Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Newfoundland Regiment

16 January 1919 We Lost 149

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple families that will lose two sons to the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Private George Arthur John Daniells (Army Service Corps) dies on service at age 21.His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Private Charles Chuck (Newfoundland Regiment) dies of illness at home at age 27. His brother was killed in April 1917.

Sunday 27 October 1918 We Lost 1,422

Keith MacDonald Scobie

The decisive assault of the Allied armies across the Piave begins.  At 06:45 the 12th Durham Light Infantry begins the advance onto the Green Dotted Line.  Very deep swift water is found in the most northerly area of the Piave and while wading this, the battalion suffers heavily from machine gun fire, the leading company losing nearly half its strength.  The Companies reorganize and press forward only to be held up by uncut wire close to the objective, which is strongly held.  The wire is cut most gallantly by various parties.  The battalion presses on, and C Company captures the first objective Blue Dotted Line, (the road from C Padovan to C Benedetti).  Here orders are received that as the Italians on the left of the brigade have failed to cross the Piave, no further advance is to be made. The battalion suffers 29 officers and men killed, 114 wounded and eleven missing.

During the morning, Major William George Barker (Royal Air Force) observes an enemy two-seater over the Foret de Mormal.  He attacks this machine and after a short burst it breaks up in the air.  At the same time a Fokker biplane attacks him, and he is wounded in the right thigh, but manages, despite this, to shoot down the enemy airplane in flames.  He then finds himself in the middle of a large formation of Fokkers who attack him from all directions, and he is again severely wounded in the left thigh, but he succeeds in driving down two of the enemy in a spin.  He loses consciousness then, and his machine falls out of control.  On recovery he finds himself being again attacked heavily by a large formation and singling out one machine he deliberately charges and drives it down in flames. During this fight his left elbow is shattered and he again faints, and on regaining consciousness he finds himself still being attacked, but notwithstanding that he is now severely wounded in both legs and his left arm shattered he dives on the nearest machine and shoots it down in flames.  Being greatly exhausted, he dives out of the fight to regain our lines, but is met by another formation, which attacks and endeavors to cut him off, but after a hard fight he succeeds in breaking up this formation and reaches our lines, where he crash-lands.  This combat, in which Major Barker destroys four enemy machines (three of them in flames), brings his total successes to fifty enemy machines destroyed, and is a notable example of the exceptional bravery and disregard of danger which this very gallant officer has always displayed throughout his distinguished career.  For this action he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Earl Frederick Crabb (Royal Air Force) having crashed an enemy machine, then goes to the assistance of one of our own that is being attacked, and materially helps to shoot the enemy down.  In addition to the above he has accounted for three other machines and assisted in crashing a fourth.

Second Lieutenant Keith MacDonald Scobie (Royal Garrison Artillery attached Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 21.  His brother was killed in action in July 1916 and he is a Great War Poet.

Lunae

Have you ridden alone in the country ever

By the dusty light of the harvest-moon?

Cycled intent in a vain endeavor

To match your speed to your soul’s quick tune

When there’s never a sound to break the magic;

For the tyres; crisp whir on the powdered road

And the hoot of an oul in the distance, tragic,

Are pricking your heart with a fairy goad?

Then the hawthorn hedges, sweet dissembling,

Stealthily close on your path, till fear

Of their dense bulk looms; and your heartsick trembling

Shakes into stillness as you swing clear.

Then the high haw-hedges furious will bide,

Drawing back from the light of the moon:

But the black trees haste down the silver hillside.

