Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Quinn’s Post

Saturday 7 August 1915 – We Lost 2,330

The Nek Cemetery

The Nek Cemetery

The Nek is a ridge fifty yards wide at the Anzac line, narrowing to only thirty yards at the Turkish front.  The opposing trenches at this point are only twenty yards apart and at least five Turkish machine guns cover the ground between.  A half hour bombardment of the Turkish positions by all available land guns as well as naval gunfire precedes a planned attack by the 8th and 10th Australian Light Horse regiments on the Nek.  For reasons never known, the bombardment stops at 04:23, seven minutes earlier than planned.  In the silence of the next seven minutes the Turks move to man the trenches two deep in readiness for the attack.

At 04:30 the men of the 8th Light Horse Regiment climb out of their trenches and charge the Turks.  This is met by a hail of Turkish machine gun fire which cuts down the entire Australian line within 10 yards of their trenches.  All officers are killed, including the commander, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Henry White, who has insisted on leading his men into action, after saying goodbye to his troops with “Boys, you have ten minutes to live, and I am going to lead you”.  He dies at age thirty-three.  Lieutenant Eliot Gratton Wilson reaches the Turkish parapet where he is killed.  It is his 33rd birthday.  As soon as the first line clears the parapet the 2nd line takes their place.  Scrambling over the bodies of their fallen comrades, they meet the same fate.

Next comes the turn of the 10th Light Horse Regiment in the 3rd and 4th lines of the attack.  They know full well what has happened to their comrades in the previous two waves.  They also know most of them, if not all are going to certain death.  They shake hands with each other and quietly say goodbye.  Only a handful of the men reach the Turkish trenches where they are killed.  One light horseman, Private Wilfred Lukin Harper “is last seen running forward like a schoolboy in a foot race with all the speed he could compass”.  He too is cut down by gunfire and killed at age 25. This scene is highlighted in the movie “Gallipoli”. His brother Trooper Gresley Harper of the same battalion is killed at age thirty-one in the same charge. Also killed in the charge is Trooper Dudley Lukin whose brother will be killed in June 1918. The commander of the 10th, realizing that the objective cannot be taken, requests a cancellation of the attack. He is told the attack must be continued because of a report of a success. The slaughter continues. At the nearby Quinn’s Post, an entire line of 54 men from the 2nd Light Horse Regiment, except for one man, are killed or wounded within a few feet of their trenches.

When holding the north-west corner of ‘The Vineyard’, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) William Thomas Forshaw (Manchester Regiment) is attacked and heavily bombed by Turks, who advance time after time by three trenches which converge at this point, but he holds his own, not only directing his men and encouraging them by exposing himself with the utmost disregard to danger, but casually lighting bomb fuses with his cigarette, and personally throwing them continuously for forty-one hours.  (See 8th August 1915).

The opportunity for a swift victory at Chunuk Bair has been lost. The three battalions travelling along the north side of Rhododendron Spur are in position by 04:30 shortly before dawn. They advance to a knoll dubbed “The Apex” which is only about 500 yards from the summit where at the time there are only a handful of Turkish infantry. The Canterbury battalion on the south side of the spur is lost and delayed. Johnston makes the fatal decision to wait for the last battalion to arrive before making the attack. By 08:00 the Turks have started firing on the New Zealanders on the spur. In broad daylight, after an exhausting climb and faced by stiffening opposition, the prospects for a New Zealand assault against the peak looks slim. Nevertheless General Godley ordered Johnston to attack. Two hundred yards beyond where the New Zealanders are positioned on the Apex is another knoll called “The Pinnacle” from which it is a straight climb to the summit. Off the side of the spur to the north is a small, sheltered plateau known as “The Farm”.  Johnston orders the Auckland battalion to attack. About 100 men make it as far as the Pinnacle where they desperately try to dig in. Around 300 men fall as casualties between there and the Apex. Johnston tells the Wellington battalion to continue the attack. The battalion’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel William George Malone refuses, stating that he is not willing to order his men to carry out a hopeless attack. He says his battalion will take Chunuk Bair at night. During the day the New Zealanders are reinforced by two battalions from the British 13th (Western) Division: the 7th Gloucestershire Regiment and the pioneers of 8th the Welsh Regiment.

