Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Gordon Highlanders

Thursday 12 November 1914 – We Lost 342

Seal of Harvard University

Seal of Harvard University

Army Order # 480 approves the addition to each Division of a motor machine gun battery to be designated a unit of the Royal Field Artillery and known as the Motor Machine Gun Service.

A reconnaissance in force from Sanniyeh inflicts losses on the Turks near Saihan. In spite of poor conditions including thick dust, mud and heat the remainder of Force D is landed.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Stepson of the Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose twin brother was killed on service last century
  • Son of the 5th Earl of Cadogan
  • Grandson of the 1st Earl of Munster
  • Nephew of a man who died of wounds in the Crimean War
  • The first graduate of an American University killed in the Great War
  • Son of the President of the Blackheath Harriers
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Brigadier General Charles FitzClarence VC General Officer commanding the 1st Guards Brigade is killed in action at age 49. He was awarded the Victoria Cross at Mafeking on the 14 October 1899 during the South African War. His twin brother was killed in 1897-8 at Abu-Hamed and they are sons of Captain ‘the Honorable’ George FitzClarence Royal Navy the 3rd son of the 1st Earl of Munster. Another son of the 1st Earl died of wounds received in the attack on Redan in the Crimea. Brigadier General FitzClarence is also the son-in-law of the 6th Duke of Marlborough. He is also the father of the 6th Earl of Munster.

  •  Major ‘the Honorable’ William George Sidney CadoganMVO (Hussars attached General Staff) is killed at age 35.  He is son of the 5th Earl Cadogan KG and served in the South African War and was Equerry to H R H Prince of Wales from 1912 to 1914 and his Aide de Campe during his India tour of 1905-6.
  • Major Thomas Philip Godman-Dorington(Dragoons) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the late Major General Richard Temple Godman and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Keith Bethune Mackenzie (Seaforth Highlanders attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 34. A veteran of the South African War he is the grandson of the Reverend Neil Bethune.
  • Captain Duncan Collisson Willey Thomas (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 23. He is the son of A P Thomas the 1st
  • Lieutenant George Williamson (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of wounds received four days prior at age 31. He is the son of Lady Skinner and stepson of ‘Sir’ Thomas Skinner Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway. A Graduate of Harvard in 1905 he is the first graduate of an American University to be killed in the War.
  • Lieutenant Denis Duncan Philby (Dublin Fusiliers attached Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Alexander Kenneth Anderson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of Charles Edward Tuck JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys DSO (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed last August.
  • Private James Thomas Stanley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Bartlett Cecil Elmes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Tom Crafter (London Scottish) is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1917 and they are sons of the president of the Blackheath Harriers.

Photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 7 November 1914 – We Lost 741

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Tsing-tau falls to British and Japanese forces and two thousand three hundred prisoners are taken. The British casualties during the siege are 2 officers wounded, 12 men killed, and 61 wounded. Numerous congratulatory messages are exchanged between the British and the Japanese. Lord Kitchener sends his felicitations to the Japanese Minister of War at Tokyo: “Please accept my warmest congratulations on the success of the operations against Tsing-tau. Will you be so kind as to express my felicitations to the Japanese forces engaged? The British Army is proud to have been associated with its gallant Japanese comrades in this enterprise”.

Two American companies accept orders from the British Admiralty for twelve flying boats.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  A Victoria Cross winner
  • A grandson of the first victim of the India Mutiny
  • A man whose uncle was killed in the South African Wara
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • A grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Cousin of a General
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who had two brothers lose their lives in the service of King & Country before the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A cousin of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a former Lord Mayor of London
  • A man who played one first class cricket match for Worcestershire

 Today’s highlighted casualties is

 At Zillebeke, Belgium, when leading an attack against the Germans under very heavy fire, Captain John Franks Vallentin (South Staffordshire Regiment) is struck down and on rising to continue the attack and immediately killed at age 32. The capture of the enemy’s trenches which immediately follows is in a great measure due to the confidence which the men have in their captain, arising from his many previous acts of great bravery and ability. For his actions Captain Vallentin will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. He also served in the South Africa War. Vallentin is the nephew of the noted naturalist Rupert Vallentin. His grandfather ‘Sir’ James Vallentin was Knight Sheriff of London, and his cousin Archibald Thomas Pechey, the lyricist and author, adapted the family name for his nom-de-plune ‘Valentine’. His grandfather Colonel Finnis was the first victim of the Indian Mutiny and another uncle, Major Valentin was killed in the South African War.

