Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Hill 971

Monday 9 August 1915 – We Lost 2,714

Poet Nowell Oxland

Poet Nowell Oxland

General Godley remains at his headquarters near the beach, largely ignorant of the state of the fighting on Chunuk Bair. His plan for today is to take Hill Q. The main force for the assault is the 38th Brigade of the 13th Division commanded by Brigadier General Anthony Baldwin. Baldwin but the situation is so confused that the force he leads toward Hill Q contains only one of his normal battalions, the 6th East Lancashire Regiment. He also has the 9th Worcestershire Regiment and 9th Warwickshire Regiment from the 39th Brigade and the 5th Wiltshire Regiment from the 40th Brigade (who would later be redirected to reinforce Chunuk Bair). Plus he leads two 10th (Irish) Division battalions; the 10th Hampshire Regiment and 6th Royal Irish Rifles from the 29th Brigade.

This force will climb to Hill Q from the Farm. At the same time the New Zealanders on the right from Chunuk Bair and units of General Vaughn Cox’s Indian Brigade on the left will also attack the hill. The plan falls apart when Baldwin’s battalions become lost in the dark trying to find the Farm which they do not reach until after dawn around 06:00. The only force to reach Hill Q is Allanson’s battalion of Gurkhas. They suffer the same fate as Colonel Malone, shelled by their own artillery, and their stay on the hill is brief. With the offensive once again stalled, the New Zealanders on Chunuk Bair have to endure another day of Turkish harassment. As night falls the remaining New Zealanders move back to the Apex and are replaced by two New Army battalions, the 6th  North Lancashire Regiment and some of the 5th Wiltshire Regiment from Baldwin’s force.

At about 05:00 this morning, a series of determined attacks is made by the enemy on an isolated sap, where six officers are killed or severely wounded, a portion of the sap being lost.  Lieutenat William John Syons (Australian Infantry) then leads a charge and retakes the sap, shooting two Turks with his revolver.  The sap is under hostile fire from three sides and Lieutenant Symons withdraws some fifteen yards to a spot where some overhead cover can be obtained, and in the face of heavy firfe, builds up a sand barricade.  The enemy succeeds in setting fire to the fascines and woodword of the head-cover, but Lieutenant Symons extinguishes the fire and rebuilds the barricade.  For his actions this day and yesterday he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

At Lone Pine the enemy makes a determined counter attack on the center of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Frederick Harold Tubb, two corporals Alexander Stewart Burton and William Dunstan (Australian Infantry) and a few men.  The enemy blow in the sandbag barricade leaving only a foot standing, but the lieutenant and the two corporals repulsed the enemy and rebuilt the barricade.  Twice more the enemy blows in the barricade and on each occasion they are repulsed and the barricade rebuilt, Corporal Burton is killed while most gallantly building up the parapet under a hail of bombs.  All three men will be awarded the Victoria Cross for their actions on this day.

During a heavy bomb attack by the enemy on the newly captured position at Lone Pine, Private John Hamilton (Australian Infantry), with utter disregard of personal safety, exposes himself under a heavy fire on the parados, in order to secure a better fire position against the enemy’s bomb throwers.  His coolness and daring example has an immediate effect.  The enemy is driven off with heavy losses.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

During the morning Captain Alfred John Shout (Australian Infantry) at Lone Pine trenches and with a small party charges down trenches strongly occupied by the enemy and personally throws four bombs among them, killing eight and routing the remainder.  In the afternoon from the position gained in the morning he captures a further length of trench under similar conditions but as he is holding three bombs the final one, having thrown the other two, bursts in his hand destroying his right hand and shattering the left side of his face and body.  Carried to the rear he dies two days later on board HMHS Euralia.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

The march by 32nd Brigade from Suvla Bay to Tekke Tepe ridge, in darkness over unfamiliar, rough terrain, is difficult and the brigade will not approach the summit until 04:00. Turkish reinforcements have reached the ridge shortly before them and meet the exhausted British infantry with a bayonet charge. The 32nd Brigade is virtually annihilated in a matter of minutes and the remnants of the battalions scatter back towards the beach. Around midday the gunfire set scrub alight on Scimitar Hill.

A battalion of Gurkhas from the Indian Brigade, commanded by Major Cecil Allanson, reach a secondary objective, the neighboring summit of Hill Q, today but are forced to retreat shortly afterwards.

The destroyer HMS Lynx (Commander John Francis Herbert Cole, Royal Navy) strikes a mine in a field off Moray Firth laid by the German auxiliary minelayer Meteor.  There are seventy casualties including her commanding officer while there are twenty-six survivors.

