Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Military Cross

Monday 24 July 1915 – We Lost 905

Richard Molesworth Denny

Richard Molesworth Denny

Captain Richard Molesworth Dennys (Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received at the Battle of the Somme on 12th July at age 32. He is Winchester College and St Bartholomew’s Hospital educated.  He is a Great War Poet his poems being published in There is No Death.

The Question

Soldier-boy, at the edge of wood

Stretched on th tufty grass,

With a red wound there in your tangled hair

And Never a friend to pass,

The Sky isdark, it will rain tonight

And you are not very old,

So I bring green branches to cover you

And shelter you from the cold.  

Soldier-boy, it’s a grim old world

(Deny it, he who can),

Who knows that your life would have happier been

Had you lived to be a man?

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War Poet
  • A writer of musical comedies and publisher of many songs
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • The brother of a posthumous Victoria Cross winner
  • Multiple members of the clergy
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The son of a Surgeon General

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Charles Comyn Scott Scott-Gatty (Hertfordshire Regiment) a son of ‘Sir’ Alfred Scott-Gatty, KCVO, Garter Principal King of Arms, and Lady Scott-Gatty, dies of an illness contract on service at home at age 33. In collaboration with his wife Muriel he wrote the words and music to several musical comedies and many published songs.
  • Captain Henry Brian Brooke (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds received on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme at home at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Vesey and Lady Brook.  His brother Captain James Brooke was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross in 1914 and another brother will die in 1917 at home.
  • Captain Harcourt Sutcliffe Farebrother MC (Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds at London at age 26. He is the grandson of the Reverend C. Farebrother, M.A., Rector of Truham-cum-Corby, and Chaplain to the Duke of Cambridge. He was commissioned in the Norfolk Regiment in November 1909, and served at Gibraltar, in Belgium, in India, and in Mesopotamia. He went to the Front in November 1914, and was three times mentioned in Despatches, and was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery at Shaiba, in Mesopotamia where on 12th April 1915 he received the wounds from which he dies.
  • Captain Noel Cairns Clery MC (Headquarters, Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the late Surgeon General J A Clery CB.
  • Captain Alexander Torrance Laing (Northumberland Fusiliers) dies of wounds received in action on 3th July at age 27. He is a Deacon in Holy Orders.
  • Lieutenant Frances Paul Hamilton Layton (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He was confirmed into the Anglican Church on 6th April 1914 along with Tom Pollard.  Pollard will be killed in May 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Ian Stewart Falconar-Stewart (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed on Salonika in September 1918.
  • Private Victor George Dallimore (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed in action at age 29 by shellfire while tending the wounded. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Sidney John Isted (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His older brother was killed in May 1915 at Gallipoli.
  • Private Wildred Cockroft (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in December of this year.
  • Private Herbert Briers (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Private John Gretland Veall (Australian Infantry) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in six weeks.
  • Private Arthur Walter Gotts (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will be killed in March 1918.

Tuesday 28 December 1915 – We Lost 209

Military Cross

Military Cross

The final evacuation of Gallipoli begins while the Indian Corps leaves France for service in the Middle East.

The Military Cross is instituted as an award to commissioned officers of the rank of Captain and below for distinguished and meritorious service in battle on land.  Approximately 37,000 will be awarded in the Great War.

The merchant ship El Zorro is captured and sunk 10 miles south from the Old Head of Kinsale.  Two crew members are killed.

Today’s losses include:

  • A school teacher
  • A Constable in the Essex County Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lance Corporal James Harold Potter (Northumberland Fusiliers) a school teacher is killed at age 25.
  • Private Harry Basil Wick (Royal Fusiliers) a Constable in the Essex County Constabulary is killed.

Wednesday 11 August 1915 – We Lost 521

Alfred John Shout VC

Alfred John Shout VC

The 5th Indian Light Infantry arrives at Duala, Cameroon.

