Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Dragoon Guards

Friday 5 November 1914 – We Lost 281

6th Earl Annesley

6th Earl Annesley

For the second time within a month the minimum height requirement to join the British army is lowered, this time from 5’5” to 5’3”.

The British proclamation that the entire North Sea will be viewed as a military area takes effect.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 6th Earl Annesley
  • Grandson of the 1st Baron Newlands
  • A suicide by a Major General
  • Son and father of a Baronet
  • Royal Academy Artist
  • Nephew of a General
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Edward Teshmaker Busk (Royal Engineers) dies from a fire in the air while doing experimental service at Laffans Plain near Aldershot at age 28. He is a pioneer of early aircraft design, and the designer of the first full-size efficient inherently stable aeroplane. After attaining First Class Honours in Mechanical Sciences at Cambridge he became Assistant Engineer at the newly formed Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough, later the Royal Aircraft Establishment.  Here he devotes much of his time to the mathematics and dynamics of stable flight. Before the invention of mechanical control devices, inherent stability in an aircraft is a most important quality.  Busk took his theories into the air and tried them out in practice. As a result, in 1914 the RE1 (Reconnaissance Experimental) evolved and was claimed as the first inherently stable aeroplane. The remarkable feature of this design was that there was no single device that was the cause of the stability.The stable result was attributed to detailed design of each part of the aeroplane, with due regard to its relation to, and effect on, other parts in the air. Weights and areas were so arranged that under practically any conditions the machine tended to right itself.  Busk was killed while flying his own stable aeroplane, which burst into flames and came down at Laffans Plain (Farnborough Airfield), near Aldershot. He is buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery with full military honours.  His genius and his courage were recognised by the posthumous award of the Gold Medal of the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain, and among the many letters of condolence received by his mother is one from King George V. His youngest brother, Hans Acworth Busk (b.1894), will be reported missing on 6 January 1916, last seen flying a heavy bomber against the Turks at Gallipoli. They are sons of T T Busk JP.

  • Major Clive Macdonnell Dixon(Lancers) dies of wounds received in the first battle of Ypres at age 44. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Raylton Dixon DL and a Royal Academy Artist best known for the charming images in his book The Leaguer of Ladysmith, created during the four-month Siege of Ladysmith in South Africa. He served in Chitral and the South Africa War. Several of his watercolors are kept by the Africana Museum in Johannesburg.
  • Captain Graham de Montmorency Armstrong-Lushington-Tulloch (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 28. He is the great nephew and godson of General de Montmorency.
  • Captain William Frank Gardiner Baird (Bedfordshire Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds he received on 27 October at Neuve Chapelle. He is the 29-year-old son of the 8th Baronet ‘Sir’ William James Gardiner Baird and father of the 10th He is also the grandson of the 1st Baron Newlands.
  • Lieutenant Noel George Scott McGrath(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received 31 October at age 29. He is the son of the Honorable George McGrath.
  • Lieutenant Edward Joseph Cormac Walshe (Leinster Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother will be killed in November 1917 and they are sons of Edward Cormac Walsh JP DL.
  • Flight Lieutenant Charles Francis Beevor and Sub Lieutenant Francis Annesley (Royal Naval Air Service, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) the 6th Earl are killed when their Bristol TB8 is shot down by shell fire while he is traveling to Dunkirk and crashes into the sea. The Earl dies at age 30. Lieutenant Beevor was a skilful and daring pilot who had seen previous service in the Balkan war.
  • Private Patrick Curtis (Irish Guards) is killed at age 28. His brothers will be killed 1917.
  • Major General Robert Geoge Kekewich commander of the 13th (Western) Division commits suicide. He was promoted into the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) and commanded the 1st Battalion of that regiment in the Second Boer War. He commanded the garrison during the successful defence of Kimberley. He received the rank of Brevet-Colonel and a Companion of the Order of the Bath. In August 1902 he was specially promoted Major General after winning the Battle of Rooiwal in April of that year. He was appointed colonel of the Buffs in October 1909.

Wednesday 3 November 1914 – We Lost 730

Royal Navy Ensign

Royal Navy Ensign

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings into cover some wounded men, who are lying, exposed to enemy fire, in the open.