You know in your hear that you laughed too soon.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Great War Poet
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a Field Marshall
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A 7-victory ace
  • A former police constable
  • A man whose wife is widowed a second time by the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Ashton Alexander St Hill DSO (commanding 11th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in Italy at age 44.
  • Major James Boswell Egerton (Indian Cavalry) is killed in action at age 38 in Mesopotamia. He served in the Somali Expedition and on the North West Frontier of India and is the son of the late Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Charles Egerton who also lost a son in April of this year.
  • Captain George Pomeroy Sterling DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action in Italy at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Sterling of the CMS Gaza Palestine.
  • Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Guy Wilbraham Wareing DFC (Royal Flying Corps) a seven-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lukyns Williams (Indian Cavalry) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed in December 1915.
  • Private Percival Henry Onyett (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25 in Italy. His brother died of wounds in Eygpt in November 1917.
  • Gunner Alfred James Hyder (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of influenza at age 29. He is a former police constable.
  • Private William Hall (Newfoundland Regiment) dies on service. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Private Bryen Sidney Smither (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in Italy at age 20. His widow was widowed in March 1915 when her then husband was killed.
  • Private John Morris (Devonshire Regiment) dies on service after a serious operation. His brother was killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman James J Toole (HMS Lion) dies of pneumonia at age 19. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Driver Alf Rayner (Royal Field Artillery) becomes the third brother to be killed in successive Octobers.

Wednesday 2 October 1918 We Lost 1,391

Na

Maurice Lea Cooper

The Admiralty Chartered Oil Tanker Arca is torpedoed and sunk by the U-118 forty miles northwest of Tory Island. The ship catches fire and patrol boats are unable to render assistance due to a storm. Fifty-two of the crew are killed including

  • Gunner Kenneth MacLeod who drowns at age 33. His brother will die on service in September 1919.

Today’s losses include:

  • A 6-victory ace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of member of the clergy
  • A Welsh International Hockey and Football player
  • A highly reputed violinist
  • A man whose death will make his wife a two time Great War wido

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Maurice Lea Cooper (Royal Air Force) a 6-victory ace is killed at age 19. Lieutenant Clement Wattson Payton DFC (Royal Air Force) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in July 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend Joseph Wattson Payton Vicar of Calton.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Palmer (Lancers) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed in August 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Skelton (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Second Lieutenant Alan Thompson Watt Boswell (Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 28. He is a former Welsh International Hockey and Football player.
  • Sergeant Cecil Francis Edwin Godby (Irish Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. He is a violinist of repute in the County of Somerset.
  • Sergeant Charles Isidore Laugeard DCM (Hampshire Regiment attached Irish Rifles) is killed in action. His widow’s first husband Gunner Walter Gaudin Mason (Royal Garrison Artillery) was killed in May 1915.
  • Lance Corporal George Bursey (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed two years earlier.
  • Private Newton Marsden Shaw (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 18. His brother was killed in April 1918 and his parents will be with him when he dies.
  • Private Hugh Nelson Cannell (Wellington Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend W Cannell.

Monday 30 September 1918 We Lost 2,097

Eric Howard Harvey

At 12:00 the Bulgars on Salonika surrender.

On 27th September, when his company commander and all other officers of his company have become casualties, Lieutenant Samuel Lewis Honey (Manitoba Regiment) takes command and skillfully reorganized it under very severe fire. He continued the advance with great dash and gained the objective. Then finding that his company has suffered casualties from enfilade machine-gun fire he located the machine-gun nest and rushed it single-handed, captured the guns and ten prisoners. Subsequently he repeled four counter-attacks and after dark again went out alone and located an enemy post, lead a party which captured the post and three guns. Yesterday he led his company against a strong enemy position with great skill and daring and continued to display the same high example of valor and self-sacrifice. He dies of wounds received today during the last day of the attack by his battalion. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The brother of a Great War Poet
  • A 10-victory ace
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A Military Chaplain
  • An Australian Rules footballer