At Chunuk Bair Ridge after the New Zealand Brigade has attacked and established itself on the ridge, Corporal Cyril Royston Guyton Bassett (New Zealand Divisional Signal Company), in full daylight and under continuous fire, succeeds in laying a telephone line from the old position to the new one on Chunuk Bair.  He also does further gallant work in connection with the repair of telephone lines by day and night under heavy fire.  For his actions on this day Corporal Bassett will be awarded the Victoria Cross, becoming the first New Zealander to be awarded the Victoria Cross in the Great War.

At Suvla Bay progress is minimal. The two brigades of the 10th Division come ashore, adding to the confusion. In the heat of the day, the soldiers became desperate for drinking water. Towards evening two hills east of the salt lake are captured; these represented the sole gains for the first day ashore at Suvla. IX Corps has suffered 1,700 casualties in the first 24 hours, a figure exceeding the total size of the Turkish defenders. Stopford does not go ashore from the Jonquil and by the end of today the chain of command has completely broken down.

Battalions of the Lincolnshire Regiment and Border Regiment capture Green Hill and Chocolate Hill, while the West Yorkshire Regiment storm Lala Baba.

Lance Corporal Leonard Keysor (Australian Infantry) is in a trench at Lone Pine that is being heavily bombed by the Turks.  He picks up two live bombs and throws them back at the enemy at great risk to his own life.  Although wounded himself, he continues to throw bombs at the enemy, thereby saving a portion of the trench that is deemed too vital to hold.  For his actions on this and the next day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man whose sister and her daughter will be killed in February 1941 during the Blitz
  • Seven battalion commanders
  • A Rhodes scholar
  • The son of the 6th Viscount Melville
  • The grandson of a Baronet
  • The amateur heavyweight boxing champion of New Zealand
  • A New Zealand Rugby international
  • Multiple Australian Rules footballers
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose brother-in-law was killed yesterday
  • Multiple men who will have two brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers who are killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother also killed in the Great War
  • Multiple men who will have a cousin killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Richard Dalton Waterhouse (commanding 8th Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 31.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Horace James Johnston DSO (commanding 8th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Robert Scobie (commanding 2nd Australian Infantry) is killed at Lone Pine at age 44.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Albert Meill (commanding 9th Australian Light Horse) is killed at Russell’s Top at age 45.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Samuel Brown (commanding 3rd Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at Lone Pine at age 40.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Augustus Heathcote Allenby (commanding 7th Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 52. He is the son of Major R Allenby JP.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Henry Chapman (commanding 6th Yorkshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 40.
  • His cousin serving in the same regiment Captain Wilfred Hubert Chapman is also killed at age 35.
  • Major D’Arcy MacKenzie Fraser (75th Carnatic Infantry, Indian Army) is killed in action on Gallipoli. He is the son of Lieutenant General Hastings Fraser.
  • Major Percy John Overton (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed in action in the Aghyl Dere below Chunuk Bair on Gallipoli at age 38. His younger brother will be killed in three days serving in the same regiment.
  • Staff Captain Gerald Lysley Derriman (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late Admiral Derriman.
  • Captain Henry Frederick Rycroft (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Richard Henry Charles Rycroft 3rd
  • Captain Alfred Victor Clegg (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 30 at Gallipoli. His younger brother will be killed serving in the Border Regiment at Gallipoli in fifteen days.
  • Captain Morton Brown Paton (South Lancashire Regiment attached Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 44. He is Cotton Merchant in Liverpool and former Bailliol student and the son of the Reverend Dr. John Brown Paton.
  • Captain Hugh Eaton Frederick Travers (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 21. He is the son of Brigadier General Joseph Oates Travers CMG DSO.
  • Lieutenant Leslie Hall Osborne (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. His brother, who is wounded in the same action, will die of those wounds on a hospital ship in two days.
  • Lieutenant Robert Douglas Foster (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at Suvla Bay. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Lawrence Talbot Lisle Foster (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Albert John Foster Vicar of Wooton.