Today’s losses include:

  • A member of the New Zealand Parliament
  • A Great War Poet
  • A relative of the architect Edwin Lutyens an architect of many WWI memorials
  • Two battalion commanders
  • A son of the 1st Baron Hewart
  • A brother of the 8th Earl of Dartmouth
  • A son of the 10th Baron Middleton
  • The son of a Baronet
  • A son of a General
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple examples of sons of members of the clergy
  • Two brothers killed together by ‘friendly fire’
  • Multiple examples of two brothers killed together
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A man who will have his two brothers killed tomorrow in the same regiment
  • Multiple examples of men who will have a brother killed in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father was killed in November 1914 as the fleet surgeon of HMS Good Hope
  • A man whose brother will be killed in North Africa in 1941
  • The ‘father’ of actor David Niven
  • An Australian Rugby International
  • Two Rosslyn Park Rugby footballers
  • A member of the All-Blacks
  • A player for the Workington Central Football Club

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Major Frank Hadfield Statham (Otago Regiment) and his brother Corporal Clive Heathcote Falk Statham (Otago Regiment,) a Member of Parliament in New Zealand are both killed about 05:00 when a Turkish attack on their position is at its height.  Three high explosive howitzer shells coming from the right rear land near their position killing the brothers and seven or eight other men. The shell almost certainly comes from one of the howitzer batteries inside the old ANZAC line. They are killed by ‘friendly’ fire.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Glanville Allen Moore (commanding 6th East Yorkshire Regiment) is murdered at age 50 after being taken prisoner by the Turks when he is stabbed and bayoneted through the back, he dies about 10 minutes later. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Dawson Moore former Vicar of Hornby.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Franklin MacAulay Gillespie (commanding 4th South Wales Borderers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 42.
  • Major Henry Pulleine John Cowell (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) dies of wounds on a hospital ship off Gallipoli at age 34. He is the son of Major General the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ John Clayton Cowell KCB PC and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Major James McGregor Elmslie (Wellington Mounted Rifles) dies of wounds at age 38. He is a South African War veteran and football player and his brother will die of wounds in Egypt in 1917.
  • Another Major in the Wellington Rifles Norman Frederick Hastings DSO commanding the 6th Squadron dies of wounds at age 35. He is also a South Africa War veteran and one of only 14 members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces to be awarded the Legion of Honour by the President of France.
  • Captain Robert Maxwell Pike (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of Robert Lechy Pike DL.
  • Captain Percival Leathley Browne (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 32. He is the son of the late Reverend S B Browne and his brother will die of wounds next April received in the Easter Rising.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Gerald Legge (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 33. He is the brother of the 8th Earl of Dartmouth and son of the 6th His nephew will be killed in the Second War.
  • Captain Francis George Godfrey Willoughby (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the 10th Baron Middleton and has a brother who will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.
  • Captain Charles Graeme Lutyens (East Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Sari Bahr on Gallipoli at age 28. His brother will die of wounds in January 1918 and the brothers are related to the architect Edwin Lutyens who will design many Great War Memorials.
  • Captain Robert Dewar Squires (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Alfred Squires Vicar of St Peter’s St Albans.
  • Captain Cuthbert Arthur Verge (Medical Officer 6th Australian Light Horse) dies in Egypt of dysentery contracted on Gallipoli at age 35. He played international rugby for Australia against Great Britain in 1904.
  • Captain Ralph Hawksworth Legard (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 40. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer and his brother will die of wounds in 1924 while serving as Headmaster at Bow School, Durham that he received in the war
  • Lieutenant Kenneth John Wyatt Peake (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War, one in 1915 the other in 1916.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Pennell Walsh (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 22. His father was Fleet Surgeon James Joseph Walsh (HMS Good Hope) when she went down in November 1914.
  • Lieutenant Richard Parker Gilbanks (Border Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend William Foster Gilbanks Rector of Gt Orton.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Debenham (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at Chunak Bair at age 26 when he is shot through the heart while leading an attack. He is the son of the Reverend John Wilmot Debenham.
  • Lieutenant Nowell Oxland (Border Regiment) is killed in action two days after landing at Suvla Bay at Gallipoli at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend William Oxland (Royal Navy) Rector of Alston and one of the minor Great War Poets. He showed promise of becoming a writer of distinction and his poem “Outward Bound” is first published in The Times later this year while his Poems and Stories will be published in 1917. He played rugby football for Rosslyn Park, Richmond, Middlesex and Cumberland. He is a friend and contemporary of William Noel Hodgson who will be killed on the Somme in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Stanley Charles Squire (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother is wounded in the same action and they are sons of the Reverend Charles Henry Squire Vicar of Southrop.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Graham Niven (Berkshire Yeomanry) is killed in action at Scimitar Hill at age 37. He is the father of the actor David Niven.
