Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Maryleborne Cricket Club

Friday 13 November 1914 – We Lost 254

 

Herbert Kitchener

Herbert Kitchener

Sanctuary Wood is shelled during this night while being used to screen troops behind the front line.

The British 8th Division is deployed to the front providing much needed reinforcement.

Today’s losses include:

  • A former Aide de camp to Lord Kitchener
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead
  • A Swinton Town Football Club player
  • Grandson of the 9th Lord Digby
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • The brother of a ‘war poet’
  • Son of a General
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of General
  • Brother-in-law killed later in the war
  • Nephew of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Colonel Raymond John Marker DSO (Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, I Army Corps Headquarters) on the General Staff dies of wounds at Boulogne received 4 November at age 47. His body is one of the few repatriated to England for burial during the War. He is the son of Richard Marker JP and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Marker and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Thomas Jackson 1st Baronet. He is the grandson of the 9th Lord Digby and during the South African War served as Aide de Camp to Lord Kitchener. His brother-in-law Claude Stewart Jackson will be killed in October 1917.

  •  Captain Charles James Lyon(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the youngest of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.  The first was killed in the first month of the war while the oldest, a war poet, will be killed in May 1915.
  • Captain Robert Guy Incledon Chichester(Highland Light Infantry) the son of the late Reverend Richard Chichester the Rector of Drewsteignton is killed at age 41. He served on the North West Frontier 1897-8 and South African War.
  • Captain William Ernest Rogerson (Durham Light Infantry) dies of heart failure at age 42 at home. He is the son-in-law of Lieutenant General W H Mackesy.
  • Captain John Alexander Halliday (Hussars) died of wounds at Le Touquet at age 39 received 31 October Messines. He is the nephew of R Howell Brown Vicar of Enfield and a member of MCC.
  • Captain Archibald William Roberson-Glasgow (Garhwal Rifles Indian Army) is killed at age 34. He is the son of R B Robertson-Glasgow DL and his wife is the niece of Lady Robertson of Forteviot. He served in the Somaliland Campaign in 1901.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Archibald Loyd (Scots Guards) is killed at Zonnebeke by shrapnel at age 24. He is the son of A K Loyd KC MP North Berks.
  • Lieutenant David Scott Dodgson(Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 29 when he is shot by a sniper while attempting to lay cable for his battery at Gorre. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ David Scott Dodgson KCB.
  • Lieutenant N Ramsay (Dragoon Guards attached Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Humfrey Richard Talbot (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 25 after his trench is hit by a shell killing and wounding many men. He attends to the wounds of his men despite his own wounds before dying. He is the son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead, Gustavus Talbot.
  • Private Edwin Charles Waite (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Private William Arthur Brewer (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is a member of the Swinton Town Football Club.
  • Boy George Leonard Hamshire (HMS Shannon) dies on service at age 16. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Wednesday 21 October 1914 – We Lost 818 (Plus 1)

Mr Punch and the footballer

A Punch cartoon, later made into a poster, shows Mr. Punch saying to a professional football player, “No doubt you can make money on this field, my friend, but there’s only one field today where you can get honor”.

On this morning British and French cavalry at Passchendaele, on a ridge midway between Ypres and Roulers, leave the village and fall back towards Ypres.  They have not been attacked, but seek the greater security of proximity to the larger town. Both sides begin to dig trenches, linking them in a continuous line, with machine gun emplacements, dugouts, communication trenches leading to the rear and saps going forward as close as possible to the enemy front line.  The trench lines established in the Ypres Salient become the scene over the next four years of the harshest fighting of any war in history. The Irish Guards are given the orders to “drive back the enemy wherever met”.

The first Battle of Langemark begins. It will last for four days.

In heavy fighting at Le Maisnil, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and the Middlesex Regiment are forced to retire this evening leaving on the field eight officers and men who will be buried the following day by the enemy. Captain Edward Stephen Gibbons (Middlesex Regiment) displays great coolness and zeal in action at La Maisnil during what is described as a serious emergency.  For his actions he will be awarded the DSO.  He will be killed in September 1918.

