Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Middlesex Regiment

Saturday 14 November 1914 – We Lost 254

Field Marshall Frederick Roberts

Field Marshall Frederick Roberts

Field Marshall Frederick Sleigh Roberts (1st Earl of Kandahar) dies while visiting the front at age 82. He was one of the most successful military commanders of the 19th century. He served in the Indian rebellion, the Expedition to Abyssinia and the Second Anglo-Afghan War before leading British Forces to success in the Second Boer War. He also became the last Commander-in-Chief of the Forces before the post was abolished in 1904. He died of pneumonia at St Omer, France, while visiting Indian troops. After lying in state in Westminster Hall (one of two non-Royals to do so during the 20th century, the other being Sir Winston Churchill), he will be given a state funeral and entombed in St. Paul’s Cathedral.

Rebels are routed at Bultfontein.

Today’s losses include:

  • A King’s Messenger
  • Nephew of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The first son to fall in a family that will lose four sons
  • Multiple families that will lose one of two sons
  • A member of the Wisbech Isle of Ely Constabulary
  • Grandson of the founder of the first foreign hotel in China

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Major Eric Grey Drummond (Gurkha Rifles) is killed the day after he enters the trenches at age 39. He retired from his majority in 1913 to become a King’s Messenger then rejoined at the beginning of the Great War. He is the son of the late Major General Henry R Drummond (Royal Engineers). He was wounded in the Mohmand Expedition of 1897-8.

  •  Captain Charles John Chard Barrett (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 41. He is a South African War veteran and nephew of Colonel J R M Chard VC the hero of Rorke’s Drift.
  • Captain George Raleigh Kerr Evatt(Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ George KCB and Lady Evatt and grandson of the late Lieutenant Evatt who fought with the 57th Foot (predecessor of the Middlesex Regiment) and was wounded at the Battle of Albuera where they earned the nickname ‘The Die Hards’.
  • Lance Corporal George Frederick Mathieson (London Scottish) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in January 1916.
  • Lance Corporal William John Cheney (Coldstream Guards) a member of the Wisbech Isle of Ely Constabulary is killed in action.
  • Private Oliver Edward Breed (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Edward George Hodder (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds as prisoner of war at age 33. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private Joseph Clayton (Highland Light Infantry) is killed. He is the first of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Ronald Mackenzie Richards (London Scottish) is killed at age 19. He is the grandson of Peter Felix Richards founder of the Richard Hotel in Shanghai, the first foreign hotel in China and the forerunner to the Astor House Hotel.

 

Thursday 29 October 1914 – We Lost 796

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

At 05:30 the Germans attack in the Ypres sector in an attempt to break through to the Channel Ports, and sever the lines of communication of the British Expeditionary Forces.  British artillery is restricted because of shell shortages to nine rounds per gun per day and is unable to take advantage of prior knowledge of the attack plans.  The 1st Coldstream Guards at Gheluvelt are attacked along a front of 800 yards by six German battalions and by the end of the day the 1st Guards Brigade suffers 1,100 casualties and is reduced in strength to 275 men.  The 1st Coldstream Guards lose all 11 Combatant Officers and is reduced to a party of 60 other ranks under the Quartermaster.  The 2nd and 3rd Coldstream Guards successfully defend Zonnebeke some three miles to the north.  The Germans force their way in between two companies of the 1st Middlesex Regiment so that one company finds itself with the enemy not only in the front but also directly in the rear within 50 feet. About 40 Germans who have penetrated to a communication trench are all killed or taken prisoner by the battalion’s reserve company.  Eventually with the help of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders the trenches are cleared of the enemy.

Lieutenant James Anson Otho Brooke (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability near Gheluvelt in leading two attacks on the German trenches under heavy rifle and machine gun fire regaining a lost trench at a very critical moment.  His efforts prevented the enemy from breaking through the British line at a time when a general counter attack could not be organized.  Having regained the lost trench, he goes back to bring up support and while doing so is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Vesey Brooke JP DL, grandson of ‘Sir’ Arthur Brooke MP 2nd Baronet and great grandson of General ‘Sir’ George Anson GCB and had been awarded the Sword of Honor at Sandhurst and dies at age 30.  He has two brothers who will die during the Great War both dying at home, the first in 1916 the second in 1917. Their brother-in-law will be killed on Christmas Day this year.

