Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Field Artillery

Tuesday 26 January 1915 – We Lost 147

Original Logo of the Austin Motor Company

A patrol of the Gurkha Rifles engages a Turkish patrol near El Kantara close to the Suez Canal.

 Today’s losses include:

  • An heir to the Austin Motor Company family
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of a member of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Vernon James Austin (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 21. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Herbert Austin MP KBE. Although destined to take over the family business Austin Motor Company from his father he was set on a military career and on the 6th of January 1912 was commissioned in the Special Reserve of the Royal Artillery as a Second Lieutenant. As an experienced motor car racer he was due to sail for Russia to take part in a race organized by the Automobile Club of Russia when war was declared in August 1914. This morning he and his commanding officer Lieutenant Colonel Sandilands (OKS) went forward alone to reconnoitre near La Bassee. While returning along an open stretch of road he is shot in the right side of his chest by a sniper. He lapses into unconsciousness and dies in a few minutes.

  •  Lieutenant John Arthur Hughes (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend John Elias Hughes.

Thursday 12 November 1914 – We Lost 342

Seal of Harvard University

Seal of Harvard University

Army Order # 480 approves the addition to each Division of a motor machine gun battery to be designated a unit of the Royal Field Artillery and known as the Motor Machine Gun Service.

A reconnaissance in force from Sanniyeh inflicts losses on the Turks near Saihan. In spite of poor conditions including thick dust, mud and heat the remainder of Force D is landed.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Victoria Cross winner
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Stepson of the Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose twin brother was killed on service last century
  • Son of the 5th Earl of Cadogan
  • Grandson of the 1st Earl of Munster
  • Nephew of a man who died of wounds in the Crimean War
  • The first graduate of an American University killed in the Great War
  • Son of the President of the Blackheath Harriers
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Brigadier General Charles FitzClarence VC General Officer commanding the 1st Guards Brigade is killed in action at age 49. He was awarded the Victoria Cross at Mafeking on the 14 October 1899 during the South African War. His twin brother was killed in 1897-8 at Abu-Hamed and they are sons of Captain ‘the Honorable’ George FitzClarence Royal Navy the 3rd son of the 1st Earl of Munster. Another son of the 1st Earl died of wounds received in the attack on Redan in the Crimea. Brigadier General FitzClarence is also the son-in-law of the 6th Duke of Marlborough. He is also the father of the 6th Earl of Munster.

  •  Major ‘the Honorable’ William George Sidney CadoganMVO (Hussars attached General Staff) is killed at age 35.  He is son of the 5th Earl Cadogan KG and served in the South African War and was Equerry to H R H Prince of Wales from 1912 to 1914 and his Aide de Campe during his India tour of 1905-6.
  • Major Thomas Philip Godman-Dorington(Dragoons) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the late Major General Richard Temple Godman and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Keith Bethune Mackenzie (Seaforth Highlanders attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 34. A veteran of the South African War he is the grandson of the Reverend Neil Bethune.
  • Captain Duncan Collisson Willey Thomas (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 23. He is the son of A P Thomas the 1st
  • Lieutenant George Williamson (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of wounds received four days prior at age 31. He is the son of Lady Skinner and stepson of ‘Sir’ Thomas Skinner Director of the Canadian Pacific Railway. A Graduate of Harvard in 1905 he is the first graduate of an American University to be killed in the War.
  • Lieutenant Denis Duncan Philby (Dublin Fusiliers attached Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Alexander Kenneth Anderson (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of Charles Edward Tuck JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys DSO (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed last August.
  • Private James Thomas Stanley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Bartlett Cecil Elmes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Tom Crafter (London Scottish) is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1917 and they are sons of the president of the Blackheath Harriers.

Photo from wikipedia.org

Wednesday 11 November 1914 – We Lost 777

 

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The torpedo gunboat HMS Niger is torpedoed in the English Channel.  She later explodes and sinks though there are no casualties.

British troops pass through the small village of Oulchy-le-Chateau in their advance on the Aisne.

