Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Irish Guards

Monday 4 November 1918 We Lost 2,767 – Highest loss before the war’s end

Lieutenant Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (London Regiment attached Manchester Regiment) the world renown war poet is caught in a German machine gun attack and killed at the Olse Canal, north of Ors, France age 25. He is on the Continent teaching until he visits a hospital for the wounded and is deeply affected by this and decides then and there, in September 1915, to return to England and enlist. Owen describes his decision to enlist in the following “I came out in order to help these boys – directly by leading them as well as an officer can; indirectly, by watching their sufferings that I may speak of them as well as a pleader can. I have done the first”. Owen is injured in March 1917 and sent home and when he is deemed fit for duty returns to the front in August of this year. His poems include The Dead Beat, Dulce Et Docorum Est, The Sentry, Anthem for the Doomed Young, Exposure, The Parable of the Young Man and the Old and Strange Meeting. The bells will be ringing on 11 November in Shrewsbury to celebrate the Armistice when the doorbell rings at his parent’s home bringing them the telegram telling them he has been killed.

Asleep

Uder his helmet, up against his pack,

After so many days of work and waking,

Sleep took him by the brow and laid him back.

There, in the happy no-time of his sleeping,

Death took him by the heart. There heaved a quaking

Of the aborted life within him leaping,

Then chest and sleepy arms once more fell slack.

And soon the slow, stray blood, came creeping

From the intruding lead, like ants on track.

Whether his deeper sleep lies shaded by the shaking

Of geat wings, and the thoughts that hung the stars,

High-pillowed on calm pillows of Gods making,

Above these clouds, these rains, these sleets of lead,

And this winds’ scimitars,

-Or whether yet his thin and sodden head

Confuses more and more with the low mould,

His hair being one with the grey grass

Of finished fields, and wire-scraggs rusty-old,

Who knows? Who hopes? Who troubles? Let it pass!

He sleeps. He sleeps less tremulous, less cold,

Than we who wake, and waking say Alas!

Killed along side Owen this day is Lieutenant James Kirk of the same regiment who will later be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions today while attempting to bridge the Oise Canal. To cover the bridging of the canal Lieutenant Kirk took a Lewis gun, and, under intense machine-gun fire, he paddles across the canal on a raft, and at a range of ten yards expends all his ammunition. Further ammunition is paddled across to him and he continuously maintains a covering fire for the bridging party from a most exposed position till he is killed at his gun.

Another Victoria Cross winner Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) James Neville Marshall (Irish Guards commanding 16th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery, determination and leadership in the attack on the Sambre-Oise Canal, near Catillon. When a partly constructed bridge comes under concentrated fire and is broken before the advanced troops of his battalion can cross Lieutenant Colonel Marshall goes forward and organizes parties to repair the bridge. The first party are soon killed or wounded, but by personal example he inspires his command, and volunteers are instantly forthcoming. Under intense fire and with complete disregard of his own safety, he stands on the bank encouraging his men and assisting in the work, and when the bridge is repaired he attempts to rush across at the head of his battalion and is killed while so doing.

Captain Allen Hepburn and his observer Alexander Tranter (Royal Air Force) score their last two victories of the Great War when they destroy two Pfalz DIII in the Mainvault-Faucaumont area.

The Battle of Vittoria-Veneto ends with the Armistice on the Italian Front.  During the battle, the 14th British Corps has captured over 28,000 prisoners and two hundred nineteen guns.

  • Captain Thomas Charles Richmond Baker DFC MM (Australian Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 21. He is a twelve-victory ace.
  • Captain the Reverend George William Jones (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 39.
  • Lieutenant Henry Michael de Bathe (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at Sleaford at age 29. He is the grandson of the late General ‘Sir’ Henry de Bathe Baronet KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant John Douglas Lightbody (Royal Air Force) a five-victory ace is killed in action at age 19.
  • Cadet Geoffrey William Auden (Royal Air Force) dies at home at age 18 of pneumonia. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Auden, Church Broughton Vicarage.

 

  • Captain Adam Francis Burdett (South African Service Corps) dies on service in South Africa at age 36. He took part in the 1906-7 South Africa rugby union tour, the original ‘Springbok’ tour. He was awarded two caps for South Africa.
  • Captain Burleigh Leycester Muir (Army Service Corps attached III Corps Headquarters) is killed in action. He is the son of Sir Richard and Lady Muir.
  • Private John William Moulds (Army Service Corps) dies of illness at Woolwich. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Stephen Owbridge Parish (Army Service Corps) dies on service in Egypt at age 36. His son will be killed 16 September 1942 at Khartoum Airfield in the Sudan attempting to save the life of a passenger on a crashed aircraft and will be posthumously awarded the George Cross for his efforts.

