Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Hooge

Thursday 30 September 1915 – We Lost 668

Thomas Charles Reginald Agar-Robartes

Captain ‘the Honorable’ Thomas Charles Reginald Agar-Robartes (Buckinghamshire Hussars attached Coldstream Guards) a Member of Parliament for St Austell and Mid Cornwall since 1908 dies of wounds at age 35.  He is a son of the 6th Viscount Clifden. He was recommended for the Victoria Cross for saving a wounded comrade in the action which will lead to his death.

Second Lieutenant Rupert Price Hallowes VC MC (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 34.  He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the fighting at Hooge between 25th September and today. Second Lieutenant Hallowes displays throughout these days the greatest bravery and untiring energy, and sets a magnificent example to his men during four heavy and prolonged bombardments. On more than one occasion he climbs up on the parapet, utterly regardless of danger, in order to put fresh heart into his men. He makes daring reconnaissances of the German positions in our lines. When the supply of bombs is running short he goes back under very heavy shell fire and brings up a fresh supply. Even after he is mortally wounded he continues to cheer those around him and to inspire them with fresh courage.

Second Lieutenant Ernest William Hammond (Honorable Artillery Company) although severely wounded in the right side this afternoon and unable to use his right arm during a bomb fight at Sanctuary Wood remains at the front using his left arm until after nightfall when his wounds compels him to retire. For his actions on this day Lieutenant Hammond will be awarded the Military Cross. He will be killed at Bullecourt on 3rd May 1917.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Member of Parliament
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • The 16th Baron Petre
  • The son-in-law of the 13th Earl of Winchelsea
  • Grandson of the 3rd Earl of Belmore
  • Son of a Baronet
  • A man whose daughter will be born in December
  • Multiple sons of Justice of the Peace
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Generfal
  • A man whose son will be killed in Normandy in 1944
  • A man whose brother will be killed as a member of the Commandos in 1943 outside Tripoli

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Temporary Captain Lionel George Carroll ‘Lord’ Petre (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds at age 24. He is the 16th Baron Petre. His second child and only daughter will be born on 13th
  • Captain Archibald Thomas Bostock (Northumberland Fusiliers) dies of wounds received four days earlier at age 28. He is the son of Dr. Edward Ingram Bostock JP and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Robert Bingley Herbert (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 32. He is a member of the Stock Exchange and a partner is the Firm of G S Herbert and Sons.
  • Captain Norman Sinclair Stewart (Royal Scots) is killed at Hooge at age 30. His brother will be accidentally killed in the Royal Flying Corps in October 1917 and they are sons of Captain M P Stewart JP.
  • Captain Osmond Trahairn Deudraeth Williams DSO (Welsh Guards) dies of woudns at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Osmond Williams 1st Baronet, the son-in-law of 13th Earl of Winchilsea and was a veteran of the South Africa War.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Richard Henry Lowry-Corry (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received in action five days earlier at age 25. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Henry Corry and grandson of the 3rd Earl of Belmore.
  • Lieutenant William Hyde Eagleson Gordon (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds received in action at Loos at age 22. He was studying for Holy Orders when war broke out and at once joined up and his brother will died as a result of his military service in 1932.
  • Lieutenant Richard Francis Richardson (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Taswell Richardson Vicar of Moreton Morrell.
  • Lieutenant Stephen Cormack Swayne (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. He is the son of Major General J D Swayne.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Lindsey Gwydyr Law Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed next August and they are sons of the Reverend Henry Kiburn Law Rector of Dolton.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Douglas-James (South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. His brother was killed five days earlier and they are sons of C H James JP.
  • Second Lieutenant H E E Williams (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend C Eccles Williams.
  • Lance Corporal John McFarlane (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 31. He is the middle of three sons of Private John McFarlane (Royal Defence Corps) to be killed before their father dies on service.
  • Gunner John Frederick Hewitt (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 34. His brother also fell.
  • Private Herbert Ernest Townrow (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Sydney Lamacraft (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the sinking of HMS Goliath.
  • Private Alfred Edgar Willing (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Charles Carter (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private Harold Milburn (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed. His son will be killed in Normandy in June 1944.
  • Private Harry Marriott (Border Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Eddie Lenihan (Irish Guards) a member of Second Lieutenant John Kipling’s platoon is killed in action at age 25. He has three sons one will join the Irish Republican Army while the other two will join the British Army. The two who join the Army will both die on service the first on cerebro-spinal meningitis in 1931 while the second will be killed as a member of the Commandos in 1943 outside Tripoli.