At 10:00 the 2nd Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry are turned out to back up the 1st Brigade which has been attacked while holding the ground a little to the north of the Ypres-Menin road. They are ordered to Westhoek to get in touch with the 1st Division, who are holding up reinforcements on the right. In spite of a barrage that lays shells about them, the Oxfords reach Westhoek without loss. Here they get under cover and observe the Northamptonshire Regiment advancing on their right, into the southern part of the wood lying to the south of Westhoek. At the same time Colonel Lushington of the Royal Artillery sends gunners, cooks, etc armed with rifles against the Germans in Nonne Bosschen Wood.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry R Davies sends two companies to clear Nonne Bosschen Wood (Nun’s Wood) near Ypres, advancing from the northwest to southeast.  They drive the Germans before them killing and capturing many. Two more companies follow in support.  When the first two companies, ‘A’ and ‘B’ come out on the southeastern edge of the wood they are joined by the Northamptons on the right and by some Connaught Rangers and Sappers on the left. They force the Germans out of the trenches; some of the enemy turning and running when the attack is thirty or forty yards off, others surrender. Most of those who run are shot. Casualties to the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry amount to twenty-seven, of whom five are killed.  There is still another trench held by the Germans in front, but before an attack can be mounted on it French artillery begins to drop shrapnel into the British front line, not realizing how far it has advanced. It takes some time to inform the French of this error and by this time dark has set in.

Near Becelaere, Belgium, Captain Walter Lorrain Brodie (Highland Light Infantry) leads a charge to evict the enemy from a portion of our trenches that they have succeeded in occupying. He bayonets several of the enemy himself and relieves a dangerous situation. As a result of his actions, 80 of the enemy are killed and 51 taken prisoner. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Uncle of a man killed yesterday
  • Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Two members of the Surrey Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Brothers Privates James F and John William Stallard are among those killed in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. John is a boxer of some repute in the Army and had gone into strict training for a bout at the National Sporting Club when the war broke out. Because of his prowess in the ring he was known as ‘The Mad Mullah’. He dies at age 26 while his older brother is 28.  They are sons of James and Florence Stallard of St Mary Street, New Bradwell, Bucks.

Another set of brothers are killed on this day while serving together. Private Thomas and James Freemantle (Scots Guards) have both served in the Guards prior to the war then joined the Surrey Constabulary together and both resigned to rejoin the Guards upon the outbreak of the war. The brothers are both 26. They are sons of William and Sarah Freemantle of Easton, Winchester.

  •  Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahonDSO, General Officer Commanding 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached 10th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Division is killed in action at age 48. The General tries to rally support troops east of Hooge, on the south side of the Ypres-Menin Road when he is suddenly seen to sink to one knee and begins to remove his legging as though hit in the leg. At that moment a shell bursts close to him killing him instantly. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon CB Baronet and he served in Burma from 1886 to 1887 and in the South African War.
  • Major Alfred Herbert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. He served in Sierra Leone 1898-9 and in the South African War. His nephew was killed yesterday at the same place while also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Major Harold Henry Norman (Temporarily commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in the above action at age 47. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and Zakka Khel in 1908. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Henry Wood.
  • Captain William Maynard Carlisle-Crowe (Warwickshire Regiment attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is a Swiss Alpine skier and the son of General Thomas Caralisle-Crowe.
  • Captain and Adjutant Ewen James Brodie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed when he is shot by a sniper at age 36 in the Nonne Bosch Wood. He is the son of J C J Brodie Lord Lieutenant of the County of Nairn.
  • Captain James William Lennox Sprot (Black Watch) is killed at age 28 less than three weeks after his brother was killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Jeune Collins (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29 while signaling for more men to protect the flank of his trench. Typically known by his initials A E J Collins is an English cricketer and soldier. He is most famous for achieving the highest-ever recorded score in cricket: as a 13-year-old schoolboy, he scored 628 not out over four afternoons in June 1899. Collins’ record-making innings drew a large crowd and increasing media interest; spectators at the Old Cliftonian match being played nearby were drawn away to watch a junior school house cricket match. One brother will be killed in August 1916 while his second brother will die of illness on service in February 1917.
  • Captain Hugh James Shaw (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in November 1915.
  • Captain Arthur Kenneth Puzey (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain William Augustus Portman Foster(South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds in a German hospital at Frankfort-on-Main of wounds received at Gheluvelt on 31 October at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Yorke Foster the 3rd Baronet and Lady Foster.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Symonds Holmes (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of Admiral of the Fleet ‘Sir’ Thomas M Symonds GCB.
  • Lance Corporal James Robert Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed less than three weeks earlier.
  • Private William Stoyan(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed later in the Great War, one in 1916 the other in 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Brown(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25.  His brother Peter Hume Brown will fall in November 1916.
  • Private John Hamon Massy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private George Etherington (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28 less than two weeks after his brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment.
  • Rifleman Robert James Adair (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service in March 1919.
  • Gunner Sidney Herbert Toll (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service at home in the first week of the war.
  • Private Edward Webster Wood (Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Turks forces attack the British camp at Sanniyeh with heavy loss and are forced to withdraw four miles.