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Major Cecil Alfred Orton (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at home. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Orton Rector of Swyre.
  • Captain Eric Howard Harvey (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He is the brother of the war poet Frederick William Harvey.
  • Captain Cecil Vernon Gardner DFC (Royal Air Force) dies of wounds received three days earlier at age 29. He is a ten-victory ace and his brother was killed in May 1917.
  • Lieutenant Harold Doust MC (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 32. His brother was killed last September.
  • Second Lieutenant Harry Hutchinson (King’s Own Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in November 1916.
  • Chaplain Cecil Alfred Mallett (New Zealand Chaplain’s Department) dies of accidental injuries at age 37.
  • Sergeant Arthur Leslie (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33. He is the third brother to be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Frederick Thomas Stephens MM (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service in the Royal Navy in August last year.
  • Private George Green (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 26. His younger brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Private John Sharp Cameron (Auckland Infantry) is killed. His brother died of wounds in June 1917.
  • Private Clarence Valentine Harris (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in November 1917.
  • Private Ernest George Hodder (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother was killed last April.
  • Private Denis Kelly (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. He has two brothers who have previously been killed while serving in the Leinster Regiment.
  • Bombardier James Duncan Gordon (Australian Field Artillery) is an Australian rules footballer who played with Essendon in the Victoria Football League.
  • Private Griffith Piercy (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 21 exactly four months after his brother was also killed.
  • Signalman George Redvers Victor Slater (HMS Vivid) dies of illness at home at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick George Slater Vicar of Ince

Sunday 29 September 1918 We Lost 3,228

Australian Corps attacks at St Quentin supported by approximately 150 tanks of the 4th and 5th tank brigades. American divisions launch the initial attack, with the Australian 3rd and 5th Divisions intended to “leapfrog” through the American forces. The inexperienced Americans do not clear German positions as effectively as they might have (due to the confusion created during the attack on 27th September). This forces the advancing Australians to fight for the ground that the Americans had planned to have already taken. In the confusion of battle, some American pockets that had been left without effective leadership willingly went along with the Australians as they advanced and there are documented accounts of soldiers from both nations fighting alongside each other in ad-hoc mixed outfits. The British 46th Division crosses the St Quentin Canal (defended by fortified machine gun positions), capturing 4,200 German prisoners (out of a total for the army of 5,300).

Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Frederick Warrington Gillet (Royal Air Force), when on a low line patrol, attacks three Fokkers, driving down one, which falls in flames. Lieutenant John Rose observes an enemy scout attacking some of our machines.  He engages it, drives it down from 15,000 feet to 6,000 feet, when it falls in flames.  On his return journey he attacks and destroys an enemy two-seater.

The merchant ship S S Nyanza (Master Finlay Kerr) is sunk by a German submarine torpedo fourteen miles northeast from the Maidens.  Her crew of 13 is killed including her master who dies at age 54.

  • Fourth Engineer Officer William Evitt is killed at age 20. His father was killed in September 1917 also serving in the Merchant Marine.

At Terhand, Belgium, when the right flank of his company was held up by enemy machine-guns, Lance-Corporal Ernest Seaman (Inniskilling Fusiliers) goes forward under heavy fire with his Lewis gun and engages the position single-handed, capturing two machine-guns and 12 prisoners, and killing one officer and two men. Later in the day he again rushes another enemy machine-gun post, capturing the gun under very heavy fire. He is killed immediately afterwards, but it was due to his gallant conduct that his company was able to push forward to its objective. For his efforts he will be posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

During the attack at Bellenglise and Lehaucourt Lieutenant Colonel Bernard William Vann (commanding 1st/6th Sherwood Foresters) leads his battalion with great skill across the Canal du Nord through a very thick fog and under heavy fire from field and machine guns. On reaching the high ground above Bellenglise the whole attack is held up by fire of all descriptions from the front and right flank. Realising that everything depends on the advance going forward with the barrage Colonel Vann rushes up to the firing line and with the greatest gallantry leads the line forward. By his prompt action and absolute contempt for danger the whole situation is changed, the men are encouraged and the line swept forward. Later, he rushes a field-gun single-handed and knocks out three of the detachment. The success of the day is in no small degree due to the splendid gallantry and fine leadership displayed by this officer. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross as he will be killed near Ramicourt by a sniper on 3rd October when leading his battalion in attack.  He is an ordained minister who played football for Northampton Town, Burton United FC and Derby County from 1906-7.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Battalion commander
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose father will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose uncle will be killed in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A church organist and music critic for the Southern Reporter
  • Multiple Military Chaplains
  • A schoolmaster
  • A man whose son will be killed in 1942
  • A member of the Vancouver Police Department
  • The grandson of Chief Sitting Bull the victor over General Custer as the Battle of Little Big Horn