Brigadier General Aitken and many of the staff of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’ disembark at 16:00 and set up shop in a building they identify as the White House on the outskirts of Tanga. A building with a red roof, called the Red House is converted into a hospital, although bandages, medicines and other medical supplies will not be landed until after the battle starts. By 20:00 the landing force is at last ashore. As expected, the landing is unopposed.  A few patrols are sent out though no one seems certain where the enemy might be. The sepoys are nervous, and when someone accidentally fires a rifle, the 13th Rajputs and the 61st Pioneers panic, rise up and rush for the shore. It is only with great difficulty that their officers persuade them to return to their bivouac.

Winston Churchill arranges with the head of Bethlehem Steel, that Great Britain will purchase eight 14-inch guns needed for newly commissioned monitors. They were originally constructed by Bethlehem for a Greek battleship under construction in Germany.

The Admiralty sends Vice Admiral Sackville H Carden the following message: “Without risking the ships a demonstration is to be made by bombardment against the forts at the entrance to the Dardanelles”.  He is ordered to retire before return fire becomes effective.  Early this morning an Allied squadron under Carden bombards the forts with the battle cruisers HMS Indefatigable and HMS Indomitable, allowing eight rounds per turret.  Two French battleships join the attack.  The fortress on the northern shore, Sedd-ul-Bahr, is hit and its powder magazine blown up, while Turkish counter-fire is ineffective.

Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) performs conspicuously good work in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who are beginning to dig a new trench within 30 yards of his own. Thirty of the enemy will be shot during this engagement. Lieutenant Pepys will be killed in nine days.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A man whose wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • Scottish International Rugby footballer
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of a Justice of the High Court of Bombay

Three German cruisers appear off Yarmouth and shell the town of Lowestoft for fifteen minutes without any significant effect. HM Submarines D5 and E10 are ordered to intercept the enemy off Terschelling. While proceeding on the surface to the interception point, D5 (Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Herbert) strikes a drifting mine and sinks.  There are six survivors including the commander while 21 of the crew are lost.

  •  Lieutenant Donald Francis O’Callaghan Brodie is among those lost at age 26. He is the grandson of the Reverend William Brodie.
  • Engine Room Artificer William John Copland killed at age 33. His brother was lost in the sinking of HMS Amphion in August.

 Others lost today include: 

  • Major Frederick Manners-Smith(Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 43.  He is the youngest son of the late Surgeon General Charles Manners-Smith.
  • Captain George Millais James (East Kent Regiment) Brigade Major 2nd Infantry Brigade VII Division is killed by a sniper at age 34. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Millais Baronet and painter. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ James Heath Baronet who lost a son in September.
  • Captain Lewis Robertson (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 31. He is a Scotland International Rugby player played for a number of clubs including Fettesian-Lorettonian, London Scottish, Monkstown and the Edinburgh Wanderers.
  • Lieutenant Raymond Philip Drummond Nolan (Black Watch) is killed at age 31. He is the nephew of Lieutenant Colonel J P Nolan MP.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Dorman Partridge (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed two days ago on HMS Good Hope.
  • Lieutenant Martin James Richardson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed by a shell. He is the nephew of Major General George B Heaste Royal Army Medical Corps. The same shell will wound Captain Thomas McCann Phillips (Royal Army Medical Corps) who will die of his wounds tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Laurence George Hart (Pioneers Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 37. He is the nephew of Major General Fitzroy Hart-Synnot CB CMG and General ‘Sir’ Reginald Clare Hart VC KCB KCVO. His wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Charles Day (Rajputs Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 23. He is the son of the Very Reverend Maurice W Day Dean of Waterford.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Nelson Coxe(Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 19. His two brothers will be killed later in the war, the first in January 1915 the second on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. They are sons of Justice Coxe Judge of the High Court of Calcutta.
  • Corporal Edward Hugh Mainwaring Furley (East Africa Mounted Rifles) is killed at Lungido, East Africa at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Mainwaring Furley.
  • Private Bertie Bruce(Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in Baghdad in 1916.
  • Private William Simcox (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Albert Greenwood (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed on the same day in 1917.

Skipper George Alfred Gower (fishing trawler Will and Maggie) is killed when his ship strikes a mine and sinks seventeen miles northeast of Lowestoft. The crew of six is lost.

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.