Sunday 1 August 1915 – We Lost 239

Wellington College

Wellington College

British forces retake trenches at Hooge.

Great Britain places orders for motor boats from the United States.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son and heir of Lord Anslow
  • A Master at Wellington College
  • A son of a member of the clergy
  • A man who will have two brothers killed in the Great War
  • A man who will have one brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain Nicholas Mosley (North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received from a sniper at home at age 33. He is the son and heir of the future Lord and Lady Anslow and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain John Kingsley Martin (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Henry Martin Rector of Kelloe.
  • Second Lieutenant Percival Powell (Rifle Brigade) is killed. He is the Master at Wellington College.
  • Lance Corporal George M McColgin (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds in Egypt at age 21. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Private Owen Kelly (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action. He has two brothers, one of which has already been killed the second will be killed in September 1918.

Saturday 31 July 1915 – We Lost 260

Frederick Hulton-Sams

Frederick Hulton-Sams

While on his second operational sortie with the Royal Flying Corps in an RE5, Captain John Aiden Liddell (Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) takes off from St. Omer with his observer Second Lieutenant. R H Peck for a routine reconnaissance patrol over the Ostend, Bruges and Ghent area.  Near Bruges, over enemy territory they are suddenly fired at from above seriously wounding Lieutenant Liddell and taking away part of his hip. Lieutenant Peck returns the fire but as he is reloading Liddell loses consciousness, the plane goes out of control, loses some 3,000 feet and turns upside down. Liddell regains sufficient consciousness, realizes where he is and instinctively rights the machine. Being determined not to fall into enemy hands he writes a note (apart from hand signals the other method of communication between pilot and observer) to Peck and they agree to try to get back to the Allied lines.  The aircraft is extensively damaged with the control wheel, the throttle and under-carriage all hit and the only way that the severely wounded pilot can fly the plane is to hold the damaged control wheel in one hand and to work the rudder control cables with the other.  After half an hour flying they reach La Panne Belgian airfield and in spite of his wounds and the damage to the aircraft Lieutenant Liddell makes a perfect landing at full throttle and switches off the engine on touchdown.  Lieutenant Liddell will be awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on this day, though he will die of his wounds one month later on 31st August.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • The son of Lord Templemore
  • A former 3 time Cambridge boxing champion
  • A member of the clergy
  • A Welsh International Rugby union wing
  • A lawn tennis player
  • The grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple men who are the sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple men who will have a brother also killed in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Frederick Sargeaunt (Royal Engineers) is killed when shot through the jugular vein at age 44. He is a South African War veteran and his brother will be killed in June 1917. They are grandsons of Charles Sargaunt JP.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Jennings Imrie Harris (commanding 5th Australian Light Horse) is killed at Harris Ridge southern Anzac at age 44. His half-brother will be killed serving in the South Africa Infantry in France 1916.
  • Captain Noel Jardine Exell (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Exell.
  • Captain Richard Wilfred Braithwaite (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the late Reverend J M Braithwaite Vicar & Rural Deacon of Croydon who lost another son last May.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Richard Cecil Frederick Chichester (attached Serbian Army) dies of typhoid fever at age 26. He is the son of Lord Templemore and when he was pronounced medically unfit for active service he went to Serbia as Secretary to Lady Paget’s Hospital.
  • Captain Richard Selby Durnford (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1918 and they are sons of the Bishop of Durnford.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Edward Barwick Hulton-Sams (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed while crawling from cover to fetch water for his wounded men at Hooge at age 33. He is the son of the late Reverend George Frederick Sams and his cousin (also son of a priest) will be killed in January 1916 in Mesopotamia. While at Cambridge he won the University Featherweight Boxing Cup in 1901, 1902, 1904, and represented Cambridge against Oxford in those years, winning each time. He was ordained in September 1905 to the curacy of St. Paul’, Balsall Heath, Birmingham and in 1908 joined the Bush Brotherhood, Queensland, where he worked till 1914, his skill in boxing earning him the sobriquet of “the Fighting Parson”. On the outbreak of the War Lieutenant Hulton-Sams applied for a Military Chaplaincy but failing to obtain one he enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment, in which he rose to the rank of Lance-Corporal. In November 1914, he received a Commission in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry.
  • Second Lieutenant William Purdon Green (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 24. He is a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for Newport and county rugby for Monmouthshire and was selected for Wales on three occasions.
  • Sergeant Stewart Charles Everett (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) dies on Gallipoli of enteric fever at age 21. He is a well known footballer and the district lawn tennis champion.
  • Rifleman Arthur Sharman (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. His brother will die at home on service three days before the Armistice in 1918.