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John McDonnell (Leinster Regiment commanding 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 40.
  • Captain Stanley Walter Neale MC (Australian Infantry) is killed by a shell at age 24. He is an Australian rules footballer who played 28 games with University in 1913-14.
  • Captain Herbert Rendell (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant John Neville Beeman MC (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at Villers Hill near Gouzeaucourt at age 20. His uncle was killed in October 1914.
  • Lieutenant Nicholson Stuart Boulton (Royal Air Force) a six-victory ace is shot down and killed at age 19 east of Caudry by German ace Josef Mai.
  • Lieutenant Vernon Douglas Stuart MC (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Canon E A Stuart.
  • Lieutenant John Cuthbert Backhouse Brown (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Brown.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Henry May (Tank Corps) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed last June.
  • Lieutenant John Ledge Bromley (Army Service Corps attached Royal Air Force) is killed in action at age 21. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Crabbe Park (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds at age 29. He is the organist at Bowden Parish Church and the music critic for the Southern Reporter.
  • Flight Cadet Hector Campbell Wright (Royal Air Force) is accidentally killed at age 18. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P A Campbell Rector of Fladbury.
  • Cadet John Henry MacLaurin (Royal Air Force) is killed in an accident at home. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Robert Twiss MacLaurin Rector of Killaloe.
  • Chaplain Cyril Barnard Wilson Buck (attached Leicestershire Regiment) dies on active service at age 38,
  • Chaplain Umberto Michael Bertini dies on active service at age 33.
  • Lance Corporal Herbert William Carpenter (West Surrey Regiment) the schoolmaster of Abinger Council School is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in the Royal Air Force in May 1942.
  • Private Joseph Taylor (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. His older brother will die as a prisoner of war next month.
  • Private William Morrison (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He is a member of the Vancouver Police Department.
  • Private Arthur Leslie James (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother was killed in June 1916.
  • Private Alfred Jenkins (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. His brother was killed earlier this year.
  • Gunner Francis Sepitmus Evert (Australian Field Artillery) is killed. His brother was killed last September.
  • Private Frank Ernest Sidney Cox (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Thomas W Ballard (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 32 just 4.5 kilometers from where his brother was killed earlier this month.
  • Private Charles Carr (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will die as a result of war service in 1921.
  • Private Anthony Rudd (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 25. His brother died of wounds in March of last year.
  • Able Seaman William Marshall Neiass DSM (HMS Cumberland) dies on service. His brother died on service last December.
  • Private Robert Wilfrid Longmore (Canadian Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1918 and they are sons of the Reverend Francis Longmore Rector of Carman Manitoba.
  • Private John Charles Crane (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Standing Buffalo (Manitoba Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is the grandson of Chief Sitting Bull who led the Sioux into the Battle of the Little Big Horn and defeated George Armstrong Custer at that battle. He is the son of Chief Julius Standing Buffalo of the Lakota Sioux tribe.

Wednesday 22 May 1918 We Lost 420

Charles James Mott

Lance Corporal Charles James Mott (London Regiment) dies of wounds received two days prior at age 37. He was born in Hornsey, North London, the son of Henry Isaac Mott, a surveyor’s clerk, and Eliza Brockley, a singing teacher. His early music was as a choirboy at St. James’ Church in Muswell Hill. When he left school he took a clerical job like his brothers, and he became a bank clerk, where he was well-known for his habit of singing to himself as he worked. After work he studied singing with Josiah Booth and Henry Stanley, before being spotted by Baron Frederic d’Erlanger who sent him to study with Paul Knupfer in Berlin. A year later, such was his progress that Knupfer arranged an audition with the Hofoper at Dessau leading to his becoming principal baritone.

