Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Duke of Wellington’s Regiment

Sunday 18 April 1915 – We Lost 455

British troops report gas shelling at Hill 60, and repulse German attacks.  A British aircraft drops six one-pound bombs on the German aircraft hanger at Chanak, destroying the aircraft inside.

Brigadier General Frederick Hugh Cunliffe opens the third campaign in the northwest corner of Cameroon with an Allied force that includes on the British side, nine companies of infantry (one mounted), three guns (including a borrowed 12-pounder and gun crew from HMS Challenger) and nine machine guns; the French contribute three companies of tirailleurs, a squadron of cavalry, two guns and two machine guns.

Union forces occupy Seeheim, German South West Africa.

A frontier raid is repulsed on the northern border of the Peshawar Valley.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Field Marshall
  • Multiple sons of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • Two men whose father will be lost later this year
  • A member of the Berthamsted Town Band

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Captain Cecil Thomas Tuff (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in action on Hill 60 Ypres at age 29. He is the son of Charles Tuff JP who will have a second son die of wounds on Malta in November of this year.
  • Captain Ronald Charters Macpherson (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action at age 22. He is the youngest son of the late ‘Sir’ J M and Lady Macpherson.
  • Lieutenant Charles Caledon Egerton (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. His brother, Major James Boswell Egerton (Indian Cavalry) will be killed in action in October 1918 at age 38. They are sons of Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Charles C Egerton GCB DSO.
  • Captain Edward Wilberforce Leather (Yorkshire Regiment attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 35. He is a veteran of the South African War and his older and younger brothers will also be killed in the Great War. Second Lieutenant Edmund Basil Walker (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend George Walker Rector of Marach.
  • Second Lieutenant Bernard Craig Keble Job (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed on Hill 60 at age 27. He is the only son of the Reverend Frederick William Job vicar of Lower Gomal Staffordshire.
  • Second Lieutenant John Haslope Oldham (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. He is the son of Ernest Haslope Oldham JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Rennell Thackeray MC (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. His father will die on active service in October of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis John MacLardie Chubb (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His father will be killed in July of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Burden Hodges (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He was the public school champion at Aldershot in 1914 and is the son of J F W Hodges JP.
  • Sergeant Joe Leonard Bottomley (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 38 on Hill 60. He is a South Africa War veteran and his brother Willie will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Frederick John Jones (Hertfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22.  He is a member of the Berkhamsted Town Band.

Thursday 12 November 1914 – We Lost 342

Seal of Harvard University

Seal of Harvard University

Army Order # 480 approves the addition to each Division of a motor machine gun battery to be designated a unit of the Royal Field Artillery and known as the Motor Machine Gun Service.

A reconnaissance in force from Sanniyeh inflicts losses on the Turks near Saihan. In spite of poor conditions including thick dust, mud and heat the remainder of Force D is landed.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Stepson of the Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose twin brother was killed on service last century
  • Son of the 5th Earl of Cadogan
  • Grandson of the 1st Earl of Munster
  • Nephew of a man who died of wounds in the Crimean War
  • The first graduate of an American University killed in the Great War
  • Son of the President of the Blackheath Harriers
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Brigadier General Charles FitzClarence VC General Officer commanding the 1st Guards Brigade is killed in action at age 49. He was awarded the Victoria Cross at Mafeking on the 14 October 1899 during the South African War. His twin brother was killed in 1897-8 at Abu-Hamed and they are sons of Captain ‘the Honorable’ George FitzClarence Royal Navy the 3rd son of the 1st Earl of Munster. Another son of the 1st Earl died of wounds received in the attack on Redan in the Crimea. Brigadier General FitzClarence is also the son-in-law of the 6th Duke of Marlborough. He is also the father of the 6th Earl of Munster.

  •  Major ‘the Honorable’ William George Sidney CadoganMVO (Hussars attached General Staff) is killed at age 35.  He is son of the 5th Earl Cadogan KG and served in the South African War and was Equerry to H R H Prince of Wales from 1912 to 1914 and his Aide de Campe during his India tour of 1905-6.
  • Major Thomas Philip Godman-Dorington(Dragoons) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the late Major General Richard Temple Godman and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Keith Bethune Mackenzie (Seaforth Highlanders attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 34. A veteran of the South African War he is the grandson of the Reverend Neil Bethune.
  • Captain Duncan Collisson Willey Thomas (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 23. He is the son of A P Thomas the 1st
  • Lieutenant George Williamson (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of wounds received four days prior at age 31. He is the son of Lady Skinner and stepson of ‘Sir’ Thomas Skinner Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway. A Graduate of Harvard in 1905 he is the first graduate of an American University to be killed in the War.
  • Lieutenant Denis Duncan Philby (Dublin Fusiliers attached Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Alexander Kenneth Anderson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of Charles Edward Tuck JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys DSO (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed last August.
  • Private James Thomas Stanley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Bartlett Cecil Elmes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Tom Crafter (London Scottish) is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1917 and they are sons of the president of the Blackheath Harriers.