  •  Major Richard Ducat (Infantry Indian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of Major General Claude Malet Ducat and grandson of Hugh Hamersley JP. He was member of the force that fought on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-8.

Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Doveton Sturdee departs Devonport his flag on HMS Invincible in company with HMS Inflexible on a voyage to the South Atlantic to search for the German squadron under Vice Admiral Graf Maximillan von Spee. At the same time HMS Princess Royal is dispatched to the Caribbean to guard the Panama Canal.

At a matinee at the Empire Theater John George Lambton 3rd Earl of Durham whose brother was killed on the Western Front less than two weeks earlier states the opinion that he would “wish that the Germans would drop a shell among these footballers some Saturday afternoon.  I really think it would be the best method of waking up the young men of Sunderland”.  In two weeks 16 members of The Hearts of Midlothan join the 16th Royal Scots becoming the only team in the history of British football to enlist en masse in the armed force. Seven members of the first team will lose their lives in the Great War.

Tuesday 10 November 1914 – We Lost 296

Club House at the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews

Club House at the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews

Lieutenant John Peake Knight (Royal Field Artillery) consistently shows conspicuous gallantry in assisting infantry. For his actions especially on this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Lieutenant Knight will be killed in action in August 1916 at age 26.

In what is believed to be an act of vengeance against an unpopular sergeant by a disgruntled soldier, a live hand grenade is thrown at a Royal Flying Corps lorry at St. Omer. The lorry does not blow up but the explosion wounds five men one of whom later dies in hospital. A court of inquiry is held, but the matter is never explained and the bomb thrower is never found.

Today’s losses include:

  • The first member of the House of Lords to fall in the Great War
  • 5th Baron Congleton
  • Son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon
  • A man whose widow will be killed in the Blitz in 1944
  • Battalion commander
  • A Member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two and three sons
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • Nephew of a man who will be killed tomorrow
  • Cousin of a man previously killed
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a participant in the Charge at Balaclava

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain William Alexander Henderson (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 37 in Ploegsteert Wood. He is the son of Alexander Edward Henderson the Advocate Sheriff Substitute of Edinburgh and the Lothians. He received his commission in February 1900 and served previously in the South African Campaign. He is a keen cricketer and an exceptionally good golfer member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews. In 1909 at the Amateur Championship Meeting at Muirfield he defeated the American amateur champion Jerome Travers, winner of the United States Amateur four times before the war. Travers will become only the second amateur to win the U S Open when he wins it next year.

  •  Major ‘Lord’ Bernard Charles Gordon-Lennox (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon and he served in the South African War. His widow will be killed during an air raid on London on 18 June 1944 at age 66.
  • Major Harold Herny Norman (commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 46.
  • Captain John Francis Hodgkinson (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is related to Edward Hodgkinson JP.
  • Captain William Charles Rait KerrDSO (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed next May. They are grandsons of Major General Hutchinson CB.
  • Captain Thomas Cecil de Trafford (Royal Fusiliers) dies of wounds received in action. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Joseph Edward Radcliffe 4th Baronet and the first grandson of the late ‘Sir’ Humphrey de Trafford, the Baronet, to die in the Great War. His brother will be killed in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant Albert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and the great grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. His uncle will be killed tomorrow at the same place also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Right Honorable’ Henry Bligh Fortesque Parnell (Grenadier Guards) 5th Baron Congleton is killed at Ypres at age 24 becoming the first member of the House of Lords to lose his life in the Great War. His brother will be killed in September 1916. They are sons of the late 4th Baron Major General Henry Parnell and distant cousins of Irish Policitan Charles Stewart Parnell.
  • Lieutenant Michael George Stocks(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21 just short of one month after his cousin has been killed.  He is the grandson of Colonel ‘Sir’ Richard Ellison and Major Stocks who took part in the charge at Balaclava and as a thank offering his family built the Church of St. Mary’s Halifax.
  • Corporal Lewis Waters (Leinster Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will die on service in India in November 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Samuel Whiteman (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the War.
  • Private James Joseph Mallyon (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of wounds at age 39. His stepbrother drowned on service in August while his brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Robert Kilpatrick(Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) is killed. His brother-in-law will be killed in December of this year.

Friday 6 November 1914 – We Lost 378

The Life Guards cap badge

The Life Guards cap badge

German troops are forced out of the village of Soupir. The village will remain very close to the front line for the greater part of the Great War.

