Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Life Guards

Saturday 24 October 1914 – We Lost 616

Warwickshire Regiment Badge

Warwickshire Regiment Badge

The First Battle of Langemarck ends. At Reutel, just north of the Menin Road, the 2nd battalion of the Wiltshire Regiment is all but wiped out with the 450 survivors being taken prisoner.

The 4th Guards Brigade, with the Coldstream Guards leading, attacks some high ground covering Langemarck.  In spite of fierce German opposition, the feature is taken, and held until the Battalions are relieved in two days.

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings up ammunition under heavy shellfire.

The importation of sugar into Britain is prohibited.

DeWet and Beyers are in overt rebellion in South Africa.

Captain John Edmund Valentine Isaac (Rifle Brigade) is wounded while guiding a unit to a critical point and with great skill which resulted in checking the enemy.  For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  He will be killed in May 1915.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Battalion commanders
  • Sons and sons-in-law of clergy
  • Father of ten children, including two sets of twins, one of which will die in the Second World War
  • Master of Kinnaird (son of the Baron)
  • Aide-de-camp to the former Lieutenant Governor of Burma
  • Baronet and son of Baronet
  • Son of a General
  • Rosslyn Park rugby footballer
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Colonel Walter Latham Loring (commanding 2nd Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Henry Loring Rector of Gillingham (one of three sons of his to be killed) and son-in-law of the Reverend R M Marshall Rector of Hedensham Norfolk. He leaves ten children including two sets of twins. His son Lieutenant Henry Latham Loring will lose his life in the first year of the Second World War.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel William Stirling Bannatyne (commanding 1st Liverpool Regiment) is killed when he is the shot in the heart at age 45. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend H H Windwood of Bath and brother-in-law of Lieutenant Colonel W Q Winwood DSO (Dragoon Guards).
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Douglas Arthur Kinnaird (Scots Guards) the Master of Kinnaird son of the 11th Baron is killed in action at age 35. His brother will be killed in 1917 and they are related to the Duke of Leinster, the Earl of Gainsborough and ‘Sir’ Andrew Agnew.
  • Captain William Geoffrey Vyvyan (Welsh Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Frederick Vyvyan Rector of Withiel.
  • Captain William Cecil Holt Cree (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend William Cree of St Matthias and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon T S Hichens.
  • Captain Lachlan Gordon-Duff(Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of Thomas Gordon-Duff JP DL and grandson of ‘Sir’ Charles Tennant Baronet. He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Julian Silver Strickland Dunlop(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 38 leading a bayonet charge near Ypres. He was the ADC to ‘Sir’ Frederick Fryer, Lieutenant Governor of Burma from 1899-1903. He has four brothers who serve in the military, two of whom will be killed one in November 1914 the other in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Richard William Levinge (Life Guards) the 10th Baronet is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ William Henry Levinge and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Wardleworth(Royal Army Medical Corps) drowns at age 34 while taking his regular constitutional swim at Le Havre.  He is the only son of Douglas Wardleworth MD JP and his son will be born today.
  • Lieutenant Gerald Ferrers Nixon (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 33. He is the son of Major General A I Nixon DL.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Antrobus (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the 4th Baronet ‘Sir’ Edmund Antrobus.
  • Lieutenant Bruce Duffus Costin (West Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds received four days earlier at age 25. He played rugby football for Rosslyn Park.
  • Lieutenant Cecil Smeathman (Leicestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day by a shell in the trenches at Rue du Bois at age 25. His brother Lieutenant Julian Missenden Smeathman (Royal Engineers) is killed in action on the same day at age 26.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Craig Cowan (Royal Scots) is killed La Plinche at age 20. He is the grandson of C W Cowan DL.
  • Lance Sergeant Frederick Henry Mills (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His two brothers will be killed in 1917.
  • Private Ernest Cobb (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in January 1918.
  • Brothers Private Harry and Private Thomas Hedges are killed in action while serving together with the Wiltshire Regiment. Harry dies at age 23 and Thomas dies at 28. Both are commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.
  • Also killed while serving in the Wiltshire Regiment and commemorated on the Ypres Memorial this day is Corporal Edwin Pagetkilled at age 27. He has two brothers who will be killed in late 1918.

