Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Herbert Kitchener

Tuesday 23 November 1915 – We Lost 260

Alfred George Drake VC

Alfred George Drake VC

On the second morning of the Battle of Ctesiphon a weak Turkish attempt to counter-attack fails.  They try again in strength at night but again the British defence holds.

Lord Herbert Horatio Kitchener advises the government to withdraw all troops from Anzac and Suvla and warns them that casualties could be high in doing so.

Heavy losses are inflicted on the enemy at Yaunde in Cameroon.

British military operations against the Senussi commence.  Es Sollum is evacuated.

Near the hamlet of La Brique a patrol of four men of the Rifle Brigade is reconnoitering towards the German lines when it is discovered close to the enemy who open fire with rifles and machine guns wounding the officer and one of the men. The latter is carried back to our lines by one of the unwounded men while the other Corporal Alfred George Drake stays with his officer bandaging his wounds in spite of the enemy’s fire. Later a rescue party finds the officer alive and bandaged but Corporal Drake is dead, his body riddled with bullets. For saving the life of his officer Corporal Drake will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. The officer Lieutenant (later Captain) Henry Tryon will be killed on 15th September next year.

The Entente Powers send a note to the Greek government demanding non-interference with Allied troops, and guaranteeing eventual restoration of occupied Greek territory.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A son of the 5th Earl of Antrim
  • A former Private Secretary to the Prime Minister at the turn of the century
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 16-year old soldier
  • Men who will lose one and two brothers in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major the Honorable ‘Sir’ Schomberg Kerr McDonnell KCB GCVO (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 54. He is the son of the 5th Earl of Antrim. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and served as Private Secretary fo the Prime Minister 1888 to 1902.
  • Captain Geoffrey Barham Johnson (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Barham Johnson.
  • Private Norman Crowther (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action by a bullet in the lungs while he is stepping down from a sentry post. He is killed at age 16.
  • Private William Arthur Cook (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He is the eldest of five brothers who serve in the Great War, two of whom are killed.
  • Rifleman Walter Frank Fowler (Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds at age 28. His brother will be killed in March 1918.

Thursday 4 November 1915 – We Lost 199

Cap badge of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry

Cap badge of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry

The transport Mercian is shelled off the Algerian coast.  The Mercian is carrying approximately 500 members of the Lincolnshire Yeomanry of whom twenty three will be killed during the shelling including Captain Thomas Carew Trollope (3rd Baron Kesteven) (Lincolnshire Yeomanry) will die of wounds received the following day at Oran. He is 24 years old. Lance Corporal Harold Thomas Springthorpe (Lincolnshire Yeomanry) is also killed. He is an English International footballer who played for Northampton and Grimsby.

On Gallipoli a patrol is sent out by the Newfoundland Regiment under Lieutenant J J Donnelly which occupies a ridge midway between the trenches occupied by the enemy and those held by our forces.  From this ridge the Turks have been causing trouble every night for some time.  The patrol has scarcely reached the ridge before it is opposed by the enemy who outnumber our men by about seven to one.  The sound of the firing from the ridge indicates to the Commanding Officer that our patrol is being attacked and suspecting that it is greatly outnumbered he immediately dispatches six men under Lieutenant Ross and Sergeant Green to reinforce the patrol.  As this small party is slowly making its way across No Man’s Land it encounters a large party of Turks who are rapidly surrounding our men who are holding the ridge.

In the skirmish that follows only Sergeant W M Greene and Private R E Hynes escape without being wounded.  The rapid fire that these two men deliver at close range completely deceives the Turks who greatly exceed them in numbers.  The enemy finally retires to his own trenches and the attempt to surround the original patrol is foiled.  This timely aid enables Lieutenant Donnelly and his men to hold the ridge all night, even though every man in the party has been wounded, some several times.

General Cunliffe’s Allied force attacks Banyo Mountain, Cameroon. One Company of the Nigerian Regiment under Captain Cedric Gray Bowyer-Smith (Gloucestershire Regiment attached) finds a weak point in the enemy lines and captures the summit of the mountain. However, a mist that had helped the British suddenly clears and Bowyer-Smith is killed by the enemy’s reserves and the remnants of his company are forced back down the mountain.

Lord Kitchener leaves England for the Dardanelles.  General ‘Sir’ Charles Monro is appointed to command the Salonika Force, while ‘Sir’ William Birdwood is appointed to command the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 3rd Baron Kesteven
  • An England International footballer
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  •  Captain Hugh Makins (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. His brother was killed in August of this year.
  • Lieutenant Philip Anthony Brown (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 29. His brother will be killed in April 1917.

Sunday 15 August 1915 – We Lost 613

On Gallipoli British forces attack Kirich Tepe.

