is now under continuous machine gun and rifle grenade fire. An advance section are still undetected forward of the Keep and they inflict many casualties on the enemy during this attack with a Lewis Gun before retiring.

During the afternoon the enemy makes a number of determined assaults on the Keep, all of which are repulsed. At 17:00 Captain Maurice Harper calls for two volunteer runners to report to Brigade HQ. The men, Privates Banks and Ancliffe, return two hours later with the news that the enemy had penetrated two miles to the northwest and nearly three miles to the west and southwest. With its flanks driven in and the enemy behind it, Travecy Keep is completely surrounded. At this point Captain Harper’s force consists of 3 officers and 60 men. Just before dusk the Germans launch a further assault on all sides of the Keep and the fight rages for an hour before the enemy falls back. During the night the Germans continue to bomb the Keep and sweep it with machine gun and rifle fire.

At 09:40 for the first time five captured British tanks start their advance against British trenches at St Quentin. Two are damaged by British artillery fire, while the other three continue until they run out of fuel.

Lieutenant Colonel Wilfrith Elstob VC DSO MC (commanding 16th Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at Manchester Redoubt, near St. Quentin performing the duties that will result in his being awarded the Victoria Cross at age 29.  Elstob is the son of the Reverend Canon J G Elstob Vicar of Capesthorne, Manchester Hill. During the preliminary enemy bombardment he encourages his men in the posts in the Redoubt by frequent visits, and when repeated attacks develop he controls the defense at the points threatened, giving personal support with revolver, rifle and bombs. Single-handedly he repulses one bombing assault driving back the enemy and inflicting severe casualties. Later, when ammunition is required, he makes several journeys under severe fire in order to replenish the supply. Throughout the day Lieutenant-Colonel Elstob, although twice wounded, shows the most fearless disregard of his own safety and by his encouragement and noble example inspires his command to the fullest degree. The Manchester Redoubt is surrounded in the first wave of the enemy attack, but by means of the buried cable Lieutenant-Colonel Elstob is able to assure his Brigade Commander that “The Manchester Regiment will defend Manchester Hill to the last.” Sometime after this the post is overcome by vastly superior forces, and this very gallant officer is killed in the final assault, having maintained to the end the duty which he had impressed on his men – namely, “Here we fight, and here we die.”

Second Lieutenant Edmund De Wind (Royal Irish Rifles) dies of wounds received at Race Course Redbout, near Grugies at age 34.  For seven hours he holds this post and though twice wounded and practically single-handed, he maintains his position until another section could get to his aid.  He continues to repel attack after attack until he is mortally wounded.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously.

At the beginning of the great German offensive the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service have a total of five hundred seventy nine serviceable aircraft in the battle area, two hundred sixty one of them single-seaters. Against them are deployed seven hundred thirty aircraft, of which three hundred twenty six are scouts.

In the dark hour preceding dawn the British destroyers HMS Botha (Commander Roger L’E M Rede) and HMS Morris (Lieutenant Commander Percy R P Percival) and three French destroyers Mehl, Magon and Bouclierare are on patrol in the eastern waters of the English Channel, when a sudden outburst of firing is heard to the north.  Vivid flashes of gunfire out to sea make it plain that the enemy is engaged in a bombardment of the crumbling bathing-sheds of deserted French watering places.  The Allied force promptly makes for the flashes at full speed, led by the Botha.  Star shells are fired in an attempt to light up the enemy and obtain their range, however, merely have the effect of quelling the bombardment and scattering the raiders, who are not seen again.  The patrolling force then proceeds to search to the north and west in the hope of intercepting any divisions of the enemy which have ventured more into mid-Channel.  Star shells are fired at intervals, as the morning is misty, and presently one of these bursting ahead reveals the outline of a force of enemy destroyers and torpedo boats heading through the darkness in the direction of their base.