  •  Captain Arnold Stearns Nesbitt (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is a cricketer who played one first class match for Worcestershire in 1914.
  • Captain Richard Alexander Noel Smyth (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend J Coke Vicar of Ilebrewers near Taunton Somerset the former Principal and Chaplain of the Lawrence Military Asylum, Sanawar India.
  • Captain Beauchamp Oswald Duff(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Beauchamp GCB commander of the Army in India and Lady Duff.  He had served in the Waziristan and Somaliland campaigns 1901-4.
  • Captain Lionel Alfred Francis Cane(East Lancashire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on an enemy trench at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Granger Cane of Great Paxton Vicarage, St Neots Hunts and 1st cousin to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby KCB.
  • Captain Edward Basil Chichester (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and has had two brothers previously die in the service of their King one dying on service in 1898 and the second being killed in 1902 in Somaliland.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Alexander Goldsmid (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the second cousin of ‘Sir’ Julian Goldsmid Baronet and related to ‘Sir’ Isaac Francis Goldsmid Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Jessie Marson Atkin(Sherwood Foresters attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed in May 1918. Lieutenant Atkin is the son of Mr H Atkin, New Westwood and entered The University College, Nottingham in the session 1910 – 11.  While at college he passed the final examinations of the Bachelor of Arts Degree of London. He received his military training under Captain Trotman in the Officers Training Corps, passing ‘A’ and ‘B’ Military examinations.  At the completion of his college career he applied and was accepted for the special reserve of officers.  A touching incident in connection with the announcement of his death is that his sister who was employed at the Jacksdale Post Office was the one to receive the message informing the family of his death.  
  • Lieutenant Reginald Nigel Gipps (Scots Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Reginald Gipps GCB.
  • Lieutenant John Beauclerk Vandeleur(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Colonel J S Vandeleur CB.
  • Second Lieutenant Gillachrist Moore (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Norman Moore the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Hutton(Leicestershire Regiment attached Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Henry Hutton Rector of West Heslerton.
  • Second Lieutenant James Neil Grant McGrigor (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds in London received 24 October at age 19. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James McGrigor.
  • Second Lieutenant Murray Stuart Pound (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received 21 October at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ John Lulham Pound the 2nd Baronet and grandsons of ‘Sir’ John Pound Baronet Lord Mayor of London 1904-5.
  • Sergeants and brothers Alfred James (age 29) and William John Cogan age 33 (Bedfordshire Regiment) are killed together. A third brother will be killed in next March.
  • Sergeant William Peart (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother Henry will also lose his life in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Jake Clarke Andrews (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Percy Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed next August on Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Lamond (Black Watch) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Ernest Herbert Bygrave (Bedfordshire Regiment) becomes the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War. They are sons of the late Reverend Joseph Hutton.
  • Private William Gray(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 18.  His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Drummer George Edward Ransom (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private William Cowan Fulton (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Patrick O’Connell (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother John will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Samuel Hateley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.                                                                                                                                                  

photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.

Thursday 29 October 1914 – We Lost 796

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

At 05:30 the Germans attack in the Ypres sector in an attempt to break through to the Channel Ports, and sever the lines of communication of the British Expeditionary Forces.  British artillery is restricted because of shell shortages to nine rounds per gun per day and is unable to take advantage of prior knowledge of the attack plans.  The 1st Coldstream Guards at Gheluvelt are attacked along a front of 800 yards by six German battalions and by the end of the day the 1st Guards Brigade suffers 1,100 casualties and is reduced in strength to 275 men.  The 1st Coldstream Guards lose all 11 Combatant Officers and is reduced to a party of 60 other ranks under the Quartermaster.  The 2nd and 3rd Coldstream Guards successfully defend Zonnebeke some three miles to the north.  The Germans force their way in between two companies of the 1st Middlesex Regiment so that one company finds itself with the enemy not only in the front but also directly in the rear within 50 feet. About 40 Germans who have penetrated to a communication trench are all killed or taken prisoner by the battalion’s reserve company.  Eventually with the help of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders the trenches are cleared of the enemy.

Lieutenant James Anson Otho Brooke (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability near Gheluvelt in leading two attacks on the German trenches under heavy rifle and machine gun fire regaining a lost trench at a very critical moment.  His efforts prevented the enemy from breaking through the British line at a time when a general counter attack could not be organized.  Having regained the lost trench, he goes back to bring up support and while doing so is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Vesey Brooke JP DL, grandson of ‘Sir’ Arthur Brooke MP 2nd Baronet and great grandson of General ‘Sir’ George Anson GCB and had been awarded the Sword of Honor at Sandhurst and dies at age 30.  He has two brothers who will die during the Great War both dying at home, the first in 1916 the second in 1917. Their brother-in-law will be killed on Christmas Day this year.

Lieutenant Arthur Martin Leake (Royal Army Medical Corps) will be awarded his second Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty beginning on this day through 8 November near Zonnebeke in rescuing while exposed to constant fire a large number of the wounded who are lying close to the enemy trenches. He is one of only three men ever to be awarded the Victoria Cross twice.

