Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Hill 60

Sunday 29 August 1915 – We Lost 296

Robert Reginald Pittendrigh

Robert Reginald Pittendrigh

The submarine C29 (Lieutenant William Robert Schofield age 27)  and the trawler Ariadne are carrying out anti U-boat duties off the Outer Dowsing Light Vessel off the Humber in the North Sea.  The submarine is under tow and in telephone contact with the trawler when it strays into a mined area and strikes a mine killing her crew of seventeen. The loss of C29 brings an end to trawler/submarine operations.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • The son of a Deputy Inspector General
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • One son of a family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • One son of a family that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose a second son in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Major John Noble Jephson (Royal Munster Fusiliers) dies of wounds on Mudros at age 50. He is the son of the late Deputy Inspector General William Holmes Jephson MD and on his own initiative captured an important post on the Dardanelles (afterwards called ‘Jephson’s Post’) where he was wounded.
  • Captain Walcot Harmood-Banner (South Wales Borderers) is killed in action at age 33. He is the son of ‘Sir’ J S Harmood-Banner, Member of Parliament.
  • Lieutenant Wilfrid Smyth-Osbourne (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed on HMS Invincible at the Battle of Jutland in 1916 they are sons of J S Smyth-Osborne JP DL.
  • Second Lieutenant Owen Whitaker MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is shot in the head by a sniper at age 20. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Sergeant Cyril Humphreys (Australian Light Horse) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Humphrey Humphreys Rector of Herllan.
  • Corporal Robert Reginald Pittendrigh (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received one week earlier when he and Chaplain Andrew Gillison have attempted to rescue a wounded man on Hill 60 when the bushes on the ground have caught on fire. Prior to joining the service he was a clergyman.
  • Private Patrick Conlon (Connaught Rangers) is killed. He is one of four brothers who will lose their lives in the war.
  • Private William Fishburn Donkin Smith (Canadian Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 26. He is the middle of three sons of Canon George Herbert Smith of Madras who will lose their lives.

Saturday 28 August 1915 – We Lost 398

Charles Alfred Lister

Charles Alfred Lister

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the 4th Baron Ribblesdale
  • The son of a Baronet
  • A Chaplain
  • The son of a New Zealand Jurist
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Two brothers killed together
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

Sub Lieutenant Charles Alfred Lister (Hood Battalion, Royal Naval Division) the son of the 4th Baron Ribblesdale, dies of his third wound of the war at Gallipoli at age 27.  A secretary in His Majesties Diplomatic Service he joined other Sub Lieutenants Rupert Brooke, Patrick Houston Shaw-Stewart, Frederick Septimus Kelly, Bernard Freyberg & John Bigelow Dodge when the call went out to join the military. His brother-in-law Percy Lyulph Wyndham was killed in September 1914.

  • Major Francis William Lindley Gull (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 28.He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Cameron Gull 2nd
  • Chaplain ‘the Reverend’ William Grant (attached Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action at age 56 while looking for wounded in captured trenches close to Hill 60.
  • Second Lieutenant Desmond Fosbury Kettle (Auckland Mounted Rifles, NZEF) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 34. He is the son of Judge Charles Kettle.
  • Brothers Trooper Edward Guise Brittan and Lance Corporal Henry Bertram Brittan (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) are killed together at Gallipoli. Edward dies at age 24, while Henry is killed at 27. A third brother will be killed in action in April 1918.
  • Private Walter Thomas Dowsell (Royal Berkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at home received in action at age 29. His brother was killed earlier in the month.
  • Trooper Charles Cyril Milling (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed in Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Matthew John Tyne Milling Vicar of Ashton Keynes.
  • Trooper Bernard Reginald John Deane (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Henry John Deane Vicar of Isle Brewers.

Monday 23 August 1915 – We Lost 320

Australians continue to fight at the Battle of Hill 60.

Today’s losses include:

  • The grandson of an Alderman
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed later in the Great War
  • An amateur golf champion
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Grandson of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain George Owen Green (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the grandson of Alderman George Green.
  • Captain Allan Bonville Hay-Webb (Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds received in action on Gallipoli at age 29. He was wounded in December 1914 in France and served in the Abor Expedition 1911-12. His brother will be killed in December 1916.
  • Captain Geoffrey Makins MVO (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 37. He served in the South African War. His brother will be killed in November of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Ashley Maude (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) a barrister and amateur golf champion is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of the late Frederick William Maude JP and the grandson of Colonel ‘Sir’ George Ashley Maude and ‘Sir’ John Kelk the 1st