Tuesday 20 October 1914 – We Lost 728

Duke of Devonshire Coat of Arms

Duke of Devonshire Coat of Arms

The Indian Expeditionary Force (Cavalry, Meerut and Lahore Divisions) arrive on the Western Front.  A German counter-offensive begins against 3rd Division.

The first merchant ship known to be sunk by a submarine is the British steamer SS Glitra sunk by U17.  The U-boat captain gives her crew ten minutes to abandon ship then open the sea cocks sending her to the bottom.  The U-boat then tows their boats several miles towards the English coast.

The 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment embarks on HMAT Star of Victoria at Sydney bound for Egypt and eventually Gallipoli.

The plan designed by Brigadier General Dobell to capture Edea, in the Cameroon begins.  While a diversion is created on the Sanaga River by 150 men of the West Africa Regiment, a main force of 240 Europeans, 800 Senegalese tirailleurs with another 150 men of the West Africa Regiment, and 1,000 carriers, all under the command of a French Colonel will proceed, first by transports to the mouth of the Nyong River and then by small craft, 25 miles up the river to Dehane.  Here the force will disembark and march twenty miles overland to Edea from what is hoped will be an unexpected quarter.

Today’s losses include:

  • Grandson of the 7th and brother of the 9th Duke of Devonshire
  • Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving holder
  • Son and son-in-law of Baronets
  • Sons of families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of Generals
  • Sons of clergy
  • Amateur jockey and polo player
  • Son and heir to a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son of the High Sheriff of Oxford
  • Battalion commander
  • Man whose son will be born early next year
  • Man whose son will be killed in the Second World War while a brother is killed later in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Major ‘Lord’ John Spencer Cavendish DSO (Life Guards) is killed in action at age 39.  He is the third son of ‘Lord’ and Lady Edward Cavendish, grandson of the 7th Duke of Devonshire and the younger brother of the 9th Duke of Devonshire. He served in the South African War.

  •  Major Edward Henry Edwin Daniell DSO (commanding 2nd Royal Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at Le Pilly at age 46.
  • Captain (Temporary Major) Peter Martin Connellan (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the only son of Major J H F H Connellan JP DL and he holds the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for saving a man in his Regiment from drowning in 1909.
  • Captain Selwyn Lucas Lucas-Tooth(Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 35 five weeks after his younger brother has been killed in action. They are the sons of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert Lucas-Tooth whose eldest son who has succeeded him as the Baronet will be killed in July 1918. Captain Lucas-Tooth is the son in law of Edward Law Durand the Baronet.
  • Captain William Graham Montgomerie (Leinster Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. He is the grandson of Dr. William Montgomerie discoverer of gutta percha and General William Anson McCleverty.
  • Captain Arthur Craven Charrington (Dragoons) is killed at age 32. He is an amateur jockey who once at the Simla Race Meeting rode 13 winners and one second out of 15 mounts. He also has a fine record as a polo player.
  • Captain Eric Bruce Reid(North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of Major General A T Reid.
  • Captain Henry Arthur Chichester (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at Canteleux at age 32. He is a first cousin of Brigadier General A A Chichester and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Arthur George Tillard(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 39.  He is the son of the Reverend James Tillard and had served in the South African War. His son will be born early next year.
  • Lieutenant John Lawson-Smith(West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action ten days before his brother will meet the same fate.  He dies at age 22.
  • Lieutenant Charles Hylton Van Neck(Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in six days serving in the Grenadiers Guards.
  • Lieutenant Edwin Cecil Leigh Hoskyns (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the only son and heir to ‘Sir’ Leigh Hoskyns 1st Baronet JP and High Sheriff for Oxford.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Spencer (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend William Edmund Spencer Vicar of St Botolph’s Colchester.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Phillip Joseph Snead-Cox(Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when he is shot in the head at age 19.  One of his brothers will be killed in eight days and another at the Battle of Jutland.
  • Second Lieutenant Mervyn Noott (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Alfred Hickman Baronet.
  • Second Lieutenant Almericus John Falkiner de Courcy Williams (West India Regiment attached Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the 1st cousin of Lord Kingsale.
  • Second Lieutenant Cuthbert Temple Waldy (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Garmondsway Waldy Rector of Yarm.
  • Lieutenant Peter Clutterbuck (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 22 when his company is sent to support the Leinster Regiment between Lille and Armentiers. He is the eldest son of Peter Clutterbuck JP Lord of the Manor of Sarratt of Goldingtons, Sarratt Herts. Lieutenant Clutterbuck was gazetted to the East Yorkshire Regiment in 1911 and went to the Front on 6 September.
  • Second Lieutenant Mark Robinson Pease (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Harold Robinson Pease JP DL.
  • Second Lieutenant Alan James Ramsay Anderson(Royal Irish Regiment) is killed at age 21.  He was educated at University College, Oxford where he was a “Blue” in Boxing vs. Cambridge for three years.  He was also President of the St. Patrick’s Club and a Member of the Vincent’s Club at Oxford.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Herbert Hawkswood (Grenadier Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Lance Corporal Walter James March (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in February 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Claude Hamblin (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Charles Arthur Howard (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Thomas Frain (Leinster Regiment) is killed, his brother will die on service in November 1915.
  • Private Ellis Nuttall (Manchester Regiment) is killed. His son will be killed in World War II.
  • Private William Hudson (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother Thomas will also be killed in the war.