  • Lieutenant William John Osborne (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds received in action two days prior in the same action that his younger brother was killed.
  • Lieutenant Hubert Hartnell-Sinclair (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at Kaiajik Aghala, near Hill 971 north Anzac at age 30. His brother will be killed in France serving in the British Army next month.
  • Lieutenant William Louis Jennings Longbourne (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 27. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Ernest Gent (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of the late Albert William Gent JP.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Giles Prichard (East Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at home at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Collwyn Prichard Vicar of Alresford who lost another son in April of this year.
  • Lieutenant George Herbert Davies (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next July and they are sons of the Reverend John Bayley Davies Rector of Waters Upton.
  • Lieutenant E M Harper (Munster Fusiliers) is killed in the Dardanelles. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Trench Wilson (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Engineers) is killed at age 30 on the Western Front. He is the son of the late Reverend Alfred Wilson, Vicar of St Michaels Bedford Park London.
  • Lieutenant Michael Vallancey Molloy (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Eben Molloy Vicar of Shenstone.
  • Second Lieutenant Gordon Morley Hewart (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hewart.
  • Second Lieutenant Aubrey William Fyldes (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend William Fyldes Vicar of Witton.
  • Second Lieutenant Culcheth Holcroft (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Harry Holcroft 1st Baronet who will have another son killed in 1941 in North Africa.
  • Second Lieutenant William Charles Mayo (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. James Mayo of Trinity College Cambridge who will lose another son in August 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant John Digby Cartwright (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend William Cartwright Rector of Aynhoe who will lose another son killed in September 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Bassett Morgan (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli three months after his brother was killed also on Gallipoli. A third brother will be killed in a flying accident in May 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Longbottom (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 21. His brother was killed ten days ago.
  • Sergeant Henry Dewar (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 33. He is a prominent and popular rugby footballer and was a member of the All Blacks that toured California in 1913.
  • Sergeant Geoffrey Gibbings Wacher (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lance Sergeant Harold Ernest Sanby (Rifle Brigade) is killed. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Brothers Lance Sergeant Henry and Corporal Albert Cottrell (Sherwood Foresters) are killed together.
  • Lance Corporal Harry Wise (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed in May 1917 when HMS Derwent strikes a mine. Private Benjamin Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private Charles Alfred McKee (Border Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Joseph Morgan (South Wales Borderers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 29. His younger brother died of wounds in Egypt received in action on Gallipoli ten weeks earlier.
  • Private Francis William Fletcher (Sherwood Foresters) is killed on Gallipoli at age 24. His two brothers will both be killed later in the war the first next December and the second in 1917.
  • Privates Albert & Arthur Wadkin (West Yorkshire Regiment) are killed together on Gallipoli. Albert dies at 22 while his younger brother dies at age 20.
  • Private Benjamin Nutter (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 26. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Albert Fisher is killed in action serving with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment on Gallipoli. His two brothers will be killed serving in the same regiment tomorrow.
  • Private Laurence Barnard Carlton (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Carlton.
  • Private Joseph Lilliman (Sherwood Foresters) is killed. He is the middle of three brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Private Ernest Baguley (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Private Percy George Sprott (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 22 on Gallipoli. His brother will die of wounds in November.
  • Private Albert Iceton (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. He was a prominent footballer for Workington Central Football Club.
  • Trooper Thomas Lewis Douglas (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 26 the day after his brother was killed.
  • Trooper Richard Murphy (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action Chunuk Bair, Anzac serving alongside his brother Trooper Michael Murphy who is also killed. A third brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Trooper Francis Darbyshire Twisleton (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in action in October 1917.
  • Trooper James Ernest Walkley (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed. He is one of Manawaitu’s finest fullbacks.
  • Private Luke Knight (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Brothers Albert, 21, and Allen Harper, 23, die while serving with the Lincolnshire Regiment and Edward 26, and Percy Stennett, 19, are also killed while serving in the same battalion.

Friday 6 August 1915 – We Lost 1,718

Lone Pine Cemetery

Lone Pine Cemetery

On the second day of her second patrol in the Sea of Marmora submarine E11 sinks the Turkish gunboat Berki Satvet.