  • Lieutenant Horace Curtis (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 26. He has two brothers that are also killed in the war.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Holmes Nisbet (Otago Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces) is killed in action at age 23. His is the son of the Reverend Dr. Thomas Nisbet DD.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Kenneth Robert Dundas (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action on by an aerial bomb dropped by a German aircraft at Suvla Gallipoli at age 33. He is the son of the 6th Viscount Melville. He is a fluent German speaker and had been a former district commissioner in German East Africa.
  • Lieutenant Humphrey Gilbert Belcher (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 22. His brother will be killed serving in the same regiment in three days and they are sons of the Reverend Gilbert Edward Belcher Rector of Chaldon.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Marson (Welsh Regiment is killed at age 19. He is the only son of the Reverend Claud Latimer Marson Vicar of Hambridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Phipps Turnbull (Australian Light Horse) is killed at the Nek. He is a Rhodes Scholar.
  • Second Lieutenant Amiraux Silver Fletcher (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Gurkha Rifles) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend J A Fletcher.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Robert Johnson (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Brothers Duncan age 27 and Robin Hook age 24 are killed together serving as commissioned officers in the Lancashire Regiment. They are buried in adjacent graves in Hill 10 Cemetery, not far from where they landed at the Salt Lake on Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Duckworth (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of James Duckworth JP. The Redoubt Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery contains an oak tree planted by the parents of Second Lieutenant Duckworth in 1922; but his body was never found. This memorial is unique in the peninsula as the only private memorial located within a CWGC cemetery.
  • Sergeant William Ernest King (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 29. He is the brother in law of Everard Digges La Touche who died of wounds yesterday and the son of the Reverend Canon William J King Vicar of Kilcolman who will lose another son next April.
  • Sergeant John Leslie Connor (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 30. His cousin will die of wounds off Gallipoli next month.
  • Sergeant Sydney John O’Neill (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 27. He was an Australian Rules footbalerl who played one game for Fitzroy in 1909.
  • Sergeant Thomas Roughton Worthington (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His sister Agnes Mary Bennison and her daughter will be killed in February 1941 during the Blitz.
  • Corporal Andrew Bernard Smith (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in six weeks.
  • Lance Sergeant Eric Cecil Chute (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Brothers serving in the Australian Light Horse are killed in action serving together. Lance Corporal Lindsay Lewis Stirling Chipper is killed at age 28, while his brother Trooper Ross Richard Vivian Chipper dies at age 31.
  • Another set of brothers serving in the Australian Light Horse are also killed serving together on the attack on Quinn’s Post and Pope’s Hill. Troopers Frederick Herbert and Harold Samuel Sherwood are both killed.  Frederick dies at age 29 while Harold dies at age 25.
  • Trooper George Frederick Henry Sandy (Australian Light Horse) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 26. His younger brother will be killed on Gallipoli in seventeen days.
  • Trooper Arthur Jones (Australian Light Horse) an Australian Rules Footballer is killed at age 23. He scored 3 goals in 7 games for Fitzroy in 1914.
  • Trooper Frank Laird Villis (Australian Light Horse) and his brother Trooper Stanley Villis are killed together near Pope’s Hill. Frank dies at 25 while Stanley is 23.
  • Trooper Arthur Wellesley Oakes (Australian Light Horse) is killed at age 29. He is the son of the Archdeacon of Bathurst George Spencer Oakes Rector of Kelso New South Wales.
  • Private Henry Cullinan (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. His brother will be killed on the last day of this year.
  • Private Charles Savoury (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 23. He is the Amateur Heavyweight boxing champion of New Zealand and a Rugby International.  He also was a member of the Australiasian Northern Union team that toured England.
  • Private Herbert Charles Wicking (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will be killed together in 1917.
  • Private Harry Richard Wildig (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next July.
  • Private William Mather (Otago Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private Hugh McGlade (Royal Irish Fusiliers) is killed in action at Gallipoli. He has two brothers that will be killed in action during the war, one in 1916 the other in 1917.
  • Rifleman George Alfred Dolman (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private William Joseph Cooke (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother was killed last May.
  • Private William Chester Yates (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli less than one month after his brother died of wounds on Malta also received on Gallipoli. He is killed at age 18.
  • Private Edward Lawrence Goodall (Manchester Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed next July.