Friday 30 October 1914 – We Lost 984

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

After an intense bombardment the Germans attack the British line held by the 9th Lancers at Messines.  They attack from St Yves to Wytchaete, capturing St Yves and gaining a footing in Messines village.  They are driven out by a counter-attack.

The village of Zandvoorde is held by the Life Guards numbering between three and four hundred men. It is bombarded for over an hour with heavy guns and then captured by the 39th German Division.  The entire front of the 3rd Cavalry Division is driven back to the Klein-Zillebeke Ridge.

Lieutenant G N Humphreys (Royal Flying Corps) shoots up an enemy convoy firing two hundred fifty rounds from his Lewis gun.  This is most likely the first ever ground attack by an aircraft.

The trail of the accused German spy Karl Lody begins in Britain.

Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood hoists his flag on the French destroyer L’Intrepide, the first time a French warship has acted as an English flagship without having first been captured.  L’Intrepide and L’Aventurier have joined the Second Light Squadron in the English Channel earlier in the month and have fought with that British squadron off the Belgian coast. Admiral Hood will be killed at the the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Good Hope and HMS Monmouth head north from Vallenar intent on a rendezvous with the other two members of the squadron after they complete their intelligence missions that they have been dispatched to perform the previous day.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The original Boy Scout who was called Baden-Powell’s favorite
  • Brother-in-law of Douglas Haig
  • Grandson of an officer who served under Nelson at Copenhagen
  • Former Aide-de-camp to Field Marshall the Earl of Roberts
  • Former Aide-de-camp to the Governor General of Australia
  • Actor and member of the Green Room Club
  • The father of a child who will be born after his death
  • Son of the artist Ernest F Marillier
  • Great grandson of a 50-year Master at Harrow
  • Co-found and one time editor of the Yokahama (Japan) Press
  • Staff member of the Burlington Magazine
  • Champion boxer
  • The second son of the former Governor of the Windward Islands to be killed in two days
  • Multiple sons of Members of Parliament
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • A Roman Catholic Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Grandson of an Alderman
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple families who lose one of two sons killed in the Great War
  • Two examples of families that will lose four sons in the Service of King and Country
  • A family who previously lost a son in the South African War
  • Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster
  • Son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne
  • Son of the 4th Earl of Yarborough
  • Son of the 2nd Earl of Durham
  • Son of the 1st Earl of Dudley
  • Son-in-law of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Erne
  • Son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian
  • Son-in-law of Baron Knaresborough
  • Grandson of the Duke of Abercorn
  • Grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Father of the 4th and 5th Dukes of Westminster

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton (Northamptonshire Yeomanry attached Lancers) dies of wounds received when he is shot by a sniper at age 23. He is known affectionately as ‘Bob’ by his friends and family. His father was master of the Pytchley Hunt and his uncle is Philip Wrought MP JP DL. A close family friend is ‘Sir’ Robert Baden-Powell, hero of the Siege of Mafeking during the South African War, and when ‘BP’ came up with the idea of organizing a camp for boys to teach them the principles of leadership and teamwork. He immediately turned to ‘Bob’ Wroughton to join him in his venture.

The camp was held on Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset, in August 1907 – and became an historic event. It was from that beginning that the World Wide Boy Scout Movement was to emerge. After the Camp, Baden Powell heaped praise on Bob’s leadership “he was a great help to me & quite set the example to other Patrol Leaders,” he wrote in a letter to Bob’s mother,  in which he also asked her for Bob’s suggestions as to how the whole Scouting movement could be established. A career in the army was a natural progression. He was commissioned in November 1913, and when war broke out he joined the 12th Lancers where again he received high praise for his courage. His Major wrote of him that he was an “excellent soldier and can turn his hand to anything”. After just a few weeks of the war, he had gained a gallantry honour, being Mentioned in Disptaches by the Commander in Chief, Sir John French. While on patrol in the Ypres salient in Belgium he is shot by a German sniper, at age 23.

A distraught Baden Powell writes to his parents soon after: “I have felt as nearly as possible like a second father to him, and to read the little testimonies to Bob’s character after all the hopes that I had formed of him, is the greatest possible comfort. I am so glad that he had made his mark already before he died.”