Lieutenant Arthur Martin Leake (Royal Army Medical Corps) will be awarded his second Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty beginning on this day through 8 November near Zonnebeke in rescuing while exposed to constant fire a large number of the wounded who are lying close to the enemy trenches. He is one of only three men ever to be awarded the Victoria Cross twice.

Second Lieutenant James Leach and Sergeant John Hogan (Manchester Regiment) will each be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Festubert when after their trench has been taken by Germans and after two attempts at recapture fails they voluntarily decide in the afternoon of this day to recover the trench themselves, and, working from traverse to traverse at close quarters with great bravery, they gradually succeed in regaining possession, killing eight of the enemy, wounding two and taking sixteen prisoners.

The 2nd/8th Gurkha Rifles arrive at the Western Front and go into the trenches near Festubert.

Beduin tribesmen raid the Egyptian frontier.

Lord Fisher is appointed First Sea Lord.

Admiral Cradock’s squadron reaches Vallenar Roads, just south of Chiloe Island. He sends HMS Glasgow ahead to see if there are any messages for him with the British consulate in Coronel.  He also dispatches HMS Otranto to Puerto Montt to try to gather information as to the whereabouts of any German warships.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla departs Leith for Dunkirk to board wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and Grandson of the 1st Duke (The Iron Duke)
  • Battalion commander
  • A man whose father died on service in the South African War of typhoid fever
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Great nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • Children born after their father’s death
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be later in the Great War
  • Sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • An uncle and nephew killed together
  • A Somerset cricket batsman
  • Grandson son of writer to the Signet
  • Son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzel
  • Son of the Marquis de la Pasture
  • Son and heir to the 3rd Baron Penrhyn
  • Son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Darley
  • Son of the 7th Viscount Falmouth
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim
  • Nephew of the Earl of Kintore

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘Lord’ Richard Wellesley (Grenadier Guards) the son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald Baronet and the 20th Knight of Kerry is killed in action at age 35. His daughter will be born on 8 January 1915. He is the grandson of the ‘Iron Duke’ the original Duke of Wellington