During night at the same time as the British IX Corps begins landing at Suvla to the north a breakout from the Anzac sector is made by units of the New Zealand and Australian Division under the command of General Alexander Godley. Two columns of troops are directed at two peaks of the dominating ridge which are expected to be captured by dawn tomorrow. Both columns are preceded by a covering force to clear the Turkish outposts and protect the flanks of the main assaulting force. The left, or northern, column of the Australian 4th Infantry Brigade and the 29th Indian Brigade are heading for Hill 971, the highest point on the Sari Bair range. They have the furthest to travel over completely unfamiliar terrain and never get close to their objective.

The right, or southern, column is heading for Chunuk Bair. Though lower than Hill 971, this peak overlooks the north of the Anzac perimeter and is used as a base for an artillery battery. The main Sari Bair ridge extends from Chunuk Bair down into the Anzac sector via Battleship Hill and Baby 700. From Baby 700 the ridge branches towards the beach via the Nek and south to Lone Pine via the line of tenuous Anzac positions known as Quinn’s, Courtney’s and Steele’s Posts. The capture of Chunuk Bair would provide considerable relief to the Anzac sector.  The approach to the peak is made along Rhododendron Spur which runs from the beach to the peak of Chunuk Bair. The Turks have outposts along the spur at the Table Top, Destroyer Hill and nearest the beach at Old No. 3 Outpost. There is also a Turkish outpost on Bauchop’s Hill to the north. All these outposts have to be cleared by the covering force, the four regiments of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, before the main assault column can proceed up the spur to the summit. The Auckland regiment clears Old No. 3 Outpost and the Wellington regiment takes Destroyer Hill and the Table Top. The Otago and Canterbury regiments capture Bauchop’s Hill, named after the Otago regiment’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Bauchop who will die of wounds received during the attack. In all the New Zealanders lose about 100 men in clearing the outposts and while their efforts are successful, the plan is now running two hours behind schedule, making it difficult to reach the summit before first light.

The main force of the right column is the New Zealand Infantry Brigade under the command of Brigadier General Francis Johnston. The Brigade’s four battalions, reduced by sickness and battle, mustered about 2,800 men.. The advance is initially made up the valleys, on either side of Rhododendron Spur and once past the Table Top, the New Zealanders climb on to the ridge, leaving about 1,000 yards to travel to the summit.

As a diversion to the main assaults against the Sari Bair peaks of Chunuk Bair and Hill 971 the whistles blow for an assault on Lone Pine at 17:30 and the Australians of the 1st Infantry Brigade emerge yelling and shouting from underground tunnels which have been dug 50 yards beyond their own front.  They have 100 yards to dash and when they reach the Turkish front they discover the Turks have roofed over most of their advanced trenches with pine logs.  Some Australians drop their rifles and try to pry the logs away.  Others fire between the logs into the Turks below, while still others dash beyond to the communications trenches and attack the enemy rear.

A fierce close quarters battle rages as the Australians drop into the darkened passages below while the Turks, who have been sheltered from the artillery bombardment that preceded the attack, attempt to emerge from their tunnels. The Australians fight mainly with rifle and bayonet and sometimes with their hands. The preliminary attack has killed or wounded many of the Turks and the rest are either killed, driven out or captured by the Australians.

By 18:00, Lone Pine is in Australians hands. Many hours of attack and counterattack follow with the Turks eventually throwing their entire reserve into the battle.  The enemy uses close-in bomb fighting in their efforts to retake the lost positions. Many Australians catch bombs and throw them back, an audacious act, which ends when the Turks shorten the fuses on their bombs.  This results in quite a few Australians having their hands and arms blow off.

The 32nd and 33rd Brigades of the 11th Division began to come ashore at “B Beach” Suvla Bay south of Nibrunesi Point shortly before 22:00. In the first action fought by a New Army unit, two companies from the 6th Yorkshire Regiment drive the Turkish defenders off the small hill of Lala Baba which overlooks the beach. It is an inauspicious start as all but two of the Yorkshire’s officers become casualties as do one third of the men. Shortly afterwards the 34th Brigade attempts to land at “A Beach” within Suvla Bay but the landing goes awry from the start. The destroyers conveying the brigade anchor 1,000 yards too far south, facing shoal water and on the wrong side of the channel that drained the salt lake into the bay. Two lighters ground on reefs and the men have to wade ashore submerged up to their necks. The Manchester Regiment, having come ashore from the destroyer HMS Grampus has the greatest success of the landing, managing to find its way to the Kiretch Tepe ridge and fight its way some distance along it to the east with the loss of 200 casualties.

Elsewhere the landing is in chaos, having been made in the dark which results in confusion with units becoming mixed and officers unable to locate their position or their objectives. Later, when the moon rises, the British troops become targets for Turkish snipers. Attempts to capture Hill 10 fail because no one in the field knows where Hill 10 is. Shortly after dawn it is found and taken, the Turkish rearguard having withdrawn during the night.