HM Special Service smack GRE sinks UB-4 off the Sussex coast.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A Baronet
  • The Headmaster of Mount Albert School
  • The son-in-law of an Admiral
  • A man whose brother-in-law will also be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in September 1944
  • A man whose brother will be killed in the Great War
  • A man who has two brothers who will be killed on service
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • An author and artist

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain Gilbert George Downes (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 25. His brother in law Captain Frederick Hugh Sasse died of wounds last May.
  • Captain ‘Sir’ Herbert Archer Croft (Herefordshire Regiment) is killed in action in Gallipoli at age 46. He is the 10th Baronet and son of ‘Sir’ Herbert Croft the 9th  His son ‘Sir’ James Herbert Croft the 11th Baronet will be killed on service and buried at home serving as a Captain commando King’s Shropshire Light Infantry on 15th August 1941.
  • Captain Alfred John Shout VC MC (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received two days prior while performing the acts that will win him a posthumous Victoria Cross. He dies at sea aboard HMHS Euuralia at age 34.
  • Lieutenant John Aubrey Moore (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Herbert Augustine Moore Rector of Bewdley.
  • Lieutenant Cosmo George Romilly (Sherwood Foresters attached Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. He is the son-in-law of Admiral ‘Sir’ Compton Edward Domville’
  • Lieutenant Hugh Arnold (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 42. He is the son of Charles and Annie, of Sussex, husband of Mary, of Kensington, London. He is an author and artist.
  • Second Lieutenant George Hanson Wheatcroft (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Richard Alfred Fedarb (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He has two brothers who will be killed in the service of their King. The first dies in the Faversham explosion in August 1916 and the second will be killed serving on the minesweeper Topaze in April 1941.

Thursday 11 March 1915 – We Lost 892

Military Cross

Military Cross

A British attack shortly after midday at Neuve Chapelle takes place five minutes after the supporting artillery fire has stopped, leading to heavy casualties. General Haig orders a frontal attack, and almost all those who take part in it are killed. This evening he gives the order for a renewed advance on the following day. Some British forces do make progress occupying the village of l’Epinette.

Captain John William Mapplebeck (Liverpool Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) and Lieutenant Alastair St John Munro Warrand (Black Watch attached) carryout the first night bombing raid of the Great War.  Each aircraft carries two 100-lb bombs on carriers designed and built by the squadron.  Preparations include fitting the cockpits with electric lights and, to direct the crews, two signaling lamps are placed on the ground, five miles apart.  They depart for Lille at 04:45.  Both aircraft are shot down and though Captain Mapplebeck is able to make it back to the British lines, Lieutenant Warrand will die of his wounds in eight days.

With intelligence concerning Turkish ammunition shortages Churchill and the Admiralty order Admiral Carden to shift from his methodical bombardment of the Dardanelles forts to an attack to obtain victory. The results to be gained are enough to justify loss of ships and men if success cannot be obtained without. Efforts to sweep the Kephez minefields at night with trawler minesweepers continue to be unsuccessful when the warships are unable to knock out the searchlights which expose the trawlers to the deadly fire of the batteries protecting the minefields. Carden and his staff concludes that the only method to succeed will be a daylight attack to silence the forts at the Narrows as well as the batteries protecting the Kephez minefields.  The trawlers can then clear a channel at night and permit the fleet to destroy the Narrows forts at short range the following day. This, in turn, will permit the trawlers to sweep the Narrows minefields and open the way into the Sea of Marmara.

British Cavalry make a reconnaissance to Nakaila, west of Basra.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Bayano (Commander Henry Cecil Carr) is sunk by the submarine U27 ten miles west of Corsewell Point off the River Clyde.  There are one hundred ninety-five casualties including her commanding officer along with twenty-six survivors.

Britain announces a blockade of German ports.

Third Squadron Royal Naval Air Service sails for the Dardanelles.

Captain Trevor Howard Beves (Border Regiment) is awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and exceptionally good work performed at Neuve Chapelle.  He leads his men with great ability in the attack and is wounded twice.  Captain Beves will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the Duke of Stacpoole
  • The 3rd Baron Brabourne
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • A family that will lose two more sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Baronet
  • An International Cricket player
  • A man who was awarded the Military Cross in the first class in January 1915
  • A son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose father was killed in the South African War
  • A son of a member of the clergy
  • A brother of a man who will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously in the war
  • The Captain of the 1st football eleven at Leys School Cambridge

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

 Major Charles Ernest Higginbotham (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He played three cricket matches for the Straits Settlements against Hong Kong between 1890 and 1891 and two first class matches and served in the South African War.