The operation to capture Edea has scarcely commenced when a whaler belonging to the Nigerian Government Yacht Ivy capsizes on a sandbar in the Njong River, drowning the superintendent of the Nigeria Marine, Commander George Smith Booth Gray (HMS Cumberland, Royal Naval Reserve), Lieutenant Herbert Alexander Child CMG (HMS Cumberland, Royal Navy) is also killed at age 44.  He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Child also killed is a French staff officer and one of the nine native soldiers on board. The lifeboat of the steamship Fullah is immediately launched and succeeds in rescuing Captain Cyril T M Fuller and the remaining eight natives. Captain Fuller is pulled exhausted from the surf after struggling valiantly to save the others.

Today’s losses include:

  • Great grandson of the Defender of Fort Detroit in the War of 1763 against the Indians
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Sons of clergy
  • Grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Heir to the 5th Viscount Monck
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Son of families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a Judge
  • A man whose father was killed in the Soudan
  • Son of Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Gladwyn Maurice Revell Turbutt (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. He is the son of William Gladwin Turbutt JP and great grandson of General Henry Gladwyn Defender of Fort Detroit Canada in the War of 1763 against the Indians.

 

  • Major Nigel Lucius Samuel Lysons(Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 38. He is the son of the late Canon Samuel Lysons Vicar of Rowsley and served in the South African War.
  • Major Charles Inglis Stockwell(Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received 20 October at age 38.  He is the son of General C M Stockwell CB and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Charles Henry Stanley Monck(Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son and heir of the 5th Viscount Monck. He had served previously in the South African War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wyndham Portal 2nd Baronet and he is a member of the MCC.
  • Captain S G Roe(Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.  His widow will marry Lord Gravers.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Gerald Malpas Robertsof the same Regiment is killed at age 19.  He was the “Victor Ludorum” three years in succession at Ardingly College, Sussex.
  • Captain William Miles DSO (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He served in the South African War and is a member of the MCC, the I Zinjari and the Free Foresters.
  • Captain Penry Bruce Lendon MVO (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P Lendon and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon Richardson Vicar of Northop Flints.
  • Captain John Ralph Mylton Thornycroft (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed last month.
  • Captain Cameron O’Bryen Harford Methuen (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is related to Field Marshall Methuen GCB and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Allan Humphrey Harden (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when shot in the head at age 33. He is the grandson of Judge Harden of Cheshire and General Atkinson of the Madras Army. His wife is the granddaughter of John Howe JP DL and a cousin of the Right Honorable Lord Musketry.
  • Captain William Miles Kington (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. His brother will die on service at home in September 1943.
  • Captain Arthur Howell Romilly (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next September and he is the son of Captain Francis J Romilly Royal Engineers who was killed in Soudan at Trofek. He is also a descendant of ‘Sir’ Samuel Somilly Solicitor General and law reformer of the early 19th He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Daniel George Harold Auchinleck (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of Major Thomas Auchinleck DL and played cricket for the Winchester XI in 1894 & 1895 against Eton.
  • Captain Logan Deare Passy (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed in August next year.
  • Lieutenant Henry Stanley Lowe(Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds in Paris received over a month ago on the Aisne at age 24. He is a son of the late Reverend E J Lowe Vicar of Stallingborough.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Fowler Murphy (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Richard William Murphy Canon of Tuam.
  • Lieutenant Theodore Prain(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ David Prain, CMG, CIE and Lady Prain.
  • Second Lieutenant Theodore Hugh Galton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are grandsons of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Hugh Clifford VC.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Holmes Watkins (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds next February.
  • Second Lieutenant William Woodthorpe Barnard-Smith (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Barnard Gooh Barnard-Smith Rector of North Cove.
  • Second Lieutenant Leonard Amauri Filleul(Somerset Light Infantry attached Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the chest at age 26. He is the Master at Monkton Combe School, Bath and had rowed in the winning Oxford trial eights in 1910.  He is also the Secretary of the Lincoln College Boat Club and the son of the Reverend Philip William Girdlestone Filleul, Rector of Devizes Wiltsire.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Fydell Walker (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day. He is the son the Reverend David Walker Vicar of Darlington and nephew of General J T Walker Royal Engineers the Surveyor General of India.
  • Private Lionel Vernon Brown (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds at home in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Dowing Lake (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother James will also lose his life in the war.
  • Private William Turner (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Walter John will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private John Banks (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother Richard will be killed in one week.
  • Private John Charles Howell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Arthur will also be killed in the war.
  • Private Lewis Pelgrena Mazzei (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in May 1917 and they are the only Mazzei to lose their lives in the service of King and Country in the Great War.

