Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: RMS Lusitania

Friday 11 May 1917 – We Lost 760

 

Ralph Robertson

A naval bombardment is scheduled for Zeebrugge this night.  A Sopwith Strutter of 2 Royal Naval Air Service, crewed by Flight Sub Lieutenant H V Tapscott and Gun-layer G A Richardson arrives off the coast to perform standby wireless ranging duty for the attack. This operation is planned to seal the German shipping in Zeebrugge by shelling the entrance, but to do so requires extremely accurate firing.  It has been calculated that the firing will need to be sustained for almost ninety minutes.  As there is a delay in bringing up one of the ships for the bombardment the crew of this aircraft delays their return flight home and when their engine fails they force land at Cadzand and are interned in Holland.  10th Royal Naval Air Service squadron also assists in the bombardment of Zeebrugge on this night one Sopwith Triplane being hit by anti aircraft fire and it goes down eight miles off shore, the pilot

  • Flight Lieutenant Maurice William Wallace Eppstein being killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend William Charles Eppstein DD Rector of Lambourne Essex.

Today’s losses include:

  • An Australian Rules footballer and Sydney AFL Hall of Fame inaugural member
  • A Rosslyn Park footballer and published author
  • A man whose father and a brother died of typhoid fever in the South African War, two brothers will be killed in the Great War and a fifth brother will be killed fighting the Japanese in 1942
  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two, three and four sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Generals

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Tyrrell Robinson DSO (East Surrey Regiment commanding 7th Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 44. His older brother was killed in May of last year and they are sons of Major General Daniel George Robinson.
  • Lieutenant Humphrey Herbert Orlando Bridgeman (Royal Horse Guards) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the late General ‘the Honorable’ Francis Charls Bridgeman MP.
  • Lieutenant Henry Alexander Robertson (New Brunswick Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother was killed in May 1915.
  • Flight Lieutenant Lewis Morgan (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally killed at home at age 24. His two brothers were killed in 1915 on Gallipoli.
  • Second Lieutenant Anthony Basil Enright (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received last March at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend John Anthony Enright and his brother will be killed in November 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Edward Hawkins (London Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Edward Hugh Hawkins Vicar of Holy Trinity Stroud.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Cecil Duxbury (General List attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed while on an offensive patrol near Hagnecourt at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Aryon Herbert Duxbury Vicar of St Mary Magdalene Southwark.
  • Second Lieutenant Ralph Robertson (Hampshire Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at 35 in a crash into another in Egypt. He is an Australian Rules Footballer who played 14 games scoring 1 goal for St Kilda. He also played Rugby Union for one year in 1902. In 2003 he will become one of the inaugural members of the ‘Sydney AFL Hall of Fame’.
  • Captain Arthur Tulloch Cull (Seaforth Highlanders attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 32. He is a Rosslyn Park Rugby footballer and in 1913 he published a volume of “Poems to Pavlova” in praise of the Russian ballerina, a copy of which was in Rudolph Valentino’s library.
  • CQMS Charles McKay (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 29. His two brothers have already lost their lives in the Great War. Their father and another brother died of typhoid fever during the South African War and a fifth brother will be killed fighting the Japanese in 1942.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Reginald Arnold (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action in the St Catherine’s area near Arras. His brother was killed in July 1916.
  • Private Irwin Bunyan (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in action at age 27. His brother will be killed in October of this year.
  • Private Frederick William Shephard (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother Ernest was killed last January.
  • Private Herbert George Cook (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 18. He is the last of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Acting Bombardier Philip Brown (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed in March.
  • Able Seaman Percy Barrow Moss (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother drowned in the sinking of S S Lusitania in May 1915.

Monday 2 April 1917 – We Lost 1,075

Brinley Richard Lewis

The enemy positions from Doignies to Henin-sur-Cojeul, including the village of Ecoust, are captured by the 4th Australian and 7th Divisions.

Two men who survived the sinking of RMS Lusitania in May 1915 are killed in action today.