Hamilton finally cables Kitchener that the IX Corps generals are “unfit” for command. Kitchener makes Lieutenant-General Julian Byng available to command IX Corps. Hamilton dismissed Stopford and, while Byng is travelling from France, replaces him with Major-General Beauvoir de Lisle, commander of the British 29th Division at Helles. Hammersley is also dismissed but Hamilton intends to retain Mahon in command of the 10th Division. However, Mahon is incensed that de Lisle is appointed above him and resigns, stating “I respectfully decline to waive my seniority and to serve under the officer you name.” He abandons his division while it is in the thick of the fighting on Kiretch Tepe. The commander of the 53rd Division, Major-General John Lindley, voluntarily resigned.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the Irish Nationalist Member of Parliament for South Mayo
  • Two battalion  commanders
  • An International footballer
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The son of a General
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Saunders Vanrenen (commanding 5th Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 52. He is the son of the late General Donald Vanrenen.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Alfred Edsell (Royal Army Medical Corps commanding 83rd (1st/3rd Home Counties) Field Ambulance) dies on service at home of pleurisy contracted in April at age 56.
  • Captain Brian Clarke Cumberland (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 26. He is the son of Hugh Cumberland, JP.
  • Captain Charles Tanueray Baker (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at Gallipoli. He is the son of the Rector of Dunstable.
  • Captain and Adjutant William Reeves Richards (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. He is the son of John William Richards JP.
  • Lieutenant Harry Spottiswoode Trevor (Royal Engineers attached Sappers and Miners) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Charles Trevor KCSI.
  • Lieutenant Laurance Alfred Pinsent (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action one year before his younger brother meets the same fate. He is 20 years old and they are sons of Richard Alfred Pinsent 1st
  • Lieutenant Michael Joseph Fitzgibbon (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action at Gallipoli. He is the son of the Irish Nationalist Member of Parliament for South Mayo.
  • Lieutenant Cyril Richard Lydekker (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed during the second assault on Kidney Hill on Gallipoli at age 25. His brother will die on service in June 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Donald James Grubb (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 20 on Gallipoli. He is the only son of the Reverend James Grubb.
  • Second Lieutenant William Yonge Radcliffe (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Caynton Radcliffe Rector of Rockbourne.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Broughton Harrop Beck (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds on a hospital ship after being wounded in saving his gun at the landing at Suvla Bay at age 24. He is the only son of the late Colonel C H Beck CB JP for the County of Cheshire, who commanded the 4th (Militia) Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment in the South African War and of Mrs. Beck youngest daughter of the late Reverend C F Broughton Rector of Snelston, Derbyshire. Lieutenant Beck volunteered for active service on the outbreak of the War and received a commission in the Cheshire Regiment.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald Turner (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He is the son of Reverend Robert Turner (late vicar of Tirley) and an Amateur International and Football blue.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Gibson Heuston (Irish Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 21. His twin brother will be killed next April.
  • Sergeant John Rice (Essex Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. His brother was killed last May.
  • Brothers Lance Sergeant Albert, 20, and Sergeant Nathan Payne, 21, are killed while serving with the Bedfordshire Regiment on Gallipoli.

Monday 7 June 1915 – We Lost 312

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The King takes the extraordinary step of sending a personal telegram to Reginald A J Warneford (one day after his action versus a Zeppelin in Belgium) conferring upon him the Victoria Cross.

The Dardanelles Committee assembles to review two proposals, both committed to holding the position on the Gallipoli peninsula.  Kitchener wants Hamilton to progress slowly, Churchill suggests a major reinforcement.  Kitchener accepts the later and Hamilton is informed that three ‘New Army’ divisions will be put at his disposal.

While flying a reconnaissance over the area of Staden Captain Amyas Eden Borton (Black Watch and Royal Flying Corps) is wounded in the head and neck by a bullet fired from an enemy airplane and although suffering severely from loss of blood he continues, with the assistance of his observer, Captain Anthony Marshall (Light Cavalry, Indian Army, Royal Flying Corps) to bandage his wounds and completes the reconnaissance on the prescribed course. Captain Marshall continues the observations after rendering all possible aid his pilot who is gradually losing consciousness all the time the German airplane continues its attack.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  An Olympic Bronze Medal winner
  • A brother of the 1st Marquess of Sligo
  • Son of the 2nd and father of the 3rd Viscount Bridport
  • Great grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • The son of a General
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A first class cricketer

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Captain Oswald Armitage Carver (Royal Engineers) dies of wounds at age 28 on Gallipoli. He is a holder of the Olympic Bronze medal as a member of the 1908 eight-oared with coxswain rowing team. His widow will marry the future Field Marshall Bernard Law Montgomery. His younger brother will be killed in action next year.
  • Captain Christopher William Broderick Birdwood (Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds at Gallipoli received on the 4th. He is the son of General William Spiller Birdwood.
  • Lieutenant “The Honorable” Maurice Henry Nelson Hood (Hood Division) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 34. He is the only son of the late 2ndF Viscount Bridport and his son will become the 3rd
  • Second Lieutenant Albert Edward Stringer (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 27 on Gallipoli. He is the son of Edward Stringer JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Claude Lysaght Mackay (Worcestershire Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is a cricketer who made one first class appearance for Gloucestershire.
  • Sub Lieutenant William Denis Browne (Hood Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) known as the musician, is killed in action at Gallipoli. He was a friend of Rupert Brooke from their days at Rugby and Cambridge. A grandfather had been Dean of Emly (the cathedral was demolished in 1877), and a great-grandfather was a Member of Parliament for Mayo and younger brother of the 1st Marquess of Sligo.
  • Corporal Robert Handley (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His son will be killed serving in the same regiment in May 1917.
  • Private Hugh Latimer Tuke (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Laurence Tuke Archdeacon of Tauranga New Zealand and he represented the Hawke’s Bay Province at cricket and football.

Tuesday 25 May 1915 – We Lost 978

On this Memorial Day in the United States we wish to acknowledge the contribution and sacrifices made by the United States of America after joining the Great War effort in 1917. 