Friday 6 August 1915 – We Lost 1,718

Lone Pine Cemetery

Lone Pine Cemetery

On the second day of her second patrol in the Sea of Marmora submarine E11 sinks the Turkish gunboat Berki Satvet.

During night at the same time as the British IX Corps begins landing at Suvla to the north a breakout from the Anzac sector is made by units of the New Zealand and Australian Division under the command of General Alexander Godley. Two columns of troops are directed at two peaks of the dominating ridge which are expected to be captured by dawn tomorrow. Both columns are preceded by a covering force to clear the Turkish outposts and protect the flanks of the main assaulting force. The left, or northern, column of the Australian 4th Infantry Brigade and the 29th Indian Brigade are heading for Hill 971, the highest point on the Sari Bair range. They have the furthest to travel over completely unfamiliar terrain and never get close to their objective.

The right, or southern, column is heading for Chunuk Bair. Though lower than Hill 971, this peak overlooks the north of the Anzac perimeter and is used as a base for an artillery battery. The main Sari Bair ridge extends from Chunuk Bair down into the Anzac sector via Battleship Hill and Baby 700. From Baby 700 the ridge branches towards the beach via the Nek and south to Lone Pine via the line of tenuous Anzac positions known as Quinn’s, Courtney’s and Steele’s Posts. The capture of Chunuk Bair would provide considerable relief to the Anzac sector.  The approach to the peak is made along Rhododendron Spur which runs from the beach to the peak of Chunuk Bair. The Turks have outposts along the spur at the Table Top, Destroyer Hill and nearest the beach at Old No. 3 Outpost. There is also a Turkish outpost on Bauchop’s Hill to the north. All these outposts have to be cleared by the covering force, the four regiments of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, before the main assault column can proceed up the spur to the summit. The Auckland regiment clears Old No. 3 Outpost and the Wellington regiment takes Destroyer Hill and the Table Top. The Otago and Canterbury regiments capture Bauchop’s Hill, named after the Otago regiment’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Bauchop who will die of wounds received during the attack. In all the New Zealanders lose about 100 men in clearing the outposts and while their efforts are successful, the plan is now running two hours behind schedule, making it difficult to reach the summit before first light.

The main force of the right column is the New Zealand Infantry Brigade under the command of Brigadier General Francis Johnston. The Brigade’s four battalions, reduced by sickness and battle, mustered about 2,800 men.. The advance is initially made up the valleys, on either side of Rhododendron Spur and once past the Table Top, the New Zealanders climb on to the ridge, leaving about 1,000 yards to travel to the summit.

As a diversion to the main assaults against the Sari Bair peaks of Chunuk Bair and Hill 971 the whistles blow for an assault on Lone Pine at 17:30 and the Australians of the 1st Infantry Brigade emerge yelling and shouting from underground tunnels which have been dug 50 yards beyond their own front.  They have 100 yards to dash and when they reach the Turkish front they discover the Turks have roofed over most of their advanced trenches with pine logs.  Some Australians drop their rifles and try to pry the logs away.  Others fire between the logs into the Turks below, while still others dash beyond to the communications trenches and attack the enemy rear.

A fierce close quarters battle rages as the Australians drop into the darkened passages below while the Turks, who have been sheltered from the artillery bombardment that preceded the attack, attempt to emerge from their tunnels. The Australians fight mainly with rifle and bayonet and sometimes with their hands. The preliminary attack has killed or wounded many of the Turks and the rest are either killed, driven out or captured by the Australians.