Botha challenges, and an unfamiliar reply is received.  The next instant the British and French are pouring a heavy fire into the enemy.  The Allies rapidly overhaul the raiders and set the darkness ablaze with flashes of gunfire and blazing wreckage-flying broadcast from shells bursting on impact.  The Germans reply with torpedo shots, though none find their mark.  Morris, emerging from a smoke screen flung up by the fleeing enemy cuts off a German torpedo boat and torpedoes her at 500 yards. The German blows up and sinks almost immediately, heeling over amid clouds of steam and vanishing stern first.  In the meantime an enemy shell has severed the Botha’s main steam pipe, and she immediately begins to loose her way through the water.  As a result her commander quickly fires his torpedoes at the leading enemy boats, and putting his helm hard over, rams the number four amidships.  His speed has dropped considerably, but it is still sufficient to drive the knife-edge bow of the Botha clean through, cutting the enemy completely in half.  The Botha then swings around and attempts to repeat the coup on the next ship astern. This German vessel succeeds in eluding the Botha’s crippling onslaught, but she falls victim to the French destroyers. She is soon a flaming wreck under torpedo and gunfire.

The Morris by this time has relinquished her pursuit, having lost the quarry in the smoke and mist.  She returns to the scene of action and takes her lame sister in tow, while the French destroyers circle in the gray dawn picking up prisoners.  From statements made by these it appears that no fewer than eighteen torpedo craft have sallied forth for the raid. They have been unhesitatingly attacked and rather badly mauled by the two British and three French destroyers, torpedo boats A7 and A19 having been sunk in the action.  Both British commanders will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for their actions on this day along with several of their officers and men who will also receive decorations of various awards.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple Battalion Commanders
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • Two brothers killed today in different actions
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • A man whose daughter will be born next July
  • The son of a Deputy Clerk of the Peace and Deputy Sheriff Clerk
  • A Royal Humane Society Medal for life saving
  • A man who will be buried in the Churchyard where his father is rector
  • A writer to the Signet
  • A Northamptonshire cricketer
  • An England player
  • The Assistant Master of Wem Grammar School
  • The Assistant Master at Ducie Avenue School
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A Military Chaplain
  • The son of the Clerk of the House of Commons
  • A man whose brother-in-law is killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1941
  • A Police Constable for Aberdeen
  • A man whose father is killed in the Great War
  • The nephew of the Vice General of the Isle of Man