Sunday 22 August 1915 – We Lost 895

Andrew Gillison

Andrew Gillison

Captain Chaplain 4th Class Andrew Gillison is waiting to read the burial service over the bodies of some of the men who have fallen in the attack on Hill 60 when he hears someone groaning in the scrub on the ridge.  He at once calls on Corporal Robert Reginald Pittendrigh, another clergyman, and a man name Wild. The three crawl forward and reach the wounded man and begin to drag him when a Turkish sniper opens fire and severely wounds the two clergymen.  Chaplain Gillsion age 47 dies three hours later while corporal Pittendrigh will die one week later.  Chaplain Gillison’s cousin was killed in April 1915 landing at Gallipoli.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Chaplain
  • Two battalion commanders
  • An England Rugby International
  • A Scotland Rugby International
  • A Harlequins Rugby footballer
  • A Western Suburbs fullback
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • The son of a Bombay Jurist
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple families that will lose a second son in the Great War
  • A man who will have two brothers killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Lionel Arthur Bosanquet (commanding 9th Sherwood Foresters) is killed by machine gun fire in Dead Man’s Gully near Chocolate Hill while leading his regiment with orders to take it at all costs at age 53 on Gallipoli. He is the eldest son of the late Arthur Bosanquet JP of Cleddon Hall, Monmouth and a Judge for the Bombay Presidency.  He is the son-in-law of the Reverend John Erskine Campbell-Colquhoun JP DL of Killermont and Parscadden, Dumbarton. Colonel Bosanquet was gazetted to the Sherwood Foresters in 1883 was promoted Captain in 1892 and Major in 1903. He served in the Tirah Campaign 1897-8, and took part in the operations of the Bazar Valley in the action of Dargai and in the capture of Arhanga and Sanpagha Passes, receiving the medal with two clasps. He retired in 1911. Rejoining his Regiment on the outbreak of the War, he sailed for the Dardanelles in June 1915 as Colonel of the 9th Battalion which he had himself trained.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Fletcher Broadrick (commanding 6th Border Regiment) is killed at age 45.
  • Captain Frank Cecil Clegg (Border Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 27. His older brother has been killed fifteen days earlier while serving in the Lancashire Fusiliers also at Gallipoli.
  • Captain Francis Robert Leslie Lowth (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Captain Leonard Robinson (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend John Henry Robinson.
  • Captain Roger Francis Draper (York and Lancashire Regiment attached Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Captain Arthur James Dingle (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli when shot in the head at age 23. He earned 3 rugby caps for England and was the son of the Reverend Arthur Treharne Dingle Rector of Eaglescliffe who will lose another son in May 1916.
  • Lieutenant William Middleton Wallace (Rifle Brigade attached Royal Flying Corps) is shot down and killed as an observer while engaged in photo reconnaissance at age 22. He was considered one of the best schoolboy athletes of his day and received his Rugby ‘Blue’ for Cambridge. He represented Scotland against England in 1913 and 1914 and also against Wales in 1914.
  • Lieutenant Clarence Ernest Wand Tetley (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. He gained his Oxford Hockey half blue and played for the Harlequins Rugby 1st XV from 1909-1912.
  • Second Lieutenant Hubert Arthur Hamilton (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Staples of St Matthew’s Vicarage, St Albans Christchurch.
  • In their advance on Scimitar Hill inland from Suvla Second Lieutenant Thomas Wood Rutherford (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Rutherford.
  • Lance Sergeant David Shields (Yorkshire Regiment) is also killed at age 40. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Isaac Roberts (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will die on service in October 1918.
  • Private George Duffin (Australian Infantry) is killed on the dawn attach on Hill 60 at age 29 three days after landing on Gallipoli. He was Western Suburbs’ first fullback in 1908.

Saturday 21 August 1915 – We Lost 1,657

John Peniston MIlbanke VC

John Peniston MIlbanke VC

The 11th and 29th Divisions and the 2nd South Midland Mounted Brigade attack Green Hill and Chocolate Hill.  Although pressed with great resolution, the front line does not move.

Australians take part in the First Battle of Hill 60. In the Battle of Scimitar Hill, the Suvla forces attack the hills immediately north of Hill 60. They succeed in capturing half of the hill.  Intense machine-gun, rifle and shellfire set fire to the bushes on the ground at Hill 60 across which the allies are attacking.  The flames, reaching some of the dead or wounded, ignite their clothing and explode their bombs and rifle ammunition, and the pieces of burning cloth or wood are flung about, starting more fires.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 5th Earl of Longford
  • Two Victoria Cross winners
  • A Brigadier General
  • A Baronet
  • Three battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A former Aide de Camp to John French
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of the Head Master of ‘Sir’ George Monoux School
  • An International Cricket player
  • A Norfolk Cricket player
  • A steeplechase and polo players
  • A member of the Eton Exelsior Rowing Club and Eton Football Club
  • A member of the Aylesbury Football Club
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Brothers killed together
  • A brother-in-law of the editor of the Christchurch Star