Today’s losses include:

  • A world renown Great War Poet
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • A Battalion Commander
  • Flying ace
    • 12-victory ace
    • 5-victory ace
  • A member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Grandson of a General and Baronet
  • A member of the original South African Rugby ‘Springbok’ tour
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father died on service and whose brother was killed
  • A man whose son was previously killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in September 1942 performing deeds which will win him a George Cross
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1944
  • A well known cricketer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Frank Harrison CMG DSO (Royal Engineers, Control of Chemical Warfare) dies at home at age 49. His son was killed in July 1916.
  • Major Cyril D’Albini Sykes-Banks MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of illness at home at age 29. His father died of illness on service in February 1916 and his brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Captain Robert Colvill-Jones MC (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in May.
  • Captain Francis Jones-Bateman (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action two and half years after his older brother has been killed in France. He dies at age 22.
  • Captain Rupert Ayrton Hawdon (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action at age 24. He is the middle of three brothers to die in the war the first in 1916 the second later this month.
  • Lieutenant Robert Evelyn Sandford Poole (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother died of pneumonia in January 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant George Augustus Hughes MC (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend William Hughes of Hawnby Rectory, York who has already lost a son in the war and will lose another later this month.
  • Second Lieutenant John McNair Lamb (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend John Lamb.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Stewart White (Royal Field Artillery dies of wounds at age 20 at home. He is the son of the Right Reverend William Charles White Bishop of Honan China.
  • Private Martin Leslie Johnson (Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1917.
  • Private Albert Charles Wilson (Labour Corps) dies on service at age 29. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Robert Heaford Dempster (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private Robert Moody (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Private Frederick Ernest Barker (Royal Sussex Regiment). He was a well-known cricketer. Munitions Worker at the Aeroplane Works Richard Sutton Staines dies at home. His brother died of wounds in October of last year.
  • Private Percy W Billings (Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1917.
  • Private Birkett Stuart (Border Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the final of three brothers who lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private James Sallis (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Arthur Edmund Potts (Sherwood Foresters) dies on service at home at age 18. His brother was killed two months ago.
  • Private Percy Albert Russell (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 34. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Richard Leadbeater (South Wales Borderers) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Gunner Alexander Francis Lyall Houison (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Ellis (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action. His son will be killed in the Second World War in April 1944.
  • Private Samuel Needham VC (Bedfordshire Regiment) is accidentally killed by a gunshot at age 33 in Egypt. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last September at Kefr Kasim, Palestine.

Sunday 20 October 1918 We Lost 1,732

Francis Granger Quigley

The monitor M21 strikes two mines off Ostend killing five.  She manages to steam to Dover but sinks there.

Today’s losses include:

  • A battalion commander
  • 33-victory ace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of an Alderman and Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A Liverpool City Police officer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Bryan John Jones DSO (Leinster Regiment commanding 15th Irish Rifles) is killed at age 44.
  • Captain Francis Granger Quigley DSO MC (Royal Air Force) dies of influenza in Liverpool two days after returning from serving as an instructor in Canada at age 24. He is a thirty-three-victory ace.
  • Captain Noel Martyn Saunders (Border Regiment) is killed at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend Clement Morgan Saunders Rector of Rumboldswyke.
  • Lieutenant Walter Randall Tilling (Royal Naval Reserve) dies at home at age 36. He is the son of the late Alderman George John Tilling JP.
  • Second Lieutenant James Martin Tolson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Second Lieutenant John Haslip Fletcher (Scots Guards) is killed at age 20. His brother died on service at home in October two years ago.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Westcott King (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late Reverend E G King DD.
  • Private John Pryce (Welsh Guards) a member of the Liverpool City Police is killed in action at age 27.
  • Private William Edward Norman Baker (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in September 1917.
  • Private Arthur Brennan (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in 1915.
  • Private Charles Wellavise (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Rifleman Alfred Thomas Watson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in October 1915.

Thursday 10 October 1918 We Lost 1,657

Royal Mail Ship S S Leinster (Captain William Birch) operated by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, serving as the Dublin-Holyhead mail-boat is torpedoed by the U-boat UB-123.  Having departed the Dublin ferry port at Kingstown (now re-named Dun Laoghaire) she is sunk just outside Dublin Bay at a point four miles east of the Kish light.  When she goes down 501 people perished — the greatest single loss of life at sea in the Irish Sea.  Despite many previous requests for a naval escort the Admiralty relied on the Leinster’s speed as her only protection from U-boat attack. She had been unsuccessfully attacked before but the torpedoes missed their target.