  • Captain Rupert Auriol Conant Murray (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 32. His brother was killed on 30 November 1914.  He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Henry Edwrd Dering 10th Baronet
  • Captain John Rowley Lunell Heyland (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 28. He was awarded the Military Cross in the first group awarded that award. His brother will be killed in May of this year.
  • Captain Wyndham Wentworth Knatchbull-Hugessen (Grenadier Guards), 3rd Baron Brabourne is killed in action at age 29. His cousin once removed the 6th Baron will be killed serving as Lieutenant Norton Cecil Michael Knatchbull on 15th September 1943 while serving in the Grenadier Guards.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ George Henry Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards) at age 38. He is the second and last surviving son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn to be killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Archibald Charles Edward Alexander (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of W R E Alexander JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Scott Turner (Black Watch) dies of pneumonia at age 18. He is the son of Major Scott Turner (Black Watch) who was killed in the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant Roderick Algernon Anthony De Stacpoole (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of the 4th Duke and Duchess of Stacpoole and has a brother who was killed in September 1914 and a nephew who will be killed in 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Sanderson Paterson (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Very Reverend W P Paterson DD Professor of Divinity at University of Edinburgh.
  • Sergeant George Reay (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in February of next year.
  • Private Archibald Ware (Wiltshire Regiment) is the first of three brothers to lose his life in the Great War. The other two will lose their lives in 1916 the first Corporal Sidney William Ware will die of wounds in April of that year less than two weeks after performing deeds that will win him the Victoria Cross.
  • Private William Fane Dalzell Dalrymple-Sewell (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed by a shell in front of Bois de Blez at age 18. He is the grandson of Colonel Henry Fane Haylell Sewell, great grandson of General ‘Sir’ William Henry Sewell and great great grandson of ‘Sir’ Thomas Sewell.
  • Private John Leslie Elmslie (Honorable Artillery Company) is killed at age 18. He was the best swimmer and Captain of the 1st football eleven at Leys School Cambridge.

Monday 28 December 1914 – We Lost 68

Military Cross

Military Cross

Eight days after the first German mine attacks on the Western Front, Major John Norton-Griffiths KCB DSO former MP and later ‘Sir’ John (King Edwards Horse) suggests using ‘clay kickers’, men formerly employed in mining the London Underground to dig mines for the Army.  Major Norton-Griffiths’ son Captain Michael Norton-Griffiths will be killed while serving in the 135th Excavating Company, Royal Engineers at Dunkirk in the Second World War.

Drifting German mines in the North Sea sink 8 vessels.

The Royal Warrant (dated 1st January 1915) instituting a new decoration entitled “The Military Cross” is published in the London Gazette.  The first 99 to have the award conferred on them are announced a list that includes eight who are listed as “deceased”.

Today’s losses include:

Private William Thomas Bates (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23.  His brother will be killed in October 1917.

Wednesday 28 October 1914 – We Lost 599

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg resigns as First Sea Lord the day after his nephew dies of wounds on the Western Front.  His resignation letter includes “I have lately been driven to the painful conclusion that at this juncture my birth and parentage have the effect of impairing…my usefulness to the Board of the Admiralty. I feel it is my duty to resign”. His German ancestry, titles, property and even his accent made him a target of the popular press and letters to the editor looking for a scapegoat for the Royal Navy’s lack of success to this point in the war.  The First Sea Lord’s wife is even the sister-in-law of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, the Kaiser’s brother and grand admiral of the German Navy.

Indian troops attack into Neuve Chapelle village, fighting house to house and hand to hand.  Within hours a sustained German counter attack drives the Sikhs from the village.  Of the two hundred eighty-nine men who manage to extricate themselves from Neuve Chapelle, only sixty-eight reach the road from which the attack has started. For his courage during the retreat Subadar Malla Singh will be awarded the Military Cross, the first Indian officer to be awarded the medal.  In the ensuing six days of fighting, more than twenty-five British officers and five hundred Indian officers and men will be killed, and 1,455 wounded.

The British force fighting its way along the railroad from Yapona reaches Edea, Cameroon two days after the French have occupied the town.  Meanwhile Lieutenant Colonel Haywood with the 2nd Nigeria Regiment successfully fights his way up the Northern Railway and captures Susa.

At 07:00 SMS Emden stops the British steamer Glen Turret after raiding Penang harbor.  The Glen Turret is carrying explosives but instead of being sunk she is used as a messenger by Emden.  The German captain apologizes to the survivors of a Russian light cruiser that he sank, for not picking them up. He also apologizes to the crew of a pilot boat for unintentionally firing on their unarmed vessel.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  One of four brothers who lose their lives in the service of their King and Country
  • The son of an author of religious pamphlets
  • Son of the 13th Baron Lovat
  • Aide de campe to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913
  • Great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor
  • Son of an Admrial
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Hockey player
  • Son of the late Governor of the Windward Islands
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley
  • An International high hurdler
  • Nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham
  • Father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Denis Holdsworth Michaela
  • An anthropologist
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Son of clergy
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons and grandson of Generals
  • Sons of Justice’s of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Major John Stanley Richardson (commanding 21st Company Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas and Lady Anna Constance Richardson and was a King Edward’s Gold Medal (1902) and King George’s Durbar Medal (1911) winner. He is one of five brothers who will lose their lives in the service of their King and Country four in the Great War after one was lost in a submarine accident in 1912. His mother is an author of religious pamphlets Prayers for Family Worship and Parish Meetings and A Simple Message to God’s Word.