The Plus 1 is Hungarian Gymnast Arpad Pedery who was a member of the Silver medal winning Men’s Team European System Gymnastics team at he 1912 Olympics.

Monday 19 October 1914 – We Lost 343

 

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

I Corps arrives at Ypres. ‘Sir’ Henry Rawlinson is unable to occupy Menin.

The 2nd Royal Irish Regiment is surrounded and more than 300 men (nearly all wounded) surrender after a very stiff fight at Le Pilly on the Aubers Ridge.  (The Battalion will be withdrawn to be rebuilt shortly after this affair).

HMS Chatham, responding to a report that German ships have been seen at the settlement of Lindi, steams into the mouth of the Lukuledi River, clears for action, but the only vessel he finds there is the merchant ship Prasident. She is flying the flag of the International Red Cross.  Notes are exchanged between Captain Drury-Lowe and the governor of Lindi. The Chatham’s first officer, Commander R Fitzmaurice, discovers documents showing Prasident has been supplying SMS Konigsberg with both intelligence and provisions at a place called Salale.  Drury-Lowe disables Prasident’s engines.  Salale is not shown on any British maps, so its location is unknown.  Also found on board is a recent survey of the waters off the Rufiji River.  The British also discover an out of date copy of the “Handbuch der Ostkurste Afrikas” in which the village of Salale is mentioned as being on the Rufiji.  Drury-Lowe heads for the Rufiji.

A new naval decoration the Distinguished Service Medal is established for “bravery and resource under fire”. Two hundred twenty nine holders will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include”

  • Cousin of Winston Churchill
  • Son and son-in-law of Baronets
  • Grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Norman Jerome Beauchamp Leslie (Rifle Brigade) a son of Colonel ‘Sir’ John Leslie the 2nd Baronet and cousin of Winston Churchill is killed in action at age 25 when he is shot by a sniper at Armentieres.

  • Captain John Hugh Gardiner McCormick (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 28. He is the son of S S McCormick JP.
  • Captain George Ryefield Taylour(Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Major General ‘Lord’ John Henry Taylour and grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort KP. He was wounded and made a prisoner of war during the South African War and is a keen amateur heavyweight boxer.
  • Captain Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton (Life Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the only son of Canon T Percy Pemberton Prebendary of York Minster and a member of the MCC. He is also the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Worsley Baronet.
  • Captain Leicester William le Marchant Carey(Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 36. He is the only son of the late Major General Constantine Carey CB.
  • Private Frank William Farrant(Cheshire Regiment) is killed his brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Stephen Collins (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 16. He is the first of four sons of Agnes Collins of Waterford who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Thomas Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

 

Monday 21 September 1914 – We Lost 170 (Plus 1)

Laurence Binyon’s poem “For The Fallen” is first published in TheTimes

 With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,

England mourns for her dead across the sea.

Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,

Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal

Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,

There is music in the midst of desolation

And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,

Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.

They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;

They fell with their faces to the foe.

 They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;

They sit no more at familiar tables of home;

They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;

They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,

Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,

To the innermost heart of their own land they are known

As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,

Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;

As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,

To the end, to the end, they remain.