  •  Colonel Charles Arthur Cecil King (commanding 2nd Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 51. He served previously at the Nile 1885-6 Burma 1893 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Trevor Crispon (commanding 2nd Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 46. He served in the Nile campaign of 1898, Crete and South Africa.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Osbert Samuel Cadogan (commanding 1st Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 46 attempting to save his mortally wounded adjutant Captain Alfred Edwin Claud Toke Doonerat Zandvoorde, Ypres at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Cadogan Rector of Wicken and he served in Hazara in 1891 and China in 1900. Dooner’s brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Major (T/Lieutenant Colonel) John Murray Traill(commanding 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt when his battalion is shelled in the open.  His brother will be killed in a railway accident in November 1916.
  • Major George Geoffrey Prendergast Humphreys(Baluchi Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 41. He is the son of T W D Humphreys JP is the grandson of Major J Humphreys who served under Nelson at Copenhagen and had been an extra aide de camp to His Majesty King George in India. He is the son-in-law of Major General ‘Sir’ James Bell KCVO.
  • Major Hugh St Aubyn Wake MVO (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the late Admiral Charles Wake and he served on the North West Frontier 1897-9.
  • Major Eustance Henry Egremont AbadieDSO (Lancers) is killed at age 37. He has had two brothers die in the King’s service prior to the Great War and a fourth brother will be killed in action in 1917 and they are sons of Major General Henry Richard Abadie. One brother was killed in the South African War while the second die of fever during on service in February 1904.
  • Major ‘Lord’ Charles George Francis Mercer Nairne Petty-FitzMauriceMVO (Dragoons attached 6th Cavalry Brigade) is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the South African Medal, the Legion of Honor, Order of Military Merit, Order of the Crown, the Order of the Iron Crown Class II, Equerry-in-Ordinary to King George V when he was Prince of Wales 1909-1910 and Equerry to his Majesty 1910-1914. He had sometimes been the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Earl Roberts and is the son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne. He is the grandson of the Duke of Abercorn KG and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Hugh William Grosvenor(Life Guards) dies of wounds at age 30.  He is the son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and is married to Lady Mabel Crichton, daughter of John Crichton, 4th Earl Erne and his wife, the former Lady Florence Cole, daughter of William Cole 3rd Earl of Enniskillen.  He is the commander of ‘C’ Squadron 1st Life Guards. His sons will become the 4th and 5th Duke of Westminster.
  • Captain Alexander Moore Vandeleur(Life Guards) the son-in-law of the 1st Baron Knaresborough is killed at age 30 when his squadron is surrounded and scorning surrender fights to the last and are wiped out in hand to hand fighting.
  • Captain Frank Harrison Saker (Connaught Rangers) is killed in action. He worked as an actor before he joined the army in 1904 and was a member of the Green Room Club. His brother will be killed on the second day of the Gallipoli landing next year.
  • Captain Alfred James Woodhouse(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is one of four brothers who give their life in the service of the King. The first was killed in the South African War and the final two will be killed in 1915. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend A C Woodhouse Rector of Winterborn Monckton Dorset and gained the Sword of Honour at Woolwich.
  • Captain Otho Claude Skipwith Gilliat (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 31. He played cricket at Eton in 1899 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club and a veteran of the South Afria War.
  • Captain and Adjutant Douglas Byres Davidson (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed late next month and they are grandson of General John Clarke.
  • Captain Ernest Reginald Hayes-Sadler (Gurka Rifles) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed two days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Ian Bouverie Maxwell (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 24. He is the nephew of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Ronald Maxwell KCB and he is a member of the staff of the “Burlington Magazine”.
  • Captain Barry Hartwell (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 33. He served in the Tibet Expedition of 1903 and was awarded the Silver Medal of St John of Jerusalem for life saving in the earthquake at Dharmsala in 1905. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Brodrick Hartwell 2nd Baronet and the great grandson of General Frederick Young.
  • Captain Reginald Wickham Harland(Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Augustus Harland of Harefield Vicarge Middlesex. His brother was killed in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Charles Sackville Pelham ‘Lord Worsley’ (Royal Horse Guards) Baron Worsley is killed in action at age 27 at Zandvoorde. He is the son of the 4th Earl and Countess of Yarborough and son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian his other daughter married Douglas Haig. An order to withdraw does not reach the machine gun section he is in charge of, or some of the other soldiers. They are cut off, and Lord Worsley is first listed as ‘Missing’, and is officially recorded as killed early in 1915. However, Worsley’s body had been found and buried by the Germans, and a plan of where he had been buried is later passed on via Diplomatic channels from the Germans. In December 1918 his grave will be located by a British Officer using the plans, with the upright wooden portion of the cross which had been placed there by the Germans still standing. A replacement wooden cross will be put there in January 1919, and Lord Worsley’s widow later purchases the land.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Dennis Harding (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 22. He is the grandson of Major General Worthy Bennett (Royal Marine Light Infantry).
  • Lieutenant Philip Francis Payne-Gallwey(Lancers, Indian Army) is killed at age 21.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Henry Payne-Gallwey Rector of Sessay Thirsk, cousin of ‘Sir’ Ralph Payne Gallwey and nephew of General A Lowry Cole CB DSO.
  • Lieutenant David Rex Wilson (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Alderman Jonathan Angus.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Close-Brooks (Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the son in law of Major General Beresford Lovett and JP for Cheshire. His brother will be killed in Mesoptamia in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Lennox Harvey (Lancers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Douglas Lennox Harvey JP DL Vice Chairman of West Sussex County Council. His brother will be killed in three days serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Ernest Francis WardMVO (Life Guards) a son of the 1st Earl of Dudley is killed in at age 36. He played cricket for the Marylebone Cricket Club and is a veteran of the South African War. His body will not be found.
  • Lieutenant John Arnold St C Anstruther(Dragoon Guards attached Life Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the only son of the late Colonel commanding 2nd Life Guards and a former Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Australia.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Walter Henry Legge-Bourke(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Harry Legge-Bourke GCVO grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth and is married to the youngest daughter of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire KG. His only child will be born on 16 May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Francis Lambton(Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 43.  He is the son of the 2nd Earl and Countess of Durham.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Ludovic Carew(Hussars) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of Charles Carew a Member of Parliament and the grandson of the Reverend Robert Baker Carew.
  • Second Lieutenant Joseph Frain Webster(Black Watch attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Francis Webster.
  • Second Lieutenant Rowland Le Belward Egerton (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Philip Henry Brian Grey-Egerton 12th
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Charles Jennens Marillier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the artist Ernest F Marillier and great grandson of J F Marillier for 50 years the Master at Harrow.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Herbert Posden Burn (Dragoons) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Colonel Charles Rosdew Burn MP ADC to the King 1st Baronet who will later change his name to Forbes Leith and grandson of Lord Leith of Fyvie.
  • Second Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant Frederick Charles Hatton (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed with his Colonel at age 36. He is the part founder and one time editor of the Yokohama (Japan) Press. He fought in the South African War where he was wounded at Driefontein. He is related to ‘Sir’ Westby Brook Percival KCMG late Agent General for New Zealand. His wife is the niece of Alderman Thewlis late Lord Mayor of Manchester.
  • Sergeant Robert Henry Vanson age 28 and his brother Corporal Archibald John Vanson age 26 are killed together while serving in the Dragoons.
  • Corporal of Horse Herbert William Dawes (Life Guards) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private James Kane (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 22. He is a champion boxer at his weight.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla is wrecked when she strikes submerged rocks close to the Nab, Whitby, in a southeast easterly gale.  Out of two hundred twenty-nine on board, eighty-three are lost. The Whitby, Upgang and Tynermouth lifeboats pick up the survivors.