  • Major William Lynn Allen DSO (Border Regiment) is killed at age 43. He is a South African War veteran and son of Bulkeley Allen JP.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh Joseph Fraser MVO(Scots Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of Simon Fraser MVO, the 13th Baron Lovat and he served as the ADC to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913.
  • Captain Rowland Latimer Almond (Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 27. He is the first and youngest of three brothers who will be killed.
  • Captain Robert Frederick Balfour (Scots Guards) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 31. He is the son of Edward Balfour JP DL and great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor and his brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Captain Edgar Wilmer Walker (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Admiral C F Walker and grandson of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Captain Robert Jim McCleverty (Sikhs) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of General W A McCleverty and Surgeon General H H Massy CB. He fought in the South African War and is a hockey player.
  • Captain Eric May Battersby (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Worsley Battersby JP.
  • Captain Edwin John Berkeley Hayes-Sadler (Royal Engineers) is killed two days before his brother is killed. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ James Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Alexander Kennedy(Royal Irish Rifles) dies of wounds received four days earlier. He is the son of the late General H F Kennedy (King’s Royal Rifle Corps). His wife is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Aylmer Hunter Weston KCB DSO.
  • Captain Bertram Lawrence (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 37 when he is shot by a sniper. He is the grandson of General Henry Lawrence and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Charles Almeric John Cholmondeley(Border Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the late Lord and Lady Cholmondeley and the grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley.
  • Captain John Mounsey Lambert(Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 30.  He is the only son of the late Major General G C Lambert.
  • Lieutenant James Booker Brough Warren (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is an international caliber high hurdler.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald Charles Melbourne Gibbs (Scots Guards) is also killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Honorable’ Henry Gibbs, grandson of General Charles Crutchley and nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham.
  • Second Lieutenant Clarence Leslie Bentley(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 20 when he is shot in the head by a sniper. He is the son of the late Alderman William Bentley JP.  He passed out of Sandhurst as war was declared.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Mary Snead-Cox(Royal Scots) is killed 8 days after his brother has been killed when he is shot in the chest while another brother will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed yesterday.
  • Sergeant Major Sydney Barnard Thompson (Lancers) is killed at Messines a day before his brother will be killed at Ypres.
  • Lance Corporal Edward Alexander Guess (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Brothers Jim and Tom Pumfrey are killed in action while serving as privates in the South Staffordshire Regiment.
  • Private Arthur Holdssworth (East Yorkshire Regiment) an archaeologist is killed in action. He is the father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Michaela Holdsworth Denis.
  • Private Frank Lawes (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918.
  • Private Richard Banks (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed one week after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private John Haines (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother William will also lose his life in the war.
  • Colonel Bertram Charles Percival Heywood(Manchester Regiment) dies at home at age 49.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas Percival Heywood, the 2nd  He served in the South African Campaign.

A British Naval Flotilla continues to support the Allies left, and since the morning of the 27th the fire of 12in. guns has been brought to bear upon the German positions and batteries. The reports received from shore testify to the effect and accuracy of the fire, and its strong results. The flank is thus thoroughly protected. The enemy brings up heavy guns and replies vigorously to the fire from Admiral Hood’s ships. The vessels receive no structural damage. The casualties are slight throughout, but one shell explodes on the destroyer HMS Falcon killing her commander along with seven other men.

  • Lieutenant Hubert Osmond Wauton is the son of the Reverend Atherton E Wauton age 29.
  • Able Stoker Petty Officer Charles Arthur Beaney killed at age 38. His brother was killed last month in the sinking of HMS Hogue.
  • Able Seaman William Skye is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service as a leading aircraftman in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1946.

The fishing vessel Our Tom (Skipper Albert R Larkins) is sunk by a mine 45 miles southeast from Southwold.  Her skipper and two crew men are killed.

photo from wikipedia.org