It is agreed on this day that the Indian Expeditionary Force “D”, which in its advance inland has now reached Nasiriya, should advance on Kut.

Today’s losses include:

  • A classical actor
  • A member of the clergy
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A Gold Medal Skater
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • An Aylesbury footballer
  • The nephew of the Head Master of the South School Invercagill
  • A man whose brother and his wife’s brother will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Royal Air Force in 1944
  • A man who will have his three brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple men who will have to brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain Edwin Gerald Venning (Suffolk Regiment) is killed by a sniper shot to the neck while observing the German lines from his own trench at age 32. The regimental history stated “All ranks deplored the loss of a very valuable, gallant and popular officer. His body was conveyed to Locre the same evening and buried in the village churchyard.” He is the son of the late Reverend Edwin James Venning, British Chaplain at Cassel, Germany and is a well known classical actor.
  • Captain Harry Burnett Stevenson (Rajput Light Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Captain Nicolas Melville Gepp (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed on Hill 12 Gallipoli. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the Reverend Nicolas Parker Gepp Canon of Ely and Rector of Witchingham.
  • Captain Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker.
  • Captain Alec Vaughan Thomas (East Surrey Regiment attached Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed one day short of two years from today.
  • Lieutenant Lancelot Botry Pigott (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26 on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Eversfield Botry Pigott Rector of Ellisfield.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Alexander Ross Fitzmaurice (Sappers and Miners, Royal Engineers Lahore Division) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Judge of Dharwar, a scholar of Felsted School Essex and a government engineer at Bareilly, India.  He had been seriously wounded on 28th October 1914, returning to the front on 19th
  • Lieutenant Howard Field (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother was killed just over two months earlier.
  • Lieutenant Amyas Leigh Goldie (Gloucestershire Regiment attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Everard Digges La Touche (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in the intestine at Lone Pine at age 32. He is a Clerk in the Holy Orders (Clergyman) but had been unable to obtain a position as Chaplain so he enlisted as a private in the Infantry.  His brother will be killed in action in September 1915.  He was the youngest ever to earn a Letters Degree from Trinity College, Dublin.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander John Robertson (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 28. He played 10 Australian Rules Football games for Melbourne University in 1909.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Hobson Whidborne (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33 as the first of three sons of the Reverend George Ferris Whidborne who are killed in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Moor (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Lone Pine. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. Charles Moor Vicar of Barton on Humber & Canon of Lincoln.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker Rector of Quainton.
  • Second Lieutenant Gavin Campbell Arbuthnot (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend William Arbuthnot, Vicar of Lea Marston Warks.
  • Sergeant Robert Anthony Fleming (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 24. His ancestors claimed to have saved the flag bearing the legend “For Christ and Covenant” from the field of Bothwell Bridge in 1688.
  • Lance Corporal Alleyne Gordon Webber (Otago Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in February 1917 and they are nephews of the head master of the South School Inverecagill.
  • Trooper Stanley Maris Clark (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 35. He is a keen football player and well known in rowing circles.
  • Brothers and Privates Harold Benjamin and Edward John Victor Hennell (Australian Infantry) are killed together in the attack.
  • Trooper Alexander Forbes Hogarth (Australian Light Horse) dies of wounds in Egypt at age 27. He has two brothers who will die in the Great War, the first next year the second in March 1918.
  • Private Harold Forbes Clarke Winch (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Winch Vicar of OF Brompton.
  • Private Alan Gordon Till (Australian Infantry) is killed. His son will lose his life serving in the Royal Air Force in June 1944.
  • Private William Hall (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. He is a member of the Aylesbury Football Club.
  • Private Frederick Henry Wright (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of pneumonia in December 1917.
  • Private John Henry Tromans (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in January 1916 and his wife’s brother will also be killed in action.
  • Private William John Methven (Hampshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die on service in Mesopotamia in July 1919. Driver Robert Lynn (Royal Field Artillery) is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives as a result of Great War service when he is killed at age 30.
  • Private Charles Heaton (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 27 one month after his brother was also killed on Gallipoli.

Two hundred forty one members of the Essex Regiment are killed at Achi Baba, Gallipoli.

  • Lieutenant John Charles Gardom (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is a Gold Medal Skater of the National Skating Association in 1911.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard George Gabb (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in December 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Roper (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 24 and his brother Private Frederick Roper (Essex Regiment) are killed together.
  • Private Jesse Freshwater (Essex Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Privates and brothers Richard James (age 19) and Frederick Thomas Whall (age 23) are also killed.