 HMHS Rohilla casualties include:

  • Roman Catholic Chaplain the Reverend Robert Basil Gwydir lost at age 47.
  • Brothers and Junior Reserve Attendants Thomas and Walter Horsfield are also killed. Thomas is described as an enthusiastic worker in the Salvation Army and drowns at age 47 while 35 year old Walter served twice in the South African War with General Hospitals.

Thursday 29 October 1914 – We Lost 796

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

At 05:30 the Germans attack in the Ypres sector in an attempt to break through to the Channel Ports, and sever the lines of communication of the British Expeditionary Forces.  British artillery is restricted because of shell shortages to nine rounds per gun per day and is unable to take advantage of prior knowledge of the attack plans.  The 1st Coldstream Guards at Gheluvelt are attacked along a front of 800 yards by six German battalions and by the end of the day the 1st Guards Brigade suffers 1,100 casualties and is reduced in strength to 275 men.  The 1st Coldstream Guards lose all 11 Combatant Officers and is reduced to a party of 60 other ranks under the Quartermaster.  The 2nd and 3rd Coldstream Guards successfully defend Zonnebeke some three miles to the north.  The Germans force their way in between two companies of the 1st Middlesex Regiment so that one company finds itself with the enemy not only in the front but also directly in the rear within 50 feet. About 40 Germans who have penetrated to a communication trench are all killed or taken prisoner by the battalion’s reserve company.  Eventually with the help of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders the trenches are cleared of the enemy.