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Henry Lawrence Anderson(Bhopal Infantry) dies of wounds at age 47.  He is the son of Major General Robert Patrick Anderson.
  • Major Wilfred Beckett Walker(Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and his first brother was killed in the first few days of the Great War while his second brother will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918.  They are grandsons of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Leslie D’Henin Hamilton MVO(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell father of the 3rd Baron and he served in the South African War.
  • Major Humphrey St Leger Stucley(Grenadier Guards) dies of injuries at age 37. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ George Stucley, 1st Baronet and had served in Egypt 1898 and in the South Africa War. His son will be killed in World War II.
  • Captain Charles Edward Mary de la Pasture (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. He is the eldest son of the Marquis de la Pasture who will die what many will say is from shock and a broken heart within three months. Captain de la Pasture served in the South African War and from 1907-10 was Aide de Campe to General ‘Sir’ Frederick Forestier Walker at Gibraltar.
  • Captain Gordon Hargreaves Brown(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 34.  He is the son and heir of the late ‘Sir’ Alexander Brown, the 1st Baronet and he had served in the South African War. His third child will be born next February and his only son Captain ‘Sir’ John Hargreaves Pigott-Brown who will become the 2nd Baronet will be killed in North Africa in December 1942.
  • Captain Colin Frederick Fitzroy Campbell(Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Major General F Lorn Campbell and son-in-law of Lady May Stewart.
  • Captain Robert Forbes Stanley Stanley-CreekDSO (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His widow is the daughter of ‘Sir’ David Masson.
  • Captain Arthur George McCausland Burn (East Surrey Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 31. His great grandfather Lieutenant Colonel William Burn successfully held Delhi against Holkar.
  • Captain Edgar W Walker(East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39.  He is the son of Rear Admiral Charles Walker and his brother-in-law will be killed next May.
  • Captain Geoffrey Malcolm Bentley(Northamptonshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. His brother was killed seventeen days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wilson Bentley JP.
  • Captain Guy Francis Headlam Keenlyside(Royal West Kent Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier at age 34. His second son will be born in May 1915 and his brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Captain Robert John Blatchford Oldrey(Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 31. His brother will die on active service in February 1919.
  • Captain Percy Lionel Moubray (Black Watch) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Robert Moubray Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain John Kearsley Dawson-Scott (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of General R N Dawson-Scott.
  • Lieutenant Morys Wynne-Jones(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John William Wynne-Jones Vicar of Carnarvon and his wife the Honorable Jessie F Wynne-Jones and the grandson of Lord Aberdare.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Henry Loftus Reade (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and the grandson of the Right Reverend Loftus George Reade.
  • Lieutenant Charles Keith Latta (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of John Jopp Writer to the Signer.
  • Lieutenant Graham Eardley Dunsterville (Devonshire Regiment) is killed when he is shot in the head at Festubert at age 30 attepting to bring in a wounded man who was crying out. He is the son-in-law of F Hastings Coldney JP and his son will be born on 29 December.
  • Lieutenant James Raymond McClintock Lonsdale (Hussars) dies of wounds received 13 October at age 20. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ James Mathew Stronge 2nd Baronet and nephew of ‘Sir’ John B Lonsdale Baronet MP.
  • Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock DSO (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26 six days after performing the acts that will win him the DSO. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend P P Broadmead and a Somerset County cricket batsman.
  • Lieutenant Ian Hay Steuart Clarke(Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the late Hastings A Clarke DL JP.
  • Lieutenant the ‘Honorable’ Alan George Sholto Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards)age 24 the son and heir of the 3rd Baron Penrhyn is killed. His uncle Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Charles Douglas-Pennant JP (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the same action. He served in the South Africa War and is a son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn who will lose another son the following year.  He is also the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl Darley.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Arthur Campbell (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. George Campbell.
  • Lieutenant Granville Keith Falconer Smith (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the late Colonel Granville and Lady Blanche Smith. He is also the nephew of the Earl of Kintore and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Gilchrist Nevill Ogilvy (Scots Guards) 11th Baronet is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Reginald H A Ogilvy.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Vere Douglas Boscawen(Coldstream Guards) is also killed at age 24. He is the son of Major General Evelyn Edward Thomas Boscawen, the 7th Viscount Falmouth KCVO CB and his older brother will die of wounds in 1918. In 1909 he was with the Eton XI Cricket Club against Harrow. They will have a nephew, who is not yet born, killed in action with the Coldstream Guards in May 1940.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Knollys Foster(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert Charles Foster St Thomas’s Vicarage Groombridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Patrick Edward Adam Blair (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel A S Blair CMG (Royal Scots) writer to the Signet.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Harford Nicholl (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the great nephew of Major General C R H Nicholl.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick McMahon Hardman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His father Captain John Wreford Julian Hardman died of typhoid fever in May 1900 during the South African War at age 37. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon Baronet CB whose son (and uncle of Lieutenant Hardman) Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahon will be killed in the less than two weeks.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed a day after his brother was killed with the 21st
  • Private Albert Shipp(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Private Fred (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Georgeson (Scots Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Henry Etherington (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in less than two weeks serving in the Royal Fusiliers.
  • Private Henry Long (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brothers George and Edward will also lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Fred Castle (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will also die in service including one in the Second World War.

photo from wikipedia.org

Sunday 25 October 1914 – We Lost 426

Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas

Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas

At night during a heavy rainfall the Germans attack with great force from Bois de Biez. The Gordon Highlanders are driven from their trenches by sheer weight of numbers but the Middlesex Regiment and the Royal Fusiliers turn the enemy out of the trenches with a bayonet charge.

The seaplane carriers HMS Riviera and HMS Engadine, while attached to the Harwich Force, attempt to launch a strike on the supposed German airship base at Cuxhaven.  The operation is canceled following the failure of all six Short float planes to leave the water.