Second Lieutenant James Leach and Sergeant John Hogan (Manchester Regiment) will each be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Festubert when after their trench has been taken by Germans and after two attempts at recapture fails they voluntarily decide in the afternoon of this day to recover the trench themselves, and, working from traverse to traverse at close quarters with great bravery, they gradually succeed in regaining possession, killing eight of the enemy, wounding two and taking sixteen prisoners.

The 2nd/8th Gurkha Rifles arrive at the Western Front and go into the trenches near Festubert.

Beduin tribesmen raid the Egyptian frontier.

Lord Fisher is appointed First Sea Lord.

Admiral Cradock’s squadron reaches Vallenar Roads, just south of Chiloe Island. He sends HMS Glasgow ahead to see if there are any messages for him with the British consulate in Coronel.  He also dispatches HMS Otranto to Puerto Montt to try to gather information as to the whereabouts of any German warships.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla departs Leith for Dunkirk to board wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and Grandson of the 1st Duke (The Iron Duke)
  • Battalion commander
  • A man whose father died on service in the South African War of typhoid fever
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Great nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • Children born after their father’s death
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be later in the Great War
  • Sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • An uncle and nephew killed together
  • A Somerset cricket batsman
  • Grandson son of writer to the Signet
  • Son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzel
  • Son of the Marquis de la Pasture
  • Son and heir to the 3rd Baron Penrhyn
  • Son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Darley
  • Son of the 7th Viscount Falmouth
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim
  • Nephew of the Earl of Kintore

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘Lord’ Richard Wellesley (Grenadier Guards) the son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald Baronet and the 20th Knight of Kerry is killed in action at age 35. His daughter will be born on 8 January 1915. He is the grandson of the ‘Iron Duke’ the original Duke of Wellington

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Henry Lawrence Anderson(Bhopal Infantry) dies of wounds at age 47.  He is the son of Major General Robert Patrick Anderson.
  • Major Wilfred Beckett Walker(Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and his first brother was killed in the first few days of the Great War while his second brother will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918.  They are grandsons of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Leslie D’Henin Hamilton MVO(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell father of the 3rd Baron and he served in the South African War.
  • Major Humphrey St Leger Stucley(Grenadier Guards) dies of injuries at age 37. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ George Stucley, 1st Baronet and had served in Egypt 1898 and in the South Africa War. His son will be killed in World War II.
  • Captain Charles Edward Mary de la Pasture (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. He is the eldest son of the Marquis de la Pasture who will die what many will say is from shock and a broken heart within three months. Captain de la Pasture served in the South African War and from 1907-10 was Aide de Campe to General ‘Sir’ Frederick Forestier Walker at Gibraltar.
  • Captain Gordon Hargreaves Brown(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 34.  He is the son and heir of the late ‘Sir’ Alexander Brown, the 1st Baronet and he had served in the South African War. His third child will be born next February and his only son Captain ‘Sir’ John Hargreaves Pigott-Brown who will become the 2nd Baronet will be killed in North Africa in December 1942.
  • Captain Colin Frederick Fitzroy Campbell(Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Major General F Lorn Campbell and son-in-law of Lady May Stewart.
  • Captain Robert Forbes Stanley Stanley-CreekDSO (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His widow is the daughter of ‘Sir’ David Masson.
  • Captain Arthur George McCausland Burn (East Surrey Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 31. His great grandfather Lieutenant Colonel William Burn successfully held Delhi against Holkar.
  • Captain Edgar W Walker(East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39.  He is the son of Rear Admiral Charles Walker and his brother-in-law will be killed next May.
  • Captain Geoffrey Malcolm Bentley(Northamptonshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. His brother was killed seventeen days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wilson Bentley JP.
  • Captain Guy Francis Headlam Keenlyside(Royal West Kent Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier at age 34. His second son will be born in May 1915 and his brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Captain Robert John Blatchford Oldrey(Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 31. His brother will die on active service in February 1919.
  • Captain Percy Lionel Moubray (Black Watch) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Robert Moubray Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain John Kearsley Dawson-Scott (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of General R N Dawson-Scott.
  • Lieutenant Morys Wynne-Jones(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John William Wynne-Jones Vicar of Carnarvon and his wife the Honorable Jessie F Wynne-Jones and the grandson of Lord Aberdare.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Henry Loftus Reade (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and the grandson of the Right Reverend Loftus George Reade.
  • Lieutenant Charles Keith Latta (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of John Jopp Writer to the Signer.
  • Lieutenant Graham Eardley Dunsterville (Devonshire Regiment) is killed when he is shot in the head at Festubert at age 30 attepting to bring in a wounded man who was crying out. He is the son-in-law of F Hastings Coldney JP and his son will be born on 29 December.
  • Lieutenant James Raymond McClintock Lonsdale (Hussars) dies of wounds received 13 October at age 20. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ James Mathew Stronge 2nd Baronet and nephew of ‘Sir’ John B Lonsdale Baronet MP.
  • Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock DSO (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26 six days after performing the acts that will win him the DSO. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend P P Broadmead and a Somerset County cricket batsman.
  • Lieutenant Ian Hay Steuart Clarke(Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the late Hastings A Clarke DL JP.
  • Lieutenant the ‘Honorable’ Alan George Sholto Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards)age 24 the son and heir of the 3rd Baron Penrhyn is killed. His uncle Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Charles Douglas-Pennant JP (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the same action. He served in the South Africa War and is a son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn who will lose another son the following year.  He is also the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl Darley.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Arthur Campbell (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. George Campbell.
  • Lieutenant Granville Keith Falconer Smith (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the late Colonel Granville and Lady Blanche Smith. He is also the nephew of the Earl of Kintore and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Gilchrist Nevill Ogilvy (Scots Guards) 11th Baronet is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Reginald H A Ogilvy.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Vere Douglas Boscawen(Coldstream Guards) is also killed at age 24. He is the son of Major General Evelyn Edward Thomas Boscawen, the 7th Viscount Falmouth KCVO CB and his older brother will die of wounds in 1918. In 1909 he was with the Eton XI Cricket Club against Harrow. They will have a nephew, who is not yet born, killed in action with the Coldstream Guards in May 1940.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Knollys Foster(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert Charles Foster St Thomas’s Vicarage Groombridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Patrick Edward Adam Blair (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel A S Blair CMG (Royal Scots) writer to the Signet.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Harford Nicholl (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the great nephew of Major General C R H Nicholl.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick McMahon Hardman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His father Captain John Wreford Julian Hardman died of typhoid fever in May 1900 during the South African War at age 37. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon Baronet CB whose son (and uncle of Lieutenant Hardman) Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahon will be killed in the less than two weeks.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed a day after his brother was killed with the 21st
  • Private Albert Shipp(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Private Fred (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Georgeson (Scots Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Henry Etherington (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in less than two weeks serving in the Royal Fusiliers.
  • Private Henry Long (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brothers George and Edward will also lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Fred Castle (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will also die in service including one in the Second World War.