HMS Triumph

HMS Triumph

The second battle Ypres (Festubert) ends. The British and Canadian forces have pushed the line of trenches forward 1,000 yards over a 3,000 yard front. They have also taken eight hundred German prisoners.  The cost had been high: 16,000 casualties, versus 5,000 German casualties.

Lance Corporal Leonard James Keyworth (London Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery at Givenchy. After the successful assault on the German position by the London Regiment efforts are made by that unit to follow up their success by a bomb attack, during the progress of which fifty eight men out of a total of seventy five become casualties.  During this very fierce encounter Lance Corporal Keyworth stands fully exposed for two hours on the top of the enemy’s parapet throwing about 150 bombs among the Germans who are only a few yards away.

After taking part in an assault on a trench Captain Donald Whitley Figg (London Regiment) leads repeated rushes with bombs into a German work and when most of the bombers are killed he continues the attack single-handed. His actions on this day and the next day will be rewarded with the Distinguished Service Order.  Lieutenant Colonel Figg will be killed in action on 5th March 1917 at age 31.

The Kaiser grants his permission for air raids east of the Tower of London.

Herbert H Asquith reorganizes his liberal ministry as a coalition. Mr. Asquith as Prime Minister, Lord Lansdowne, Balfour, 1st Lord of the Admiralty, ‘Sir’ E Grey, Foreign Secretary, Mr. Bonar Law, Colonial Secretary, Lord Kitchener, War, Lloyd George, Munitions, Mr. Henderson, Education, ‘Sir’ E Carson, Attorney General, Mr. McKenna, Chancellor of the Exchequer. The ministry contains twelve liberals, eight Unionists, one Labour and one non party member.

The battleship HMS Triumph is torpedoed and sunk by U-21 while supporting the landings at Gallipoli and at anchor off Cape Helles.  Although she has her torpedo nets deployed she is hit on the starboard side abreast No. 2 boiler room.  Despite having her guns manned and most watertight doors shut she capsizes in about 10 minutes and sinks in about 30 minutes. All it takes to sink her 11,985 tons is one torpedo.  She suffers seventy-three casualties while five hundred of the crew survives. Among those lost is Able Seaman Clem Flisher Williams who is lost at age 25. He is the first of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War.  It is said that both the Australian and Turkish forces fighting on the land stop to watch her sink.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Three battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose a total of four sons in the Great War
  • A man whose two nephews will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Great War
  • A son-in-law of the 5th Lord Grantley
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The Northern Queensland Light Heavyweight Boxing champion
  • An International Polo players
  • A member of the Aylesbury United Football Club

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Hethorn Cunliffe (commanding 9th Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 44.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Loveband CMG (commanding 2nd Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action. His two nephews will be killed, the first in 1914 and second in 1918.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Derrick Alfred Carden (Seaforth Highlanders commanding 7th Argyll and Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 40. His brother Major Henry Charles Carden DSO will be killed in action in exactly four months at age 60. They are sons ‘Sir’ John Carden the 4th
  • Major Hugh Quinn (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at the post that bears his name on Gallipoli at age 27. He is the Northern Queensland Light Heavyweight boxing champion.
  • Captain Arthur Noel Edwards (Lancers) an International Polo player is killed in action at age 31. He represented England against America at Meadowbrook in 1911 and 1913. Also on the team was Captain Leslie St Clair Cheape who will be killed 1916.
  • Captain Claude Wreford Wreford-Brown DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 39. He served in the Nile Expedition and Battle of Khartoum in 1898, in the South Africa War and on the North West Frontier of India from 1906-9. He was an instructor at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and has a brother who will be killed in action in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant William Galbraith Tennant (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed at age 36. He is the son-in-law of the 5th Lord Grantley Baron of Markenfield and brother will be killed in August.
  • Lieutenant Bernard Courtenay Laws (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant H E Hobbs (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. His brother will be accidentally killed in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Spencer Henry Le Marchant (Royal Fusiliers) dies of wounds at home. He is the son of the late ‘Sir” Henry Denis 1st Baronet and the ‘Honorable’ Lady Le Marchant.
  • Company Quartermaster Sergeant Francis Richard Duncan Adamson (London Regiment) dies of wounds at age 41. He is a holder of the Long Service Medal and his son will be killed in action in September 1918 at age 21.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Bertram Cook (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother will die of wounds in July 1917.
  • Private Harold Charles Jones (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Hugh William Jones Rector of Llanferres.
  • Rifleman John Clarke (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 28. He is a member of the Aylesbury United Football Club and his brother will be killed in June 1918.

Tuesday 18 May 1915 – We Lost 729

William Throsby Bridges

William Throsby Bridges

In the battle of Festubert the British advance to the La Quinque Rue-Bethune road.  The Irish Guards attack with the support of the Hertfordshire Regiment but are held up by heavy machine gun and rifle fire after only 200 yards.

Lieutenant John George Smyth (Sikhs) is awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Richebourg L’Avoue. With a bombing party of ten men, who voluntarily undertake this duty, he convoys a supply of ninety six bombs to within twenty yards of the enemy’s position over exceptionally dangerous ground, after the attempts of two prior parties failed.  Lieutenant Smyth succeeds in taking the bombs to the desired position with the aid of two of his men (the other eight having been killed or wounded) and to achieve his purpose he has to swim a stream, being exposed the whole time to howitzer, shrapnel, machine gun and rifle fire.