Friday 30 July 1915 – We Lost 769

Burn-Merz Shield

Burn-Merz Shield

Units of the German Army launch an attack using flame throwers against the 14th (Light) Division holding front-line positions at Hooge in the Ypres Salient.  It causes large numbers of casualties to the British defenders and the front is pushed back. British infantry soon learn to deal with the slow-moving men carrying the cumbersome equipment. The British Army will not adopt the weapon.

The Australian Flying Corps suffers its first casualties. In an operation during the attack on Nasiriyeh the two CaudronG3’s are brought down. Lieutenant George Pinnock Merz and Lieutenant William Wallace Allison Burn are brought down among hostile Arabs and armed with only revolvers, they decide to make a stand and in the ensuing engagement one is wounded and the other stays to protect him. Both men are then reported to be captured and murdered. Their bodies are never found. The trophy for the annual Australia versus New Zealand Rugby League competition is known as the Burn-Merz shield.

German air forces again drop three bombs on St. Omer, this time at 05:45.

The enemy break through the center of our front trenches help by the Rifle Brigade and the position held by Second Lieutenant Sidney Clayton Woodroffe (Rifle Brigade) is heavily attacked with bombs from the flank and subsequently from the rear.  Still he manages to defend his post until all his bombs are exhausted and then skillfully withdraws his remaining men.  He then leads his party in a counter-attack under an intense rifle and machine gun fire until he is killed while in the act of cutting wire obstacles in the open.   For his actions on this day he will be awarded the posthumous Victoria Cross.  He dies at age 19 and is the second of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include:

  • The two men for whom the annual Australia versus New Zealand Rugby League competition is names
  • A grandson of the 4th Lord Lyttelton
  • The son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Latham
  • The son of the Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
  • The man whose memory is celebrated at Talbot House (Toc H)
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • An Australian and former Sussex cricketer
  • A man whose son was previously killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple men who are the sons of clergy
  • Multiple men who are the sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Charles Slingsby Chaplin (commanding 9th King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 52.
  • Major John John Bulkeley Jones-Parry (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in action. His son was killed in April serving on HMS Wolverine in the Dardanelles.
  • Captain Geoffrey Charles Walter Dowling (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 23. He is an Australian cricketer who played for Sussex from 1911 to 1913.
  • Captain Bertram Pawle (Rifle Brigade) is killed at Hooge at age 23. He is the son of George Strachan Pawle DL JP.
  • Lieutenant Gilbert Walter Lyttelton Talbot (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the Right Reverend, the Lord Bishop of Winchester and the Honorable Mrs. E S Talbot and grandson of the 4th Lord Lyttelton. His brother the Reverend Neville Talbot will found Talbot House (Toc H) in his memory.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Reverend’ Frederick Edward Barwick Hulton-Sams (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend G F Sams. He applied for a Chaplaincy but enlisted when he failed to obtain one.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Darwin Overton (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Arthur Overton Rector of East Barnet.
  • Lieutenant George Mitford Paddison (Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Francis Seymour (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 29. He is the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Lathom.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Benoni Nicholl (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Powell Nicholl Vicar of Ascot.
  • Second Lieutenant Richmond Fothergill Robinson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and his son will lose his life in the Second World War.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘The Honorable’ Gerald William Grenfell is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady Desborough and a Great War poet. He is the brother of Julian Henry Francis Grenfell another of the Great War Poets, who died of wounds in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Brandt Arnell (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of William Thomas Arnell JP and his older brother died of enteric fever contracted during the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Longbottom (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in ten days.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Bonar Macnicol (Royal Scots) dies of wounds at home at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend D C Macnicol of Grange Church Edinburg.
  • Private Thomas Cox (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private James H Campbell (Royal Scots Fusiliers) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Rifleman Bertie Raymond (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 26 the day after his brother was killed serving in a different battalion of the same Regiment.
  • Private Oliver Robinson (Border Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in November 1916. Rifleman William Denix Lauria (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend John Alexander Lauria Vicar of Emmanuel.

Monday 31 May 1915 – We Lost 245

George Colborne Nugent

George Colborne Nugent

There is fighting at Hooge.

London suffers its first air raid.  Zeppelin LZ38 comes in over Margate at 21:42, flies northwest to Shoeburyness and then makes for London.  The attack starts on Stoke Newington at 23:20 and thirty small high explosive bombs and ninety incendiaries are dropped, totaling 3,000 pounds, scattered on a curving line south to Stepney, then northeast to Leytonstone.  Seven people are killed and thirty five injured.  Nine aircraft go into the air in a vain attempt to catch the Zeppelin, one of which, a Sopwith Gunbus, apparently lost, crashes while trying to land at Theobalds Park in Herefordshire.  The pilot Flight Lieutenant Douglas M Barnes is killed.  LZ37 is briefly over the north Kent coast, having been unsuccessfully sought by ten Royal Naval Air Service aircraft from Dunkirk, but drops no bombs.

British forces under General C V F Townshend commanding the 9th Division advances up the Tigris. Using a flotilla of boats to help move men and supplies he defeats the Turks at Kurna, on the Tigris, capturing the town.

Germans capitulate to Anglo/French forces at Monso, Cameroon.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A Brigadier General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Former military correspondent for The Times
  • Grandson of the former Mayor of London
  • Heavyweight Boxing Champion of the West Coast of New Zealand
  • Grand nephew of a General
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Families that will lose two and three more sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Brigadier General George Colborne Nugent MVO (Irish Guards) General Officer Commanding 141st Infantry Brigade 47th Division is killed in action at age 51. He is the son ‘Sir’ Edmund Charles Nugent 11th
  • Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Huntley Hooper (Deputy Assistant Adjutant General – British Expeditionary Forces) dies of illness in London at age 47. He is a former military correspondent for “The Times”.
  • Captain Richard Reginald Maude Brooke (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 37. He is the son of Lady Kathleen Bushe.
  • Second Lieutenant Albert Reginald Knight Aitkens (London Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. He is the grandson of Alderman ‘Sir’ Henry Knight Mayor of London 1883.  His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Sergeant Percy Kent Irvine (Canterbury Infantry) is killed at age 24. He is the grand nephew of the late Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Kent.
  • Private Clarence Walker (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Private George Councellor Willetts (Canterbury Infantry) is killed at age 25. He is the heavyweight boxing champion of the West Coast of New Zealand.
  • Trooper Victor James Christophers (Otago Mounted Rifles) is killed on Gallipoli at age 29. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Leading Seaman William James Tingley (Howe Royal Naval Division) is killed on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private William McClellan (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in February 1917.