photo from wikipedia.org

Sunday 25 October 1914 – We Lost 426

Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas

Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas

At night during a heavy rainfall the Germans attack with great force from Bois de Biez. The Gordon Highlanders are driven from their trenches by sheer weight of numbers but the Middlesex Regiment and the Royal Fusiliers turn the enemy out of the trenches with a bayonet charge.

The seaplane carriers HMS Riviera and HMS Engadine, while attached to the Harwich Force, attempt to launch a strike on the supposed German airship base at Cuxhaven.  The operation is canceled following the failure of all six Short float planes to leave the water.

South African rebels are routed at Calvinia.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  Chief of the Imperial General Staff and First Military Member of the Army Council
  • Son of the former Vice Consul of the Netherlands and Argentina
  • Son of the Lord Lieutenant of Dorset and Poole
  • First student of Trinity College to fall
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of the Head Master of Russell Scott Memorial School Denton Lancashire
  • Grandson of a veteran of the Nile Campaign of 1898
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons and a grandson of Generals
  • Son and a grandson of an Admiral
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Cousin of a Baron
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Police Officer

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 General “Sir” Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas GCB (Colonel, Gordon Highlanders), Chief of the Imperial General Staff and First Military Member of the Army Council dies in London at age 64.  He joined the 92nd Highlanders in 1869, served in the Afghan War of 1878-80, the Boer War of 1881 and the Sudan War of 1884-5.  He was the Aide de Camp to Her Majesty Queen Victoria from 1898-1901 and to His Majesty King Edward VII in 1901. The Commanded the 9th Brigade and a Field Column of the South African Field Force in 1900.  From 1904-9 he was Adjutant General to the Forces and Second Military Member of the Army Council and was General Officer Commanding-in-Chief Southern Command from 1909-1911. An extract from the Annual Register of 1914 reads that he died after “having worked at the War Office, though seriously ill, until a week before his death”.