At the age of 25 Charles returned to England to continue studying with Madame Novello Davies. His chance to sing publicly in England came when he was invited to share the stage with a new tenor, John McCormack. In 1909 he was given supporting roles at the Royal Opera, before being given the part of Méru in Meyerbeer’s Les Huguenots, singing with Luisa Tetrazzini. Early in 1912 Mott sang the part of the Second Knight of the Grail in The Royal Opera’s Festival of German Opera production of Wagner’s Parsifal – this being the first English production, though sung in German. Following Parsifal, Mott sang in Meistersinger and Götterdämmerung. Later in 1912 he sang in the Wagner Festival in Budapest, and the next year at the Edinburgh Festival. Early in 1913 he participated in an unsuccessful production of Raymond Roze’s Joan of Arc, but later that year he was fortunate in playing leading roles more to his liking in Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde, Lohengrin and Bizet’s Carmen. In 1914 the English composer ‘Sir’ Edward Elgar attended the Festival, expecting to hear Tristan, but instead of that the curtain rose on Meistersinger in which Mott by chance took August Kiess’s part of Kothner. Mott would have been singing the part of the Nachtigall, but Kiess was indisposed. Elgar was impressed by Mott’s voice, praised him personally and remembering him later, recommended him for the part of the Priest in his Gerontius.

Elgar invited Mott to play the key role of The Organ Grinder in Lena Ashwell’s production of The Starlight Express at the Kingsway Theatre, and this was followed by successful performances in Elgar’s song cycle on Kipling’s poems The Fringes of the Fleet. In 1916 Mott played the part of the Angel of the Agony in Gerontius, alongside Clara Butt and Gervase Elwes, with the composer conducting. There was a run of six performances at Queen’s Hall from 8th May and a gala performance on 19th May in the presence of the King and Queen. At the end of that year he sang in Coleridge-Taylor’s exotic Scenes of Hiawatha. He was conscripted into the British army and joined the Artists Rifles. On 20th May 1918, during the Third Battle of the Aisne, whil3 on active service with his comrades in Aveluy Woods, he is mortally wounded by enemy fire. He died of his wounds two days later. There are other singers in the regiment, and he is fondly remembered by one of them, Roy Henderson, for his popularity, unconventionality and light-heartedness. ‘Sir’ Edward Elgar, in writing to a friend, said “It is difficult to believe that Charles Mott is dead; dead of wounds in France. I am overwhelmed: a simple, honest GOOD soul.”

 Today’s losses include:

  • A baritone singer and actor
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A man whose two brothers have been previously killed in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain William Nelson Graham MC (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of the Honorable George P Graham.
  • Lieutenant Basil Howard Baker (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Howard Baker.
  • Second Lieutenant John Whitely Mallinson (Machine Gun Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend J H Mallinson.
  • Second Lieutenant Edmund Nicholas Prideaux-Brune (Rifle Brigade) the son of Colonel and Mrs. (the Honorable) Prideaux-Brune is killed in action at age 19.
  • Sergeant Francis Vaughan (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed. His two brothers have already been killed in the Great War.