On her final morning she carries a crew of 77 and 694 passengers, of whom 500 are soldiers.  Initially UB-123 fires two torpedoes; one misses, passing harmlessly across the ship’s bow, but the other strikes the Leinster mid-ship forward of the bridge.  The ship begins to settle very slowly bow down in the water. In response to her distress call the British destroyers HMS Lively and HMS Mallard go to her assistance.  It is believed that at this stage she could have been saved by being towed back into Dublin or Dun Laoghaire harbour but the captain of the submarine decides to administer the coup de grace and finish her off with a third torpedo.  This he does as the Leinster continues taking on water and is disembarking her passengers into the lifeboats in rough seas. One hundred seventy-six of the 757 people on board are lost, including

  • Captain Birch who has been wounded in the initial attack and drowns when the lifeboat he is in swamps in heavy seas and capsizes while trying to transfer survivors to HMS Mallard. Others killed include
  • Lieutenant Commander George Richard Colin Campbell (Royal Navy Compass Department) age 34 the superintendent of the Magnetic Compass Department and inventor of the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass who is travelling with his wife and 4½ year old daughter. All are lost. He is the son of the Reverend Edward F Campbell.
  • Clerk shorthand typist Josephine Carr (Women’s Royal Naval Service) killed at age 19 after being in the service less than 30 days. She is the first WREN killed on active service.
  • Able Seaman David White (HMS Pembroke) is lost at age 41. His wife is pregnant and will name their son George Paul Leinster White.
  • Lieutenant Anchitel Edward Fletcher Boughey (Rifle Brigade) drowns at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Anchitel Harry Fletcher Boughey (Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge).
  • Captain Harold Locke (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the son of Frederick Locke DL JP.
  • Captain Robert Ernest Lee (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed in action on Gallipoli in August 1915 and they are sons of the late Edward Lee JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Gilbert Hayward Aldworth (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Ernest Aldworth Vicar of Laverstock.
  • J Shaw-Jones dies of injuries received in the sinking. He is a veteran of the South Africa War and rejoined the army at the outbreak of the Great War and was wounded twice and invalided out. He then worked in the Factory Audit Department of the Ministry of Munitions and was returning from a business trip.
  • Corporal Samuel Eddy (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in action earlier this year.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The co-inventor or the Campbell-Bennett aperiodic compass with his wife and young son
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The first WREN (Women’s Royal Navy Service) member killed in action
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A twice wounded discharge veteran currently working in the Department of Ministry of Munitions
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Member of Parliament

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel George Ernest Beaty-Pownall DSO (Border Regiment commanding 1st King’s Own Scottish Borderers) dies of wounds at age 41. His brother has been killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Philip Edward Kelly (Royal Irish Fusiliers commanding 9th (North Irish Horse) Royal Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Bissett DSO MC (commanding 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 28.
  • Major Leonard Coulthard Hill MC (Royal Field Artillery attached Fourth Army Artillery School) is accidentally killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Percival Oakley Hill.
  • Captain Kenneth Sutherland Rudd (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Prebendary Eric John Sutherland Rudd Rector of Souldern.
  • Captain George Goldon Dilliway (Army Service attached Camel Transport Corps) is killed in Palestine at age 28. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Captain Robert Chaworth-Musters MC (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies at home. His two brothers have previously been killed in action in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John Hackett (HMS Nimrod) dies of illness at home. He is the son of the Reverend John Hackett Rector of Orlingbury.
  • Lieutenant Richard Henry Hocken (Canadian Light Horse Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of H C Hocken MP.
  • Lieutenant John Carruth (Dublin Fusiliers attached Irish Rifles) dies of wounds. His brother was killed in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor James French (Irish Guards) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Somerset French KCMG.
  • Driver George Lawrence (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of pneumonia at age 20. His brother died of wounds in July 1916.
  • Private Frederick William Knight (Lord Strathcona’s Horse) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in May of this year.
  • Private Maurice Rudolph Hannam (Royal Air Force) dies on service in Canada at age 18. His brother was killed in November 1916 and the boys came from Brooklyn New York.
  • Private James Samuel Griffiths (Manchester Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Herbert Bennett (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 33. One brother died of wounds as a prisoner of war in August 1917 while a second died of wounds at home in September 1916.

Friday 27 September 1918 We Lost 3,297

Captain William Henry Hubbard (Royal Air Force) while flying at altitudes between two and fifteen hundred feet engages and silences many anti-tank guns, thereby rendering valuable service.  He at the same time completes a detailed and accurate reconnaissance of the area, locating the position of our troops. Lieutenant Gerald Anderson and Second Lieutenant Thomas Sydney Chiltern (Royal Air Force) bring down a Fokker D VII at Lambersart.