South African rebels are routed at Calvinia.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  Chief of the Imperial General Staff and First Military Member of the Army Council
  • Son of the former Vice Consul of the Netherlands and Argentina
  • Son of the Lord Lieutenant of Dorset and Poole
  • First student of Trinity College to fall
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of the Head Master of Russell Scott Memorial School Denton Lancashire
  • Grandson of a veteran of the Nile Campaign of 1898
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons and a grandson of Generals
  • Son and a grandson of an Admiral
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Cousin of a Baron
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Police Officer

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 General “Sir” Charles Whittingham Horsley Douglas GCB (Colonel, Gordon Highlanders), Chief of the Imperial General Staff and First Military Member of the Army Council dies in London at age 64.  He joined the 92nd Highlanders in 1869, served in the Afghan War of 1878-80, the Boer War of 1881 and the Sudan War of 1884-5.  He was the Aide de Camp to Her Majesty Queen Victoria from 1898-1901 and to His Majesty King Edward VII in 1901. The Commanded the 9th Brigade and a Field Column of the South African Field Force in 1900.  From 1904-9 he was Adjutant General to the Forces and Second Military Member of the Army Council and was General Officer Commanding-in-Chief Southern Command from 1909-1911. An extract from the Annual Register of 1914 reads that he died after “having worked at the War Office, though seriously ill, until a week before his death”.

  •  Major Ronald Anthony Markham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 44. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Francis Grant and served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain John Henry Strode Batten (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Colonel John Mount Batten CB the Lord Lieutenant of Dorset and Poole.
  • Captain Barton Hope Besly(Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the Reverend William Blundell Besly.
  • Captain Frederick Wilberforce Steele (Royal Fusiliers)is killed at age 29.  His brothers Philip John Rupert and Norman Leslie will also fall in the Great War.
  • Captain ‘Sir’ Francis Ernest Waller (Royal Fusiliers) JP DLis killed at age 34.  He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ George Waller, the 3rd Baronet and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant William Gordon Tollemache Hope-Johnstone MC (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in July 1917 commanding the 12th Battalion of William’s Regiment
  • Lieutenant Hugh John Sladen Shields(Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Guards) dies of wounds at Ypres while tending a wounded man 200 yards from the enemy at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur John Shields Rector of Thurnford Dorset and he gained a rowing Blue at Cambridge and with Fairbairn also won the Lowe Double Sculls in 1910. In 1913 he was Light Heavyweight runner-up in the Army and Navy Boxing Championships.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Kennedy (Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 26. He is the son John Kennedy JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Algernon Fitzgerald Foley (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the only son of Vice Admiral Francis John Foley, great grandson of Admiral the Honorable Fitzgerald A C Foley and General the Honorable ‘Sir’ St George Gerald Foley. He is also the cousin of Baron Foley.
  • Lieutenant Vivian Trevor Tight Rea (Irish Rifles) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the son of Henry Tight Rea the Vice Counsul of the Netherlands and Argentine Republic and he is the first student of Trinity College to fall in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Widdrington Herdman(King’s Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 28. He is the only son of the late Reverend Robert Morrison Herdman Vicar of Holy Trinity North Shields.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Charles Verner (Shropshire Light Intantry) is killed at age 22. He is related to Major General Thomas Edward Verner CB.
  • Lieutenant Vernon Dudley Bramsdeon Bransbury (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 31 at Neuve Chapelle. He is the nephew of ‘Sir’ Bransdon MP for Portsmouth.
  • Second Lieutenant Russell Willis (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of William Willis Head Master of Russell Scott Memorial School Denton Lancashire.
  • Second Lieutenant George Rupert Alexander Fetherstonhaugh (Royal Fusiliers)is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of Major General R S Fetherstonhaugh.  His brother will be killed in May of next year.
  • Lance Corporal Alfred McCullough (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Simeon Beale (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 30. His brother will die of wounds next July.
  • Private Harold Speller (Grenadier Guards) a police officer is killed in action.

 photo from wikipedia.org

Thursday 22 October 1914 – We Lost 466

 Golf Union of Wales

As part of the First Battle of Ypres, the Coldstream Guards, as part of the 4th Guards Brigade, attacks the high ground covering Langemarck and hold it until relieved tomorrow.