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Bezley Houghton (commanding 2nd/6th North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 44.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Stuart-Wortley (commanding 6th South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Wogan Festing DSO (commanding 15th Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 35. He is the son of the late Major General ‘Sir’ Francis Festing and his daughter will be born on 9th July 1918.
  • Lieutenant Colonel James Robert MacAlpine Downie (commanding 1st/8th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 40.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Henry Stephen Dimmer VC MC (King’s Royal Rifle Corps commanding 2nd/4th Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 35.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Spencer Acklom DSO MC (Highland Light Infantry commanding 22nd Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 35.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Lawrence Julius Le Fleming (commanding 9th East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the son of the late Reverend John Le Fleming.
  • Major Henry Archer Johnstone (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in February 1916.
  • Major John Hugh Jerwood MC (Durham Light Infantry attached Somerset Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Jerwood.
  • Major Claude Stuart Lyon MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son of the late James S Lyon, Professor of Engineering at Royal College of Science in Dublin.
  • Major Charles Reginald Chenevix Trench (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 30. He is the son of the late Reverend Herbert Francis Chenevix Trench Vicar of St Peter’s Thanet.
  • Major Thomas Wedderspoon Alexander (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of the Deputy Clerk of the Peace and Sheriff Clerk of Buteshire. Brevet
  • Major Malcolm Roy Wingate DSO MC (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of the 1st Baronet General ‘Sir’ Reginald and Lady Wingate GCB GCVO GBE KMCG DSO.
  • Captain Wilfrid Henry Hensley (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Gabriel Hensley Rector of Gt Barrington.
  • Captain John Brown MC (Royal Irish Rifles) is killed in action at age 23. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society’s Bronze Medal and Certificate for life saving from drowning at Belfast in September 1916.
  • Captain Thomas Horsfall Crofton (Connaught Rangers) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Malby Crofton the 3rd
  • Captain Francis Reginald Hudson (Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England at age 27. He is buried at Huntsham (All Saints) Churchyard where is father, the Reverend Arthur Reginald Hudson is the rector of the church. He is the younger brother of Godfrey Burnside Hudson who will be killed on 18th April 1918.
  • Captain Ernest Harry Gilpin (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 35. His brother died at home serving in the Royal Defense Corps.
  • Captain Philip Dawson Harris (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of Arnold Elsmere Harris JP.
  • Captain Thomas Leslie Astbury (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 30 He is the son of the Reverend Canon George Astbury Vicar of Smethwick.
  • Captain John Balfour MC (Scots Guards) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Captain Robert Gerald McElney MC (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Robert McElney.
  • Captain Wilfred Roland Desages (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in May.
  • Captain Marmaduke Marshall Shaw MC (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Marmaduke Spicer Shaw Vicar of All Saint’s Exmouth.
  • Two sons of the late Percy and Mrs. Whitehead are killed in different actions today. Captain Percy Neil Whitehead (Royal Engineers) is 28 years old while his brother Second Lieutenant Hugh Maguire Whitehead (Sussex Regiment) is only 23.
  • Captain Maurice William Campbell Sprott MC (Norfolk Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Bishop of Wellington New Zealand.
  • Lieutenant John Walcot Stewart MC (Royal Scots) is killed at age 33. He is a Writer to the Signet.
  • Lieutenant Derrick Osborne (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Francis Osborne 15th
  • Lieutenant Reginald Frederick Rowley (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the late Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ George Charles, the 3rd
  • Lieutenant Edward Gladwin Arnold (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Lowther Arnold Vicar of Holy Trinity Fareham and his brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Harold Charlton Boycott (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds at age 41. He played cricket for Northamptonshire and was also a member of the English hockey team for several years.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Morley Hooper (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 40. He is the son of Reverent J H Hooper.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Meldrum Watson Leith MC (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the late Reverend John Watson Leith Minister of O’Meldrum Aberdeenshire.
  • Lieutenant Alexander James Bartlett-Begg MC (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Begg.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Henry Liddon Addis (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend William Edward Addis Vicar of All Saints.
  • Lieutenant Robert Gray Nicol Gibson MC (Royal Scots) is killed. His brother was killed in June 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Alexander James Bartlet Begg MC (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Begg Rector of Unsworth.
  • Lieutenant Charles Leslie Wilkinson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 20. He was awarded a medallion for life saving two years in a row at Haileybury.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Stranger Chaplin (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend W Knight Chaplin.
  • Second Lieutenant Timothy Davies Williams (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Charles David Williams.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Edward Alexander Orme Davenport (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Davenport Rector of Draughton.
  • Second Lieutenant Stewart Spiers Jackson (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend S Jackson.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Lewis (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the Assistant Master of Wem Grammar School, Salolp.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Adam Ingles (Royal Scots) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Ingles.
  • Second Lieutenant Eustace Charles Keble (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Prebendary Thomas Keble Vicar of Christ Church Lichfield.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Clark Fyfe (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant William Henry Flory (Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Henry William Flory Vicar of St Matthew’s Littleport and has two brothers who will die before the end of the Great War in service of their King.
  • Second Lieutenant James Donald Allen Bell (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Benedict Godfrey Allen Bell Canon of Norwich.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric George King (Royal Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son of Walter George King JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Cates (Durham Light Infantry) is the middle of three brothers who lose their lives in the Great War. The first brother to be killed is Second Lieutenant George Edward Cates VC, killed in March 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Christopher Baring (Royal West Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Henry Baring Rector of Eggesford who has two other sons who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Denys Stutely Rogers (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend W O Rogers.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Stanley Manktelow (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 21.He is a fine footballer and cricketer.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Foss Wilson (Machine Gun Corps) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry Thomas Wilson.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Alan Cecil Judd MC (attached Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 31.
  • Second Lieutenant Cyril Walter Fellowes (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed. He is the last of three sons of Sir Edward Abdy Fellowes Clerk of the House of Commons.
  • Sergeant Frederick William Avery (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August.
  • Corporal Ernest Alfred Ward (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Evan Davies (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 29. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Edward Brazier (Worcestershre Regiment) is killed as the last of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal John H MacDonald, 22, and his brother Private William, 24, are killed while serving with the Seaforth Highlanders.
  • Corporal Albert Victor Carey MM (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 25. His older brother was killed in June 1917.
  • Corporal Albert Cleverley (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Lance Bombardier Isaac John Moore (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed by a chance shell from a long range gun. His brother was lost on HMS Formidable and a brother-in-law was also killed in the Great War.
  • Private Thomas Alfred King (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Private Thomas Bain (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in four days.
  • Private Harry Abbotts (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private Ernest Albert Negus (West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Charles B Hambling (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in one month.
  • Private George Hodgkinson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private George Everley (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 36. His son will lose his life in 1941 while serving in the Shropshire Light Infantry.
  • Private Tom Place (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 39. His brother will die on service in April of next year.
  • Private John Myers (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in March 1917.
  • Private Percy Bartholomew (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother Ernest will be killed next month.
  • Private Frank Whetstone (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 21. His brother Alfred will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Driver Edmund Mounsey (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Joshua Hall Bean (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. His father was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Duncan Campbell Carmichael (Black Watch) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Rifleman Walter Plaice (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 37. He is one of four brothers who fell during the Great War.
  • Gunner James McIntosh (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. He is a Police Constable for the Aberdeen City Police.
  • Rifleman George Arthur Tyerman (Irish Rifles) dies of wounds at age 29. His brother will die on service in February 1919.
  • Private William Johnston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 22. His father John was also killed in the Great War.
  • Rifleman George Payne (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Private Eli James Heald (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. He is the Assistant Master at Ducie Avenue School, Manchester.
  • Private George David Jeffery (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed. He is one of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Levi Farrington Harding (Liverpool Regiment) is killed in action. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the war and a fourth will be lost in the sinking of submarine M1 in November 1925 when she collides with a Swedish steamship.
  • Private Frederick Andrew Dobie MM (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed in June 1915.
  • Private Richard Steven Andrews (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother died of wounds last October.
  • Private Geoffrey Bower Hughes-Games (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next October and they are sons of the Reverend Joshua Wynn Hughes-Games and nephews of the Vice General of the Isle of Man.
  • Private Archibald Gallienne (Royal Guernsey Light Infantry) is killed at age 24. His twin brother will be killed in two days and their older brother was killed in November 1917.
  • Private Joseph Leonard Garner (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 31. His brother will die of wounds next year.
  • Private Richard Stephen Andrews (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • rivate William Swain (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed in February 1916.