Lieutenant James Anson Otho Brooke (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability near Gheluvelt in leading two attacks on the German trenches under heavy rifle and machine gun fire regaining a lost trench at a very critical moment.  His efforts prevented the enemy from breaking through the British line at a time when a general counter attack could not be organized.  Having regained the lost trench, he goes back to bring up support and while doing so is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Vesey Brooke JP DL, grandson of ‘Sir’ Arthur Brooke MP 2nd Baronet and great grandson of General ‘Sir’ George Anson GCB and had been awarded the Sword of Honor at Sandhurst and dies at age 30.  He has two brothers who will die during the Great War both dying at home, the first in 1916 the second in 1917. Their brother-in-law will be killed on Christmas Day this year.

Lieutenant Arthur Martin Leake (Royal Army Medical Corps) will be awarded his second Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty beginning on this day through 8 November near Zonnebeke in rescuing while exposed to constant fire a large number of the wounded who are lying close to the enemy trenches. He is one of only three men ever to be awarded the Victoria Cross twice.

Second Lieutenant James Leach and Sergeant John Hogan (Manchester Regiment) will each be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Festubert when after their trench has been taken by Germans and after two attempts at recapture fails they voluntarily decide in the afternoon of this day to recover the trench themselves, and, working from traverse to traverse at close quarters with great bravery, they gradually succeed in regaining possession, killing eight of the enemy, wounding two and taking sixteen prisoners.

The 2nd/8th Gurkha Rifles arrive at the Western Front and go into the trenches near Festubert.

Beduin tribesmen raid the Egyptian frontier.

Lord Fisher is appointed First Sea Lord.

Admiral Cradock’s squadron reaches Vallenar Roads, just south of Chiloe Island. He sends HMS Glasgow ahead to see if there are any messages for him with the British consulate in Coronel.  He also dispatches HMS Otranto to Puerto Montt to try to gather information as to the whereabouts of any German warships.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla departs Leith for Dunkirk to board wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and Grandson of the 1st Duke (The Iron Duke)
  • Battalion commander
  • A man whose father died on service in the South African War of typhoid fever
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Great nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • Children born after their father’s death
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be later in the Great War
  • Sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • An uncle and nephew killed together
  • A Somerset cricket batsman
  • Grandson son of writer to the Signet
  • Son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzel
  • Son of the Marquis de la Pasture
  • Son and heir to the 3rd Baron Penrhyn
  • Son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Darley
  • Son of the 7th Viscount Falmouth
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim
  • Nephew of the Earl of Kintore

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘Lord’ Richard Wellesley (Grenadier Guards) the son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald Baronet and the 20th Knight of Kerry is killed in action at age 35. His daughter will be born on 8 January 1915. He is the grandson of the ‘Iron Duke’ the original Duke of Wellington