Lieutenant James Edward Maddox MM (Cheshire Regiment) is instructing a class in throwing live bombs.  One of the men after withdrawing the pin from a Mills No V Mark 1 Grenade accidentally drops the grenade in the trench and then apparently through fright falls on it.  Lieutenant Maddox with great presence of mind immediately pulls the man off the grenade seizes it and throws it over the parapet where it explodes almost immediately saving the man’s life.  For his actions Lieutenant Maddox will be awarded the Albert Medal.

  • The highest scoring ace of 22 Royal Air Force is killed in action east of Cambrai along with observer who is also an ace. Captain Samuel Frederick Henry ‘Siffy’ Thompson MC DFC (Royal Air Force) is a thirty-victory ace while his observer
  • Lieutenant Thomas Clifford John Tolman is also killed at age 21. He is an eight-victory observer ace.
  • Lieutenant Gavin Black Motherwell McMurdo (Royal Air Force) is killed at home at age 19. His two brothers will both die on service in 1919.
  • Sergeant Thomas Proctor (Royal Air Force) an observer ace with five victories is killed in action when his BF2b is shot down near Abancourt by German ace Fritz Classen.

“Sanders Keep” is a German fortification two kilometers south west of Graincourt-Les-Havrincourt between the Hermies and Havrincourt roads. Today it is stormed by the Guards regiments. Among those killed in the battle is

  • Captain William Herbert Gladstone MC (Coldstream Guards) he is the son of the Reverend Stephen Edward Gladstone Rector of Barrowby and the grandson of the late Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Grant (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Alexander Grant KC.

During this operation (part of Battle of Canal du Nord) Captain Cyril Hubert Frisby (Coldstream Guards) is detailed to capture a canal crossing but when the canal is reading the leading platoon comes under annihilating fire from a strong enemy post under the bridge on the far side of the canal. Captain Frisby with Lance Corporal Thomas Norman Jackson and two others climb down into the canal under intense fire and succeed in capturing the post with two machines and twelve men. They then give timely support to a company which has lost all its officers and sergeants, organizing the defences and beating off a heavy counter attack. Both men will be awarded the Victoria Cross, though Lance Corporal Jackson will be killed at age 21 during the operation.

At Flesquières, France, when his company is held up during the advance by heavy machine-gun fire, Corporal Thomas Patrick Neely VC (Lancaster Regiment) realising the seriousness of the situation, at once under point-blank fire, dashes out with two men and rushes the gun positions, disposing of the garrisons and capturing three machine-guns. Subsequently, on two occasions, he rushes concrete strong-points, killing or capturing the occupants. His actions enabled his company to advance 3,000 yards along the Hindenburg support line. For his actions today he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross as he is killed three days later in action at Rumilly-en-Cambrésis, just south of Cambrai, France.

Today’s losses include:

  • Royal Air Force ace
    • 30-victory ace
    • 8-victory ace
    • 5-victory ace
  • A grandson of the late Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose five sons in the Great War
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • A battalion commander
  • A man son will be born next year
  • The son of the Assistant Master of Eton College
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • The son of His Majesties Consul Athens
  • A England International and Olympic footballer
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose son will be killed in May 1940