Lieutenant William Murray Hutchison (King’s Liverpool Regiment) organizes and conducts an attack and leads a bombing party and by his work forces the surrender of 200 Germans and forces an additional 200 to retreat leaving behind their arms and equipment.  For his actions on the day and those two days previously he will be awarded the Military Cross.  Lieutenant Hutchison will be killed next April.

Turkish forces attack Gaba Tepe at Gallipoli.

The Greek steamer Proton under German contract to carry fuel oil to submarines operating in the Mediterranean is captured by a British warship and taken into Alexandria.

Lord Kitchener in the House of Lords insists on the importance of an adequate supply of munitions.

Today’s losses include:

  • The youngest British soldier to die on Gallipoli
  • An Australian Major General
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • The Director of the 1st Pathological Research Institute in Australia
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a member of His Majesties Body Guards
  • The Editor of the Weekly Dispatch
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Major General Sir William Throsby Bridges CMG KCB General Officer Commanding 1st Australian Division dies of wounds received on 15th May on his way through Monash Valley when he stopped near ‘Steele’s Post’. As he continues on his way he ducks around the next traverse and falls, hit in the groin by a sniper’s bullet. He is taken on board the hospital ship Gascon where he dies at age 55.  He is the first Australian General killed in the Great War and the only Australian soldier in two world wars to be brought home for burial. His son will lose his life in the Second World War in Malaya.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Fraser (commanding 4th Cameron Highlanders) is killed in action at age 50.
  • Major Basil Herbert Barrington-Kennett (Grenadier Guards) one of three sons of His Majesties Body Guards to be killed in action, dies today at age 30.
  • Major Llewellyn Morris Bucknill (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in the spine at age 32. His brother will be killed in January 1916.
  • Captain Montague Cotton (London Regiment) the Editor of the Weekly Dispatch is killed in action.
  • Captain Gordon Clunes Mackay Mathison MB DS MD DSc FRCP (Australian Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds at age 31 at Alexandria received eight days before on Gallipoli. Last month he was appointed the first Director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research Australia’s first pathological research institute. A bequest from his mother will be used to establish the Gordon Clunes Mathison Research Scholarship and the Institute.
  • Lieutenant Norman Leslie Hannon (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 20 becoming the first of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Sydney Maurice Gregory (London Rifles) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Reverend W H Gregory.
  • Second Lieutenant Harry Gustav Byng (Border Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He has a brother who will be killed in August 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Mytton (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in April next year.
  • Private Alfred Miles (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 28. His brother will die at home in August 1916.
  • Private John Cullinan (Royal Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 35 eleven days after his brother met the same fate.
  • Privates and brothers Alan Abel and Gordon Cedric Stockbridge (Hertfordshire Regiment) are killed together in action at ages 19 and 18 respectively.
  • Private Eric Osmond Collinson (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Edward Collinson Vicar of Bradford on Avon.
  • Private Alfred J Payne (Hertfordshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed next year in May.
  • Drummer Joseph Aloysius Townsend (East Lancashire Regiment) the youngest British soldier to die on Gallipoli is killed in action at age 15.

Monday 26 April 1915 – We Lost 1,609

Charles Doughty-Wylie

Charles Doughty-Wylie

In the second battle of Ypres German forces pierce the British line at Broodseinde while again the British fail to recover St Julien. “Gas Masks, Type I”, rather useless patches of blue flannel mouth covering, are distributed to the British and Canadian troops in the line. Jemadar Mir Dast (55th Rifles attached 57th Rifles IOM) is awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability at Ypres. He leads his platoon with great gallantry during the attack, and afterwards collects various parties of the regiment (when no British officers are left) and keeps them under his command until the retirement is ordered. Jemadar Mir Dast subsequently on this day displays remarkable courage in helping to carry eight British and Indian officers into safety while exposed to very heavy fire.

After his company commander has been wounded Lieutenant George Stuart Henderson (Manchester Regiment) leads his company to within 70 yards of the enemy’s trenches with great gallantry and determination and holds on through several hours of daylight and finally establishes himself there. Throughout the operations he set a final example after most of the senior officers have become casualties.  On 24th July 1920 Captain Henderson will lead his company during the Iraqi revolt in three charges against the enemy who had opened fire from the flank. At one time when the situation was extremely critical, the captain, by sheer pluck and coolness, steadied his command and prevented his company from being cut up. During the second charge he will fall wounded but refuses to leave his command and just as the company reaches the trench, he is again wounded, this time mortally. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

British airmen bomb Courtrais and various neighboring places. Second Lieutenant William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse (Royal Flying Corps) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery in flying to Courtrais and dropping bombs on the railway line near that station. On starting the return journey he is mortally wounded but succeeds in flying for thirty-five miles to his destination at a very low altitude and reports the successful accomplishment of his mission.  He will die of his wounds tomorrow at age 27. This is the first air Victoria Cross ever awarded, his aircraft is a BE2. Lieutenant Rhodes-Moorhouse had been engaged on monoplane experiments, chiefly at Huntingdon, during 1910 and 1911, and has been described as “one of the pioneers of aviation in England” and “the finest cross-country flier of his time.” He took his Pilot’s certificate after flying over 1,000 miles in October 1911 and made the first Channel flight with two passengers in August, 1912. He gave up flying after his marriage but on the outbreak of the War, received a Commission in the Royal Flying Corps. He was at first placed in charge of the workshops at South Farnborough, and then in March 1915 he transferred to the Front. His son William Henry ‘Willie’ Rhodes-Moorhouse is less than a year old when his father dies will represent England as a skier. In 1937 he will joined the Royal Air Force, flying in Bristol Blenheims, then Hawker Hurricanes with No. 601 Squadron RAF. He will be shot down and killed over Kent during the Battle of Britain in 1940, shortly after being awarded the DFC.