photo from wikipedia.org

 

Monday 19 October 1914 – We Lost 343

 

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

I Corps arrives at Ypres. ‘Sir’ Henry Rawlinson is unable to occupy Menin.

The 2nd Royal Irish Regiment is surrounded and more than 300 men (nearly all wounded) surrender after a very stiff fight at Le Pilly on the Aubers Ridge.  (The Battalion will be withdrawn to be rebuilt shortly after this affair).

HMS Chatham, responding to a report that German ships have been seen at the settlement of Lindi, steams into the mouth of the Lukuledi River, clears for action, but the only vessel he finds there is the merchant ship Prasident. She is flying the flag of the International Red Cross.  Notes are exchanged between Captain Drury-Lowe and the governor of Lindi. The Chatham’s first officer, Commander R Fitzmaurice, discovers documents showing Prasident has been supplying SMS Konigsberg with both intelligence and provisions at a place called Salale.  Drury-Lowe disables Prasident’s engines.  Salale is not shown on any British maps, so its location is unknown.  Also found on board is a recent survey of the waters off the Rufiji River.  The British also discover an out of date copy of the “Handbuch der Ostkurste Afrikas” in which the village of Salale is mentioned as being on the Rufiji.  Drury-Lowe heads for the Rufiji.

A new naval decoration the Distinguished Service Medal is established for “bravery and resource under fire”. Two hundred twenty nine holders will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include”

  • Cousin of Winston Churchill
  • Son and son-in-law of Baronets
  • Grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Norman Jerome Beauchamp Leslie (Rifle Brigade) a son of Colonel ‘Sir’ John Leslie the 2nd Baronet and cousin of Winston Churchill is killed in action at age 25 when he is shot by a sniper at Armentieres.