Thursday 31 January 1918 We Lost 304

Operation EC1 takes place. Commander Ernest W Leir in the cruiser HMS Ithuriel leads the five ‘K’ type submarines of the Thirteenth Flotilla along the Firth of Forth, directly in the wake of the battle cruiser HMS Courageous, flying the flag of Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Hugh Evan-Thomas.  Some five miles behind him comes the four battle cruisers of the Second Battle Cruiser Squadron and behind them the cruiser HMS Fearless leading the four ‘K’ boats of the Twelfth Flotilla.

The night is clear, the sea calm, and there seems little reason to expect trouble.  But a nemesis approaches in the shape of eight armed trawlers sweeping the Firth for mines. They operate out of May Island, and through a breakdown in communications, neither they, nor the officers involved in operation EC1 are aware of the others operations on this day.

A mist now descends reducing visibility so that the Ithuriel loses contact with the Courageous ahead.  As Ithuriel begins to lose its way, chaos ensues among her five ‘K’ boats. Minesweeping trawlers appear out of the mist, flashing their navigational lights and baffling the ‘K’ boat commanders who are trying to follow the stern light of Ithuriel.  K14 tries to go hard to starboard, but its helm jams for six minutes and its commander has to stop engines to avoid going around in circles.  Suddenly, at nineteen knots, K22 (the renamed K13) comes crashing into the virtually stationary K4 (Commander David de Beauvoir Stocks DSO killed at age 34).  Lights now flash out from all directions – the signalman on K14 using an Aldis lamp to call for help.  Meanwhile, the four huge battle cruisers are bearing down on the scene of the collision, oblivious to the situation ahead.  The Australia passes by the collision area safely, managing to detach a destroyer to investigate, but the last of the big ships, HMS Inflexible, plows straight into K22.  Meanwhile Commander Leir in the Ithuriel, with his remaining ‘K’ boats, responds to the appeals for help from K14 and K22.  He is now virtually at right angles to the approaching battle cruisers.  Although he is able to maneuver his cruiser out of harms way, the submarines are too sluggish to move quickly in any direction.  Australia and her sister ships just manage to scrape past K12 with inches to spare.