At Gallipoli, Hill 141 is stormed by allied forces and V beach is secured.  By nightfall more than 30,000 Allied troops are ashore on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Sedd-el-Bahr is captured, and as the Turks withdraw the landing beaches are linked, the line now encompassed the tip of the peninsula.

On Y Beach the Royal Marines commander, Colonel Godfrey E Matthews realizing that half his position has been abandoned, has no option but to withdraw despite driving off a renewed Turkish attack early this morning.  Ironically, at this moment the Turks also think that they have been beaten and retire, enabling Matthew’s detachment to get away without further loss.

Subsequent to a landing have been effected on the beach at a point on the Gallipoli Peninsula Lieutenant Colonel Charles Hotham Montagu Doughty-Wylie (Welsh Fusiliers attached as G.S.O.2 to H.Q. Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.) age 46 and Captain Garth Neville Walford age 32 (Royal Artillery) organize and lead an attack through and on both sides of the village of Sedd-en-Bahr on the old castle at the top of the hill inland. The enemy’s position is very strongly held and entrenched and defended, with concealed machine guns and pom poms. It is mainly due to the initiative of these two officers that the attack is a complete success.  Both officers are killed in the moment of victory. For their efforts both men will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

  • Doughty-Wylie was the British consul in Mersina, Turkey, during the Turkish revolution of 1909. Richard Bell-Davies (later a VC winner, then a lieutenant on the battleship HMS Swiftsure) met him at the time and gives an account in his autobiography Sailor in the Air (1967). Massacres of Armenians started along with the revolution, and Bell-Davies says that it was largely due to the efforts of Doughty-Wylie that these were halted in Mersina. Doughty-Wylie went to Adana, forty miles away. He persuaded the local Vali (Governor) to give him a small escort of Turkish troops and a bugler and with these managed to restore order. Mrs. Doughty-Wylie turned part of the dragoman’s house into a hospital for wounded Armenians. Bell-Davies says that by the time an armed party from Swiftsure arrived, Doughty-Wylie had almost stopped the massacre single-handedly. Newspaper reports of the period record that Doughty-Wylie was shot in the arm, while trying to prevent these massacres. Doughty-Wylie was the recipient of the Order of the Medjidie from the Turkish Government. He was awarded the Medjidie because of his work during the Balkan Wars when he served with the British Red Cross helping the Turkish Military. He is the only soldier to have been awarded military honors by both the British Empire and the Ottoman Empire. Doughty-Wylie is shot in the face by a sniper at age 46 and in the force attacking Gallipoli “owing to his great knowledge of things Turkish”
  • Walford is the son-in-law of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ J S Trefusis. He entered the Royal Artillery in December 1902 and he became Captain in 1914 and Brigade-Major in January 1915. When war broke out he was at the Staff College and went out to France in the middle of August being present at the Battle of the Aisne, and all the major engagements until January 1915 when he was at Ypres, serving with two batteries and holding temporary Staff appointments. He then returned to England and sailed for the Dardanelles as Brigade-Major Royal Artillery 29th

Two German batteries of artillery attack Trekkopjes at first light.  Colonel Skinner cannot reply to the German guns for his only artillery is a home-made anti-aircraft contraption, (a fifteen pounder mounted on a wagon wheel which can only shoot at the sky).  The armored car unit under Lieutenant Commander Whittall now sees action for the first time.  Moving quickly to the German flank, the armored cars’ machine guns prove decisive when the Germans put in their infantry attack.  After a five hour battle the Germans draw off, having lost fourteen dead, fourteen wounded and thirteen taken prisoner. The Union forces lose eight killed and thirty four wounded.

Lord Kitchener states that Germany has stooped to acts that vie with those of the Dervishes.  Mr. Asquith, in the House of Commons, states that reparations will be extracted from all proven to have been guilty of such acts.

The Treaty of London 1915, a secret pact between Italy and Triple Entente, is signed in London today by the Kingdom of Italy, the United Kingdom, France and Russia. According to the pact, Italy is to leave the Triple Alliance and join Triple Entente, as already stated in a secret agreement signed in London, on 5th September 1914. Furthermore, Italy is to declare war against Germany and Austria-Hungary within a month — and in fact the declaration of war will be published 23 May.