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Gilbert Burrell Spencer Follett DSO MVO General Officer Commanding 3rd Guards Brigade Guards Division is killed in action at age 40.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Alexander Ross DSO (commanding 2nd Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 38 by a shell while crossing the Piave in Italy.
  • Captain James Philip Crawford (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. He is the son of “the Honorable” Thomas Crawford.
  • Captain James Shuckburgh Carter (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 37. His son will be born next year while his younger brother will be killed next month. They are sons of the Assistant Master of Eton College and grandsons of the Reverend Thomas Thelluson Carter.
  • Captain Francis Geoffrey Eliot MC (Royal Marines Light Infantry) is killed at age 28. He is the last of three brothers who have been killed in the war.
  • Lieutenant Francis Rowlands Harker-Thomas (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Percy Baglietto Cottrell MC (Royal Fusiliers attached General Staff) dies of wounds at Salonika at age 25. He is the son of His Majesties Consul Athens.
  • Lieutenant Joseph Dines (Liverpool Regiment) is killed by machine gun fire. He is well known as the “smiling footballer” who made his international debut for England versus Wales in 1910.  He also played international matches in the Olympics and for Millwall.
  • Lieutenant Arnold Oughtres Vick (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Epinoy at age 29. He is the son of Richard William Vick JP.
  • Lieutenant John Cecil Butler Prince (London Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend John Henry Prince Vicar of Braunton.
  • Lieutenant Charles Wilfred Eales (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Henry William Eales Vicar of Lewannick. Second Lieutenant Arthur Saunders Jones (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed last April and they are sons of the Reverend William Jones.
  • Second Lieutenant Howard Cross (London Regiment) is killed in action. His son will be killed in May 1940.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald Hugh O’Farrell (Irish Guards) is killed at age 19. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Edward O’Farrell KCB.
  • Corporal Arthur Norfield MM (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die on service in January 1919.
  • Corporal A George Hercock (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Gunner Andrew Walsh (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action one day before his brother is killed. The two official forms (B.104.82) containing the news of their deaths arrive at their parent’s home within one hour of each other.
  • Private William Munns (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 24. His brother was killed in action in April 1915.
  • Rifleman Frank Woodhead Pogson (London Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed on the last day of March 1918.
  • Private Thomas Herbert Ingrey (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His older brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Reginald Cecil Stephen Rogers (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed by a shell explosion at age 27.
  • Private Arthur Henry Hammond (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother died of wounds in April of this year.
  • Private Walter Halverson (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Private Sydney Strike (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed on Salonika at age 23. His brother died on service with the Royal Naval Division in February 1915.
  • Private Lewis Wyndham Jarvis (British Columbia Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and is one of five brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Driver George Fred Wheeler (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in October 1915.
  • Private Arthur Oakley (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private Arthur Wyman (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in June 1916.

Thursday 26 September 1918 We Lost 632

Eleven aircraft of 40th Squadron bomb and strafe Lieu St. Amand aerodrome, setting airplanes and hangars on fire.

Today’s losses include:

  • An RAF pilot killed in a tragic accident
  • A 6-victory ace
  • A man played cricket for the Hampstead Cricket Club
  • A man whose brother was killed in May 1917

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain William Harold Haynes DSO (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 23. He is taxiing his Camel on his home field at night when he accidentally turns the plane into a ditch but crawls away unscathed.  He then goes to the front of the machine to check the damage when his mechanic who has run over inadvertently triggers the guns killing Captain Haynes instantly.
  • Lieutenant William Benson Craig DFC (Royal Air Force) a 6-victory ace is killed at age 23.
  • Second Lieutenant Cyril Howard Eiloart (Irish Guards attached Guards Machine Gun Regiment) is killed in action. He played cricket for the Hampstead Cricket Club and was a member of the Incognici team which toured America.  His brother was killed in May 1917.

Tuesday 27 August 1918 We Lost 1,922

Gerard Charles Brassey

Second Lieutenant William Arthur Barr (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at Croiselles by a shell case he was firing exploding in the gun turret as a result of an enemy shell landing nearby.  The 36-year old is a journalist, author and traveler who wrote for the Idler magazine and was the editor of The Aeroplane.

Vis-En-Artois and Haurcourt are taken by the Canadian Corps.

  • Lieutenant Colonel ‘Lord’ Alfred Eden Browne DSO (186th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 39 when in command of his Brigade near Vis-en-Artois while supporting the Canadian attack. He is the son of the 5th Marquess of Sligo.
  • Lieutenant Hugh D’Alton Livingston (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed leading an attack on Bois de Vert at age 27. With Oswald Grant (killed in June 1916) they were the Canadian Inter-Collegiate Tennis Champions representing the University of Toronto in 1912.
  • Acting Sergeant Ewart Arthur Blatchford (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 25 when hit by machine gun bullets. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas W Blatchford who lost another son in April 1916.

Today’s losses include:

  • A journalist, author, traveler and editor of The Aeroplane
  • The son of the 5th Marquess of Sligo
  • The son of a Member of Parliament and Baronet
  • The 1912 Canadian Inter Collegiate Doubles Tennis Champion
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A member of the Penarth Rugby Club

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain John Arthur Gascoyne-Cecil MC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Right Reverend ‘Sir’ William Gascoyne-Cecil, the Bishop of Exeter and has two brothers who been previously killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Cyril Gwyer (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Lieutenant Hugh Reginald Baldwin (Irish Guards) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed on HMS Queen Mary at Jutland.
  • Lieutenant Francis Wycliffe Russell MC (London Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Alfred Francis Russell Rector of Chingford.
  • Lieutenant Cedric George Edwards DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed by ant-ircraft fire at age 19. He is a 7 victory ace.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerard Charles Brassey (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 19. He is son of ‘Sir’ Leonard Brassey, the 1st Baronet and a Member of Parliament.
  • Private George Herbert De La Mare (Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 20 three years after his older brother has been killed in Gallipoli.
  • Private Charles Whittemore (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23 the day after his brother was killed.
  • Private James Douglas Stone (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother died of wounds in May 1915.
  • Private Walter Frank Hermon (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of wounds next November.
  • Private Arthur Chick (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. He is a member of the Penarth Rugby Club.
  • Private Edwin Lawrence Crofts (East Kent Regiment) is killed in action. His brother was killed in April 1917.