  • Second Lieutenant Osmond Bartle Wordsworth (Machine Gun Corps) is killed in action when he is shot in the heart at age 29. He is the son the Reverend Christopher Wordsworth Chancellor of Sarum Cathedral and grandson of the Reverend Andrewes Reeve Vicar of Kimmeridge. He is the author of A Happy Exchange.
  • Private Robert Hedben (Northumberland Fusiliers) is also killed. Both men survived the sinking of RMS Lusitania and are now commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A published author
  • Two survivors of the Lusitania sinking
  • A General
  • A Welsh Rugby International
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A County Cricket player
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • Two victims of the Red Baron
  • The grandson of the 9th Earl of Northesk

Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Brigadier General Francis John de Gex (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies in France while serving as the Base Commandant. He dies at age 55 and is the son of the Reverend F de Gex.
  • Major Brinley Richard Lewis (Royal Field Artillery) is killed when a shell strikes the mess he is in. He was a Welsh Rugby International twice and also played for Cambridge.
  • Captain Philip Urban Vigors MVO (Worcestershire Regiment) dies on service at home at age 42. He is the son of the Reverend R W Vigors.
  • Lieutenant Edward Charles Coleman (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. He played cricket at Dulwich College from 1907-10 and was the teams Captain in his last year. He then played for Essex County Second XI in 1910 and the County first XI in 1912.
  • Lieutenant Audley St John Perkins (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the son of Alfred Edward Perkins JP.
  • Lieutenant Patrick John Gordon Powell (Army Service Corps attached Royal Flying Corps) age 20 and 1AM Percy Bonner are killed when their aircraft is shot down by the Red Baron.
  • Lieutenant Hubert Pelham Sworder (Royal West Surrey Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) dies of wounds received in air combat over Lens at age 19. His brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant David Alexander Carnegie (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. He is the second son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Douglas Carnegie and grandson of the 9th Earl of Northesk.
  • Sergeant Henry Arundel Cheney (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Lance Corporal Ernest Baring (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. His three brothers will be killed in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Albert Edward Brooking (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother was killed in April 1915.
  • Airman 1st Class Walter Harold Bond (Royal Flying Corps) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed in September 1915.
  • Private Edward Francis Crascall (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother was killed in September 1914.
  • Private Noel Groser (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the son of Canon Charles Eaton Groser.
  • Private Even McLeod (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 17. His brother was killed in England in March 1916.

Monday 10 May 1915 – We Lost 838

LZ38

At a conference consisting of Generals Haking, Gough, Wilcocks and Haig, it is made clear that not enough artillery ammunition exists to start a second days offensive at Aubers Ridge.

At 02:50 Zeppelin LZ38 attacks Southend, then crosses the Thames estuary and returns for a second run.

Submarine E14 sinks a Turkish transport in the Sea of Marmora.

Anti German demonstrations in London and Liverpool are very active in protest of the sinking of the Lusitania.

The Anglo-French-Italian Naval Convention consisting of seven articles and a codicil of eight points providing specific details of its execution is signed.  Signing for the British is Admiral ‘Sir’ Douglas Gamble. The most important features include (Article II) the establishment under the command of the Commander in Chief of the Italian Fleet of a First Allied Fleet, which will include four British light cruisers and a division of four British battleships.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Two Rhodes scholars
  • A battalion commander
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The son of a General
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • An Australian Rugby International
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  In a twist of fate two Rhodes Scholars are killed today. Lieutenant Alfred Nelson King (Royal Field Artillery) a 1912 Rhodes Scholar from Canada is killed in action. Also killed today is Sergeant Alan Wallace (New Zealand Engineers) a Rhodes Scholar dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 24. In another irony his brother will be killed in July 1916 on the same day Athold Hudson another New Zealand Rhodes scholar is killed.
  • Lieutenant Colonel James Clark CB (commanding 9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 56.
  • Major Arthur Brabazon Stone (Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 49. He is the son of General J H Stone (Royal Artillery).
  • Captain Marmaduke John Norman Abbay (Punjabis attached Sikhs) dies of wounds received at Ypres 25 April at age 29. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Richard Abbay Rector of Earl Soham.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Gurr Hinman (Australian Infantry) an Australian Rules Footballer is killed at age 24. He scored 1 goal in 24 games in 1910 & 1911.
  • Lieutenant Francis Dennison Maurice (Canterbury Regiment) dies of wounds aboard HMHS Braemar Castle off Gallipoli at age 23. He was a master at the Waimate District High School and an enthusiastic hockey player and member of the executive of the South Canterbury Hockey Association.
  • Lieutenant Joel Harrison Seaverns (London Regiment) dies of wounds received yesterday at age 23. He is the only child of Joel Herbert Seaverns formerly MP for the Brixton Division of Lambeth.
  • Lieutenant Denys Corbett-Wilson (Royal Flying Corps) is killed in action at age 32 with his observer I Newton Woodiwiss when shot down by Anti Aircraft fire over Fournes. He is notable for his 100-minute flight on April 22, 1912, from Goodwick in Pembrokeshire to Enniscorthy – the first flight from the island of Great Britain to the island of Ireland. The journey time was 1 hour 40 minutes.
  • Lieutenant Lawreance Aubrey Fiennes Wingfield Dickenson (Bedfordshire Regiment attached Irish Rifles) dies of wounds. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Wingfield Dickenson Rector of Inworth.
  • Lieutenant John Edward Hyland (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed on Gallipoli at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend John Black Hyland Rector of Combe Florey.
  • Lieutenant William Herbert Watney (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 35. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Cameron Cull 2nd
  • Lieutenant Thomas Martin Garrod (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the first of three sons of ‘Sir’ Archibald E Garrod KCMG Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant James Neville Herbert Murphy (Royal Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the late Reverend W A E Murphy.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Charles McLean Farmer (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend James Edmund Gamul Farmer Rector of Waddesden.
  • CSM Andrew Johnstone (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action in Ypres at age 31. His son will be killed in action in March 1945 serving with Bomber Command.
  • Sergeant John Hampson (Middlesex Regiment) is killed in action at age 39. His brother will die on active service in December 1918.
  • Lance Corporal John Townsend (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 26. His brother will die of illness in October 1918.
  • Brothers Alax age 19 and Harry age 18 Hughes (Gloucestershire Regiment) are killed at Ypres together.
  • Private John G Davidson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Harold Wesley George (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds when he is shot by a sniper at Pope’s Post at age 29. He played Rugby in Australia making test caps for Australia between 1910 and 1914 including Australia’s first win over the All Black’s in 1910. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Ernest Parker (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed. His step-brothers will be killed in 1917 and 1918.
  • Private William T Brewis (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed last March.
  • Private William Ernest Holbrow (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 17. His brother will be killed at the battle of Jutland.
  • Private William Harold Saxton (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the war.