Sunday 30 May 1915 – We lost 297

Germans attack at Hooge. While in command of Hooge Fort and adjoining trenches Major Philip Granville Mason (Dragoon Guards) will show conspicuous gallantry and ability in holding the village and the defense line allotted to him for the next four days notwithstanding a terrific bombardment for several hours every day until 2nd June.  During this time practically all his trenches and dug-outs will be blow in.  For his actions Major Mason will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  He will be killed in action on 26th September of this year.

British forces are repulsed at Quinn’s Post, Gallipoli.

There is severe fighting in Cameroon.

British forces take Sphinxhaven, on Lake Nyassa, German East Africa.

Today’s losses include:

  •  The heavyweight boxing champion of Egypt
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Sergeant Henry Wilson Smith (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 29. He won the heavyweight boxing championship of Egypt while awaiting the Gallipoli landing.
  • Lance Corporal Jack Scales is killed. His brother will die of disease in England in December of this year.
  • Private William Green (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will die in December 1918.
  • Private Cecil William Hardy (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will be killed in September of this year.
  • Trooper Lionel Hughes (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the late Reverend William Henry Hughes Vicar of St Hilary.
  • Private Richard Pugh (Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. His brother will die of wounds in June 1917.
  • Private Herman Hill Jones (Australian Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend E L Jones Rector of Llansantfraid.
  • Bugler William Charles Ridgway (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in March 1917.

Wednesday 11 November 1914 – We Lost 777

 

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The torpedo gunboat HMS Niger is torpedoed in the English Channel.  She later explodes and sinks though there are no casualties.

British troops pass through the small village of Oulchy-le-Chateau in their advance on the Aisne.

At 10:00 the 2nd Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry are turned out to back up the 1st Brigade which has been attacked while holding the ground a little to the north of the Ypres-Menin road. They are ordered to Westhoek to get in touch with the 1st Division, who are holding up reinforcements on the right. In spite of a barrage that lays shells about them, the Oxfords reach Westhoek without loss. Here they get under cover and observe the Northamptonshire Regiment advancing on their right, into the southern part of the wood lying to the south of Westhoek. At the same time Colonel Lushington of the Royal Artillery sends gunners, cooks, etc armed with rifles against the Germans in Nonne Bosschen Wood.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry R Davies sends two companies to clear Nonne Bosschen Wood (Nun’s Wood) near Ypres, advancing from the northwest to southeast.  They drive the Germans before them killing and capturing many. Two more companies follow in support.  When the first two companies, ‘A’ and ‘B’ come out on the southeastern edge of the wood they are joined by the Northamptons on the right and by some Connaught Rangers and Sappers on the left. They force the Germans out of the trenches; some of the enemy turning and running when the attack is thirty or forty yards off, others surrender. Most of those who run are shot. Casualties to the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry amount to twenty-seven, of whom five are killed.  There is still another trench held by the Germans in front, but before an attack can be mounted on it French artillery begins to drop shrapnel into the British front line, not realizing how far it has advanced. It takes some time to inform the French of this error and by this time dark has set in.

Near Becelaere, Belgium, Captain Walter Lorrain Brodie (Highland Light Infantry) leads a charge to evict the enemy from a portion of our trenches that they have succeeded in occupying. He bayonets several of the enemy himself and relieves a dangerous situation. As a result of his actions, 80 of the enemy are killed and 51 taken prisoner. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Uncle of a man killed yesterday
  • Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Two members of the Surrey Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Brothers Privates James F and John William Stallard are among those killed in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. John is a boxer of some repute in the Army and had gone into strict training for a bout at the National Sporting Club when the war broke out. Because of his prowess in the ring he was known as ‘The Mad Mullah’. He dies at age 26 while his older brother is 28.  They are sons of James and Florence Stallard of St Mary Street, New Bradwell, Bucks.