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • When the initial attack by the 29th Division fails the Yeomanry are ordered to advance in the open across a dry salt lake. Raked by shrapnel fire many of the brigades halt in the shelter of Green Hill but Brigadier General Thomas Pakenham, the 5th Earl of Longford, KP, MVO, General Officer Commanding 2nd (South Midland) Mounted Brigade, 2nd Mounted Division leads his brigade in a charge which captures the summit of the hill. He is killed at age 50.
  • Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Peniston Milbanke VC (Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) the 10th Baronet and winner of the Victoria Cross at Colensburg during the South Africa War on 5th January 1900 is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 42. He is the elder son of the late ‘Sir’ Peniston Milbanke 9th Baronet DL JP for Sussex, and of Elizabeth Margaret, daughter of the Honorable Richard Denman. He succeeded as 10th Baronet in 1899 and married in 1900, Amelia (Leila), only daughter of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Charles and Lady Madeline Crichton, and leaves two sons. Colonel Milbanke joined the Sussex Militia in 1890 and was gazetted to the Hussars in 1892. He served with them in Ireland until the outbreak of the South African War, during which he acted as ADC to ‘Sir’ John French. At Colesburg on 5th January 1900, just before the memorable occasion on which the Suffolks were captured, he was out with a reconnoitring party of the Hussars, when, the horse of one of the men having been ridden to a standstill, he, being already severely wounded, rode back through a heavy fire, picked up the man, put him on his own horse and brought him safely in. Unfortunately, on arrival, he was unconscious from loss of blood and could not communicate the information he had gathered.  For his actions, while home on sick leave after his wound, he was awarded the Victoria Cross by Queen Victoria. This was the last public duty she performed before her death. He was also mentioned in Despatches and received the Queen’s Medal and two clasps. After the South African War he served with the Hussars in India.  He retired from the Army in 1910 but rejoined on the outbreak of the War, taking over the command of the Sherwood Rangers in October 1914. He left England with the Regiment in April 1915, and is killed three days after arriving on the Peninsula. At the time of his death he had just received a communication offering him a Brigade.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Maxmillian David Francis Wood DSO (commanding 9th West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at ge 42. He played cricket for the Europeans versus India and for Hampshire.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Gurney Sheppard DSO (commanding Hertfordshire Yeomanry) dies of wounds at Chocolate Hill on Gallipoli at age 50. He is a South Africa War veteran where he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.
  • Major Ernest Reginald Woodwark (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son of the late Alderman Woodwark JP.
  • Captain Ambrose Moody (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Herbert Moody Rector of Bentley. Captain Hugh George Nevile (South Wales Borderers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 36. His brother will be killed next February.
  • Captain Charles Campbell Henderson-Hamilton (Cameronians) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. His brother will be killed next month and they are sons of Reverend Charles Greenhill Henderson-Hamilton late rector of St Mary’s Hamilton.
  • Captain Gerald Robert O’Sullivan VC (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) leads his company through a hurricane of fire onto the crest of Hill 70, only to be forced back by enfilading artillery fire. Some 400 yards beneath the hilltop he gathers together the survivors in a gully and urges them to make ‘one more charge for the honour of the Old Regiment’. According to the Inniskilling history, ‘every man who could, responded and a little band of fifty rushed against the crest. Of that band only one, a wounded sergeant, came back’. Gerald O’Sullivan’s 26 year old body will never be found and his name is engraved on the Helles Memorial.
  • Captain George Gardner (Empress of India’s Lancers, Indian Army attached Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Gardner.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Lewis Kennaway (Dorset Yeomanry) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Lewis Kennaway Vicar of Tarrant Crawford and he played for Norfolk in the 1904 Minor Counties Cricket Championship.
  • Lieutenant Wolfred Reeve Cloutman (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 25 rescuing a sergeant whom he carried on his shoulder 45 feet up a ladder from the bottom of a mine. As soon as the sergeant is lifted off the Lieutenant falls to the bottom overcome by gas.
  • Lieutenant John Reginald Lingard (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. He is the only child of Thomas Dewhurst Lingard JP for the County of Westmorland.
  • Lieutenant Frank Basil Goodall (Border Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of effects from gassing in November 1917. Lieutenant Lingard was gazetted to the Manchester Regiment on the outbreak of the war and was afterwards attached to the Lancashire Fusiliers. He went to Alexandria in June 1915, and after a few days proceeded to Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Philip Hugh Gore Roberts (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend William Walter Roberts.
  • Second Lieutenant Esmond Theodore Allpass (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Alfred Allpass former head of ‘Sir’ George Monoux School who will lose another son in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Hugh Bagnall Gething (Royal Gloucestershire Hussars) is killed at age 31. He is a well-known steeplechase rider and polo player. Lieutenant Gething was sent out with his Regiment first to Alexandria, and from there to the Dardanelles in this month being killed a few days after landing. His Regiment is ordered to advance across a stretch of about a mile and a half of open country. They have only just started when heavy shell fire is opened on them, and they begin to suffer heavy casualties. He survives almost the whole way across and has just faced forward again, after turning to say a few encouraging words to his men, when he is hit by shrapnel and killed instantaneously.
  • Second Lieutenant Percy Thomas Jordan (Inniskilling Fusiliers) who is killed at age 22. He is the son of Canon Jordan Rector of Magherafelt.
  • Sergeant Frederick Palmer (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 29. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Norman Atholston Robieson (Wellington Mounted Rifles) dies at sea on a hospital ship off Gallipoli at age 31. He is the brother-in-law of the editor of the Christchurch Star.
  • Lance Corporal Nolan Sustins age 25 and his brother Trooper Leon Sustins (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) age 21 are both killed at Hill 60, Anzac.
  • Private Edwin Allen (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. His brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Brothers Bertram (age 30) and Cyril (age 21) Legge both serving in the Dorsetshire Regiment are killed together on Gallipoli.
  • Trooper Herbert Henry Hiley (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. He is a well-known member of the Eton Excelsior Rowing Club and the Windsor & Eton Football Club.
  • Private James Fletcher (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Dennis Arthur Horne (Buckinghamshire Hussars) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is a member of the Aylesbury United Football Club.
  • Private Arthur Scott (York and Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 25 two months after his brother died at home on service.

Thursday 12 August 1915 – We Lost 688

Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp

Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp

This morning three infantry battalions of the 163rd Brigade (1st/5th Norfolk, 1st/5th Suffolk and 1st/8th Hampshire) are occupying trenches, running south from the right of the 10th Division.  They have occupied these positions since the early morning yesterday, and they have experienced artillery fire and a certain amount of sniping; they are also suffering from a shortage of water and great difficulty has been experienced in getting water to them. At 13:15, orders are received at Brigade HQ, which is still situated at the beach, to advance and clear the area around Anafarta Spur of snipers. Brigade is informed that the advance is to commence at 16:00 and instructions are sent to Colonel ‘Sir’ Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp 6th Baronet CB (Commanding Officer of the 1st/5th Norfolk – who is in local command of the Brigade in the trenches) to order the Brigade to be ready at 16:00.  By 15:25 Brigade Headquarters has moved from the beach and established itself on the forward line of trenches near the Headquarters of the Suffolk Regiment.  Here Staff Officers are dismayed to hear that the orders to be ready to advance at 16:00 have not been received by the Suffolk or the Hampshire Regiments. Not with standing this breakdown in communication, the planned naval bombardment commences precisely at 16:00.  The Brigade attack commences at 16:40, units advancing in a line running approximately north and south in the following order: from north to south Suffolk Regiment – with the Norfolk Regiment in support in rear of the Suffolk Regiment then the Hampshire and remaining members of the Norfolk Regiment.