 Today’s casualties include:

  • A battalion commander
  • Member of the Maryleborne Cricket Club
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Godson of King George
  • Son of Clergy
  • One son of a family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Victoria Cross winner who was:
    • attempting to escape a from prisoner-of-war camp
    • the son of clergy
    • the son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
    • the cousin of a Baronet
    • a published author

Today’s casualty of the day is

Major Charles Allix Lavington Yate VC (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed during an attempt to escape from a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany at age 42. It is believed that when challenged by German civilians, he cut his own throat with a razor. The son of the Reverend George Edward Yate, Vicar of Madeley, son-in-law of John F Brigg JP and cousin of ‘Sir’ Charles Yate the 1st Baronet had served in the South African War. He was present at the Siege of Port Arthur during the Russo Japanese War and is a Japanese Interpreter. He is the author of an article printed in the September issue of Blackwood Magazine entitled “Moral Qualities in War”. While in command of two companies in the trenches at Le Cateau on 26 August, and, when all other officers were killed or wounded and ammunition exhausted, he led his nineteen survivors against the enemy in a charge in which he is wounded and captured.  For his actions on the 26th August he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Charles Pilleau DSO (commanding 1st Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 48 four days after his predecessor was killed. Notwithstanding his dying condition, Lieutenant Colonel Pilleau continues for four hours to direct his men.  He is the great nephew of General Thomas Addison CB, a veteran of the South African War, a lawn tennis player and member of MCC.
  • Captain Reginald Whitmore Pepys (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert George Pepys Vicar of Hallow.
  • Lieutenant George Vyvyan Naylor-Leyland(Royal Horse Guards) dies of wounds at age 22.  He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Herbert Scarisbrand Naylor-Leyland, the 1st Baronet and the godson of King George.
  • Private Samuel Wellings (Durham Light Infantry) is killed.  His brother will be killed in July 1917 in Mesopotamia.

The Plus 1

  • An Austrian swimmer at the 1906 Olympics, Leopold Mayer is killed

Monday 14 September 1914 – We Lost 1,203

Pickersgill-Cunliff

The first battle of Aisne begins. It will last until 20th September. The British victory at Troyon is considered one of the most brilliant achievements of the War so far. Much of the success of the day is due to the gallant behavior of the 116th Battery Royal Field Artillery when the command devolves on Captain Guy Bertram Oliver, who takes the Battery into action. Captain Oliver will be killed in September 1916.

The village of Soupir is cleared by the Brigade of Guards (Grenadier, Coldstream and Irish Guards Regiments, Black Watch and Cameron Highlanders) and on this day and for several days following heavy fighting will take place at the Farm of La Cour de Soupir near the head of the valley northwest of the village. The Guards Regiments officers and ranks killed today in the operations at Soupir include many listed below.

Bombardier A A Adie (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for actions beginning on this day and carrying forward until 13th October on the Aisne. Additional actions from 21st October until 15th November both times showing consistent gallantry in keeping up communications between battery and observation stations.  The efficiency of his battery is largely due to his efforts.  He will be killed in action serving as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Lancaster Regiment on 3rd May 1918.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Sons of families that will lose two, three and four sons and a family that will lose a daughter and son
  • Sons of a current and a former Member of Parliament
  • Sons of
    • Earl
    • Dukes
    • Marquess
    • Baron
    • Baronets
  • Son-in-laws of
    • Earls
    • Baronets
  • Grandsons of
    • Dukes
    • Earls
    • Baron
  • Son of the former Governor of Hong Kong
  • Son of the former Governor General of Australia
  • Sons of Generals
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son of a Writer to the Signet
  • Brother of a Baron
  • Brothers of men who lost their lives in the South African War
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Brother of a future Victoria Cross winner
  • The first Rugby International for any nation to be killed in the war
  • Members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • Member of the Wanderers Football Club
  • A duel bronze medal winner at the 1912 Olympics
  • First Class cricket player for Hampshire
  • Father of the man who will create the Army’s first Commando Unit in the next war
  • Fathers whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • A direct descendant of a knight who accompanied William the Conqueror in 1066
  • A man who had two relatives in previous wars
    • One who fought and was wounded at Trafalgar
    • One who was killed at the Storming of the Redan in the Crimean War.
  • The Designer of the Army’s War Book
  • The author of the Guide to Army Signalling
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is Lieutenant John Reynolds Pickersgill-Cunliffe

 The leading men of the advanced guard, under Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe (Grenadier Guards), push on, and near La Cour de Soupir run right into the enemy, who are in superior numbers. All the men are taken prisoner, and Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe is wounded. The rest of the advanced guard is also pressing forward, and soon the positions are reversed. Faced with the alternative of capture or retiring before a stronger force, the German officer in command decides on the second course. This means abandoning the prisoners; but there is one thing at any rate that a German officer could still do. He deliberately walks up to Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe, who is lying wounded on the ground, pulls out his revolver, and shoots him dead.