  •  Major Ronald Anthony Markham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 44. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Francis Grant and served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain John Henry Strode Batten (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Colonel John Mount Batten CB the Lord Lieutenant of Dorset and Poole.
  • Captain Barton Hope Besly(Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the Reverend William Blundell Besly.
  • Captain Frederick Wilberforce Steele (Royal Fusiliers)is killed at age 29.  His brothers Philip John Rupert and Norman Leslie will also fall in the Great War.
  • Captain ‘Sir’ Francis Ernest Waller (Royal Fusiliers) JP DLis killed at age 34.  He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ George Waller, the 3rd Baronet and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant William Gordon Tollemache Hope-Johnstone MC (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in July 1917 commanding the 12th Battalion of William’s Regiment
  • Lieutenant Hugh John Sladen Shields(Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Guards) dies of wounds at Ypres while tending a wounded man 200 yards from the enemy at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur John Shields Rector of Thurnford Dorset and he gained a rowing Blue at Cambridge and with Fairbairn also won the Lowe Double Sculls in 1910. In 1913 he was Light Heavyweight runner-up in the Army and Navy Boxing Championships.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Kennedy (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 26. He is the son John Kennedy JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Algernon Fitzgerald Foley (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the only son of Vice Admiral Francis John Foley, great grandson of Admiral the Honorable Fitzgerald A C Foley and General the Honorable ‘Sir’ St George Gerald Foley. He is also the cousin of Baron Foley.
  • Lieutenant Vivian Trevor Tight Rea (Irish Rifles) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the son of Henry Tight Rea the Vice Counsul of the Netherlands and Argentine Republic and he is the first student of Trinity College to fall in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Widdrington Herdman(King’s Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 28. He is the only son of the late Reverend Robert Morrison Herdman Vicar of Holy Trinity North Shields.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Charles Verner (Shropshire Light Intantry) is killed at age 22. He is related to Major General Thomas Edward Verner CB.
  • Lieutenant Vernon Dudley Bramsdeon Bransbury (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 31 at Neuve Chapelle. He is the nephew of ‘Sir’ Bransdon MP for Portsmouth.
  • Second Lieutenant Russell Willis (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of William Willis Head Master of Russell Scott Memorial School Denton Lancashire.
  • Second Lieutenant George Rupert Alexander Fetherstonhaugh (Royal Fusiliers)is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of Major General R S Fetherstonhaugh.  His brother will be killed in May of next year.
  • Lance Corporal Alfred McCullough (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Simeon Beale (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. His brother will die of wounds next July.
  • Private Harold Speller (Grenadier Guards) a police officer is killed in action.

 photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 24 October 1914 – We Lost 616

Warwickshire Regiment Badge

Warwickshire Regiment Badge

The First Battle of Langemarck ends. At Reutel, just north of the Menin Road, the 2nd battalion of the Wiltshire Regiment is all but wiped out with the 450 survivors being taken prisoner.

The 4th Guards Brigade, with the Coldstream Guards leading, attacks some high ground covering Langemarck.  In spite of fierce German opposition, the feature is taken, and held until the Battalions are relieved in two days.

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings up ammunition under heavy shellfire.

The importation of sugar into Britain is prohibited.

DeWet and Beyers are in overt rebellion in South Africa.

Captain John Edmund Valentine Isaac (Rifle Brigade) is wounded while guiding a unit to a critical point and with great skill which resulted in checking the enemy.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  He will be killed in May 1915.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Battalion commanders
  • Sons and sons-in-law of clergy
  • Father of ten children, including two sets of twins, one of which will die in the Second World War
  • Master of Kinnaird (son of the Baron)
  • Aide-de-camp to the former Lieutenant Governor of Burma
  • Baronet and son of Baronet
  • Son of a General
  • Rosslyn Park rugby footballer
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Colonel Walter Latham Loring (commanding 2nd Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Henry Loring Rector of Gillingham (one of three sons of his to be killed) and son-in-law of the Reverend R M Marshall Rector of Hedensham Norfolk. He leaves ten children including two sets of twins. His son Lieutenant Henry Latham Loring will lose his life in the first year of the Second World War.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel William Stirling Bannatyne (commanding 1st Liverpool Regiment) is killed when he is the shot in the heart at age 45. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend H H Windwood of Bath and brother-in-law of Lieutenant Colonel W Q Winwood DSO (Dragoon Guards).
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Douglas Arthur Kinnaird (Scots Guards) the Master of Kinnaird son of the 11th Baron is killed in action at age 35. His brother will be killed in 1917 and they are related to the Duke of Leinster, the Earl of Gainsborough and ‘Sir’ Andrew Agnew.
  • Captain William Geoffrey Vyvyan (Welsh Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Frederick Vyvyan Rector of Withiel.
  • Captain William Cecil Holt Cree (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend William Cree of St Matthias and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon T S Hichens.
  • Captain Lachlan Gordon-Duff(Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of Thomas Gordon-Duff JP DL and grandson of ‘Sir’ Charles Tennant Baronet. He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Julian Silver Strickland Dunlop(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 38 leading a bayonet charge near Ypres. He was the ADC to ‘Sir’ Frederick Fryer, Lieutenant Governor of Burma from 1899-1903. He has four brothers who serve in the military, two of whom will be killed one in November 1914 the other in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Richard William Levinge (Life Guards) the 10th Baronet is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ William Henry Levinge and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Wardleworth(Royal Army Medical Corps) drowns at age 34 while taking his regular constitutional swim at Le Havre.  He is the only son of Douglas Wardleworth MD JP and his son will be born today.
  • Lieutenant Gerald Ferrers Nixon (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 33. He is the son of Major General A I Nixon DL.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Antrobus (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the 4th Baronet ‘Sir’ Edmund Antrobus.
  • Lieutenant Bruce Duffus Costin (West Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds received four days earlier at age 25. He played rugby football for Rosslyn Park.
  • Lieutenant Cecil Smeathman (Leicestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day by a shell in the trenches at Rue du Bois at age 25. His brother Lieutenant Julian Missenden Smeathman (Royal Engineers) is killed in action on the same day at age 26.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Craig Cowan (Royal Scots) is killed La Plinche at age 20. He is the grandson of C W Cowan DL.
  • Lance Sergeant Frederick Henry Mills (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His two brothers will be killed in 1917.
  • Private Ernest Cobb (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in January 1918.
  • Brothers Private Harry and Private Thomas Hedges are killed in action while serving together with the Wiltshire Regiment. Harry dies at age 23 and Thomas dies at 28. Both are commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.
  • Also killed while serving in the Wiltshire Regiment and commemorated on the Ypres Memorial this day is Corporal Edwin Pagetkilled at age 27. He has two brothers who will be killed in late 1918.