The attack is delayed but the bombardment, predominantly naval, is on time – though largely ineffective as heavy explosives rather than shrapnel is employed, and the targets have not been clearly specified, though the noise would certainly have been comforting for the waiting British troops.  The advance starts at approximately 16:45 and almost immediately the Norfolk Regiment makes a half-turn to the right resulting in a separation of forces and confusion.  After about 1,000 yards advance across the plain (difficult, thorny scrub, ditches and dry watercourse) the Brigade is subjected to devastating enfilade fire (machine guns and small arms from the left, from the direction of Kidney Hill, and shelling, shrapnel from the right, from the direction of the W Hills; but the firing is less ferocious from the front allowing the advance to progress, although many men fall to sniper fire from well concealed positions hidden in the scrub and low well-leafed trees(stunted oaks).  Some elements of the Norfolk Regiment on the right outpace the Hampshire Regiment in the center and the Suffolk Regiment on the left.  The confusion is increased by the scrub being set on fire by shell fire and the chaotic advance continues unsupported through thick smoke, component forces getting split, disorientated and attacked by defending Turks; resulting in many casualties killed and wounded. The men, weak through lack of sleep and water become exhausted and the attack slows. Some (notably a number of the Norfolks) press on and, getting beyond the Turkish line are dealt with by the defending forces.  The attack halts and a rallying position is established in the sunken track near the Anafarta wells Anafarta Plain looking towards Tekke Teppe.

The advance of the 163rd Brigade fails for familiar reasons: inadequate preparation, complete absence of reconnaissance, failure to identify objectives, ineffective artillery bombardment, lack of experience of the troops, inefficiency – indeed possible incompetence of leaders and, very importantly, the resolute resistance of the Turkish defenders.  As a result of the failure of the Brigade’s attack the major offensive towards Tekke Teppe by the 54th Division, planned for dawn tomorrow is cancelled.

Bauchop’s Hill, Table Top, and a considerable salient covering Argyl Dere have all been captured by the Allies.  At the south end of the line Lone Pine is secured by the 1st Australian Division but Baby 700, Chunuk Bair and Hill 60 (on the Suvla side) are still in enemy hands.

Flight Commander Charles H K Edmonds (Royal Naval Air Service) flies from the Gulf of Xeros (HMS Ben my Chree) to attack Turkish shipping and becomes the first man to torpedo and sink shipping from the air.

Production on the first tank is begun: No 1 Lincoln or Tritton Machine will be called ‘Little Willie’.

The government orders 1,000 Stokes mortars the first 20 of which will be delivered on 6th September and sent to France on 11th September.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet and his nephew
  • Two sons of Baronets
  • Two battalion commanders
  • The first mountaineer to scale Mount Aspiring in New Zealand
  • Two members of the premier sail making family in England
  • A film actor and director
  • The father of actress Dorothy Holmes-Gore
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A bronze medal Olympic rower
  • A staff member of the Winnipeg Telegraph
  • A rugby footballer
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A man who will lose three brothers in service of King and Country
  • Multiple men who will have two brothers killed in the Great WSar
  • Three brothers killed together
  • Multiple examples of men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Among those killed in the attack of the 163rd Brigade are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Horace George Proctor-Beauchamp CB the 6th Baronet and his nephew Second Lieutenant Montagu Barclay Granville Proctor-Beauchamp (Norfolk Regiment) age 22 son of the Reverend ‘Sir’ Montagu H Proctor-Beauchamp the 7th
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Morriss Armes (commanding 5th Suffolk Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Brothers Captain Edward Randall Cubitt (Norfolk Regiment) and Lieutenant Victor Murray Cubitt are both killed. Edward dies at age 30, while Victor is only 27. They are the sons of E G Cubitt JP who will lose another son in April 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Randall Burroughs a cousin of the Cubitts is also killed. Captain Frank Reginald Beck MVO is killed at age 54. He was instrumental in the formation of the Sandringham Company of Volunteers.
  • His nephew Lieutenant Albert Edward Alexander Beck MC (Norfolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. His brothers will be killed in April and August 1917.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Martyr Ward (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend John Martyr Ward Rector of Gressenhall.
  • Lieutenant Marcus Francis Oliphant (Norfolk Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Francis George Oliphant.
  • Another set of brothers Captains Donald White Ratsey age 31 and Clayton Ratsay (Hampshire Regiment) age 29 are also killed at Suvla Bay. They command C and D companies respectively.  Their younger brother Lieutenant Stephen Gilbert Ratsey will be killed in April 1917 in Palestine.  For hundreds of years the family has been considered the premier sail makers in England.
  • Captain Arthur Holmes-Gore (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is a film actor and director and father of the actress Dorothy Holmes-Gore. He is an actor/director on both the stage and movies in Great Britain and the United States. He appeared in a total of eight movies including The Prisoner of Zenda and directed three movies in 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Laurence Charles Watson (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of wounds in April 1917.
  • Also killed in the Hampshire Regiment today are three brothers serving together. Riflemen Edward George Urry (35) and his younger brothers Frederick Albert (21) and William Henry Urry (26) are killed as they advance across Kuchak Anafarta Ova on Gallipoli. The family’s tragedy on this day does not end with their deaths as Edward’s brother-in-law Rifleman William Richardson of the same Regiment is killed in the same action at age 21.
  • Rifleman Reginald Robert Sibbick (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed last month also on Gallipoli.
  • Rifleman Philip Gilbert (Hampshire) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Rifleman Adolphus Roy Ballard (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He has three cousins (all brothers) who will be killed later in the War.