Another set of brothers are killed on this day while serving together. Private Thomas and James Freemantle (Scots Guards) have both served in the Guards prior to the war then joined the Surrey Constabulary together and both resigned to rejoin the Guards upon the outbreak of the war. The brothers are both 26. They are sons of William and Sarah Freemantle of Easton, Winchester.

  •  Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahonDSO, General Officer Commanding 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached 10th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Division is killed in action at age 48. The General tries to rally support troops east of Hooge, on the south side of the Ypres-Menin Road when he is suddenly seen to sink to one knee and begins to remove his legging as though hit in the leg. At that moment a shell bursts close to him killing him instantly. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon CB Baronet and he served in Burma from 1886 to 1887 and in the South African War.
  • Major Alfred Herbert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. He served in Sierra Leone 1898-9 and in the South African War. His nephew was killed yesterday at the same place while also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Major Harold Henry Norman (Temporarily commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in the above action at age 47. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and Zakka Khel in 1908. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Henry Wood.
  • Captain William Maynard Carlisle-Crowe (Warwickshire Regiment attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is a Swiss Alpine skier and the son of General Thomas Caralisle-Crowe.
  • Captain and Adjutant Ewen James Brodie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed when he is shot by a sniper at age 36 in the Nonne Bosch Wood. He is the son of J C J Brodie Lord Lieutenant of the County of Nairn.
  • Captain James William Lennox Sprot (Black Watch) is killed at age 28 less than three weeks after his brother was killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Jeune Collins (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29 while signaling for more men to protect the flank of his trench. Typically known by his initials A E J Collins is an English cricketer and soldier. He is most famous for achieving the highest-ever recorded score in cricket: as a 13-year-old schoolboy, he scored 628 not out over four afternoons in June 1899. Collins’ record-making innings drew a large crowd and increasing media interest; spectators at the Old Cliftonian match being played nearby were drawn away to watch a junior school house cricket match. One brother will be killed in August 1916 while his second brother will die of illness on service in February 1917.
  • Captain Hugh James Shaw (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in November 1915.
  • Captain Arthur Kenneth Puzey (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain William Augustus Portman Foster(South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds in a German hospital at Frankfort-on-Main of wounds received at Gheluvelt on 31 October at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Yorke Foster the 3rd Baronet and Lady Foster.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Symonds Holmes (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of Admiral of the Fleet ‘Sir’ Thomas M Symonds GCB.
  • Lance Corporal James Robert Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed less than three weeks earlier.
  • Private William Stoyan(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed later in the Great War, one in 1916 the other in 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Brown(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25.  His brother Peter Hume Brown will fall in November 1916.
  • Private John Hamon Massy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private George Etherington (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28 less than two weeks after his brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment.
  • Rifleman Robert James Adair (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service in March 1919.
  • Gunner Sidney Herbert Toll (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service at home in the first week of the war.
  • Private Edward Webster Wood (Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Turks forces attack the British camp at Sanniyeh with heavy loss and are forced to withdraw four miles.

  •  Major Richard Ducat (Infantry Indian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of Major General Claude Malet Ducat and grandson of Hugh Hamersley JP. He was member of the force that fought on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-8.

Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Doveton Sturdee departs Devonport his flag on HMS Invincible in company with HMS Inflexible on a voyage to the South Atlantic to search for the German squadron under Vice Admiral Graf Maximillan von Spee. At the same time HMS Princess Royal is dispatched to the Caribbean to guard the Panama Canal.

At a matinee at the Empire Theater John George Lambton 3rd Earl of Durham whose brother was killed on the Western Front less than two weeks earlier states the opinion that he would “wish that the Germans would drop a shell among these footballers some Saturday afternoon.  I really think it would be the best method of waking up the young men of Sunderland”.  In two weeks 16 members of The Hearts of Midlothan join the 16th Royal Scots becoming the only team in the history of British football to enlist en masse in the armed force. Seven members of the first team will lose their lives in the Great War.

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.