A combined Anglo-Indian force of 600 troops is landed in the Shatt-al-Arab near the old fort at Fao which they soon capture. The remainder of Force ‘D’ sails on to a place where it can safely disembark at Sanniyeh.

The spy Karl Lody is shot at the Tower of London.

The Central fort at Tsing-tau is stormed and two hundred prisoners are taken. Captain Dudley G Johnson (South Wales Borderers) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for conspicuous ability during the morning of these operations and for great gallantry in rescuing several wounded men while exposed to heavy machine gun fire.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of Member of Parliament
  • The father of a future Prime Minister of Northern Ireland
  • Son of the 2nd Baron and father of the 3rd Baron O’Neill
  • Son of the 2nd Baron Leconfield
  • Son of Russian Baron DeGunzburg
  • Son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn
  • Son of the 8th Viscount Downe
  • Son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford
  • Son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Brother-in-law of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Men who will have one and two sons killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple men who will have nephew’s killed in the Second World War
  • A Battalion commander
  • Uncle by marriage of Winston Churchill
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • A man whose sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Nephew of clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justice’s of the Peace
  • A former Aide-de-camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
  • Member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Edward Bruce O’Neill (Life Guards) becomes the first Member of Parliament to be killed in the Great War when he is killed today.  He is the son of the 2nd Baron O’Neill, father of the 3rd Baron who will be killed in October 1944 and the grandson of the 11th Earl of Dundonald and Member of Parliament for Mid Antrim. One son will later become Prime Minister of Northern Ireland while two others will be killed in the Second World War. He is also the son-in-law of The Marquis of Crewe and served in the South African War.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Gordon Chesney WilsonMVO (commanding Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 49. He is the eldest son of ‘Sir’ Samuel Wilson MP Kt and the son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and by marriage the uncle of Winston Churchill. He served as Aide de camp to Major General Baden Powell from August 1899 to July 1900 in South Africa.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh DawnayDSO (Life Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the 8th Viscount Downe.  He is the veteran of the South African War and Somaliland in 1908-10 and the son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force in World War II.
  • Major Edward Hawtin Phillips DSO (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 36. He was at the front three days and has previously served in 1900 in North Nigeria and Ashanti, in the South African War and again in North Nigeria in 1900. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Captain Edward Charles Stafford-King-Harman(Irish Guards) is killed at age 23.  His only child a daughter will be born in April of next year. He is the son of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Thomas Stafford-King-Harman, the 1st Baronet and his nephew Lieutenant Thomas Edward (Irish Guards) will be killed in action on 4 August 1944 at age 22. He is the grandson of the Right Honorable Edward King-Harman MP.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Arthur John Hamilton (Irish Guards). He is the son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn KG. He is the Deputy Master of the Household. He dies at age 30 and his body will never be found. His sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918.
  • Captain Norman Neill(Hussars) is killed at age 34. He is the son in law of Major General ‘Sir’ Gerald de Courcy Morton KCIE CB and Brigade Major 6th Cavalry Brigade and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Hope(Irish Guards) is killed at age 27.  On the outbreak of the war, he was serving as Aide de Camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lieutenant Robert Randle Egerton (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Eyles Egerton JP.
  • Lieutenant George William Houghton Hodgson (Border Regiment) dies of wounds at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend William George Courtney Hodgson and nephew of the Bishop of Edmundsbury.
  • Lieutenant Carleton Wyndham Tufnell (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22. He is the nephew of Rear Admiral Lionel Grant Tufnell CMG and a member of I Zingfair and MCC.
  • Lieutenant George Pierse Jenings (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at Rue de Bois. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Ulick Albert Jenings JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ William Reginald Wyndham (Lincolnshire Yeomanry attached Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the third son of the late 2nd Baron Leconfield and a nephew of Lord Rosebery. He is an Irish race horse owner and member of the Jockey Club. His nephew the eldest son of the 5th Baron will be killed in action on 9 October 1942 serving in the Queen’s Royal Lancers Royal Armoured Corps.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexis George DeGunzburg (Hussars attached Royal Horse Guards) the Baron is killed at age 27 while carrying a message to Colonel Gordon Wilson from General Kavanagh. He is the youngest son of the late Baron DeGunzburg and is also related to the Dowager Countess of Desart and ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald. He is Russian by birth and became a naturalized citizen to join the army in September.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sincliar Petersen (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is brother-in-law of Major Douglas Reynolds VC (Royal Field Artillery) who is married to Petersen’s sister.
  • Corporal Mark Charles Dowlen (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private William Brennock (Irish Guards) is killed. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Cecil Herbert Facey (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in January.
  • Private Edward Clarke (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman Melville Franklin (Collingwood RNVR RND) dies at home of illness at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Edmund John Franklin.
  • Private Edward Edwin Clarke (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in the war also.
  • Private Frederick James Allen (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother Charles will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Edward Gregory Sangster (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Seaman Horace Reginald Horscroft (RNR HMS Victorian) drowns at age 41. He is the recipient of a Belgian Medal and Diploma for saving life at sea.