Now steaming up the Firth comes the cruiser HMS Fearless, bringing the other four ‘K’ boats at their full speed of twenty-one knots.  With a horrible inevitability, they join the confusion.  Fearless rams K17 (Lieutenant Commander Henry John Hearn killed at age 32), sending it straight to the bottom.  As Fearless reverses its engines, Ithuriel and K11 rush back to the scene of chaos to look for survivors from K14 and K22.  Even now the disasters of this night and the following morning, known later as the “Battle of May Island”, are not over.  Traveling at full speed, K6 rams into K4, which, for some reason, is unlit and stationary across its path.  K4 is cut in half and sinks rapidly, while K6 narrowly avoids being dragged down with it.  The ‘K’ boats now face one final adversary.  At the tail of the battle line are the huge battleships of the Fifth Battle Squadron, with their escorting destroyers. While frenzied efforts are made to rescue the survivors of the damaged and sinking ‘K’ boats, the destroyers escorting the battleships arrive and cut straight through the scene, washing away or cutting to pieces the survivors of K17. One hundred three submariners lose their lives this disastrous night and the following morning.

The submarine E50 (Lieutenant Ralph Edgar Snook) is lost with all 50 hands when she strikes a mine south of the Dogger Light Vessel in the North Sea.

Today’s losses include:

  • The husband of the 2nd British woman to gain a Royal Aero Club aviators license
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • A family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The Grand Fleet Boxing Champion

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Commander David de Beauvoir Stocks is married to Cheridish de Bauvoir Stocks the second British woman to gain a Royal Aero Club aviators license #153 in 1911 and is the son in law of Captain Ernst DL JP.
  • Lieutenant Hugo William Louis Tyrrell (K17) killed at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William and Lady Tyrrell whose younger son has been killed in action in the Coldstream Guards in 1915.
  • Lieutenant Claude Michael Ashmore Wellesley (K4) is killed at age 27. His brother died at home in October 1916 after being awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Wilkins Antram (Royal Naval Reserve, K17) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Edward Potts Antram Vicar of Blean.
  • Midshipman Ernest Semple Cunningham (Royal Australian Navy K17) the 1917 Grand Fleet Boxing Champion in his weight category is killed at age 27.
  • Stoker 1st Class James Henry Tredgett (K4) is killed. His brother was killed on HMS Laforey in March 1917.

Monday 14 January 1918 We Lost 204

Submarine G8

British air forces bomb Karlsruhe, Thionville and the Metz area. In broad daylight a successful air raid is carried out on the railway station and nunitons factories in the Rhine Valley one and a quarter tons of bombs are dropped. There is also a raid on the steelworks of Thionville midway between Metz and Luxemburg and also bombs are dropped on the two large railway junctions near Metz. The 6th (Naval) Squadron arrives at Petite Synthe Dunkirk as a day-bomber unit on this day. It has been reformed at Dover at the end of last year from personnel of the Walmer Defense Flight and #11 Squadron Royal Naval Air Service.  The 17th (Naval) Squadron is formed to replace the Seaplane Base at Dunkirk.

British ground forces raid Lens.

Yarmouth is bombarded from the sea.  Fire is opened at 22:55 and lasts about five minutes, some twenty shells falling into the town.  Six civilians are killed and seven injured.

The submarine G8 (Lieutenant John Francis Tryon) fails to return from a North Sea patrol and it is believed that she falls victim to a mine or ran aground. Her crew of 32 is lost including Able Seaman John Short age 22 whose brother will be killed next August.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Military Chaplain
  • A Nottinghamshire cricket player

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain ‘Sir’ Ralph Henry Sacheverel Wilmot (Coldstream Guards) the 6th Baronet dies at home of an illness contracted at the front at age 42. He is the son of the Reverend A A Wilmot.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Harvey Staunton dies in Zrzizeh, Mesopotamia at age 45. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Staunton and he played cricket for Nottinghamshire from 1903-5.