Friday 7 May 1915 – We Lost 889

RMS Lussitania

RMS Lussitania

Captain William Turner of the Lusitania upon entering what is called the danger zone of waters in which enemy submarines operate orders all lifeboats to be swung out, all the bulkhead doors to be closed, look-outs to be doubled and steam pressure to be kept high to give the ship all possible speed in case of an emergency.  At 08:00 the ships speed is reduced to eighteen knots to secure the ship’s arrival at the bar outside Liverpool at 04:00 the following morning, in order catch the high tide. At 12:40 the ship’s course is altered in order to make a better landfall. The ship is brought closer to land and the Old Head of Kinsale is sighted at 13:40.

At 14:15 as the ship is between ten and fifteen miles off the Old Head of Kinsale with weather clear and the sea smooth, Captain Turner hears the second officer shout “There is a torpedo coming, Sir”.  Immediately afterwards there is a terrific explosion on the starboard side, between the third and fourth funnels. Almost simultaneously there is a second explosion, which at the time is thought to be a second torpedo, but has since been confirmed to be an internal explosion, although the cause has never been definitely established. The stricken Lusitania immediately takes on a heavy list to starboard and in about eighteen minutes she sinks, with the loss of 1,198 lives. The ship sinks bow first, with its stern almost perpendicular out of the water. Two crewmembers will be officially recognized with the Silver & Bronze medals for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea. Able Seaman Leslie Morton is the first to observe the approach of the torpedo and he reports it to the bridge. When the torpedo strikes the ship he is knocked off his feet, but he recovers himself quickly, and at once assists in filling and lowering several boats.  Having done all he can on board, he jumps overboard. While in the water he manages to get hold of a floating collapsible lifeboat, and with the assistance of Able Seaman Joseph Parry he rips the canvas cover off it and succeeds in drawing into it fifty to sixty passengers. Morton and Parry then row the boat some miles to a fishing smack. Having put the rescued passengers on board the smack they return to the scene of the wreck and succeed in rescuing twenty to thirty more people.