Friday 23 October 1914 – We Lost 497

 

Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon

Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon

The first Indian Army units enter the line south of Ypres.

Drummer William Kenny (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Ypres in rescuing wounded men on five occasions under very heavy fire in the most fearless manner and for twice previously saving machine guns by carrying them out of action. On numerous occasions Drummer Kenny conveys urgent messages under very dangerous circumstances over fire swept ground.

Captain Robert Edward Rising (Gloucestershire Regiment) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order when he goes up with supports and controls the defense of his battalion’s trenches against a determined attack by the enemy at Langemarck. But for his defense the line must have been penetrated.  He will be killed in two weeks. Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock (Devonshire Regiment) displays conspicuous gallantry in leaving his trench under very heavy fire and going back some sixty yards over absolutely bare ground to pick up Corporal Warwick who had fallen while coming up with a party of reinforcements.  Lieutenant Hancock conveyed this NCO to the cover of a haystack and then returned to his trench. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the DSO. He will be killed in six days.

Today’s losses include:

  • Cousin of the future Queen Mother Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon whose brother will be killed in action next year
  • Survivor of the Empress of Ireland sinking earlier this year
  • Grandson of the 13th Earl of Stratchmore and 26th Earl of Crawford
  • Great grandson of Field Marshall the 1st Baron Raglan who commanded British troops in the Crimean War
  • Son of a former Minister for Defence and the Colonial Secretary for New Zealand
  • Grandson of the 2nd Baron Carwshaw
  • Great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Verulam
  • Multiple sons and grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Son of Baronet
  • Grandson of a Waterloo veteran and nephew of Redan veteran
  • Great nephew of a man killed at the battle of Quatre Bras
  • Father of a man who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two sons
  • Two Gloucester cricket players
  • Somerset cricket player

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon (Black Watch) is killed at age 29.  The son of ‘the Honorable’ Francis and Lady Bowes-Lyon was a survivor of the Empress of Ireland sinking the previous May. He is the grandson of the 13th Earl of Strathmore and 26th Earl of Crawford and cousin of the future Queen Mother whose brother will be killed in action next year.

  •  Captain Horace Sylvester Grimston (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 22. He is the grandson of the Honorable and Reverend Francis Sylvester Grimston and great grandson of the 2nd Earl Verulam.
  • Captain Edward Frederick Maltby Urquhart(Black Watch) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of the Reverend Edward William Urquhart Vicar of King’s Sutton and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Walter Russell Russell(Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 33.  He is the son of the late Captain ‘Sir’ William Russell Russell former Minister for Defence and Colonial Secretary of New Zealand.
  • Captain Lawrence Peel(Yorkshire Regiment commanding 7th Divisional Cyclist Company) is killed at age 30. He is the husband of the Honorable Mrs. L Peel and grandson of William Brocks 2nd Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw.
  • Lieutenant Francis Lennox Holmes (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Major General Ponsonby Ross Holmes (Royal Marines), his uncle William served at the Redan and his grandfather served at Waterloo.
  • Lieutenant William Stanley Yalland (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He was a cricketer for Gloucestershire in the 1910 County Championship.
  • Lieutenant Frederic William Joseph MacDonald Miller (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Frederic Miller the 5th Baronet and his great uncle Lieutenant Colonel William Miller died of wounds at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 17 July 1815.
  • Lieutenant William Stanley (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on a German trench at age 25. He played cricket for Clifton and Gloucestershire.
  • Lieutenant Ivan Boyd Sprot (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in less than three weeks. His wife is the granddaughter of ‘Sir’ William Muir.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Kingsley (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed. He played Rugby Football for the Bedford Town Club.
  • Second Lieutenant Norman Arthur Henry Somerset (Grenadier Guards) the son of Captain the Honorable Arthur Charles Edward Somerset is killed in action at age 20. He is the great grandson of Field Marshall FitzRoy James Henry Somerset the 1st Baron Raglan commanding officer of British troops in the Crimean War.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Laurene Arthur Hart Burges (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed by a shell on his 23rd He is the son of the Reverend J Hart Burges DD Rector of Devizes and grandson of the Reverend W C Burges.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Edwin Hippisley(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Langemarcke when two platoons hold a trench against a large enemy attack, as all the officers and sixty percent of the men are killed.  He played cricket for Somerset before the war and dies at age 24.
  • Private Henry Thomas Imbert(Border Regiment) is killed at age 29.  His son will die on active service in Italy in July 1945.
  • Private Charles Ernest Trout (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Cecil Harry Barrett (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in October 1917.