Friday 7 December 1917 We Lost 461

Raymond Douglas Belcher

By today all the British gains are abandoned except for a portion of the Hindenburg line around Havrincourt, Ribécourt and Flesquières.

The steamship S S Earl of Elgin (Master James Leslie) is sunk by a submarine 10 miles west from the Carnarvon bay Light Vessel. Her master is among the 188 killed in the attack.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose twin will be killed next October
  • A local footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Raymond Douglas Belcher DSO MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 34. His is the son of the Reverend Thomas Hayes Hayes Belcher Rector of Bramley and is the last of three sons of his to be killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Morse (Royal Engineers is killed in action at age 26. His twin brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Robert Prevett (Leicestershire Regiment) dies of wounds. He is an excellent local football player.
  • Private Albert Bower (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 29. His brother will die of influenza in December 1918.
  • Private George Benjamin Wright (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) dies of pneumonia as a prisoner of war in Bulgaria at age 21. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Private Leslie Wallace Ayling (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed exactly six months earlier.

Saturday 1 December 1917 We Lost 1,440

Alastair Malcolm McReady-Diamid

By today the impetus of the German advance is lost, but continued pressure will lead to the German capture of La Vacquerie in two days and the withdrawal of the British from the east of the St Quentin canal. The Germans have reached a line looping from the ridge at Quentin to near Marcoing. Their capture of Bonvais ridge makes the British hold on Bourlon precarious. Gonnelieu southwest of Cambrai is recovered though British forces withdraw from Masnieres as German counter attacks continue at Cambrai. The enemy attacks heavily at Bourlon Wood and claim 4,000 prisoners and 60 guns captured. While attacking Gauche Wood from the south-west the 18th King George’s Own Lancers fight on foot. The tanks that are supposed to accompany them are late in arriving (07:15 hours) and then become lost in the grey morning light. The Lancers though advance into the wood where they find men from the Grenadier Guards already fighting their way in from Gouzeaucourt. Machine gun nests are dealt with by the returning tanks which patrol the perimeter of the wood. To get into the wood the Grenadiers have chosen the tactic of running as fast as they can. The German gunners cannot get the range right and the casualties are light. Still with all of their senior officers gone the Grenadiers put themselves under the direction of the Lancers who organise the consolidation of Gauche Wood.

  • Captain George Henry Tatham Paton (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 22 while performing acts that will win him the Victoria Cross for his part in numerous counter attacks in the face of heavy machine gun fire until he was mortally wounded.
  • Captain John Bernard Mary Burke (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Henry Farnham Burke and the great grandson of John Burke founder, author and editor of Burke’s Peerage.
  • Lieutenant Philip Anthony Assheton Harbord MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 20. His brother will die of wounds in July 1918 and a nephew will died of wounds in September 1919.
  • Lieutenant Bertram John Hubbard MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Honorable Evelyn Hubbard Member of Parliament for Lambeth and Director of the Bank of England and grandson of the 1st Baron Addington.
  • Second Lieutenant Stephen Hetley Pearson (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 35. His twin will die on service in Egypt next November.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Charles Denman (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of the 1st Baron Denman of Dovedale

Attacking the Quentin Mill (from which General de Lisle had made his hasty exit the day before) the Coldstream Guards and four tanks have little difficulty in gaining their objective though at the cost of three of the tanks. The 3rd Guards Brigade has been given the objective of taking Gonnelieu itself and attack with the Welsh Guards on the right and the Grenadier Guards on the left. The Welsh are brought to a halt at the top of the ridge in front of Gonnelieu with two thirds of their men being downed by the constant stream of fire from German Machine Gun positions in the old British trenches. At this moment the only surviving tank of four with the battalion rolls into action cruising along the trench spraying the Germans with all her Lewis guns. The Germans begin to surrender and the Welshmen seize the opportunity to grab the crest of the ridge. The Grenadiers manage to fight their way into Gonnelieu village but they arrive just as the Germans themselves had been preparing their next assault and are thus feeding the area with reinforcements. Faced by superior numbers the Grenadiers withdraw to a covering position alongside the Welsh Guards.