Among those lost in the sinking of RMS Lusitania

  • Justus Miles Forman. He is an American novelist and playwright. His only play, The Hyphen, appeared in 1915, but it did not receive the success Forman expected. He decided to book a first-class passage aboard the RMS Lusitania. Days before he was to board the liner, he received a mysterious phone call from a man with a thick German accent, who warned him not to board the Lusitania. He ignored the phone call and boarded the Lusitania on May 1, 1915. His body was never recovered.
  • ‘Sir’ Hugh Percy Lane was born in County Cork, Ireland in November 1875, he is best known for establishing Dublin’s Municipal Gallery of Modern Art (the first known public gallery of modern art in the world) and for his remarkable contribution to the visual arts in Ireland. He died on board the RMS Lusitania.
  • Firemen Michael Sr. and Michael Cooney Jr. are both killed in Lusitania. The elder Cooney dies at age 40 while his son is 20 years-old.
  • Fireman Edward Ryan is killed at age 44. His brother will be killed as a stoker on HMS Queen Mary at Jutland.
  • Henry St Giles Humphreys is killed. He is the son of Reverend Henry James Humphreys Vicar of Thornley who will have two others sons killed in the Great War.

U-20 sights the British cruiser Juno, but as she is zig-zagging and going at full speed, the German submarine gives up the chase.

The Tribal class destroyer HMS Maori strikes a mine off the Belgian coast and the entire crew plus those of HMS Crusader’s boat are made prisoners of war.

The King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, the Royal Irish Rifles and the Cheshire Regiment attack the Zwarteleen salient at Hill 60.  The first trench is taken and crossed but shortly after this dawn breaks and it becomes evident that although the enemy has been driven out of the neck of the Salient they still hold the Salient itself.  The day passes quietly until darkness comes at 19:45 and patrols are sent out to ascertain what the results of the attack have been. The totality of the failure is reported including 22 members of the Yorkshire’s killed 124 officers and men wounded and 42 officers and men missing. Most of the missing will prove to be killed.

The 1st/5th Royal Scots attack Fir Tree Wood on Gallipoli.  They advance at 10:00 and enter the wood.  There they find many snipers situated on small wooden platforms in the branches.  The Scots are driven back after three hours fighting.  The battalion is reduced to the strength of two companies.

The operations on the Karkha River, Mesopotamia begin.  The district which contains oil fields and the pipeline is cleared of the enemy by 3 June.

‘Sir’ Edward Grey sends a message to the Ottoman Government stating that members of that government will be held personally responsible for the safety of British and French civilians transported from Constantinople to Gallipoli.

The attack on Achi Baba continues still with little progress.

Lieutenant Ernest G Boissier (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he behaves with gallantry in charge of a machine gun during operations south of Achi Baba and effecting the destruction of an enemy machine gun. His son will be killed in 1945 serving at a Sub Lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

Airship SS-1 is destroyed by fire after colliding with telegraph wires near Dover when her pilot mistakes the wind direction signal and lands down-wind.  Both occupants escape injury.

Today’s losses include:

  • A man killed on Lusitania will have two brothers killed later on service in the Great War
  • A man killed on Lusitania will have a brother killed on HMS Queen Mary and Jutland
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • A son of an Admiral
  • A son of a Baronet
  • An Antarctic Explorer
  • A man whose brother will lose his life in the Second World War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Major Christopher Henry Hoskyns-Abrahall (Royal Marines Light Infantry) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 43. His son will be accidentally killed in December 1917.
  • Captain George Culme-Seymour (King’s Royal Rifle Corps and Acting Adjutant London Regiment) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son of Admiral ‘Sir’ Michael Culme-Seymour, 3rd Baronet GCB.
  • Captain Edward Frederick Robert Bage (Australian Engineers) is killed in action at age 27. He was an astronomer, assistant magnetician and recorder of tides with ‘Sir’ Douglas Mawson’s 1911 Antarctic expedition.  He was one of the six volunteers that formed the relief party that was left in the Antarctic for a second winter when Mawson and his companions failed to return to winter quarters on time.  Lieutenant Bage contributed the chapter “The Quest of the Southern Magnetic Pole” to Mawson’s book “The Chome of the Blizzard”.  He was awarded the King’s Polar Medal this year. At Trinity College Melbourne he obtained 1st Class honors in chemistry, rowed in the College Eight and was honorary secretary of the Students’ Representative Council. The “Robert Bage Memorial Scholarship” at the University of Melbourne will be founded in his honor.
  • Private Charles Alfred Fisher (King’s own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed in action. His son will lose his life in January 1944 on service.
  • Two brothers are in the trenches this morning, Private Fred age 20 and Lance Corporal James Henry ‘Harry’ Tennant age 27 (Lancashire Fusiliers). Harry is killed this morning.  Fred writes their mother: “He fell with his face to the enemy, and I am sure no man could wish for a more glorious death”. Fred will die of wounds next month.
  • Private Charles Cullinan (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action at age 41. His brother will be killed eleven days later.
  • Private Thomas Frederic Farrier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Bethune during shelling at age 26. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed by the middle of next year.