photo from findagrave.com

Wednesday 14 October 1914 – We Lost 182

Hubert Hamilton

Hubert Hamilton

Air reconnaissance is impossible and artillery is badly hindered due to heavy mist and rain.  Still the first artillery “barrage” of the Great War is fired by the highly trained gunners of the 65th Field Howitzer Battery (Royal Artillery) in support of French infantry at Vermelles.

The 8th Brigade entrenches in the positions taken the previous day while the 9th Brigade which has made less progress pushes forward on its left.  British troops of the 19th Brigade and the 4th Division drive the Germans out of Bailleul which is easily occupied as are Dranoutre, Kemmel, Neuve Eglise, Wulverghem, Messines and Wytschate. The South Staffordshire Regiment reaches Ypres while units of the Cavalry Corps meet with the 3rd Cavalry Division south of Ypres completing a tenuous line of the BEF from the south of the La Bassee Canal to Ypres.

Today’s losses include:

  • Major General H I W Hamilton
  • Son and grandson of a general
  • Families that will lose two children including one that will have a daughter die on service
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A multi sport athlete
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Baronet
  • The first Australian to be killed on the Western Front

 Today’s highlighted casualty is:

Major General Hubert Ian Wetherall Hamilton CVO CB DSO General Officer Commanding 3rd Division is killed at age 53 by a shell while visiting the trenches of the 8th Brigade. He and his Aide de Camp are out to the north of Vieille Chapelle to see why an advance is hung up. They are dismounted and standing on a road when a salvo of shrapnel burst right over them.  One bullet hits him in the forehead and he dies almost immediately. No one else standing in the group is hit. He is the son of Lieutenant General Henry Meade Hamilton and brother of General ‘Sir’ Bruce Hamilton KCB KCVO. He served in Burma 1886-8, Nile 1897-8 and the South Africa War. His body will be returned to England for burial at Cherlton St Mary Churchyard.

 

  • Major William Lewis Campbell Allan(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at Mont des Cats age 43. He is the son of Major General William Allan.
  • Captain Arthur Milford Ker (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Milford Ker CIE MVO and the grandson of General T D Ker.
  • Captain Cecil Glendower Percival Gilliat (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in April of next year.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Noel Whitfeld (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Lewis Whitfeld Vicar of Hughenden.
  • Lieutenant Claude Davis Sneath (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of George Sneath JP and a member of several Hendon and Middlesex hockey, football and cricket clubs.
  • Lieutenant John Stirling Ainsworth (Hussars) is killed age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Stirlng Ainsworth MP 1st Baronet and grandson of R R Macredie JP DL MP for Argyllshire.
  • Lieutenant Jasper Carew (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Henry William Carew, the Vicar of Rattery, Devon whose daughter will die on service eight days before the Armistice.
  • Second Lieutenant William George Hewitt(Royal Scots) is killed 12 days before his brother will suffer the same fate. The brothers are sons of ‘the Honorable’ William James Hewitt.
  • Second Lieutenant John Dossie Patteson (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Colonel Henry Tyrwhitt Stainforth Patteson JP DL.
  • Corporal of Horse William Thomas Leggett (Life Guards) is killed at Geluwe. He is the first Australian to be killed on the Western Front.

photo from Wikipedia.org

Tuesday 13 October 1914 – We Lost 431

John Kirwan Gatacre

At 06:30 the 8th Brigade (Middlesex Regiment, Royal Scots and Gordon Highlanders) advance over flat country.  The advance is made difficult by the many dykes, which can only be crossed by means of planks or ladders taken from neighboring houses. Still by mid-day the Middlesex Regiment has captured the village of Croix Barbee and the Royal Scots Pont de Hem. Their advance is checked by a strong counter-attack by the Germans though the British are able to maintain their ground and inflict heavy losses on the enemy. Second Lieutenant Dudley Ralph Turnbull (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his conspicuous gallantry in serving his Maxim gun when his detachment  are all wounded until he is wounded himself in two places and his gun damaged by a shell.  He subsequently recovers the gun bringing it away on his shoulder. Lieutenant Turnbull will be killed as Lieutenant Colonel commanding 20th Manchester Regiment on 1 October 1917 at age 25.