Monday 10 June 1918 We Lost 485

William Edward Parsons

An explosion occurs on board H.M. Motor Launch 64. Immediately after the explosion Commodore ‘Sir’ James Startin KCB Royal Naval Reserve proceeds alongside ML 64, the engine-room of which is still burning fiercely. On learning that Chief Motor Mechanic Herbert Mann (RNVR) is below, he springs down the hatch without the slightest hesitation, and succeeds in recovering the body practically unaided. In view of the fact that the bulkhead between the engine-room and the forward tanks had been blown down by the force of the explosion, and that the fire is blazing upon the side and on the top of the forward tanks, which are composed of exceedingly thin metal and are consequently liable to burst at any moment, the action of Commodore Startin in entering the engine-room before the fire is subdued shows the utmost possible gallantry and disregard of personal safety. Had the engineer not been past human aid he would undoubtedly have owed his life entirely to the courage and promptitude of Commodore Startin who will be awarded the Albert Medal for his actions.

Petty Officer William Sunley (HMS Low Tyne) is one of three killed when his ship is torpedoed by UB-34.  He dies at age 27 and has two brothers who will also lose their lives in the Great War. Seaman Roderick MacKenzie (SS Borg Royal Naval Reserve) is killed when his ship is torpedoed by UB-103. He is one of twenty-four casualties and dies at age 19. He has two brothers who will also be killed in the war.

 Today’s losses include:

  • A 13-victory ace
  • The 5th Earl of Rosse
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major William Edward Parsons (Irish Guards) the 5th Earl of Rosse dies suddenly at Birr Castle, Ireland at age 44.
  • Thirteen victory ace Captain John Gerald Manuel DSC (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 25 in a collision with Second Lieutenant Francis Coupe Dodd who is also killed at age 22.
  • Corporal Lionel Roy Lukin (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Private William Wallace Boustead (Border Regiment) dies at home at age 30. His brother was killed in April 1917.
  • Private John Frances Bray (Northumberland Fusiliers) dies at home at age 18. His brother was killed in action in August 1915.

Sunday 26 May 1918 We Lost 510

Thomas Frederick Le Mesurier DSC

The steamer Thames (Master W A McPhail) is torpedoed and sunk six miles from Seaham Harbour. Four of her crew are killed including her master.

S S Kyarra two days after sailing from Tilbury for Devonport, Plymouth towards the western end on the Channel where she is to embark with civilian passengers and full general cargo is attacked and fatally wounded by UB-57 near Swanage and sent to the bottom. Six lives are lost.

  • Lamps Henry Watterson (S S Princess Royal) is killed at age 53 when his ship is sunk by a submarine. His nephew was killed earlier this month while also serving in the merchant marine.
  • Also lost on the Princess Royal are father Cood John William France age 48 and his son Assistant Stewart Harry France age 17.

Lieutenant Commander Paul Thomond Gape Methuen (HMS Hercules, Royal Navy) dies of illness at home at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Paul Edward O’Bryen Methuen.

 

Today’s losses include:

  • Families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew was recently killed
  • A father and son killed together
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A 7-victory ace
  • An actor
  • The father of the man called the ‘first corporate electronic systems analyst’

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Thomas Frederick LeMesurier DSC (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 21. He is a seven victory ace.
  • Lieutenant Frank Wilfred Butt is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Butt Rector of Rodmarton.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Augustus Boyd Oliver (Irish Guards attached Guards Machine Gun Regiment) dies of wounds at age 34. He is an actor and the son of the Reverend George William Oliver.
  • Lance Corporal Henry Jack Triesman (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the father of Davaid Triesman Caminer OBE who has been called the world’s “first corporate electronic systems analyst”. He served in the Second World War losing a leg in March 1943 at the Battle of Mareth while serving in the Green Howards in Tunisia.
  • Lance Corporal Frank Hartley MM (Royal Engineers) is killed. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Private Abram Dale (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 24 becoming the oldest and last of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Wednesday 8 May 1918 We Lost 816