Today’s losses include:

  • Three battalion commanders
  • A Brigadier General
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • An Olympic runner
  • A winner of the Strathcona Gold Medal for shooting
  • The winner of the 1905 880 yard race in the Scotland versus Ireland games
  • Multiple men whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The grandson of a General
  • Multiple First Class cricket players
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The heir to the 1st and last Baron Kirkley
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The Assistant Master at St Mark’s School
  • A noted Rugby football player
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Brigadier General James Foster Riddell (149th Brigade, 50th Division) is killed in action at St Julien at age 52. He is shot through the head at a point about one hundred fifty yards south of Vanheule Farm. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Henry Scott.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry William Ernest Hitchins (commanding 1st Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 49. He is the only son of the late Major General Henry White Hitchins and the grandson of Lieutenant General Bejamin Hitchins.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frank Robert Rennick (commanding 40th Pathans) is killed.
  • Captain Percy d’Aguilar Banks (Queen Victoria’s Own Corps of Guides attached 57th Wilde Rifles) is killed at age 29. He played first class cricket for Somerset in 1903 and 08.
  • Captain Edward Nugent Bankes (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the Honorable Lalage Letitaa Caroline Vivian Bankes and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain William George Henry Bates (Leinster Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Wheatley Bates.
  • Captain Herbert Quintus Irwin (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Edward Irwin.
  • Captain George Amelius Crawshay Sandeman (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is a first class cricketer for Hampshire and Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Captain George Neville Mackie (Sikh Frontier Force) is killed at age 31. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel William Mackie JP and a South African War veteran. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force in April 1941.
  • Flight Lieutenant Stephen Medlicott (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally killed testing an airplane at home at age 22. He is the grandson of the Reverend Joseph Medlicott.
  • Lieutenant William Black Noble (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. He is the son and heir to the 1st and last Baron Kirkley.
  • Lieutenant Colin McDiarmid Allardice (Sikhs) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Richmond Garton (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. His younger brother will be killed on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916.  His fiancé Una Tomlin Hunter also lost two brothers in the same action. Captains George Edward Hunter age 28 and Howard Tomlin Hunter, 26 (Northumberland Fusiliers) are both killed.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick William Polehampton (Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 42 the day after he arrived in France. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Polehampton Rector of Hartfield.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Lancelot Rolleston (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Humphry Davy Rolleston, GCVO, KCB, 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Robert Blackett (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend William Robert Blackett Rector of Smethcote.
  • Sergeant Joseph Byrne (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in two days.
  • Lance Corporal W Paramore (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brothers will be killed in March and April 1918.
  • Private Leonard John Ricketts (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Albert Herbert (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 20. He is the Assistant Master at St Mark’s School and his two brothers will be killed on the same day in October 1917 serving in different regiments.
  • Private Bert Arthur Presant (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 16. He won the Strathcona Gold Medal at Toronto for shooting and at the Cadet School.
  • Rifleman George Thomas Haffenden (London Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in June 1916 and their father will take his own life after the death of his two sons.
  • Private Peter Galt (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William Davidson Anderson (Saskachewan Regiment) dies of wounds. He is an Olympic athlete who competed in the 1906 games in the 400 and 800 meters. He won the 1905 880 yard race in the Scotland versus Ireland games.

On Gallipoli the Australians continue to suffer heavy casualties.

  •  Major Richard Saker (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 37. He is a veteran of the South African War and his brother was killed last October.
  • Lieutenant Alan Morris Crawford Couve (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in action. His brother will be killed two weeks.
  • Lieutenant Robert Bernard (Royal Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the son of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable J H Bernard DD Archbishop of Dublin.
  • Private Philip Zahnleiter (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. His older brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Thomas Stephen Downes (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Rifleman Frederick Eve (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in exactly one year to the day next 26 April.

Heavy losses are also reported by the King’s Own Scottish Borderers.

  •  Captain Maurice Andrew Noel Becher is killed at age 30. He is the only son of Major General Andrew Craycroft Becher. Captain Becher was gazetted to the King’s Own Scottish Borderers in 1905, and was promoted Captain in 1914. He was in India when the war broke out and left with his Regiment for Ismailia, in October 1914. After being there for six or eight weeks, during which time there was no fighting, he returned with the Regiment to England. In March 1915 they were ordered to the Dardanelles, with the 29th
  • Captain Alexander Stewart Cooper is killed at age 33. He is the son of the late W S Cooper JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Alexander Grant Miller is killed at age 21. He is a noted Rugby Football player and his brother will be killed in July 1917.  They are sons of the Reverend Thomas Duncan Miller and grand nephew of the late General ‘Sir’ Archibald Galloway Buchanan.
  • Lance Corporal John Nixon is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Peter McDonnell (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 42. His two brothers will be killed together in less than one month serving in the same regiment.

Friday 13 November 1914 – We Lost 254

 

Herbert Kitchener

Herbert Kitchener

Sanctuary Wood is shelled during this night while being used to screen troops behind the front line.

The British 8th Division is deployed to the front providing much needed reinforcement.

Today’s losses include:

  • A former Aide de camp to Lord Kitchener
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead
  • A Swinton Town Football Club player
  • Grandson of the 9th Lord Digby
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • The brother of a ‘war poet’
  • Son of a General
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of General
  • Brother-in-law killed later in the war
  • Nephew of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Colonel Raymond John Marker DSO (Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, I Army Corps Headquarters) on the General Staff dies of wounds at Boulogne received 4 November at age 47. His body is one of the few repatriated to England for burial during the War. He is the son of Richard Marker JP and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Marker and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Thomas Jackson 1st Baronet. He is the grandson of the 9th Lord Digby and during the South African War served as Aide de Camp to Lord Kitchener. His brother-in-law Claude Stewart Jackson will be killed in October 1917.