Private Henry May (Cameronians) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near La Boutillerie in voluntarily endeavoring to rescue under heavy fire a wounded man who is killed before Private May can save him. Subsequently on this day he carries a wounded officer a distance of three hundred yards into safety while exposed to very severe fire.

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings up ammunition under heavy shellfire.

Admiral Cradock leaves Port Stanley in HMS Good Hope to join the rest of his squadron on the west coast of South America.

Rebels in South Africa are routed at Keimoes.

Today’s casualties include:

  • A Welsh Amateur Golf Champion
  • Sons and grandsons of clergy
  • Battalion commander
  • Nephew of a man killed in the Zulu War
  • Son of Baron Burnham
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Grandsons of Generals
  • Son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Son-in-law and great grandson of Justice’s of the Peace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Second Lieutenant Henry Noel Atkinson DSO (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds received two days earlier at age 25, when a German attack near Violaines succeeded in driving the Cheshire Regiment out of the village. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Arthur Atkinson and grandson of the Bishop of Calcutta. He was the Welsh Amateur Golf Champion in 1913.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Edmund Ward (commanding 1st Middlesex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 50 in an ambulance train near Boulogne received near La Boutillerie the previous day at Le Maisnil. He is the great grandson of the Reverend John Savile Ogle.
  • Major William Northey DSO (Durham Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Edward William Northey and his uncle Lieutenant Colonel F W Northey was killed in the Zulu War while in command of the 3rd King’s Royal Rifle Corps while his brother Lieutenant Colonel E Northey commanded the 1st King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was wounded at Aisne. He also served in the South African War.
  • Captain Thomas Henry Rivers Bulkeley CMG MVO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son-in-law of Lady Lillian Yorke Lady in Waiting to H R H the Duchess of Connaught and the late ‘Sir’ Henry Pelly 3rd
  • Captain Mervyn Keats Sandys (York and Lancs Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General George Sandys and great grandson of Myles Sandys JP DL.
  • Captain Ronald Hugh Walrond Rose (Cameronians) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed next month serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Captain William Arthur Mould Temple(Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day in the lung at age 42.  He served in the South African War and is the son of Colonel William Temple VC and grandson of Major General Mould CB. He is the son-in-law of J P L Hazledine JP.
  • Lieutenant William St John Coventry (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of the Reverend John Coventry.
  • Lieutenant William Bernard Webster Lawson(Scots Guards) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ William Webster Levy-Lawson DSO the 3rd Baron Burnham.
  • Lieutenant Charles Roger Ripley(York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Frederick Ripley, the 1st Baronet and grandson of ‘Sir’ Henry Ripley.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Robert Pollock (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds received in action one day short of his 29th He is the eldest son of the late Robert Erskine Pollock KC.
  • Private Arthur William Carman (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Henry Stillman (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next month in the explosion of HMS Bulwark.

Wednesday 21 October 1914 – We Lost 818 (Plus 1)

Mr Punch and the footballer

A Punch cartoon, later made into a poster, shows Mr. Punch saying to a professional football player, “No doubt you can make money on this field, my friend, but there’s only one field today where you can get honor”.

On this morning British and French cavalry at Passchendaele, on a ridge midway between Ypres and Roulers, leave the village and fall back towards Ypres.  They have not been attacked, but seek the greater security of proximity to the larger town. Both sides begin to dig trenches, linking them in a continuous line, with machine gun emplacements, dugouts, communication trenches leading to the rear and saps going forward as close as possible to the enemy front line.  The trench lines established in the Ypres Salient become the scene over the next four years of the harshest fighting of any war in history. The Irish Guards are given the orders to “drive back the enemy wherever met”.

The first Battle of Langemark begins. It will last for four days.

In heavy fighting at Le Maisnil, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and the Middlesex Regiment are forced to retire this evening leaving on the field eight officers and men who will be buried the following day by the enemy. Captain Edward Stephen Gibbons (Middlesex Regiment) displays great coolness and zeal in action at La Maisnil during what is described as a serious emergency.  For his actions he will be awarded the DSO.  He will be killed in September 1918.