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Henry Lawrence Anderson(Bhopal Infantry) dies of wounds at age 47.  He is the son of Major General Robert Patrick Anderson.
  • Major Wilfred Beckett Walker(Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and his first brother was killed in the first few days of the Great War while his second brother will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918.  They are grandsons of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Leslie D’Henin Hamilton MVO(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell father of the 3rd Baron and he served in the South African War.
  • Major Humphrey St Leger Stucley(Grenadier Guards) dies of injuries at age 37. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ George Stucley, 1st Baronet and had served in Egypt 1898 and in the South Africa War. His son will be killed in World War II.
  • Captain Charles Edward Mary de la Pasture (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. He is the eldest son of the Marquis de la Pasture who will die what many will say is from shock and a broken heart within three months. Captain de la Pasture served in the South African War and from 1907-10 was Aide de Campe to General ‘Sir’ Frederick Forestier Walker at Gibraltar.
  • Captain Gordon Hargreaves Brown(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 34.  He is the son and heir of the late ‘Sir’ Alexander Brown, the 1st Baronet and he had served in the South African War. His third child will be born next February and his only son Captain ‘Sir’ John Hargreaves Pigott-Brown who will become the 2nd Baronet will be killed in North Africa in December 1942.
  • Captain Colin Frederick Fitzroy Campbell(Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Major General F Lorn Campbell and son-in-law of Lady May Stewart.
  • Captain Robert Forbes Stanley Stanley-CreekDSO (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His widow is the daughter of ‘Sir’ David Masson.
  • Captain Arthur George McCausland Burn (East Surrey Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 31. His great grandfather Lieutenant Colonel William Burn successfully held Delhi against Holkar.
  • Captain Edgar W Walker(East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39.  He is the son of Rear Admiral Charles Walker and his brother-in-law will be killed next May.
  • Captain Geoffrey Malcolm Bentley(Northamptonshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. His brother was killed seventeen days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wilson Bentley JP.
  • Captain Guy Francis Headlam Keenlyside(Royal West Kent Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier at age 34. His second son will be born in May 1915 and his brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Captain Robert John Blatchford Oldrey(Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 31. His brother will die on active service in February 1919.
  • Captain Percy Lionel Moubray (Black Watch) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Robert Moubray Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain John Kearsley Dawson-Scott (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of General R N Dawson-Scott.
  • Lieutenant Morys Wynne-Jones(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John William Wynne-Jones Vicar of Carnarvon and his wife the Honorable Jessie F Wynne-Jones and the grandson of Lord Aberdare.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Henry Loftus Reade (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and the grandson of the Right Reverend Loftus George Reade.
  • Lieutenant Charles Keith Latta (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of John Jopp Writer to the Signer.
  • Lieutenant Graham Eardley Dunsterville (Devonshire Regiment) is killed when he is shot in the head at Festubert at age 30 attepting to bring in a wounded man who was crying out. He is the son-in-law of F Hastings Coldney JP and his son will be born on 29 December.
  • Lieutenant James Raymond McClintock Lonsdale (Hussars) dies of wounds received 13 October at age 20. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ James Mathew Stronge 2nd Baronet and nephew of ‘Sir’ John B Lonsdale Baronet MP.
  • Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock DSO (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26 six days after performing the acts that will win him the DSO. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend P P Broadmead and a Somerset County cricket batsman.
  • Lieutenant Ian Hay Steuart Clarke(Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the late Hastings A Clarke DL JP.
  • Lieutenant the ‘Honorable’ Alan George Sholto Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards)age 24 the son and heir of the 3rd Baron Penrhyn is killed. His uncle Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Charles Douglas-Pennant JP (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the same action. He served in the South Africa War and is a son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn who will lose another son the following year.  He is also the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl Darley.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Arthur Campbell (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. George Campbell.
  • Lieutenant Granville Keith Falconer Smith (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the late Colonel Granville and Lady Blanche Smith. He is also the nephew of the Earl of Kintore and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Gilchrist Nevill Ogilvy (Scots Guards) 11th Baronet is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Reginald H A Ogilvy.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Vere Douglas Boscawen(Coldstream Guards) is also killed at age 24. He is the son of Major General Evelyn Edward Thomas Boscawen, the 7th Viscount Falmouth KCVO CB and his older brother will die of wounds in 1918. In 1909 he was with the Eton XI Cricket Club against Harrow. They will have a nephew, who is not yet born, killed in action with the Coldstream Guards in May 1940.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Knollys Foster(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert Charles Foster St Thomas’s Vicarage Groombridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Patrick Edward Adam Blair (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel A S Blair CMG (Royal Scots) writer to the Signet.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Harford Nicholl (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the great nephew of Major General C R H Nicholl.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick McMahon Hardman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His father Captain John Wreford Julian Hardman died of typhoid fever in May 1900 during the South African War at age 37. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon Baronet CB whose son (and uncle of Lieutenant Hardman) Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahon will be killed in the less than two weeks.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed a day after his brother was killed with the 21st
  • Private Albert Shipp(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Private Fred (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Georgeson (Scots Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Henry Etherington (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in less than two weeks serving in the Royal Fusiliers.
  • Private Henry Long (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brothers George and Edward will also lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Fred Castle (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will also die in service including one in the Second World War.

photo from wikipedia.org