  • Captain Reginald Percy Loyd MC (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Honorable Mrs. E Loyd.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Harry Basil Webb (Welsh Guards) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Henry Webb the 1st Baronet and his nephew Roger Christopher Arthur Watson will be killed in World War II.

At El Burf, Palestine, when the enemy in large number have managed to crawl up to within 30 yards of our firing line and with bombs and automatic rifles are keeping down the fire of our machine guns, Second Lieutenant Stanley Henry Parry Boughey (Royal Scots Fusiliers) rushes forward alone with bombs right up to the enemy, killing many and causing the surrender of a party of 30.  As he turns to go back for more bombs he is mortally wounded at the moment when the enemy is surrendering. He will die of his wounds in three days. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

German East Africa is cleared of enemy forces as Lettow-Borbeck retires across the Rovuma River into Portuguese territory.

Yesterday at the Moeuvres Sector, France, when the enemy penetrated into our position, and the situation is extremely critical, Captain Allastair Malcolm Cluny McReady-Diarmid VC (Middlesex Regiment) leads his company through a heavy barrage and immediately engages the enemy and drives them back at least 300 yards, causing numerous casualties and taking 27 prisoners. Today the enemy again attacks and drives back another company which has lost all its officers. The captain calls for volunteers, and leading the attack, again drives them back. It is entirely due to his throwing of bombs that the ground is regained, but he is eventually killed by a bomb. For his efforts on these two days he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A great grandson of John Burke founder, author and editor of Burke’s Peerage
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed
  • The son of a Member of Parliament and Director of the Bank of England
  • The grandson of the 1st Baron Addington
  • A man whose twin will die on service
  • A grandson of the 1st Baron Dovedale
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The uncle of a man who will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • A battalion commander
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of former Prime Minister Lord Salisbury
  • A Australian Rules footballer
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • One of the Herder brothers memorialized on the trophy to the Newfoundland and Labrador Senior Ice Hockey Champions every year

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Malcolm Docherty DSO (commanding Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed in action at age 40 while leading a charge. He served in the South Africa War as a Sergeant.
  • Lieutenant Randle William Gascoyne-Cecil (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 28. His daughter will be born in July 1918. His two brothers will also be killed during the Great War the first in July 1915 the second in August 1918 and they are sons of the Right Reverend Lord William Cecil Bishop of Exeter and grandsons of the former Prime Minister Lord Salisbury.
  • Lieutenant John Charles William Pinney (Royal Fusiliers attached Central India Horse) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Honorable Mrs. Pinney.
  • Lieutenant Donald Fairfax Mackenson (HMS Tower) drowns on service with Gunner John Henry Burton DSC. Mackeson is the son of Payton Temple Mackenson, JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur J Herder (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed in July 1916 and they are memorialized on the Herder Memorila Trophy which is awarded annually to the Newfoundland and Labrador senior ice hockey Champions.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Thomas Howell (attached Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 33.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Oswald Addenbrooke Holden (attached 60th Infantry Brigade) is killed at age 43. He is the Vicar of Penn and the son of the Reverend Oswald Mangin Holden Rector of Steeple Langford who will lose another son in Italy next October.
  • Sergeant Thomas Newby (Welsh Regiment) is killed in Palestine at age 38. His son will lose his life in the Second World War in April 1941.
  • Sergeant Otto Lowenstern (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed at age 28. He is an Australian rules footballer who played with St Kilda in the Victorian Football League. Lowenstern spent both the 1910 and 1911 seasons playing in the VFL. He appeared once in 1910 while playing 11 games in 1911.
  • Corporal Bertram William Bloy (London Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed in June 1916. Lance Corporal Walter Edwards (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Hugh Williams (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Percy Freshwater (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in August 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Private Arthur John Byard (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds at age 37. His brother will die of wounds next March.
  • Private Thomas Henry Brocklehurst (Army Service Corps) dies on service at home at age 23. His brother was killed in action in October 1915.
  • Private Thomas William Carr (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in September 1918.