  •  Captain William Thomas Payne-Gallwey MVO (Grenadier Guards) the only son of ‘Sir’ Ralph William Frankland-Payne Gallwey 3rd Baronet is killed at age 33. His first cousin will be killed in September 1916.
  • Captain Heneage Greville Finch‘Lord Guernsey’ (Irish Guards) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of the 8th Earl of Aylesford and his son Captain Heneage Michael Charles Finch the 9th Earl (Royal Artillery) will be killed in action on 28 May 1940 also at age 31. He served in the South African War and is the son in law of the 2nd Baron de Ramsey and grandson of the 3rd Lord Bagot.
  • Captain Hamilton Hugh Berners(Irish Guards) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Ralph Anstruther and his widow is the grand-daughter of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Walter Barttelot MP Baronet. His brother will become a Brigadier General.
  • Captain Arthur Vincent Hay, ‘Lord Hay’ (Irish Guards) the son of the 10th Marquess of Tweeddale is killed at age 25. His brother Lieutenant Colonel ‘Lord” Edward Douglas John Hay (Grenadier Guards) will be killed by enemy action at Wellington Barracks in June 1944 at age 55.
  • Lieutenant Richard Anthony Compton-Thornhill(Scots Guards) is the only son of ‘Sir’ Anthony John Compton-Thornhill, the 2nd
  • Lieutenant Frederick William Des Voeux(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George William Des Voeux and was born at Government House, Hong Kong, during his father’s governorship of that colony.
  • Lieutenant Henry Richard Inigo-Jones(Scots Guards) is killed at age 22.  He is the son of Major General Inigo-Jones CB CVO and grandson of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Richard Charteris.
  • Lieutenant Percy Lyulph Wyndham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 26 while leading his men when he is shot in the head at close range. He is the son of the late ‘Right Honorable’ George Wyndham former Member of Parliament and Countess Grosvenor, grandson of the 1st Duke of Westminster and son-in-law of the 4th Baron Ribblestone.
  • Lieutenant David Cecil Bingham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Major General the Honorable ‘Sir’ Cecil Edward Bingham CVO CB and grandson of the 4th Earl of Lucan. His widow is the only daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard William Mark Lockwood (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of General Mark Wood.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerard Frederick Freeman-Thomas (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. He is the eldest son and heir to the 1st Marquess Willingdon and grandson of the Earl of Brassey. He played cricket for Eton against Harrow in 1912.
  • Sergeant Arthur Burchett (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Fred Hutchinson (Scots Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Glazier King (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Private Richard George Carpenter (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak in February 1919.