Also lost on Gallipoli

  • Major Bernard Head (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 39. He is a mountaineer who was the first to scale Mount Aspiring New Zealand in 1909 which is the central figure feature of Mount Aspiring National Park.
  • Major De Lacy Woolrich Passy (Punjabis attached Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Second Lieutenant Edmund Maurice Buckley (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 29. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Edmund Buckley the 2nd
  • Company Sergeant Major Andrew Thomas Cumming (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at sea off Gallipoli at age 25. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Charles Bray (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. His brother will die at home in June 1918.
  • Private James Henry Harding (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the service of their King the next two are killed in the Great War and the last in the sinking of the submarine M1 lost in a collision with a Swedish steamship in November 1925 with no survivors.
  • The 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers is attacked while repairing damaged trenches on Gallipoli. They suffer one casualty Private John Herbert Harris a well known local Rugby player being killed.

On the Western Front

  • Major Hugh Speke (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend Benjamin Speke Rector of Dowlish Wake and a veteran of the South Africa War.  He is an ordained Deacon and Priest of the Church of England and a mission priest in Western Canada who returned to join the forces in October 1914.
  • Lieutenant Edward Gordon Williams (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 27. He was on the Bronze Medal winning 1908 Olympic men’s eight crew and rowed for Cambridge in the Boat Race from 1908 to 1910.

Non-combat losses today

  • Lieutenant Gilbert Thomas Richardson Pettigrew (Herefordshire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed in England. He is on the staff of the Winnipeg Telegraph and formerly of the Montreal Daily Mai and is the former Private Secretary of the Minister of Public Works for Manitoba.
  • Private Albert T Williams (Canadian Infantry) dies on service at home at age 21. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Monday 24 May 1915 – We Lost 1,275

Francis Grenfell

Francis Grenfell

A four and a half mile wide German gas attack in the Ypres salient against three British Divisions is unsuccessful in leading to a German breakthrough.

A truce is agreed on between the British and Turks on the Gallipoli peninsula for the two armies to bury their dead. The truce was observed scrupulously.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The “Master of the Beagles” at Eton
  • A son of Lord Grenfell
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • The son of the Member of Parliament for West Somerset
  • A Rhodes Scholar
  • A grandson of the Astronomer Royal at Cape Town Observatory
  • A grandson of the sculptor of the frieze at the Albert Memorial
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a General
  • A First Class cricket player
  • A Rosslyn Park rugby footballer
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons
  • Multiple sets of brothers (two and three brothers) who are killed together today
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • A man whose father will die on service in the Great War
  • A man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell VC (Lancers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 24.  He has been awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 24th August 1914 at Andregnies, Belgium.  He was the “Master of the Beagles” at Eton in 1898.  His twin brother has been killed in action in September 1914.  The brothers are the youngest sons of Lord Grenfell and were born at Hatchlands, near Guildford, on 5th September 1880. When he was fourteen he followed family tradition by going to Eton. A keen sportsman, in 1899 he scored eighty runs at Lords in a cricket match against Harrow. Later that year he joined the British Army.  After serving with the Seaforth Highlanders in Egypt he was commissioned in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps and in 1901 went to South Africa where he fought in the South African War.  His last words were “I die happy. Tell the men I love my squadron”.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Redmond George Sylverius Moriarty (commanding 2nd Royal Irish Regiment) is also killed.
  • Major John Gwynne Griffith (Lancers, Indian Army Brigade Major 9th Cavalry Brigade) is killed at age 40. He is a South African War veteran and his brother will be killed in April 1917 serving in the same Regiment in Mesopotamia.
  • Major Francis Stuart Wilson (Royal Marines Headquarters) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. He played first class cricket for Jamaica in 1904-5.
  • Captain Collingwood Lindsay Wood (Hussars) is killed in action. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Lindsay Wood, the 1st
  • Captain James Randolph Innes Hopkins (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Randolph Innes Hopkins.
  • Captain William Benjamin Crane Cawood (Royal Field Artillery) dies on service at Mhow, India at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend John Cawood Vicar of Hamble.
  • Captain John Harold-Barry (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of John Harold-Barry JP DL who lost another son at Krugersdorp South African in February 1896.
  • Captain Basil Maclear (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 34. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Thomas MacLear the Astronomer Royal at Cape Town Observatory and an Irish International Rugby player who won eleven caps. One brother was killed in the first month of the war in Africa while a second will die of wounds next year.
  • Captain James Hugh Christie (Royal Irish Regiment) is killed at age 35. He fought in the South African War where he was recommended for the Victoria Cross and he is the only son of the late Hugh Christie JP. Captain Christie originally joined the Militia Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry and with them went out to the South African War. He then received a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers and was present at the Battle of Laing’s Nek. He received the Queen’s Medal and four clasps, and the King’s Medal and two clasps. He was mentioned in Despatches and recommended for the Victoria Cross by his Colonel, who was killed before the recommendation could be sent in. He was promoted Captain in 1907 and transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment in 1908 retiring in 1909. He then went out to Vancouver but returned in 1914, to take a commission in the Royal Irish Regiment and went out to France in February 1915. He was present at Hill 60 and through the 2nd Battle of Ypres.
  • Lieutenant Francis James Gunter (Hussars) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of the late Major General James Gunter.
  • Lieutenant William Torquill Macleod Bolitho (Hussars) is killed at age 22. His father will die on service in February 1919.
  • Lieutenant Daniel Pike Stephenson (North Staffordshire Regiment attached Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action on 4th May at age 25. He was the 1911 Jamaican Rhodes scholar.
  • Lieutenant Hastings Fortescue Boles (Lancers attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 19. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Dennis Fortescue Boles MP for West Somerset the 1st  His younger brother will be killed as the 2nd Baronet on 9th April 1945 while serving as a Captain in the Royal Armoured Corps.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Windeatt Daman (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the grandson of the Reverend Robert Dell.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Alfred Trenchard (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 27. He is a Rosslyn Park rugby footballer.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Daniel Considine (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in October 1916 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Hefferman Considine CB MVO DL.
  • Second Lieutenant John Harrison Sellers (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 17. He is the grandson of the sculptor of the frieze at the Albert Memorial.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Oliver Moon (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Ernest Moon KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant Leonard John Harrison (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the late Reverend Albert Richard Harrison Vicar of Tettenhall.
  • Second Lieutenant Rycharde Mead Haythornthwaite (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend John Parker Haythornthwaite Vicar of King’s Langley.
  • Second Lieutenant Rupert George Boosey (Dragoon Guards) is killed in action at age 20. His older brother will be killed in November of this year.
  • Company Quartermaster Sergeant Charles Thomas Abbott (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 34. His son will lose his life in the Second World War.
  • Lance Corporal James Arthur Davis (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed when HMS Monmouth sank.
  • Brothers and Privates in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders George and John Nugent are killed in action together at Neuve Chapelle. George dies at age 27.
  • Also killed today are three brothers serving as Privates in the Royal Fusiliers. Arthur Ernest, 21, Frank Albert, 18, and Frederick George Racheil, 24 all are commemorated on the Menin Gate.
  • Lance Corporal Harry Allnut Willans (Royal Fusiliers) is killed. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Trooper Charles Ellis (Yorkshire Hussars) is killed in action at age 29. His brother will die of wounds in November 1918.
  • Private Frederick Mills (Hussars) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private John MacLeod (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Robert Elliott Allen (Lancers) is killed at age 28. He is the son of Thomas Allen JP.
  • Private James Henry Harris (Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31 at Boulogne. His brother will die of wounds in September 1917.
  • Brothers and Private John (22) and Patrick (32) (Dublin Fusiliers) are killed together less than one month after their older brother was killed serving in the same regiment.