Thursday 6 May 1915 – We Lost 609

Prime Minister Asquith

Prime Minister Asquith

British forces recover some trenches on Hill 60, in the second battle Ypres.

On the Gallipoli peninsula the second battle of Krithia begins.  Little progress is made including a disastrous assault by the New Zealand Infantry Brigade across the Daisy Patch, near Krithia, Helles sector:

The German submarine U-20 sinks, without warning, two British ships, the passenger liner Candidate and the freighter Centurion.  This evening the Captain of the Lusitania, William Turner, receives a wireless message from the British Admiralty: “submarines active off south coast of Ireland.”

Mr. Harcourt makes a statement as to the poisoning of wells by Germans in South West Africa.  General Botha protests against the poisoning of wells; the German commander admits the fact a gives as a justification that the wells have been marked as poisoned.

Torpedo boat #92, of the Gibraltar patrol, which on Admiralty orders has been sent to watch off Alboran, falls in with U-21 steering east forty miles west of the island.  The submarine fires a torpedo which misses and the torpedo boat is able to run her over twice but does not have enough draft to do the submarine serious damage and she escapes.

Today’s losses include:

  • A nephew of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • A battalion commander
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A brother of composer Roger Cuthbert Quilter
  • The Secretary to the Governor General of Australia before 1914
  • A man whose father fought with Garibaldi for Italy’s Independence
  • A woman who will lose her husband and three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties from the Royal Naval Division are:

  • Lieutenant Colonel John Arnold Cuthbert Quilter (Grenadier Guards commanding Hood Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action at age 40 at Gallipoli. A South Africa War veteran, he is the son of the 1st Baronet ‘Sir’ William Cuthbert and Lady Quilter and the brother of the composer Roger Cuthbert Quilter. He was the Secretary to the Governor General of Australia before 1914.
  • Sub Lieutenant Brian Trevor Roper Melland (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action at Gallipoli at age 20. He is a nephew of the Prime Minister, Herbert Asquith and has a brother who will be killed in action in 1917.
  • Sub Lieutenant Arthur Walderne St Clair Tisdall VC (Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval Division) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. William St Clair Tisdall, the Vicar of St George’s Deal. He was a Double First Class Classical Honor’s Student at Trinity College, Cambridge and a Chancellor’s Gold Medalist. He will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for his actions from the landing from the River Clyde on 25th His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Able Seaman Robert Leopold McClintock Fleury (Hood Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed. He is the first of three sons of the Reverend Louis Richard Fleury Rector of Kilwork Cork to be killed in the Great War.

 Today’s highlighted casualties from the Army are:

  •  Captain Lewis Corbally (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Matthew Corbally DL.
  • Captain Walter Aland Leslie (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 27. He has two brothers who will lose their lives later in the War.
  • Captain Ateo Frandi (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 41. His father fought for Italy’s liberation under Garibaldi.
  • Lieutenant Henry George Christopher Guise (Gloucestershire Regiment) is accidentally killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Francis George Guise the 5th
  • Private Thomas Charles Line (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private J McFarlane (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed. He is one of three sons of Privte John McFarlane who are killed in the Great War before their father dies on service in May 1917.

Private Cecil James Dunnett (Cambridgeshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 18.  His brother will die while on service in April 1917.

Saturday 1 May 1915 – We Lost 626

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

History records the first repulse of a gas attack. The men who defeat it are the men of the British 15th Brigade (5th Division) by sheer courage and determination. If any single unit can be singled out, it is the 1st Dorsetshire Regiment, who maintain rapid fire from their trench, ignoring the gas swirling around them; for this they pay a price. Ninety men dead of gas poisoning in the trenches, 207 more admitted to dressing stations, of which 46 die almost immediately, and twelve more after long suffering. Out of 2,413 British gas cases admitted to hospital during this period, 277 die.  After the repulse of the German attack on Hill 60, British forces are ordered to withdraw to a new line.

Private Edward Warner (Bedfordshire Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Hill 60. After Trench 46 has been vacated by our troops consequent to the gas attack, Private Warner enters it alone in order to prevent the enemy from taking possession.  Re-enforcements are sent to Private Warner but cannot reach him owing to the gas. He then comes back and brings up more men, by which time he is completely exhausted but the trench is held until the enemy attack ceases. This very gallant soldier dies shortly afterwards from the effects of gas poisoning.