  • Captain John Hugh Gardiner McCormick (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 28. He is the son of S S McCormick JP.
  • Captain George Ryefield Taylour(Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Major General ‘Lord’ John Henry Taylour and grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort KP. He was wounded and made a prisoner of war during the South African War and is a keen amateur heavyweight boxer.
  • Captain Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton (Life Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the only son of Canon T Percy Pemberton Prebendary of York Minster and a member of the MCC. He is also the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Worsley Baronet.
  • Captain Leicester William le Marchant Carey(Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 36. He is the only son of the late Major General Constantine Carey CB.
  • Private Frank William Farrant(Cheshire Regiment) is killed his brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Stephen Collins (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 16. He is the first of four sons of Agnes Collins of Waterford who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Thomas Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

 

Friday 16 October 1914 – We Lost 58

The First battle of Ypres begins. It will last until 22 November.  The Somerset Light Infantry occupies the village of Erquinghem-Lys, approximately 1.5 kilometers west of Armentieres.  German forces had captured it earlier in the month.  The Germans attempt to advance but as the Allied line is now complete the war of maneuver is over and the Battle of the Yser begins.  The Battle of the Yser is part of a general German attack that stretches from the sea to La Bassee. Givenchy is recaptured and held.

John French’s GHQ for the first time includes Rawlinson’s Corps. The forward movement of III Corps and Cavalry Corps to the Lys will continue and 7th Division will fan out of Ypres and take up a line from Zandvoorde, through Gheluvelt to Zonnebeke.  The weather is very poor, with heavy rain and fog. In the many places the fields are inundated with streams and ditches rising and little practical progress is made.

At 17:00 a convoy of forty-five ships, including fourteen troopships of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’ leaves Bombay harbor bound for Africa escorted by the battleship HMS Goliath. Most of the sepoys are soon sick.  The transports are badly overcrowded and any physical exercise is difficult; this is particularly true on board the small Assouan, 1,900 tons, which carries the Palamcottah Light Infantry. Many of the Indian units are not provided with their accustomed food, their digestions are upset and their religious scruples outraged. One officer declares the slow two-week voyage to Mombasa to be “a hell on crowded ships in tropical heat”.  Not surprisingly the troops are dispirited and discouraged. Major General Aitken and his staff travel in the Karmala, a converted P & O liner, and are somewhat more comfortable. On the same day Force “D” leaves Bombay bound for the Persian Gulf to be in place if Turkey enters the war.

The general attack on Tsing-tau begins from the sea by a combined British and Japanese force, assisted by airplanes.  The forts are damaged.  Casualties to the Allied forces are only three, all British.

The first Canadian Contingent (31,200 officers and men) arrives in Britain.

The New Zealand Expeditionary Forces leave Wellington with 8,250 men consisting of one mounted rifle brigade (three regiments) and one infantry brigade (four battalions) with their supply columns and a divisional headquarters in ten ships. They are bound for Albany at the southwestern extremity of Western Australia to join twenty-six transports there assembled for the 20,000 man Australian Army. This includes one infantry division (three infantry brigades plus field artillery) and one brigade of light horse as well as support troops.  This force is destined to join what will become the ANZAC force on Gallipoli.

The 17th (Duke of Cambridge’s Own) Lancers depart Sialkote, India for France aboard the transports SS Leicestershire and Islanda with 16 officers, 4 warrant officers, 533 other ranks and 619 horses.

After being quiet for almost three weeks SMS Emden strikes three times on this day. Her first victim is the Clan Grant (Captain Norman Leslie) carrying 4,000 tons of valuable mixed cargo from England to Calcutta via Madras. Victim number two is the dredger Ponrabbel.  Captain Edwin Gore and his men can hardly wait to become prisoners.  The final victim of the day is the Benmohr (Captain J D Sarchet) carrying a full cargo of 6,700 tons of valuable piece goods, including a large and elegant motor boat, from London to Penang and Japan.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet
  • Son-in-law of the Earl of Lonsdale
  • A family that will suffer the loss of two sons

 

Cap Badge of the Life Guards

Cap Badge of the Life Guards

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Second Lieutenant Eric Dennys Murray (Hussars) is killed at Le Bizet at age 21.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Sheppard and Lady Murray. Hearing that Lieutenant Murray has been shot, Sergeant David Brunton sends information to the Squadron Commander and then gallops off with the patrol towards the village. On dismounting he calls for a volunteer to help him, and Private Walter Alfred Jerome at once dismounts. Having sent his horse and that of Jerome back to the inn with the rest of the patrol, Sergeant Brunton and Jerome crawl into the road to Lieutenant Murray, but as they raise him the reports of rifles rang out from point-blank range, and they are obliged to rush to cover. After waiting a short time they make a second attempt to carry away Lieutenant Murray. Upon going out they are again fired upon, but they quickly bring the officer under cover. To their dismay, however, they find he is dead, being wounded in the head, the left hand, and the region of the heart. Both men will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for their efforts.