Friday 7 May 1915 – We Lost 889

RMS Lussitania

RMS Lussitania

Captain William Turner of the Lusitania upon entering what is called the danger zone of waters in which enemy submarines operate orders all lifeboats to be swung out, all the bulkhead doors to be closed, look-outs to be doubled and steam pressure to be kept high to give the ship all possible speed in case of an emergency.  At 08:00 the ships speed is reduced to eighteen knots to secure the ship’s arrival at the bar outside Liverpool at 04:00 the following morning, in order catch the high tide. At 12:40 the ship’s course is altered in order to make a better landfall. The ship is brought closer to land and the Old Head of Kinsale is sighted at 13:40.

At 14:15 as the ship is between ten and fifteen miles off the Old Head of Kinsale with weather clear and the sea smooth, Captain Turner hears the second officer shout “There is a torpedo coming, Sir”.  Immediately afterwards there is a terrific explosion on the starboard side, between the third and fourth funnels. Almost simultaneously there is a second explosion, which at the time is thought to be a second torpedo, but has since been confirmed to be an internal explosion, although the cause has never been definitely established. The stricken Lusitania immediately takes on a heavy list to starboard and in about eighteen minutes she sinks, with the loss of 1,198 lives. The ship sinks bow first, with its stern almost perpendicular out of the water. Two crewmembers will be officially recognized with the Silver & Bronze medals for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea. Able Seaman Leslie Morton is the first to observe the approach of the torpedo and he reports it to the bridge. When the torpedo strikes the ship he is knocked off his feet, but he recovers himself quickly, and at once assists in filling and lowering several boats.  Having done all he can on board, he jumps overboard. While in the water he manages to get hold of a floating collapsible lifeboat, and with the assistance of Able Seaman Joseph Parry he rips the canvas cover off it and succeeds in drawing into it fifty to sixty passengers. Morton and Parry then row the boat some miles to a fishing smack. Having put the rescued passengers on board the smack they return to the scene of the wreck and succeed in rescuing twenty to thirty more people.

Among those lost in the sinking of RMS Lusitania

  • Justus Miles Forman. He is an American novelist and playwright. His only play, The Hyphen, appeared in 1915, but it did not receive the success Forman expected. He decided to book a first-class passage aboard the RMS Lusitania. Days before he was to board the liner, he received a mysterious phone call from a man with a thick German accent, who warned him not to board the Lusitania. He ignored the phone call and boarded the Lusitania on May 1, 1915. His body was never recovered.
  • ‘Sir’ Hugh Percy Lane was born in County Cork, Ireland in November 1875, he is best known for establishing Dublin’s Municipal Gallery of Modern Art (the first known public gallery of modern art in the world) and for his remarkable contribution to the visual arts in Ireland. He died on board the RMS Lusitania.
  • Firemen Michael Sr. and Michael Cooney Jr. are both killed in Lusitania. The elder Cooney dies at age 40 while his son is 20 years-old.
  • Fireman Edward Ryan is killed at age 44. His brother will be killed as a stoker on HMS Queen Mary at Jutland.
  • Henry St Giles Humphreys is killed. He is the son of Reverend Henry James Humphreys Vicar of Thornley who will have two others sons killed in the Great War.