  •  Captain Charles James Lyon(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the youngest of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.  The first was killed in the first month of the war while the oldest, a war poet, will be killed in May 1915.
  • Captain Robert Guy Incledon Chichester(Highland Light Infantry) the son of the late Reverend Richard Chichester the Rector of Drewsteignton is killed at age 41. He served on the North West Frontier 1897-8 and South African War.
  • Captain William Ernest Rogerson (Durham Light Infantry) dies of heart failure at age 42 at home. He is the son-in-law of Lieutenant General W H Mackesy.
  • Captain John Alexander Halliday (Hussars) died of wounds at Le Touquet at age 39 received 31 October Messines. He is the nephew of R Howell Brown Vicar of Enfield and a member of MCC.
  • Captain Archibald William Roberson-Glasgow (Garhwal Rifles Indian Army) is killed at age 34. He is the son of R B Robertson-Glasgow DL and his wife is the niece of Lady Robertson of Forteviot. He served in the Somaliland Campaign in 1901.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Archibald Loyd (Scots Guards) is killed at Zonnebeke by shrapnel at age 24. He is the son of A K Loyd KC MP North Berks.
  • Lieutenant David Scott Dodgson(Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 29 when he is shot by a sniper while attempting to lay cable for his battery at Gorre. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ David Scott Dodgson KCB.
  • Lieutenant N Ramsay (Dragoon Guards attached Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Humfrey Richard Talbot (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 25 after his trench is hit by a shell killing and wounding many men. He attends to the wounds of his men despite his own wounds before dying. He is the son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead, Gustavus Talbot.
  • Private Edwin Charles Waite (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Private William Arthur Brewer (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is a member of the Swinton Town Football Club.
  • Boy George Leonard Hamshire (HMS Shannon) dies on service at age 16. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Saturday 7 November 1914 – We Lost 741

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Tsing-tau falls to British and Japanese forces and two thousand three hundred prisoners are taken. The British casualties during the siege are 2 officers wounded, 12 men killed, and 61 wounded. Numerous congratulatory messages are exchanged between the British and the Japanese. Lord Kitchener sends his felicitations to the Japanese Minister of War at Tokyo: “Please accept my warmest congratulations on the success of the operations against Tsing-tau. Will you be so kind as to express my felicitations to the Japanese forces engaged? The British Army is proud to have been associated with its gallant Japanese comrades in this enterprise”.

Two American companies accept orders from the British Admiralty for twelve flying boats.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  A Victoria Cross winner
  • A grandson of the first victim of the India Mutiny
  • A man whose uncle was killed in the South African Wara
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • A grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Cousin of a General
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who had two brothers lose their lives in the service of King & Country before the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A cousin of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a former Lord Mayor of London
  • A man who played one first class cricket match for Worcestershire

 Today’s highlighted casualties is

 At Zillebeke, Belgium, when leading an attack against the Germans under very heavy fire, Captain John Franks Vallentin (South Staffordshire Regiment) is struck down and on rising to continue the attack and immediately killed at age 32. The capture of the enemy’s trenches which immediately follows is in a great measure due to the confidence which the men have in their captain, arising from his many previous acts of great bravery and ability. For his actions Captain Vallentin will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. He also served in the South Africa War. Vallentin is the nephew of the noted naturalist Rupert Vallentin. His grandfather ‘Sir’ James Vallentin was Knight Sheriff of London, and his cousin Archibald Thomas Pechey, the lyricist and author, adapted the family name for his nom-de-plune ‘Valentine’. His grandfather Colonel Finnis was the first victim of the Indian Mutiny and another uncle, Major Valentin was killed in the South African War.

  •  Captain Arnold Stearns Nesbitt (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is a cricketer who played one first class match for Worcestershire in 1914.
  • Captain Richard Alexander Noel Smyth (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend J Coke Vicar of Ilebrewers near Taunton Somerset the former Principal and Chaplain of the Lawrence Military Asylum, Sanawar India.
  • Captain Beauchamp Oswald Duff(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Beauchamp GCB commander of the Army in India and Lady Duff.  He had served in the Waziristan and Somaliland campaigns 1901-4.
  • Captain Lionel Alfred Francis Cane(East Lancashire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on an enemy trench at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Granger Cane of Great Paxton Vicarage, St Neots Hunts and 1st cousin to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby KCB.
  • Captain Edward Basil Chichester (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and has had two brothers previously die in the service of their King one dying on service in 1898 and the second being killed in 1902 in Somaliland.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Alexander Goldsmid (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the second cousin of ‘Sir’ Julian Goldsmid Baronet and related to ‘Sir’ Isaac Francis Goldsmid Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Jessie Marson Atkin(Sherwood Foresters attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed in May 1918. Lieutenant Atkin is the son of Mr H Atkin, New Westwood and entered The University College, Nottingham in the session 1910 – 11.  While at college he passed the final examinations of the Bachelor of Arts Degree of London. He received his military training under Captain Trotman in the Officers Training Corps, passing ‘A’ and ‘B’ Military examinations.  At the completion of his college career he applied and was accepted for the special reserve of officers.  A touching incident in connection with the announcement of his death is that his sister who was employed at the Jacksdale Post Office was the one to receive the message informing the family of his death.  
  • Lieutenant Reginald Nigel Gipps (Scots Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Reginald Gipps GCB.
  • Lieutenant John Beauclerk Vandeleur(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Colonel J S Vandeleur CB.
  • Second Lieutenant Gillachrist Moore (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Norman Moore the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Hutton(Leicestershire Regiment attached Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Henry Hutton Rector of West Heslerton.
  • Second Lieutenant James Neil Grant McGrigor (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds in London received 24 October at age 19. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James McGrigor.
  • Second Lieutenant Murray Stuart Pound (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received 21 October at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ John Lulham Pound the 2nd Baronet and grandsons of ‘Sir’ John Pound Baronet Lord Mayor of London 1904-5.
  • Sergeants and brothers Alfred James (age 29) and William John Cogan age 33 (Bedfordshire Regiment) are killed together. A third brother will be killed in next March.
  • Sergeant William Peart (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother Henry will also lose his life in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Jake Clarke Andrews (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Percy Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed next August on Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Lamond (Black Watch) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Ernest Herbert Bygrave (Bedfordshire Regiment) becomes the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War. They are sons of the late Reverend Joseph Hutton.
  • Private William Gray(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 18.  His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Drummer George Edward Ransom (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private William Cowan Fulton (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Patrick O’Connell (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother John will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Samuel Hateley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.                                                                                                                                                  

photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 26 September 1914 – We Lost 210

Britons Your Country

The King, Queen and Lord Kitchener inspect 140,000 recruits at Aldershot.

The first Indian Army units disembark at Marseilles. Churchill visits ‘Sir’ John French and the British 1st Division which is in action at Chivy.

The 42nd (East Lancashire) Territorial Division lands in Egypt.

The German siege of Antwerp begins.

At 07:25 Lieutenant Colonel R C Grant, after a long night’s ride to Sandfontein, German South West Africa, finds Captain Welby’s force safe, but before his men can dismount, a message arrives from a lookout on the kopje that a German column is advancing from the northeast.  At the same time it is discovered that the telephone line to Raman’s Drift has been cut.  Grant scampers to the top of the kopje and sees another German column advancing at the gallop from the east while still another is coming from the west. Lieutenant F B Adler, commanding the artillery, opens fire at 08:00 from 4,000 yards. A four-gun German battery replies, and half an hour later a second battery comes into action from 3,000 yards. Casualties mount among the South Africans. The German force is estimated to be ten times that of the South Africans. At 10:30 a direct hit by a German shell destroys one gun and kills the battery sergeant major. All the artillerymen are killed or wounded. Two wounded gunners work the remaining gun.  At 11:00 the Germans add two more field pieces; ten guns now pound the South Africans.  Lieutenant Adler fights at his last gun until it runs out of ammunition, and then he destroys it, and takes the survivors of his section to join the riflemen on the kopje. At 13:00 there is a lull in the fighting while the Germans eat lunch and improve their positions. An hour later the battle resumes.  Lieutenant Colonel Grant is severely wounded and for a time Captain Welby assumes command. The Germans launch an infantry attack, but are thrown back.  Still, by 17:00 they have worked within 1,200 yards of the kopje and all of their artillery is focused on the South African Infantry. The exploding shells fling enormous rocks into the air and send great boulders rolling down the hill. Grant, his wounds tended, resumes command, but the situation is hopeless and at 18:00 he raises the white flag. Then a curious thing happens. The firing stops just as the sun is setting, and thirsty men from both sides run for the wells at the foot of the kopje. South Africans and Germans mingle, says one soldier, “as if never a shot had been fired”.  The South Africans suffer sixty-seven casualties, 22% of their strength, including sixteen killed or mortally wounded. The German losses are almost as great, sixty total casualties, of who fourteen are killed.  Thus the first attempt to establish an Allied force on South West African soil ends in defeat and surrender.  Three hundred South Africans surrender along with two guns to 2,000 Germans with 10 guns 24 miles inside the German colony.

Today’s losses include:

  • An Irish International hockey player
  • Grandson of a man who died at Vitoria, Spain serving in the 7th Foot British Legion during the First Carlist War
  • Man whose widow will lose three brothers in the war
  • A man whose daughter will be born on New Year’s Eve
  • Multiple examples of men who had brothers killed in the South African War
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two sons
  • The son of a General
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain Napier Charles Gordon Cameron (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 37. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ William Gordon Cameron GCB and son-in-law of Captain Harry Brooke DL. His brother died in 1908 at age 37 as a result of wounds he received in 1900 during the South African War. His wife is the great granddaughter of ‘Sir’ Arthur Brooke Baronet and his daughter will be born next New Year’s Eve. He is a veteran of the South African War and his wife will lose three brothers in the war including Victoria Cross winner James Anson Otho Brooke.

  •  Lieutenant William Ormsby Wyndham Ball(Royal Army Medical Corps attached South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed by a shell at Soupir while attending to wounded at age 24. He represented Ireland in six International Hockey matches in 1910 and 1911. His step-brother Captain James Thomson Seeds died on service in the South African War.
  • Among the casualties at Sandfontein is Lieutenant Francis Louis Northway (South African Mounted Rifles) who is killed at age 40. His brother was killed serving in the Canadian Mounted Rifles in South Africa on 2nd November 1900.
  • Second Lieutenant John Dundas Manley (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 22. He is the great grandson of Major Robert Thomas Dundas 7th Foot British Legion who died of fever the day before Christmas at Vitoria Spain serving in the First Carlist War.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Caldwell Sills (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 22. He is a member of the MCC.
  • Private Frederick James Aylwin (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 28. His younger brother will die in Salonika three days after the Armistice.
  • Private Frederick Ronald Lock (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in the sinking of HMS Monmouth in November.
  • Private Edward William Langford (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at home at age 23. His brother will die of wounds next June.