 The losses in the other Regiments of the Guards Brigade include

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Adrian Grant DuffCB (commanding 1st Black Watch) age 44. He is the son of ‘the Right Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant Duff PC GCSI and son-in-law of the 1st Baronet Avebury who served on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-98 and in South Africa in 1902.  He was the designer of the ‘War Book’ in his position as Assistant Secretary (Military) to the Committee of Imperial Defense in 1910 which was a complete mobilization plan for the country should war happen. His son will be killed in action in June 1940 with the Black Watch.
  • Major George Stewart-Murray (Black Watch) ‘Lord Stewart-Murray’ is killed at age 41. He is the son of the 7th Duke of Atholl and had served in the South African War. His fourth cousin Major ‘the Honorable’ Alfred Henry Maitland(Cameron Highlanders) is also killed at age 41. He is the son of the 13th Earl of Lauderdale and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898 and South African War.
  • Captain Alastair Hugh Mackintosh(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Lord Kyllachy and had served in the South African War.
  • Captain Alexander Horne (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Thomas Elliott Ogilivie Horne Writer to the Signet He is the first cousin of Major General H S Horne and Lieutenant Colonel E W Horne (commanding 3rd Seaforth Highlanders).
  • Lieutenant Arthur Stuart Nicholson(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur W and Lady Nicholson. He played cricket for the Edinburgh Garrison and his Regiment. His brother will be killed next February.
  • Lieutenant Lewis Robertson Cumming (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of John Fleetwood Cumming JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander H Mackinnon Yr of Mackinnon (Cameron Highlanders) is killed. He is the son of Mackinnon of Mackinnon and the Honorable Mrs. Mackinnon.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald George Roderick Joseph Smith-Sligo (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His sister will die on service five days before the armistice is signed in 1918.
  • Private Kenneth MacKenzie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William McCartney (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 26. His brother Joseph will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Alexander McCabe (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in April 1918.

 At 03:00 the 2nd Brigade (2nd Sussex Regiment, 1st North Lancashire Regiment, 1st Northampton Regiment and 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is ordered to take the crest above Troyon in a pouring rain and dense mist.  The 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps actually makes it to the top of the ridge but finds itself faced with stiff opposition in particular from German troops holding a sugar factory.  The 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment take up the attack on the factory as does the 1st North Lancashire Regiment. The three battalions dig in on the ridge and face a number of counter attacks throughout the day. At 13:00 the Germans launch a large counter attack which pushes the 2nd Brigade and the Guards back to where they started from in the morning, taking the sugar factory back in the process.  As with the Guards the casualties have been severe on both sides.  Every battalion in the 2nd Brigade has over three hundred men killed and wounded.