 

Thursday 4 November 1914 – We Lost 338

Battle of Tanga

Battle of Tanga

The Royal Sovereign Class battleship HMS Hood is sunk across the southern entrance to Portland Harbor to stop U-boats from entering or firing torpedoes at the Channel Fleet ships at anchorage.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The Aide de Camp to Highness the King at Delhi Dunbar in 1911
  • An Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Edmund Allenby
  • An Aide to Camp Governor of Bombay
  • A family member who will lose ten blood relatives including a brother in the War
  • A Margate Borough Police Officer
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson and a nephew of Generals
  • Families that will lose two and three children in the Great War
  • Son of an Australian Member of Parliament
  • Member of the Wanderers Rugby Football Club that won the Leinster Senior Cup in 1906
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Battalion commanders

 The renewed attack on Tanga is unsuccessful and the force re-embarks with some eight hundred casualties, leaving three hundred ninety-four dead on the field including:

  • Major Francis Joseph Braithwaite (The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) dead at age 42.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Joseph Braithwaite Rector of Great Waldingfield Sudbury who will lose another son in July 1916 and a daughter in March 1919. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Major Harold Talum (Grenadiers Indian Army) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of Captain William Tatum Military Secretary for Barbados.
  • Captain Ivan Dayrell Meredith Hogg (Grenadiers Indian Army) is killed at age 30. He is the son of General George Forbes Hogg.
  • Captain Bruce Edward Alexander Manson (King George’s Own Pioneers) is also killed at age 35. He served in the Boxer Rebellion and was the Aid de Camp to His Majesty the King at the Delhi Durbar in 1911.
  • Captain John Henry Middleton Fuller (Wallajahbad Light Infantry attached Palamcottah Light Infantry) is killed at age 35. His daughter will be born next March and he is the son of Deputy Surgeon General John Charles Fuller.
  • Captain Burton Howard Hall (Infantry Indian Army) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Howard Hall Rector of Sproatley and Chaplain Duke of Wellington’s Regiment.
  • Lieutenant Hubert James Tudor Hamer (Infantry Indian Army attached Grenadiers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of John Parry Hamer JP and is a hockey and polo player.

Losses elsewhere include:

  •  On the Western Front Lieutenant Colonel Beauchamp Tyndall Pell DSO (commanding 1st Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at Zandovoorde received in action on 31st October at Gheluvelt. He is the son of the Reverend Beauchamp Henry St John Pell Rector of Ickenham who has another son who will die on service in August 1916. Lieutenant Colonel Pell is a veteran of the North West Frontier Campaign of 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edwin Berkeley Cook MVO (commanding 1st Life Guards) dies of wounds at Sussex House received 21 October at Messines at age 45.
  • Major Aubrey John Carter DSO (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at Ypres age 42. He is the son-in-law of Reverend G H Rigby and nephew-in-law of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ John Rigby.
  • Major John Beaumont Corry DSO (Royal Engineers attached Sappers and Miners Indian Army) is killed at Sailly-sur-Lys at gae 40. He is the son of John Corry JP and served in both Tirah 1897-9 and Metran in 1901 where he was wounded.
  • Captain Charles Fremoult Preston Battersby(Royal Field Artillery) the only child of Major General Thomas Preston Battersby CB is killed in action at age 27.
  • Captain Lionel Archibald Forster(Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 35. He is the son of the Right Honorable William Forster MP of New South Wales Australia.
  • Captain Thomas McCann Phillips(Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds received yesterday at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend John Gillis Phillips Missionary of the Irish Presbyterian Church.
  • Captain and Adjutant John Francis Allen (North Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received rescuing two men buried by a shell burst at age 33. He is the former Aide de Camp to Lord Sydenham, Governor of Bombay and is the son of William Henry Allen JP DL.
  • Captain Cecil Allen Taylor Conyngham (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 31. He was a member of the Wanderers Rugby Football Club that won the Leinster Senior Cup in 1906.
  • Lieutenant George Garth Marshall(Hussars) is killed at age 29.  He is the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby. He is the grandson of General ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Alexander Hamilton Gordon KCB and nephew of Major General A Hamilton Gordon.
  • Second Lieutenant James Douglas Herbert Farmer (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of James Farmer JP and ‘Sir’ George Harris JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Rupert Coleman Laybourne Pilliner (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. He is the son of A M Pilliner JP and grandson of Richard Laybourne JP DL.
  • Signaler Basil Thomas Martin (Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother will be killed next July.
  • Private Archibald Stanley Jones (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 24. He is a Margate Police Officer.
  • Drummer Andrew Spencer Hay (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 20. He has eleven blood relations who also fall in the war including his brother who will be killed next February.