The operation to capture Edea has scarcely commenced when a whaler belonging to the Nigerian Government Yacht Ivy capsizes on a sandbar in the Njong River, drowning the superintendent of the Nigeria Marine, Commander George Smith Booth Gray (HMS Cumberland, Royal Naval Reserve), Lieutenant Herbert Alexander Child CMG (HMS Cumberland, Royal Navy) is also killed at age 44.  He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Child also killed is a French staff officer and one of the nine native soldiers on board. The lifeboat of the steamship Fullah is immediately launched and succeeds in rescuing Captain Cyril T M Fuller and the remaining eight natives. Captain Fuller is pulled exhausted from the surf after struggling valiantly to save the others.

Today’s losses include:

  • Great grandson of the Defender of Fort Detroit in the War of 1763 against the Indians
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Sons of clergy
  • Grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Heir to the 5th Viscount Monck
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Son of families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a Judge
  • A man whose father was killed in the Soudan
  • Son of Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Gladwyn Maurice Revell Turbutt (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. He is the son of William Gladwin Turbutt JP and great grandson of General Henry Gladwyn Defender of Fort Detroit Canada in the War of 1763 against the Indians.

 

  • Major Nigel Lucius Samuel Lysons(Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 38. He is the son of the late Canon Samuel Lysons Vicar of Rowsley and served in the South African War.
  • Major Charles Inglis Stockwell(Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received 20 October at age 38.  He is the son of General C M Stockwell CB and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Charles Henry Stanley Monck(Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son and heir of the 5th Viscount Monck. He had served previously in the South African War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wyndham Portal 2nd Baronet and he is a member of the MCC.
  • Captain S G Roe(Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.  His widow will marry Lord Gravers.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Gerald Malpas Robertsof the same Regiment is killed at age 19.  He was the “Victor Ludorum” three years in succession at Ardingly College, Sussex.
  • Captain William Miles DSO (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He served in the South African War and is a member of the MCC, the I Zinjari and the Free Foresters.
  • Captain Penry Bruce Lendon MVO (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P Lendon and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon Richardson Vicar of Northop Flints.
  • Captain John Ralph Mylton Thornycroft (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed last month.
  • Captain Cameron O’Bryen Harford Methuen (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is related to Field Marshall Methuen GCB and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Allan Humphrey Harden (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when shot in the head at age 33. He is the grandson of Judge Harden of Cheshire and General Atkinson of the Madras Army. His wife is the granddaughter of John Howe JP DL and a cousin of the Right Honorable Lord Musketry.
  • Captain William Miles Kington (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. His brother will die on service at home in September 1943.
  • Captain Arthur Howell Romilly (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next September and he is the son of Captain Francis J Romilly Royal Engineers who was killed in Soudan at Trofek. He is also a descendant of ‘Sir’ Samuel Somilly Solicitor General and law reformer of the early 19th He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Daniel George Harold Auchinleck (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of Major Thomas Auchinleck DL and played cricket for the Winchester XI in 1894 & 1895 against Eton.
  • Captain Logan Deare Passy (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed in August next year.
  • Lieutenant Henry Stanley Lowe(Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds in Paris received over a month ago on the Aisne at age 24. He is a son of the late Reverend E J Lowe Vicar of Stallingborough.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Fowler Murphy (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Richard William Murphy Canon of Tuam.
  • Lieutenant Theodore Prain(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ David Prain, CMG, CIE and Lady Prain.
  • Second Lieutenant Theodore Hugh Galton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are grandsons of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Hugh Clifford VC.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Holmes Watkins (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds next February.
  • Second Lieutenant William Woodthorpe Barnard-Smith (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Barnard Gooh Barnard-Smith Rector of North Cove.
  • Second Lieutenant Leonard Amauri Filleul(Somerset Light Infantry attached Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the chest at age 26. He is the Master at Monkton Combe School, Bath and had rowed in the winning Oxford trial eights in 1910.  He is also the Secretary of the Lincoln College Boat Club and the son of the Reverend Philip William Girdlestone Filleul, Rector of Devizes Wiltsire.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Fydell Walker (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day. He is the son the Reverend David Walker Vicar of Darlington and nephew of General J T Walker Royal Engineers the Surveyor General of India.
  • Private Lionel Vernon Brown (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds at home in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Dowing Lake (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother James will also lose his life in the war.
  • Private William Turner (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Walter John will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private John Banks (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother Richard will be killed in one week.
  • Private John Charles Howell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Arthur will also be killed in the war.
  • Private Lewis Pelgrena Mazzei (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in May 1917 and they are the only Mazzei to lose their lives in the service of King and Country in the Great War.