By 18:00, Lone Pine is in Australians hands. Many hours of attack and counterattack follow with the Turks eventually throwing their entire reserve into the battle.  The enemy uses close-in bomb fighting in their efforts to retake the lost positions. Many Australians catch bombs and throw them back, an audacious act, which ends when the Turks shorten the fuses on their bombs.  This results in quite a few Australians having their hands and arms blow off.

The 32nd and 33rd Brigades of the 11th Division began to come ashore at “B Beach” Suvla Bay south of Nibrunesi Point shortly before 22:00. In the first action fought by a New Army unit, two companies from the 6th Yorkshire Regiment drive the Turkish defenders off the small hill of Lala Baba which overlooks the beach. It is an inauspicious start as all but two of the Yorkshire’s officers become casualties as do one third of the men. Shortly afterwards the 34th Brigade attempts to land at “A Beach” within Suvla Bay but the landing goes awry from the start. The destroyers conveying the brigade anchor 1,000 yards too far south, facing shoal water and on the wrong side of the channel that drained the salt lake into the bay. Two lighters ground on reefs and the men have to wade ashore submerged up to their necks. The Manchester Regiment, having come ashore from the destroyer HMS Grampus has the greatest success of the landing, managing to find its way to the Kiretch Tepe ridge and fight its way some distance along it to the east with the loss of 200 casualties.

Elsewhere the landing is in chaos, having been made in the dark which results in confusion with units becoming mixed and officers unable to locate their position or their objectives. Later, when the moon rises, the British troops become targets for Turkish snipers. Attempts to capture Hill 10 fail because no one in the field knows where Hill 10 is. Shortly after dawn it is found and taken, the Turkish rearguard having withdrawn during the night.

It is agreed on this day that the Indian Expeditionary Force “D”, which in its advance inland has now reached Nasiriya, should advance on Kut.

Today’s losses include:

  • A classical actor
  • A member of the clergy
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • A Gold Medal Skater
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • An Aylesbury footballer
  • The nephew of the Head Master of the South School Invercagill
  • A man whose brother and his wife’s brother will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Royal Air Force in 1944
  • A man who will have his three brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple men who will have to brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple men who will have a brother killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  • Captain Edwin Gerald Venning (Suffolk Regiment) is killed by a sniper shot to the neck while observing the German lines from his own trench at age 32. The regimental history stated “All ranks deplored the loss of a very valuable, gallant and popular officer. His body was conveyed to Locre the same evening and buried in the village churchyard.” He is the son of the late Reverend Edwin James Venning, British Chaplain at Cassel, Germany and is a well known classical actor.
  • Captain Harry Burnett Stevenson (Rajput Light Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer.
  • Captain Nicolas Melville Gepp (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed on Hill 12 Gallipoli. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son of the Reverend Nicolas Parker Gepp Canon of Ely and Rector of Witchingham.
  • Captain Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker.
  • Captain Alec Vaughan Thomas (East Surrey Regiment attached Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed one day short of two years from today.
  • Lieutenant Lancelot Botry Pigott (Hampshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26 on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend Eversfield Botry Pigott Rector of Ellisfield.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Alexander Ross Fitzmaurice (Sappers and Miners, Royal Engineers Lahore Division) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of the late Judge of Dharwar, a scholar of Felsted School Essex and a government engineer at Bareilly, India.  He had been seriously wounded on 28th October 1914, returning to the front on 19th
  • Lieutenant Howard Field (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother was killed just over two months earlier.
  • Lieutenant Amyas Leigh Goldie (Gloucestershire Regiment attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in March of this year.
  • Second Lieutenant Everard Digges La Touche (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in the intestine at Lone Pine at age 32. He is a Clerk in the Holy Orders (Clergyman) but had been unable to obtain a position as Chaplain so he enlisted as a private in the Infantry.  His brother will be killed in action in September 1915.  He was the youngest ever to earn a Letters Degree from Trinity College, Dublin.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander John Robertson (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 28. He played 10 Australian Rules Football games for Melbourne University in 1909.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Hobson Whidborne (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33 as the first of three sons of the Reverend George Ferris Whidborne who are killed in the war.
  • Second Lieutenant Christopher Moor (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Lone Pine. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. Charles Moor Vicar of Barton on Humber & Canon of Lincoln.
  • Second Lieutenant Basil Stewart Parker (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend George Parker Rector of Quainton.
  • Second Lieutenant Gavin Campbell Arbuthnot (North Staffordshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend William Arbuthnot, Vicar of Lea Marston Warks.
  • Sergeant Robert Anthony Fleming (Canterbury Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 24. His ancestors claimed to have saved the flag bearing the legend “For Christ and Covenant” from the field of Bothwell Bridge in 1688.
  • Lance Corporal Alleyne Gordon Webber (Otago Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in February 1917 and they are nephews of the head master of the South School Inverecagill.
  • Trooper Stanley Maris Clark (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 35. He is a keen football player and well known in rowing circles.
  • Brothers and Privates Harold Benjamin and Edward John Victor Hennell (Australian Infantry) are killed together in the attack.
  • Trooper Alexander Forbes Hogarth (Australian Light Horse) dies of wounds in Egypt at age 27. He has two brothers who will die in the Great War, the first next year the second in March 1918.
  • Private Harold Forbes Clarke Winch (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Winch Vicar of OF Brompton.
  • Private Alan Gordon Till (Australian Infantry) is killed. His son will lose his life serving in the Royal Air Force in June 1944.
  • Private William Hall (Hampshire Regiment) is killed on Gallipoli. He is a member of the Aylesbury Football Club.
  • Private Frederick Henry Wright (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of pneumonia in December 1917.
  • Private John Henry Tromans (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will be killed in January 1916 and his wife’s brother will also be killed in action.
  • Private William John Methven (Hampshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die on service in Mesopotamia in July 1919. Driver Robert Lynn (Royal Field Artillery) is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives as a result of Great War service when he is killed at age 30.
  • Private Charles Heaton (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 27 one month after his brother was also killed on Gallipoli.

Two hundred forty one members of the Essex Regiment are killed at Achi Baba, Gallipoli.

  • Lieutenant John Charles Gardom (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is a Gold Medal Skater of the National Skating Association in 1911.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard George Gabb (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in December 1916.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Roper (Essex Regiment) is killed at age 24 and his brother Private Frederick Roper (Essex Regiment) are killed together.
  • Private Jesse Freshwater (Essex Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Privates and brothers Richard James (age 19) and Frederick Thomas Whall (age 23) are also killed.

Tuesday 29 June 1915 – We Lost 391

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Turkish counter attacks at the Dardanelles are repulsed with heavy loss.

Mr. Walter Long of the British government introduces a National Registration Bill, the first step on the road from volunteers to compulsory military service. It provides for the registration of all people between 15 and 65 years of age in England, Scotland, Wales, the Scilly Isles and (with reservations) Ireland.