  • The losses suffered by the 2nd Sussex Regiment include their commander Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Henry Montresor who is killed at age 50. He also served in the Nile Expedition in 1884, in the Hazara Expedition 1888 and the South African War. His son-in-law will be killed in six days. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Henry Tucker Montressor KCB GCB.
  • Major Mostyn Eden Cookson is killed by shrapnel at age 46. He is a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Captain Leonard Slateris killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Slater and a member of the MCC and Gentlemen of Sussex Cricket Club and played a single Minor Counties Championship for Devon against Glamorgan. His son John Durnford Slater is credited with creating the first Army commando unit in the Second World War and his brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant ‘the Honorable’ Herbert Lyttelton Pelham (Sussex Regiment)is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Godolphin Pelham 5th Earl of Chichester the grandson of the 1st Baron Wolverton, great nephew of the Earl of Lucan and the Earl of Cardigan and descended from Oliver Cromwell, the Duke of Marlborough and ‘Sir’ John Pelham a knight in the court of King Edward II. He also is a holder of an aviator’s and pilot’s certificate.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sladen Hughes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is a member of the Wanderers Football Club.
  • Sergeant George William Hutsonis killed at age 24.  At the Stockholm Olympics in 1912 he was a bronze medal winner in the 5,000-meters and 3,000-meter team race. Earlier this year he set a British record for the ¾ mile run.
  • Private Thomas Still (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Troyon at age 19. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Alvah Trussler (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private Sydney Elphick Kenward (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Others killed today include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Evelyn Ridley Bradford (commanding 1st Seaforth Highlanders) the 2nd Baronet is killed at age 45. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Bradford, 1st Baronet Commissioner of London’s Metropolitan Police Service from1890 to 1903. He is a first class cricket player for Hampshire from 1895-1905. His son will be killed as a Squadron Commander in Royal Air Force in May 1940.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Louis St Gratien Le MarchantDSO (commanding 1st East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Le Marchant Rector of Little Risington Bedfordshire and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Reginald Lloyd (commanding 1st Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 46, three days after his predecessor was killed. He is the son of Sampson Lloyd former Chairman of Lloyd’s Bank and Member of Parliament for Plymouth and South Warwickshire. He also served in the South African War.
  • Major Hubert Francis FitzWilliam Brabazon Foljambe(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 42. He is the son of the Right Honorable F J S Foljambe PC and Lady Gertrude Foljambe and the grandson of the 3rd Earl of Gosford. He was educated at Eton and served in the South African War.
  • Major John Herbert Kerrich(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is the son of General Walter D’Oyly Kerrich and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Captain Theodore WrightVC (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at Vailly at age 31.  On this day he assists the passage of the 5th Cavalry Brigade over the pontoon bridge and is mortally wounded while helping a wounded man into shelter. Along with his actions on the 23 August where he attempted to connect up the lead to demolish a bridge, under heavy fire and although wounded in the head, he made a second attempt. he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.
  • Captain Gabriel Roy Fitzpatrick (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Beaulne at age 30. He is the son-in-law of W F Attenborough Vicar of Fletching.
  • Captain Augustus Ernest Cathcart(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 39.  He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ A M Cathcart JP. He is a grandson of both the 2nd Earl Cathcart and the 3rd Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle. He had a brother who died of Typhoid Fever in the South African War in January 1902.
  • Captain and Adjutant Richard Howard-Vyse(The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 37.  He is the son of the late Lieutenant General E Howard-Vyse and a winner of the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.
  • Captain and Brigade Major John Banks Jenkinson(Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 33.  He is the son and heir of the 12th Baronet and he served in the South African War. His son will become the 13th Baronet next year upon the death of ‘Sir’ George Banks Jenkinson.
  • Captain Riversdale Nonus Grenfell(Buckinghamshire Hussars attached 9 Lancers) is killed at age 34. His brother Francis will be killed next year having been awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in August of this year.
  • Captain Douglas Keith Lucas Lucas-ToothDSO (Lancers) dies of wounds at age 33. He is one of three sons of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert Lucas-Tooth who will be killed in the Great War and he is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Robert Harold Olivier(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) dies at age 35.  He is the youngest son of the late Reverend Canon Olivier Rector of Wilton and had served in both the South African War and the Nandi Expedition of 1905-6.
  • Captain Marwood Edwards Yeatman (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His son will be killed in December 1941 defending Hong Kong. He is the 1st cousin of the Lord Bishop of Worcester and son-in-law of Major General F Koe CB CMG.
  • Captain Algernon Foulkes Attwood (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Llewellyn Foulkes Attwood JP.
  • Captain Arthur Maitland Byng (Royal Fusiliers) is killed while looking through field glass when he is shot in the throat at age 41. He is related to Viscount Torrington. He played cricket for Hampshire in 1905 and Jamaica in 1896-97 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Lieutenant George Godfrey Brandreth Paget (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ George Edward Paget KCB and Canon William Harper Brandreth Rector of Standish Lancashire and great nephew of ‘Sir’ James Paget Baronet. He is the nephew of Major General ‘Sir’ Alexander B Tulloch KCB CMG and Major General F W Hemming CB. He is also the cousin of Admiral ‘Sir’ Thomas Brandreth KCB.