U-20 sights the British cruiser Juno, but as she is zig-zagging and going at full speed, the German submarine gives up the chase.

The Tribal class destroyer HMS Maori strikes a mine off the Belgian coast and the entire crew plus those of HMS Crusader’s boat are made prisoners of war.

The King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, the Royal Irish Rifles and the Cheshire Regiment attack the Zwarteleen salient at Hill 60.  The first trench is taken and crossed but shortly after this dawn breaks and it becomes evident that although the enemy has been driven out of the neck of the Salient they still hold the Salient itself.  The day passes quietly until darkness comes at 19:45 and patrols are sent out to ascertain what the results of the attack have been. The totality of the failure is reported including 22 members of the Yorkshire’s killed 124 officers and men wounded and 42 officers and men missing. Most of the missing will prove to be killed.

The 1st/5th Royal Scots attack Fir Tree Wood on Gallipoli.  They advance at 10:00 and enter the wood.  There they find many snipers situated on small wooden platforms in the branches.  The Scots are driven back after three hours fighting.  The battalion is reduced to the strength of two companies.

The operations on the Karkha River, Mesopotamia begin.  The district which contains oil fields and the pipeline is cleared of the enemy by 3 June.

‘Sir’ Edward Grey sends a message to the Ottoman Government stating that members of that government will be held personally responsible for the safety of British and French civilians transported from Constantinople to Gallipoli.

The attack on Achi Baba continues still with little progress.

Lieutenant Ernest G Boissier (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he behaves with gallantry in charge of a machine gun during operations south of Achi Baba and effecting the destruction of an enemy machine gun. His son will be killed in 1945 serving at a Sub Lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

Airship SS-1 is destroyed by fire after colliding with telegraph wires near Dover when her pilot mistakes the wind direction signal and lands down-wind.  Both occupants escape injury.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man killed on Lusitania will have two brothers killed later on service in the Great War
  • A man killed on Lusitania will have a brother killed on HMS Queen Mary and Jutland
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • A son of an Admiral
  • A son of a Baronet
  • An Antarctic Explorer
  • A man whose brother will lose his life in the Second World War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Major Christopher Henry Hoskyns-Abrahall (Royal Marines Light Infantry) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 43. His son will be accidentally killed in December 1917.
  • Captain George Culme-Seymour (King’s Royal Rifle Corps and Acting Adjutant London Regiment) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son of Admiral ‘Sir’ Michael Culme-Seymour, 3rd Baronet GCB.
  • Captain Edward Frederick Robert Bage (Australian Engineers) is killed in action at age 27. He was an astronomer, assistant magnetician and recorder of tides with ‘Sir’ Douglas Mawson’s 1911 Antarctic expedition.  He was one of the six volunteers that formed the relief party that was left in the Antarctic for a second winter when Mawson and his companions failed to return to winter quarters on time.  Lieutenant Bage contributed the chapter “The Quest of the Southern Magnetic Pole” to Mawson’s book “The Chome of the Blizzard”.  He was awarded the King’s Polar Medal this year. At Trinity College Melbourne he obtained 1st Class honors in chemistry, rowed in the College Eight and was honorary secretary of the Students’ Representative Council. The “Robert Bage Memorial Scholarship” at the University of Melbourne will be founded in his honor.
  • Private Charles Alfred Fisher (King’s own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed in action. His son will lose his life in January 1944 on service.
  • Two brothers are in the trenches this morning, Private Fred age 20 and Lance Corporal James Henry ‘Harry’ Tennant age 27 (Lancashire Fusiliers). Harry is killed this morning.  Fred writes their mother: “He fell with his face to the enemy, and I am sure no man could wish for a more glorious death”. Fred will die of wounds next month.
  • Private Charles Cullinan (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action at age 41. His brother will be killed eleven days later.
  • Private Thomas Frederic Farrier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Bethune during shelling at age 26. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed by the middle of next year.

Thursday 6 May 1915 – We Lost 609

Prime Minister Asquith

Prime Minister Asquith

British forces recover some trenches on Hill 60, in the second battle Ypres.

On the Gallipoli peninsula the second battle of Krithia begins.  Little progress is made including a disastrous assault by the New Zealand Infantry Brigade across the Daisy Patch, near Krithia, Helles sector:

The German submarine U-20 sinks, without warning, two British ships, the passenger liner Candidate and the freighter Centurion.  This evening the Captain of the Lusitania, William Turner, receives a wireless message from the British Admiralty: “submarines active off south coast of Ireland.”

Mr. Harcourt makes a statement as to the poisoning of wells by Germans in South West Africa.  General Botha protests against the poisoning of wells; the German commander admits the fact a gives as a justification that the wells have been marked as poisoned.

Torpedo boat #92, of the Gibraltar patrol, which on Admiralty orders has been sent to watch off Alboran, falls in with U-21 steering east forty miles west of the island.  The submarine fires a torpedo which misses and the torpedo boat is able to run her over twice but does not have enough draft to do the submarine serious damage and she escapes.