The 1st/7th Royal Scots are engaged in clearing the battlefield on Gallipoli.  On this night the Turks make another unsuccessful attack on Quinn’s Post and Pope’s Hill.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The Scottish Cross Country Champion in 1904 and 1905
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of an Alderman
  • Multiple men who were the sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple man who will have another brother killed in the Great War
  • The third member of St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band killed in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Corporal John Ranken (Royal Scots) is killed at age 34. He has been awarded Scottish Athletic International Honors in 1900, 01, 03 and 1907 and the Scottish Cross Country Champion in 1904 and 1905. His brother will die of wounds in March 1916 and their family will create the Ranken Memorial Trophy to be awarded to the winner of the mile run at George Watson’s College.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Spottiswoode Robert Dunn (commanding 1st/4th Royal Scots) is killed on Gallipoli at age 52. He is a South African War veteran.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Bridgett Pritchard (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds on Gallipoli. He is the son of Alderman W B Pritchard.
  • Captain William Noel Atkinson (Gurkha Rifles, Indian Army) is killed in action by a sniper during a Turkish attack on Gallipoli at age 32. He was born in Calcutta and is the son of the Reverend Augustus William Atkinson of Mysore. He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and is buried at Twelve Copse Cemetery.
  • Lieutenant Malcolm Henry Young (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed less than three weeks ago.
  • Lieutenant Henry Mark Hugh Cooper (King Edward’s Horse) dies of wounds at age 19 at home received 13th He is the son of the Reverend Henry Samuel Cooper of St George’s Canterbury.
  • Second Lieutenant William Edward Balcombe-Brown (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 22. His younger brother will be killed in action with the Royal Air Force in May 1918.
  • Lance Sergeant William Stephen Keneally VC (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 28. He was one of six members of his battalion who are elected by his mates to receive the Victoria Cross on landing.
  • Private Michael David (Munster Fusiliers) who dies of wounds received in action on Gallipoli at age 20. He is the third member of the St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band to be killed in the first year of the Great War

Sunday 30 May 1915 – We lost 297

Germans attack at Hooge. While in command of Hooge Fort and adjoining trenches Major Philip Granville Mason (Dragoon Guards) will show conspicuous gallantry and ability in holding the village and the defense line allotted to him for the next four days notwithstanding a terrific bombardment for several hours every day until 2nd June.  During this time practically all his trenches and dug-outs will be blow in.  For his actions Major Mason will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  He will be killed in action on 26th September of this year.

British forces are repulsed at Quinn’s Post, Gallipoli.

There is severe fighting in Cameroon.

British forces take Sphinxhaven, on Lake Nyassa, German East Africa.

Today’s losses include:

  •  The heavyweight boxing champion of Egypt
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Sergeant Henry Wilson Smith (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 29. He won the heavyweight boxing championship of Egypt while awaiting the Gallipoli landing.
  • Lance Corporal Jack Scales is killed. His brother will die of disease in England in December of this year.
  • Private William Green (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli. His brother will die in December 1918.
  • Private Cecil William Hardy (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will be killed in September of this year.
  • Trooper Lionel Hughes (Wellington Mounted Rifles) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the late Reverend William Henry Hughes Vicar of St Hilary.
  • Private Richard Pugh (Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. His brother will die of wounds in June 1917.
  • Private Herman Hill Jones (Australian Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend E L Jones Rector of Llansantfraid.
  • Bugler William Charles Ridgway (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in March 1917.

Friday 28 May 1915 – We Lost 327

Fierce fighting takes place for the next week around Quinn’s Post Gallipoli.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the 1st Baron Wyfold
  • The Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Sierra Leone
  • A survivor of the Gretna Green Railway crash
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose son who is named after his will be killed in May 1944

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Robie Fitzgeald Uniake (General Staff and Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General Genral) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the Reverend R Fitzgerald Vicar of Tandridge.
  • Major Cecil Hallowes Lewis (Army Service Corps) dies on service at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend David Philips Lewis.
  • Major Harold Walter Gooch Meyer-Griffith (North Lancashire Regiment) and Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Sierra Leone is killed in action in what will be described in a later obituary as “sacrificed his own life for the safety of the wounded column, Cameroon”.
  • Captain ‘Reverend’ John Garratt Bussell (Sussex Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend John Garratt Bussell Vicar of Balderton.
  • Captain John Warren Garnier (Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Garnier and the Honorable Mrs. Garnier.
  • Second Lieutenant John Percival Bay Hermon-Hodge (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. He is the first of two sons of the 1st Baron Wyfold to lose their lives in the Great War. His brother will die of wounds in July 1916.
  • Private William Moncreif (Royal Scots) is killed in action age 35. He is a survivor of the Gretna Green Railway crash and has a brother who will be killed next May.
  • Private John Alexander Rose (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 28. His son with the same name will be killed in April 1944.