  • Lieutenant and Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert George Vivian Duff (Life Guards) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Charles Garden Assheton-Smith Duff, the 1st He succeeded to the title and estate of his father three weeks after the death of his father. He is the son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Lonsdale.
  • Private James Nixon(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1915.

photo from ebay.co.uk

Wednesday 14 October 1914 – We Lost 182

Hubert Hamilton

Hubert Hamilton

Air reconnaissance is impossible and artillery is badly hindered due to heavy mist and rain.  Still the first artillery “barrage” of the Great War is fired by the highly trained gunners of the 65th Field Howitzer Battery (Royal Artillery) in support of French infantry at Vermelles.

The 8th Brigade entrenches in the positions taken the previous day while the 9th Brigade which has made less progress pushes forward on its left.  British troops of the 19th Brigade and the 4th Division drive the Germans out of Bailleul which is easily occupied as are Dranoutre, Kemmel, Neuve Eglise, Wulverghem, Messines and Wytschate. The South Staffordshire Regiment reaches Ypres while units of the Cavalry Corps meet with the 3rd Cavalry Division south of Ypres completing a tenuous line of the BEF from the south of the La Bassee Canal to Ypres.

Today’s losses include:

  • Major General H I W Hamilton
  • Son and grandson of a general
  • Families that will lose two children including one that will have a daughter die on service
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A multi sport athlete
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Baronet
  • The first Australian to be killed on the Western Front

 Today’s highlighted casualty is:

Major General Hubert Ian Wetherall Hamilton CVO CB DSO General Officer Commanding 3rd Division is killed at age 53 by a shell while visiting the trenches of the 8th Brigade. He and his Aide de Camp are out to the north of Vieille Chapelle to see why an advance is hung up. They are dismounted and standing on a road when a salvo of shrapnel burst right over them.  One bullet hits him in the forehead and he dies almost immediately. No one else standing in the group is hit. He is the son of Lieutenant General Henry Meade Hamilton and brother of General ‘Sir’ Bruce Hamilton KCB KCVO. He served in Burma 1886-8, Nile 1897-8 and the South Africa War. His body will be returned to England for burial at Cherlton St Mary Churchyard.

 

  • Major William Lewis Campbell Allan(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at Mont des Cats age 43. He is the son of Major General William Allan.
  • Captain Arthur Milford Ker (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Milford Ker CIE MVO and the grandson of General T D Ker.
  • Captain Cecil Glendower Percival Gilliat (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in April of next year.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Noel Whitfeld (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Lewis Whitfeld Vicar of Hughenden.
  • Lieutenant Claude Davis Sneath (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of George Sneath JP and a member of several Hendon and Middlesex hockey, football and cricket clubs.
  • Lieutenant John Stirling Ainsworth (Hussars) is killed age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Stirlng Ainsworth MP 1st Baronet and grandson of R R Macredie JP DL MP for Argyllshire.
  • Lieutenant Jasper Carew (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Henry William Carew, the Vicar of Rattery, Devon whose daughter will die on service eight days before the Armistice.
  • Second Lieutenant William George Hewitt(Royal Scots) is killed 12 days before his brother will suffer the same fate. The brothers are sons of ‘the Honorable’ William James Hewitt.
  • Second Lieutenant John Dossie Patteson (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Colonel Henry Tyrwhitt Stainforth Patteson JP DL.
  • Corporal of Horse William Thomas Leggett (Life Guards) is killed at Geluwe. He is the first Australian to be killed on the Western Front.

photo from Wikipedia.org