Today’s losses include:

  • A nephew of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A brother of composer Roger Cuthbert Quilter
  • The Secretary to the Governor General of Australia before 1914
  • A man whose father fought with Garibaldi for Italy’s Independence
  • A woman who will lose her husband and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties from the Royal Naval Division are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John Arnold Cuthbert Quilter (Grenadier Guards commanding Hood Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action at age 40 at Gallipoli. A South Africa War veteran, he is the son of the 1st Baronet ‘Sir’ William Cuthbert and Lady Quilter and the brother of the composer Roger Cuthbert Quilter. He was the Secretary to the Governor General of Australia before 1914.
  • Sub Lieutenant Brian Trevor Roper Melland (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 20. He is a nephew of the Prime Minister, Herbert Asquith and has a brother who will be killed in action in 1917.
  • Sub Lieutenant Arthur Walderne St Clair Tisdall VC (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval Division) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. William St Clair Tisdall, the Vicar of St George’s Deal. He was a Double First Class Classical Honor’s Student at Trinity College, Cambridge and a Chancellor’s Gold Medalist. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions from the landing from the River Clyde on 25th His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman Robert Leopold McClintock Fleury (Hood Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed. He is the first of three sons of the Reverend Louis Richard Fleury Rector of Kilwork Cork to be killed in the Great War.

 Today’s highlighted casualties from the Army are:

  •  Captain Lewis Corbally (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Matthew Corbally DL.
  • Captain Walter Aland Leslie (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 27. He has two brothers who will lose their lives later in the War.
  • Captain Ateo Frandi (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 41. His father fought for Italy’s liberation under Garibaldi.
  • Lieutenant Henry George Christopher Guise (Gloucestershire Regiment) is accidentally killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Francis George Guise the 5th
  • Private Thomas Charles Line (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private J McFarlane (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed. He is one of three sons of Privte John McFarlane who are killed in the Great War before their father dies on service in May 1917.

Private Cecil James Dunnett (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 18.  His brother will die while on service in April 1917.

Saturday 1 May 1915 – We Lost 626

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

History records the first repulse of a gas attack. The men who defeat it are the men of the British 15th Brigade (5th Division) by sheer courage and determination. If any single unit can be singled out, it is the 1st Dorsetshire Regiment, who maintain rapid fire from their trench, ignoring the gas swirling around them; for this they pay a price. Ninety men dead of gas poisoning in the trenches, 207 more admitted to dressing stations, of which 46 die almost immediately, and twelve more after long suffering. Out of 2,413 British gas cases admitted to hospital during this period, 277 die.  After the repulse of the German attack on Hill 60, British forces are ordered to withdraw to a new line.

Private Edward Warner (Bedfordshire Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Hill 60. After Trench 46 has been vacated by our troops consequent to the gas attack, Private Warner enters it alone in order to prevent the enemy from taking possession.  Re-enforcements are sent to Private Warner but cannot reach him owing to the gas. He then comes back and brings up more men, by which time he is completely exhausted but the trench is held until the enemy attack ceases. This very gallant soldier dies shortly afterwards from the effects of gas poisoning.

A small battle takes place in the North Sea in which the Trawler Columbia (Lieutenant Commander Walter Hawthorn killed) is sunk with a loss of all seventeen crew members except one. The German torpedo boats A2 and A6 are also sunk by British destroyers in the North Sea.  The destroyer Recruit (Commander C A Wrightson, survives) is torpedoed by UB-6 off the Galloper light.  The ship sinks causing forty-three casualties. There are twenty-six survivors.

Navigation resumes between England and Holland.

Turkish forces, 16,000 strong, attack the entire Allied line on the Gallipoli peninsula.  The attacks are futile and the Turks are driven back. Lieutenant Colonel Richard Nelson Bendyshe (commanding Deal Battalion, Royal Marines) the grandnephew of Lord Horatio Nelson is killed.  The Colonel, visiting a section of his trenches, is shot by his own men, who in a fit of spy mania, kill him, wound three others, and slightly bayonet Colonel McNicoll.

The 1st/5th Royal Scots come under heavy bombardment.  During the night the enemy attack and the Turks break through the first line of trenches and come rushing down the gully, but then are met by the battalion with fixed bayonets. Captain D C McLagan restores the situation with a brilliant counter-attack.

The Lusitania leaves New York’s Pier 54 on its final voyage.  The cargo is entered on the manifest as foodstuffs, metal rods, ingots and boxes of cartridges.  Controversy concerning the true nature of the cargo will persist for many years.

Submarine E14 sinks the Turkish gunboat Nurelbahr in the Sea of Marmora.

Lieutenant James Cheetham (Royal Marines) is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he conducts himself with gallantry during operations south of Achi Baba.  When the enemy in strength of about a battalion attack an outpost of thirty men under Lieutenant Cheetham he calls for two volunteers and dashes out to a flank under very heavy fire into the open, bringing rapid fire to bear on the enemy and thus checks the attack and saves the outpost.  Private C J Braddock (Royal Marines) is awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal as one of the volunteers in this action.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Two battalion commanders
  • A grand nephew of Lord Horatio Nelson
  • A man accidentally shot by his own men
  • The son of a Baronet
  • An Otago football player
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Robert Ouseley Cuthbert Hume (commanding 1st Border Regiment) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 48.
  • Captain John Cockburn Jessop Teague (Portsmouth Royal Marines) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in October 1915 and they are sons of Chaplain of the Collegiate Church Crediton the Reverend John Jessop Teague.
  • Captain Perceval Christian Chapman (Mountain Battery Royal Artillery) dies of wounds in Alexandria received 25 April at Gallipoli at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Theodore Charles Chapman Vicar of Langley and he has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.
  • Lieutenant Herbert George Ferguson Davie (Royal Marines) is killed at age 42. His brother will die of wounds next April and they are sons of ‘Sir’ William Augustus Ferguson Davie 3rd
  • Private Ambrose Alphonsus Falconer (Otago Infantry) is killed. He is a well-know Otago football wing and forward who played versus Canterbury and Southland in 1908.
  • Private Walter Silcox (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother was lost when HMS Aboukir was sunk last September.
  • Private Henry Raymond Fisher (Montreal Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in August 1917.