Photo from wikipedia.org

Monday 24 August 1914 – We Lost 406

Today’s losses are the highest in any one day of the war so far and bring the total losses in the Empire’s forces to over one thousand.

Included in those losses today are:

  •  Son and grandson of General
  • Families that lost two and three sons
  • Sons and grandsons of clergy
  • A man whose stepson will be killed later in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be born after his death

The Fifth Division finds itself in a very tight position and Cavalry is sent to its assistance the 2nd Cavalry Brigade reaching the scene of the action first. The Germans are advancing in heavy numbers, so near the village of Audregnies, General De Lisle orders his men to dismount and open fire on them.  This they do but the enemy continues to advance in good order. The General then decides on a charge, and for this he chose the 9th Lancers who mount their horses and ride steadily at the enemy.  In the face of a torrent of shot and shell from guns and rifles, they dash on until they find themselves against two lines of barbed wire, where men and horses fall over in all directions. This ends the charge. The survivors are ordered to return to shelter, and out of more than four hundred who have ridden out, only seventy-two at first answer their names.  Later, some two hundred others turn up, but the regiment has lost heavily. Lieutenant Charles William North Garstin of the 9th Lancers is killed during these operations at age 20. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ William Garstin GCMG CBE. Captain Douglas Keith Lucas-Tooth (Lancers) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for gallantry in this action. He will be killed in action in less than one month.

Still the Lancers have not finished their day’s work.  When the survivors arrive at a railway embankment near Doubon, they find themselves in the company of some artillerymen who have been driven from their guns with heavy loss. Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell now the senior officer of the Lancers, who had been wounded in the original charge but has managed to keep his squadron together, goes out into the open and finds a way to help save the guns. He has his men follow him and leaving their horses they rush out, reach the abandoned guns and assist in saving the guns of the 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. For his actions on this day Captain Grenfell will be awarded the Victoria Cross as will the commander of the 119th Battery Major Ernest Wright Alexander. This is part of an action when the Lancers charge a battery of eleven German guns posted in Compiegne Wood.  The guns have been causing terrible loss to the British infantry.  According to the press account published at the time, the 9th make a furious charge, reach the battery, and cut down all the gunners and put the guns out of action. After this charge, the survivors volunteer to a man to save the British guns whose teams have all been killed. Captain Grenfell will be hit in both legs and has two fingers shot off during this action. The action is successful but Grenfell is so badly wounded he is taken by his friend, the Duke of Westminster, in his Rolls Royce to the nearby town of Bavai where he will be treated by French nuns in a convent hospital. Major Alexander will go on to achieve the rank of Major General, while Captain Grenfell will be killed on 24 May 1915.

Francis Octavius Grenfell

Francis Grenfell

  • Major Charles George Pack-Beresford (Royal West Kent Regiment) killed at age 45. He is the son of Denis William Pack-Beresford MP JP DL and he served on the North West Frontier in 1897 and 1898 and during the South African War. He is the grandson of Major General ‘Sir’ Denis Pack KCB.
  • Major Percy Belcher Strafford (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 41. He served in the South African War and played cricket for the Yorkshire Gentlemen. His wife is the daughter of Major General Hamilton Chapman.
  • Captain and Adjutant Cyril Oswald Denman-Jubb (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Denman-Jubb.
  • Captain Walter Richard Augustus Aston Dawes (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His son will be born in December.
  • Captain and Adjutant Francis Joseph Cresswell (Norfolk Regiment) is killed carrying a message at age 31. He married the niece of ‘Sir’ W H B Ffolkes Baronet and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Ernest Felix Victor Briard (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 25. His fourteen year old brother will be killed in 5 years serving as a Second Lieutenant in a Sikh Regiment of the Indian Army fighting in the Khyber Pass.
  • Lieutenant Charles Esmond Redlin Albrecht (South Lancashire Regiment) killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Eric Llewellyn Welchman (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 21. He is the son of the Venerable Canon W Welchman Archdeacon of Bristol. Lieutenant Leslie Montagu Buller (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 28.  He was educated at Eton where he was in his House Cricket XI when they won the House Cup in 1904. He is the grandson of the Reverend Richard Buller.
  • Lieutenant Lawrence Edward Russell (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in May of next year.
  • Sergeant Frederick Davison (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Lawrence R Foster (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in 1916.
  • Private John Mann (Norfolk Regiment) is killed he is the step-father of Private Percy Rudd (Suffolk Regiment) who will be killed in September 1915.
  • Private Percy Frederick Ashton (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1916. Private Francis James Heffernan (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of John Heffernan a foreign correspondent.
  • Private William Barnard (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.

Photo wikipedia