The Plus 1 is Hungarian Gymnast Arpad Pedery who was a member of the Silver medal winning Men’s Team European System Gymnastics team at he 1912 Olympics.

Sunday 23 August 1914 – We Lost 293

Today marks the first battle between the British and German Armies on what was to become the Western Front of the Great War. By the morning the British Expeditionary Force is deployed along a 20-mile front, II Corps to the west of Mons and I Corps to the east. Opposing them from the north is the entire German First Army. The British force numbers 70,000 men and 300 guns while the German numbers doubled that. Early in the morning German artillery begins massive barrages followed by infantry attacks. The British troops dug in along the canal and among the slag heaps and mining villages defend with sustained rifle fire. The German attacks continue until the afternoon with little success due to the strength and rapid British rifle fire which is so heavy the Germans believe they are facing many machine guns when in fact each battalion has only two.

At 05:30 Field Marshall French meets with Generals Douglas Haig, Edmund Allenby and Horace Smith-Dorrien at his advanced headquarters at a chateau in Sars-la-Bruyere, where he orders the outpost line on the canal to be strengthened and the bridges at the Mons canal to be prepared for demolition. They recognize that the British position is not a good one, as the canal turn is very exposed on three sides.

Lieutenant Colonel Norman Reginald McMahon commander of the 4th Royal Fusiliers gives his battalion the order to retire from Nimy. Colonel McMahon will be killed in less than three months serving as a Brigadier General.

 Today’s casualties include:

  • The first posthumous Victoria Cross recipient
  • The first British officer killed with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF)
  • The son of the 7th Earl of Granard
  • Son of a future Member of Parliament
  • Inventor of the Marsden Band Trestle bridge
  • Grandson of a Governor of Jamaica
  • Great grandfather of the singer James Blount
  • Sons and/or grandsons Clergy, Justice’s of the Peace, Judges and Generals
  • Members of families that will lose two or three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is Lieutenant Maurice James Dease

 The bridges at Nimy are defended by the Royal Fusiliers. While in command of his machine gun unit at Nimy Bridge, Mons Lieutenant Maurice James Dease is wounded in the neck. In spite of being told to “lie still and don’t move”, he stands up and is hit again.  He continues to struggle up to handle one of his guns himself and is hit once more, this time seriously.  He still crawls to the right-hand gun and drags a wounded gunner away. He then begins to fire the gun himself and rolls the wounded man down an embankment, no doubt saving the man’s life.  Dease is exposed to murderous rifle, machine gun and artillery fire and still keeps calling for gunners to take the place of the men who have been killed or wounded in the fight.  Eventually he is shot again and he dies of his wounds at around 15:30. Lieutenant Dease is the son of Edmund Fitzlaurance Dease JP, author of “History of the Westmeath Hunt” and grandson of James Arthur Dease JP DL, the Vice-Lieutenant of Cavan and he dies at age 24.  He will become the first posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross in the Great War.