Edward Budd

While on a line patrol, Captain Eldon Abraham Burn (Royal Air Force) has his machine badly damaged by anti-aircraft fire, both upper longerons being completely severed.  Despite this he flies on for another hour and completes the patrol.  A flight of six SE5a’s from 74th Squadron is pounced upon by ten Fokker Tri-planes east of Zillebeke.  Three of the British aircraft are shot down, two of the pilots being killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • A military Chaplain
  • The son of a Naval Chaplain
  • An 8-victory ace
  • A man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The son of the 5th Lord Clamorrris

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Francis Ingleby Harrison (Royal West Kent Regiment attached Royal Air Force) is killed when his HP 0/100 is shot down over Bruges Docks at age 35. He is the son of the Reverend John James Harrison Chaplain and Royal Navy Instructor.
  • Captain Roderick McDonald (Royal Air Force) an 8-victory ace is killed at age 24.
  • Captain Edward Budd (Irish Guards) MC is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Cecil L Budd, KBE.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Frederic Miles (Australian Infantry) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Frederic James Miles DSO OBE.
  • Chaplain 4th Class the Reverend Alexander Allen (attached New Zealand Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 34.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Burrell Thorne (Royal Air Force) is killed in a flying accident at age 23. His brother will be killed in action on 2nd March 1942.
  • Second Lieutenant the Honorable Richard Gerald Ava Bingham (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 22. He is the youngest son of the late John George Barry Bingham 5th Lord Clamorris and his brother was awarded the Victoria Cross at Jutland.
  • Second Lieutenant Myer Joseph Levine (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed in an airplane collision at home at age 18. His brother died on service in England almost one year ago and the brothers are buried in the same local cemetery.
  • Sergeant Delacy C Berrington (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. His brother died of wounds in March 1916.
  • Corporal Henry Wallace Impey (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Reginald Thornton (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in August 1915.
  • Private Samuel George Nash (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Henry Miller (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed when HMS Abourkir was sunk in September 1914.
  • Private Nathan Zimmerman (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed. He is one of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William McKendrick (Labour Corps) dies of wounds. His brother was killed last year.
  • Private Leslie Strudwick Elphick (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in August and they are sons of the Reverend James Studwick Elphick Vicar of St Mark’s Forest Gate.
  • Private Samuel Melling (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 38. His son will be killed in October 1944.

Wednesday 27 March 1918 We Lost 2,526

Basil Arthur Horsfall VC

Second Lieutenant Alan Arnett McLeod, while flying with his observer, Lieutenant Arthur W Hammond MC, attacks hostile formations with bombs and machine gun fire.  He is assailed at a height of 5,000 feet by eight enemy triplanes which dive at him from all directions, firing from their front guns.  By skilful maneuvering he enables his observer to fire bursts at each machine in turn, shooting three of them down out of control.  By this time Second Lieutenant McLeod has received five wounds, and while continuing the engagement a bullet penetrates his petrol tank and sets the machine afire. He then climbs out on to the left bottom plane, controlling his machine from the side of the fuselage, and by side slipping steeply keeps the flames to one side, thus enabling the observer to continue firing until the ground is reached.  The observer is wounded six times when the machine crashes in “No Man’s Land” and Second Lieutenant McLeod, notwithstanding his own wounds, drags him away from the burning wreckage at great personal risk from heavy machine gun fire from the enemy’s lines.  This very gallant pilot is again wounded by a bomb while engaged in the act of rescue, but he perseveres until he has placed Lieutenant Hammond in comparative safety, before falling himself from exhaustion and loss of blood.  For this action Lieutenant McLeod will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Colonel John Stanhope Collings-Wells (Bedfordshire Regiment) VC DSO is killed in action at age 37 performing the acts that will win him the Victoria Cross.  Beginning on 22nd March during the fighting from Marcoing to Albert when the rearguard was in great danger of being captured, Lieutenant Colonel Collings-Wells calls for volunteers to remain behind and hold up the enemy for 1½ hours while the remainder of the rearguard withdraws.  During the time the colonel moved amongst his men guiding and encouraging them and even when twice wounded continues to encourage them until he is killed.

Second Lieutenant Basil Arthur Horsfall (East Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds at Ayette at age 30 received 21st March between Moyenneville and Ablainzevelle, France performing acts for which he will be awarded the Victoria Cross. When the enemy attacked Second Lieutenant Horsfall’s center platoon, his three forward sections are driven back and he is wounded in the head by enemy fire. Ignoring the wound, he immediately reorganizes what remains of his troops and counter-attacks to regain his original position. Despite the severity of his head wound, he refuses to go to the dressing station, as the three other officers in his company have been killed. Later, he makes another counterattack, but is ordered to withdraw. The last to leave his position, he was shot soon afterwards.