Saturday 13 April 1918 We Lost 2,120

During the German spring offensive, when his platoon is surrounded Second Lieutenant John Munro (Seaforth Highlanders) leads them to fight their way out, delaying the enemy long enough for the rest of the battalion to regroup and mount a successful counter-attack. For his efforts on this day Lieutenant Munro, a Scottish Poet will be awarded the Military Cross. Three days later he will be killed in action at age 28. He wrote in his native Gaelic as Iain Rothach and came to be ranked by critics alongside other Great War Poets.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • A battalion commander
  • A Norwich City footballer
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three, four and five son in the Great War
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man who lost two brothers in the Great War and another brother in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Robert Clements Gore CB CMG General Officer Commanding 101st Brigade 34th Division is killed in action at age 51. The headquarters of both the 101st and the 74th Brigades are occupying the same cellar in a farm on the Mont de Lille (southeast of Bailleul) when it is blown in.  The explosion kills General Gore and his Signaling Officer, Major F G Avery.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Cyril Robert Studd DSO (East Kent Regiment commanding 22nd Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 37 when a shell falls on his dugout.
  • Captain Vivian Sumner Simpson MC (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 33. He was a professional club football player with the Norwich City Football Club.
  • Captain Thomas Tannatt Pryce VC MC (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at age 32 performing the deeds that will win him the Victoria Cross. Two days ago at Vieux-Berquin, France, Captain Pryce lead two platoons in a successful attack on the village. Early yesterday he is occupying a position with some 40 men, the rest having become casualties. He beats off four enemy attacks during the day, but by evening the enemy is within 60 yards of his trench. A bayonet charge led early this morning by Captain Pryce drives them back some 100 yards, but he has only 17 men left with no ammunition when yet another attack comes. He again leads a bayonet charge and is last seen engaged in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle against overwhelming odds.
  • Commander William Henry Farrington Warren DSO (HM TBD Parramatta, Royal Australian Navy) drowns in Italy at age 40. He is the son of the late Reverend John Maturin Warren.
  • Captain Kenneth Edward Brown (Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry) dies os wounds as a prisoner of war at age 22. He is the third of four brothers who lose their lives in the Great War, the final one being killed tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Henry Kenyon Bagshaw (Army Service Corps attached Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Fosbery Bagshaw.
  • Lieutenant Montague Hearfield Bingham (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Edward Leonard Bingham JP.
  • Lieutenant William Herbert Hamilton Steele-Nicholson (Royal Engineers) dies at home at age 43. His brother was killed in action in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edward Alex Shepherd (Machine Gun Corps) dies of wounds received in action. He is the son of the Reverend Edwin Thomas Shepherd Vicar of Longsleddale.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Barnes (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother was killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Charles Lionel Abrahams (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Lionel and Lady Abrahams.
  • Second Lieutenant Hubert Merefield Parsons (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action at age 24. His only brother Mervyn was killed at Ypres in September 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant John Cyprian Lott MC (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Reverend R C, sometime Vicar of De Aar, Cape Colony and Rector of Croughton, Northants.  He was educated at Trinity College, Oxford.
  • Sergeant Sidney Wedd DCM (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 23. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Sergeant Amos Brewster (Grenadier Guards) is killed. His brother was killed in October 1916.
  • Corporal Rolland Miller Neilson (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 26. He is the last of three brothers who will die in the first world war and who have a younger brother who though too young to fight in this war is killed in the Gordon Highlanders in June 1940.
  • Lance Corporal Sidney Parkhouse (Middlesex Regiment) dies on service at age 31. His brother was killed in November 1915.
  • Private Stanley Cregeen (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. His brother was killed two years earlier in April 1916.
  • Private Frederick Stooke (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 20. His is one of four brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Walter Obadiah Lee (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed less than three weeks ago.
  • Private David James Blyth Egdell (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Alfred Stewart (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the last of five brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Percy Taylor (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the last of three brothers who are killed in the war.

Monday 18 March 1918 We Lost 271

John Anthony McCudden

HM CMB-20 depth charges and sinks the submarine UB-17 in the North Sea.  The steamer SS Baygitano is torpedoed and sunk at 11:45 by UC-77 while on a voyage from Le Havre to Cardiff.  Two crewmembers are killed. Lieutenant Edwin Ballard Dalby (SS Joshual Nicholson, Royal Naval Reserve) is killed when his ship is sunk by the German U-boat U-70.  He is the grandson of the Reverend William Ballard Dalby and had been present at the engagement between the Carmania and Cap Trafalgar and lost his life along with twenty-five of his crew mates.