  • There are some early exchanges between German cavalry and British infantry outposts around 06:30, near Obourg, Nimy and Ville Pommeroeul. The morning has broken with mist and rain, which clears about 10:00. Near Abourgear, Mons a group of German soldiers is seen emerging from a wood by troops of the Middlesex Regiment. The commanding of the British company, Major William Henry Abell is killed, shot through the head, the first British officer killed with the British Expeditionary Force. As the rifle fire continues his second in command, Captain Jonathan Edward Knowles is also killed. After a prolonged exchange of fire, with many deaths on both sides, the British troops withdraw.
  • Major John Southern Maidlow (commanding 49th Battery Royal Field Artillery) dies wounds riding forward to take up a new position for his guns at age 39. His wife is the niece of ‘Sir’ Edward and ‘Sir’ Frederick Lugard.
  • Captain Oswald Bethell Walker(Hussars) killed at age 39. One brother of his will be killed in October of this year while another will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918. They are grandsons of ‘Sir James Walker Baronet.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Fergus George Arthur Forbes (Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the 7th Earl of Granard.
  • Captain John Penrice Benson (East Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 36. He is a South Africa War veteran and the son of Judge William Denman Benson and the grandson of General H R Benson whose son Lieutenant Colonel Richard Erle Benson will be killed next month commanding the 1st East Yorkshire Regiment.
  • Captain Kenneth James Roy (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend James Roy Rector of Stockton-on-Forest Yorkshire.
  • Captain Walton Mellor (Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at age 36. His brother in law Captain Cyril Gerald Valerian Wellesley will die of wounds in March next year.
  • Captain Greville Hubert Robins Blount (Royal Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. His father died of fever during the South Africa War and his wife is the daughter of the Reverend Canon Wilson. He is the great grandfather of singer James Blount. He has two brothers both will be accidentally killed serving in the Royal Air Force the first in 1918 while the other will be killed in 1940 as an Air Vice Marshall.
  • Captain Charles Harold Bass (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds at Cambrai at age 24. He is the only child of the Reverend Charles Bass of Steeple Claydon Vicarage.
  • Lieutenant Colin Knox Anderson (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in December 1917 and they are sons of George Knox Anderson JP MP.
  • Lieutenant Everard Cecil Smith (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.  He is the son of the Reverend Cecil Evan Smith, Rector of Titsey and grandson of Charles Rushworth, Governor of Jamaica,
  • Lieutenant John Rothes Marlow Wilkinson (Middlesex Regiment) killed at age 26.  He is the son of the Reverend Henry Marlow Wilkinson Vicar of Milford-on-Sea.
  • Second Lieutenant Neville Lascelles Ward (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the grandson of General Lascelles of the Court of George IV and the grandson of a judge in India.
  • Second Lieutenant John Pepys (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His younger brother will be killed in November.
  • 2nd Corporal Edwin Marsden (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He was the inventor of an improved trestle for bridge building accepted by the war office and known as the Marsden Band Trestle.
  • Private Edwin John Bywaters(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21.  His two brothers will die in the service of their King later in the Great War.
  • Private William Streeter (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Eric Fennell Trevor Morgan (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Morgan Rector of Holy Trinity Newport.

Friday 21 August 1914 – We Lost 13

Army Order 324, dated today, specifies that six new Divisions will be created, collectively called Kitchener’s Army.  It details how the new infantry Battalions will be given numbers consecutive to the existing Battalions of their regiment, but with the word ‘Service’ after the unit number.

British forces move towards Mons. Under orders from General Joffe, the French Commander in Chief, the BEF moves up on the French 5th Army left. They take position on a line with the River Sambre and the Mons Conde Canal in Belgium.

Today’s losses include the first British Army casualty of the Great War.

 The first British Army casualty in action in the Great War is suffered when Private John Parr (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at Mons. John Parr was born in 1898 and was the youngest son of Edward and Alice Parr of North Finchley. After school he took a job as a caddy at the North Middlesex Golf Course. He soon decided that life might be better in the Army and probably overstating his age joined the Middlesex Regiment at its depot and training center at Inglis Barracks, Mill Hill. There he learned to fire 15 shots a minute and also learned to ride a bike and as a result became one of the unit’s reconnaissance scouts. Today in the area of Mons, Parr and another cyclist are sent to the opposite side of the Mons Conde Canal that runs through the town to locate and report on the enemy’s movements. They are unfortunately spotted by a German unit and Parr is killed by rifle fire. Though he is stated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to be twenty years old he becomes not only the first British Army casualty of the Great War but the first under aged soldier to die in the conflict.