A small battle takes place in the North Sea in which the Trawler Columbia (Lieutenant Commander Walter Hawthorn killed) is sunk with a loss of all seventeen crew members except one. The German torpedo boats A2 and A6 are also sunk by British destroyers in the North Sea.  The destroyer Recruit (Commander C A Wrightson, survives) is torpedoed by UB-6 off the Galloper light.  The ship sinks causing forty-three casualties. There are twenty-six survivors.

Navigation resumes between England and Holland.

Turkish forces, 16,000 strong, attack the entire Allied line on the Gallipoli peninsula.  The attacks are futile and the Turks are driven back. Lieutenant Colonel Richard Nelson Bendyshe (commanding Deal Battalion, Royal Marines) the grandnephew of Lord Horatio Nelson is killed.  The Colonel, visiting a section of his trenches, is shot by his own men, who in a fit of spy mania, kill him, wound three others, and slightly bayonet Colonel McNicoll.

The 1st/5th Royal Scots come under heavy bombardment.  During the night the enemy attack and the Turks break through the first line of trenches and come rushing down the gully, but then are met by the battalion with fixed bayonets. Captain D C McLagan restores the situation with a brilliant counter-attack.

The Lusitania leaves New York’s Pier 54 on its final voyage.  The cargo is entered on the manifest as foodstuffs, metal rods, ingots and boxes of cartridges.  Controversy concerning the true nature of the cargo will persist for many years.

Submarine E14 sinks the Turkish gunboat Nurelbahr in the Sea of Marmora.

Lieutenant James Cheetham (Royal Marines) is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he conducts himself with gallantry during operations south of Achi Baba.  When the enemy in strength of about a battalion attack an outpost of thirty men under Lieutenant Cheetham he calls for two volunteers and dashes out to a flank under very heavy fire into the open, bringing rapid fire to bear on the enemy and thus checks the attack and saves the outpost.  Private C J Braddock (Royal Marines) is awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal as one of the volunteers in this action.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Two battalion commanders
  • A grand nephew of Lord Horatio Nelson
  • A man accidentally shot by his own men
  • The son of a Baronet
  • An Otago football player
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Robert Ouseley Cuthbert Hume (commanding 1st Border Regiment) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 48.
  • Captain John Cockburn Jessop Teague (Portsmouth Royal Marines) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in October 1915 and they are sons of Chaplain of the Collegiate Church Crediton the Reverend John Jessop Teague.
  • Captain Perceval Christian Chapman (Mountain Battery Royal Artillery) dies of wounds in Alexandria received 25 April at Gallipoli at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Theodore Charles Chapman Vicar of Langley and he has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.
  • Lieutenant Herbert George Ferguson Davie (Royal Marines) is killed at age 42. His brother will die of wounds next April and they are sons of ‘Sir’ William Augustus Ferguson Davie 3rd
  • Private Ambrose Alphonsus Falconer (Otago Infantry) is killed. He is a well-know Otago football wing and forward who played versus Canterbury and Southland in 1908.
  • Private Walter Silcox (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother was lost when HMS Aboukir was sunk last September.
  • Private Henry Raymond Fisher (Montreal Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in August 1917.

Saturday 16 January 1915 – We Lost 101

RMS Lusitania

RMS Lusitania

The Lusitania is involved in an international incident that gives the ship’s presence in the North Atlantic a very high profile. The ship is traveling through rough seas on the way to Queenstown and, fearing the possibility of a torpedo attack, the Captain hoists the ‘Stars and Stripes’.  With America neutral and Germany reluctant to bring her into the war on the side of the Allies, it is considered that this would guarantee a safe passage. The use of the United States flag, however, comes to the notice of the press and the incident makes world news.

Today’s losses include:

  • A father and son killed together

Mrs. Margaret Booth of West Hartlepool suffers the loss of her husband and son when H M Tug Char (Lieutenant Robert Percy Melsome) is lost after a collision.  First Engineer William Booth is killed at age 58 while his son Fireman Edward Booth dies at age 22.  Her entire crew of seventeen is lost when the tug is lost off the Thames Estuary. She is alongside a Belgian Steamer, S S Erivan, and is attempting to send crew to board her. There is a fierce gale at the time and the two ships collide. The Char is severely damaged and sinks quickly with the loss of all hands. The Erivan can do nothing in the weather conditions to assist.

photo from wikipedia.org