Today’s losses include:

  • A General
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • An 8-victory ace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple member of the Clergy
  • A 1912 Canadian Olympian
  • A military Chaplain
  • A Civilian Chaplain

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General George Augustus Stewart Cape CMG Commanding Royal Artillery, Acting General Officer Commanding 39th Division is killed in action at age 51.
  • Lieutenant John Anthony ‘Jack’ McCudden MC (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 20. He is an eight-victory ace and the brother of James McCudden VC.
  • Lieutenant Leonard A Edens (Newfoundland Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed last November.
  • Lieutenant E T Akril-Jones (Sherwood Foresters attached Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Canon David Akril-Jones.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Clarence Gorman (Canadian Engineers) is killed in action at age 30. He played La Crosse for Canada in the 1912 Olympics and his brother will be killed in August.
  • Probationary Flight Officer Eustace William Harland (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally killed at home at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend William George Harland Vicar of Lythe.
  • Chaplain Edward Walter Barker (attached 176th Infantry Brigade) dies of wounds at age 30 received nine days earlier in action in the Arras sector. He was an exhibitioner of Bedford and Queen’s, Cambridge.
  • Civilian Chaplain “the Reverend” Emlyn Holt Davies (Young Men’s Christian Association attached Indian Labour Corps) dies in France at age 41.

Monday 11 March 1918 We Lost 290

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple men who are the sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Military Chaplain
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • The grandson of an Admiral

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Captain Albert Evelyn Alderson (Royal West Surrey Regiment attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) drowns in Greece. He is the son of the late Reverend E A Alderson, Chaplain to the Forces.
  • Captain Eric Scott Aplin (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received yesterday on the eastern slope of Passchendaele Ridge leading an offensive patrol at age 22. His brother died of wounds in May 1915 and they are grandsons of Admiral E D’O Alpin.
  • Lieutenant John Lorenzo Patrick Haynes (North Lancashire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in air combat over Fresnoy Park at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Charles E Haynes.
  • Private Duncan Atwill (Newfoundland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Bombardier Leonard Spencer Moss (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in August.
  • Private George Ernest Chapman (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August.

Wednesday 9 January 1918 We Lost 391

Cyril Narramore Were

The destroyer Racoon (Lieutenant George Levack McKay Napier) strikes rocks off the north coast of Ireland at about 02:00 during a snowstorm and subsequently founders with all one hundred and five hands on board drowning.  Nine of the crew had been left behind at her last port of call, and these are the sole survivors.  Seventeen bodies are recovered by patrol craft and are buried at Rathmullan.  Five more bodies will wash ashore and will be buried locally.

  • Stoker 1st Class John Greer is among the killed. He dies at age 25 and is ironically buried in his hometown in Belfast City Cemetery.

Commander Henry Halahan, who has previously been in charge of the Royal Navy’s siege guns supporting the army’s left flank in Flanders beginning in 1915, writes to Admiral Keyes: “If the operation for which you said you might want some of my men (Zeebrugge) is eventually undertaken, I should very much like to take part in it.  I would willingly accept the same conditions, viz: that I should not expect to come back.”

HMS Cyclamen uses high-speed explosive paravane and depth charges to sink the German submarine UB69 off Bizerta.

The Sopwith Camel fighter unit 73 Squadron arrives in France.

Captain William Donald Patrick scores the last Nieuport Scout victory for 1 Squadron on this day.  British air losses for the day are placed at three aircraft.  All three pilots are killed along with one observer.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Military Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Christopher Joyce Postlethwaite (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was in November 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Cyril Narramore Were (attached Rifle Brigade) dies on active service at age 36. He is the son of the Bishop of Stafford.
  • Sergeant Reginald Bayley White (Newfoundland Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19. He is the son of the Bishop of Newfoundland.
  • Private Lewis Brown (East Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother was killed in May 1916.