Advance patrols find the Germans well entrenched on the far side of the Meterenbeek stream, near Hazebrouck.  The 4th and 6th Divisions of Lieutenant General Pulteney’s III Corps are ordered to attack the enemy.  This is the first formal attack by the British Army on the Western Front.  Going in at 14:00 the attack is successful but slow and difficult.  The weather is poor, being misty and wet. By dusk the hamlet of Outtersteene along with Meteren and Mont Noir have all been captured, while the hill outside St. Jans-Cappel (Mont des Cats) is captured by the dismounted members of the Hussars and Lancers together with a battery of the  Royal Horse Artillery.  British losses amount to approximately 1,000 many of which are incurred in a heavy bombardment of Givenchy.  St Omer becomes and will remain until the end of March 1916, the General Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Forces.

Lieutenant George Edward Boscawen (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the DSO for gallantly fighting his section in front of La Bassee when all his detachment except himself are wounded and all infantry had fallen back from where the guns are. He will be killed in June 1918.  Sergeant E Howard (Lancashire Regiment) will be awarded the DCM for actions at Meterin when within two hundred yards of the enemy in the open and noticing that the twelve men on the left of his platoon are not firing though he shouts to them to carry on. He crawls along the line at very great risk to make them do so, only to find that all twelve are dead.  He will be killed next month.

The Russian Imperial Navy sends to London a German signal book from the German cruiser Madgeburg, which has run aground in the Gulf of Finland and come under Russian naval gunfire.  The German signal man who is about to destroy the book is killed by a bursting shell. The Russians discover the book and as a result of this find, British cryptographers are able to begin painstakingly decoding German naval wireless messages and locating their adversaries.

Today’s losses include:

  • Water color artist
  • Sons of Generals
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two sons and one family that will lose four
  • First Class Cricket player
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Grandsons of the 7th Marquess of Lothian, the 14th Duke of Norfolk and the 1st Baron Lawrence
  • A member of the Dundrum (Dublin) Hockey Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Major John Kirwan Gatacre (Lancers Indian Army attached Hussars) a gifted water color artist is killed at age 32. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ William Forbes Gatacre KCB DSO.  Being on leave when at the outbreak of the war he was attached to the 4th (Queen’s Own) Hussars. He had been previously awarded the French decoration the ‘Croix de Chevalier” of the Legion of Honour.

 

  • Captain Cecil Falconer Tulloh (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the son of Major General John Stewart Tulloh and nephew of Lieutenant Colonel G S Tulloh (commanding 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment) who will be killed on Hill 60 next year.
  • Captain Arthur Edwin Bradshaw(Lancers Indian Army attached Hussars) is killed during a recon of the village of Bout de Ville at age 32. He is the youngest son of the late Surgeon Major General ‘Sir’ Alexander Frederick Bradshaw KCB and Lady Bradshaw. His wife is the sister of ‘Sir’ William Price and on his mother’s side he came from a family which had seen service at the Battle of Plassey and almost every Indian campaign since.
  • Lieutenant Walter Evelyn Parke (Durham Light Infantry) a first class cricketer is killed in action at age 23. His brother will be killed in September of next year.
  • Lieutenant James Maxwell Pitt (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will die of wounds in August 1916.
  • Lieutenant Joe Anthony Francis Parkinson (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed by a sniper at age 26. He is the son of Thomas Parkinson JP.
  • Second Lieutenant G A B Chester(North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23.  He is the son of the late Reverend J G Chester.
  • Second Lieutenant David Anselm Kerr(Royal Scots) is killed after three days at the front at age 21. He is the son of Major General Lord Ralph Kerr KCB CB and grandson of both the 7th Marquess of Lothian and the 14th Duke of Norfolk.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Hal Lawrence(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Henry Arnold Lawrence and his brother will be killed next January serving the same regiment. They are grandsons of the 1st Baron Lawrence and great nephew of ‘Sir’ Henry Lawrence who was killed at Lucknow.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Sydney Smith(Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Sydney Edward Smith Rector of Sprotborough.
  • Second Lieutenant Arved Waterhouse (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 23. He was raised by his aunt and uncle the Reverend Canon Herbert Woodward after he was orphaned.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Molesworth Samuels (Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel W F Samuels who served at Ashanti 1973-4 and the grandson of George McCulloch Staff Surgeon of the Life Guards who died on his way home from Crimea. He is also a member of the Dundrum (County Dublin) Hockey Club.
  • Second Lieutenant Greville Arthur Bagot Chester (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at Oultserteen at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend John Greville Chester and grandson of Colonel C M Chester DL JP. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Corporal Alfred Arnell (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private George Cleverley (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private Luke Bradley (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed next August. Private John Sanderson Jardin Douglas (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 25. He is the first of four sons of James & Agnes Douglas of 15 Green Terrace, Selkirk.

Photo from findagrave.com