  • Lieutenant Athelstane Key Durance George (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier when he is shot in the heart while urging his men not to expose their heads. He is the grandson of Jonathan Muckleston Key D, great nephew of ‘Sir’ John Key Baronet and a direct descendant of ‘Sir’ William Bloet who came over with William the Conqueror in 1066.
  • Lieutenant Godfrey Lyall Miller(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Ontario and Lady Miller.
  • Lieutenant John Edward Langton ClarkeMC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at Moussy-sur-Aisne at age 24.  He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Edward Henry St Lawrence Clarke the 4th Baronet and will be one of the first 99 members of the military to be awarded the new Military Cross on 1 January 1915.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Lieutenant Robert Harold Bond (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at Aisne at age 32. He is the nephew of General Bond CB.
  • Lieutenant John Fraser (Connaught Rangers) dies of wounds at age 30 received rescuing a fellow officer. He is the son of John Fraser JP.
  • Lieutenant Mervyn Taylor Johnson (South Wales Borderers) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Arnott Baronet.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Archibald Charles Gibson-Craig(Highland Light Infantry) the 4th Baronet is killed at age 31. He loses his life while leading his men to attack a machine gun which is hidden in a wood with sword in hand and shouting, “Charge, men! At them”. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ James Henry Gibson-Craig, the 3rd Baronet whose elder son died of dysentery in South Africa in April 1900 at age 17.
  • Lieutenant George Owen Birch(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Birch.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Lucas Quixano Henriques (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the author of the Guide to Army Signaling.
  • Lieutenant and Assistant Adjutant Edward Charles Daun (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Edward Arthur Williams CB. His great great uncle Admiral ‘Sir’ William Pierson KCB was wounded as a Midshipman on HMS Belleisle at Trafalgar and his great uncle Lieutenant Colonel the Honorable H R Handpick was killed at the storming of the Redan in the Crimea War. He is a member of the MCC.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Francis Simson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. He is a Scotland International Rugby player and the first Rugby International of any nationality to be killed in the Great War.
  • Two Lieutenants in the Connaught Rangers killed this day will be among the first 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross on 1 January 1915. Rhys Ivor Thomas MC is killed at age 24, while Ralph Lessingham Spreckley MC is killed at age 21. He is the first of 3 brothers who will be killed serving in the armed forces in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Raymond Lodge (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Oliver Lodge.
  • Second Lieutenant John Forster(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Henry William Forster the 1st Baron of Lepe former Governor General of Australia and he has a brother who will die of wounds received late in the war in March 1919.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor Aloisius Lentaigne (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Vincent O’Neill Lentaigne.
  • Second Lieutenant Rhys Campbell Ffolliot Powell(Highland Light Infantry) is killed attempting to capture an enemy machine gun at age 22. The gun will be captured later in the day by Private Wilson of his platoon who will be awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ C H Powell KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant George Samuel Rodie Thompson(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20.  He is the only son of George Rodie Thompson JP.
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the Great War Second Lieutenant Alexander John Neeve Williamson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action today.
  • Lance Corporal James William Pearson (Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in April 1943 in Tunisia, North Africa serving with the Grenadier Guards.
  • Lance Corporal William Joseph Guiver (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. His brother will die at home on service in October 1918.
  • Private George Ware(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 20.  He is the youngest of four brothers, all of whom will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Gunner Horace Glover (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Harold Alfred Bull (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Valenciennes at age 28. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private John Charles Howe (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will die of wounds five days before the Armistice in 1918.
  • Private Alfred Charlesworth (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Lawrence Leith (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. His brother will killed be in one day over two months from today.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Carmania (Captain Noel Grant) engages the German auxiliary cruiser Cap Trafalgar off the eastern coast of South America.  Despite having to abandon the bridge of the ship due to a fire, the crew of the Carmania continues to fire on the German ship. The Cap Trafalgar begins to list and goes down bow first.  The battle has lasted nearly an hour. The Carmania has been potted with holes from Cap Trafalgar’s bombardment and has lost seven men in the action. The ship will be escorted to Gibraltar and placed in dry dock.  For her courageous action she is commemorated by the British Navy League who presents her with a silver plate from Nelson’s dinner service. The duel is unique because the combatants are not men-of-war but in fact floating hotels armed with miniature artillery, the first such meeting and engaging on the high seas.

The officers and men of the destroyer HMAS Parramatta see the Australian submarine AE1 (Lieutenant Commander Thomas Fleming Besant) at 15:30 patrolling to the south west of Duke of York Island.  The crew of the destroyer assumes the submarine is returning to harbor at Herbershohe on the island of New Britain for the evening.  It never arrives and searches all along the coasts of New Britain and New Ireland and the surrounding waters turn up no trace. The fate of AE1, the first Allied submarine to be lost in the Great War, along with its three officers and thirty-two men, remains a mystery to this day.

  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Leopold Florence Scarlettis one of the officers killed, when this boat is lost, at age 25 His brother the 5th Baron Abinger will die on service in May 1917.
  • Able Seaman George Hodgkin is lost at age 27. His brother will be killed in August 1916 in Mesopotamia.

Photo from http://www.findagrave.com