Two old destroyers are mined in company off the east coast of England in the North Sea. HMS Kale (Commander Harold E Dennison) sinks while the Exe is damage losing five of her crew.

Flight Lieutenant Lea Ewart Barnes Wimbush (Royal Naval Air Service) is performing aerobatics over the assembled crowd at Berkhampstead Grammar School’s speech day when the wings of his Sopwith Triplane tear off while attempting three consecutive loops. He will die of his injuries tomorrow at age 19. His cousin will be killed in the Royal Air Force next May and due to their parents both being John and Maud Wimbush they are sometimes believed to be brothers.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Welsh Rugby International
  • A man who is both the son and father of Baronets
  • Multiple Victoria Cross Winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • Multiple families that will lose two and the sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple men whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • A medical student
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A man whose father will die on service next September
  • A Police Officer
  • The Captain of the East Grimstead Football Club

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Harry Fearnley Kirkpatrick DSO (East Kent Regiment commanding Anson Battalion Royal Naval Division) dies of wounds at age 42. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James Kirkpatrick 8th Baronet of Closeburn and the father of the 10th His brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Skinner Raymond Sebastian MC (commanding 5th Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at Cugny on 23rd March at age 31.
  • Major Austin Hanbury Brown DSO MC (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Hanbury Brown KCMG.
  • Major George Paterson Nunneley MC (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Barham Nunneley Vicar of Rennington whose younger son was killed in October 1914.
  • Captain Percival St George Findlater (Army Service Corps) is killed at age 36. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Findlater.
  • Captain Noel Forbes Humphreys MC (Tank Corps) dies of wounds at age 27. He is a Welsh Rugby International and member of the 1910 British Tour of South Africa Rugby team. He is the son of the Reverend Henry James Humphreys Vicar of Thornley who has previously lost two other sons in the war.
  • Captain Charles Frederick Wybrow Nash MC (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Barnett Nash Vicar of Watton.
  • Lieutenant Edward Treloar Smart (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend John Raester Smart Chaplain of Tonbridge School.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Sydney Howells (Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed while instructing at age 19. He is the son of Canon Edmund Howells vicar of Milford Haven.
  • Lieutenant Michael William Doyle (General List attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 24. His brother died of wounds in February 1916.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Raymond Whately (South Wales Borderers attached Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Lieutenant Dudley Walter Rowland Hall (Royal Marine Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas Rowland Hall of Kirstead Rectory.
  • Flight Sub Lieutenant Edward Cuthbert Stocker (Royal Naval Air Service) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Edward White Irvine (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20 at Morcourt. He is a medical student at Aberdeen University and the son of the Reverend John A Irvine of the South United Free Church.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Mather (Liverpool Regiment) is killed in action at Folies. His two brothers have been killed previously in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant David Macklin (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Walter Macklin Rector of Houghton.
  • Sergeant George Henry Caton (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. His father will die of pneumonia on service next September.
  • Sergeant Lionel William Loveband (Australian Light Horse) is killed in the Middle East at age 29. His brother was killed in December 1914 and they are sons of the Reverend Matthew Loveband Vicar of Burrington.
  • Corporal William Henry Warren (Machine Gun Corps) is killed. His son will be killed in the Second World War in April 1942.
  • Corporal Ashley Hatchard (South African Infantry) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war. He is the son of the late Reverend Alfred Hatchard (Resident Commissioner, Mafeking) and grandson of the late Right Reverend T G Hatchard, Bishop of Mauritius.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Woodcock VC (Irish Guards) is killed at age 29. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions last September.
  • Lance Corporal Albert Edward Joseph (Sussex Regiment) is killed in action. He is the third son of Reverend F Joseph to die in the Great War and had been the Captain of the East Grinstead football club.
  • Rifleman Frank Godfrey (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed last June.
  • Private Thomas Daniel Richard Carter (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Don W MacBeath (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds. His two brothers have already lost their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Harold Crossley (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed on Christmas Eve December 1914.
  • Private William George Elliott (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action. His brother was killed on Gallipoli in August 1915.
  • Private George Edward Astley (Welsh Guards) is killed at age 26. He was a police officer for the London and North Western Railway Police.
  • Private Thomas Beaumont (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 19. His only son will die in 1943 as a prisoner of the Japanese while serving in the West Yorkshire Regiment.
  • Gunner Arthur George Freeman (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 33. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Private John Williams Bailey (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age19. His brother was killed in August 1916.