 

Monday 1 November 1914 – We Lost 2,447

HMS Good Hope 1914

HMS Good Hope 1914

Shortly after noon Cradock’s squadron is whole again, HMS Glasgow having rejoined.  The admiral signals for his ships to spread out at 25-mile intervals and sweep north to look for the enemy. Graf von Spee hopes to cut off HMS Glasgow before she can rejoin Cradock, realizing she will have to leave Coronel because of the 24-hour rule. Cradock’s ships hear a great deal of wireless traffic between German supply ships and SMS Leipzig as Graf von Spee has been using Leipzig to transmit and receive all wireless messages between his squadron and its supply ships so as not to give away the presence of the other cruisers. This works as Cradock heads north to trap the Leipzig before she can rejoin Graf von Spee. This action leads to the dramatic situation this afternoon when each admiral believes he is taking his full squadron to cut off a single enemy light cruiser. In reality the two formations are steaming towards each other at a combined speed of almost forty knots. The admirals, friends since their days on the China Station during the Boxer rebellion, are about to meet again. By late afternoon Cradock’s squadron is still fanning out and moving in a northerly direction. They are about thirty miles from Arauco Bay, where the port of Coronel is situated. The flagship is the outermost ship, close to forty miles from HMS Glasgow.  At 16:30 the light cruiser’s lookouts sight smoke on the eastern horizon. Captain Luce gives orders to turn to starboard and increase speed.  A few minutes later HMS Monmouth and HMS Good Hope turn east in support of HMS Glasgow. Very soon the lookouts are able to recognize the hull and upper works of SMS Leipzig.  As HMS Glasgow gets closer the lookouts see more patches of smoke on the horizon. These are soon identified as coming from four funneled cruisers, and HMS Glasgow turns back and signals, ‘Enemy armored cruisers in sight’.  The Glasgow’s wireless operators can hear the high pitched scream in their earphones coming from German Telefunken sets trying to jam their transmissions.  They are not certain whether the flagship has received their signal. All three British ships head at full speed toward HMS Good Hope to warn Cradock that instead of trapping a single light cruiser, he is running into Graf von Spee’s entire squadron.

SMS Leipzig identifies HMS Glasgow at about the same time and follows her.  She soon sees the smoke from the rest of Cradock’s squadron.  Leipzig reverses her direction and signals the news to Admiral Graf von Spee. The German admiral realizes that he has found the British squadron, not a single light cruiser. He orders his ships to close up and form a line-heading southwest. Cradock orders his ships to change direction to southeast by east and form a line headed by HMS Good Hope, followed by HMS Monmouth, HMS Glasgow and HMS Otranto. They complete these maneuvers by 17:45. The two squadrons are now approximately 17 miles apart and the Germans soon change course to southwest by west. This brings the battle lines into rapidly converging paths.  At this point Cradock still has time to break off contact and move south to join forces with HMS Canopus, which is about three hundred miles away.  He realizes that if he does, Graf von Spee will not have enough time to catch him before nightfall.  He could then return the next morning, strengthened with HMS Canopus, to attack the German squadron, if he can find it. Even if it slipped by him, the Admiralty has assured him that Admiral Stoddart has a strong force waiting for the Germans in the Atlantic. Cradock has to know that he has little or no chance against Graf von Spee’s superior force, but his orders are, ‘Destroy enemy cruisers’.  If he cannot do this, he might at least damage them enough that they will have to seek internment in a Chilean port, or else face the next British squadron at a disadvantage.  One or two telling hits on the German large ships might weaken Graf von Spee’s squadron so much that it is no longer a serious threat.

Cradock resolves to attack as soon as possible, while he still has the sun behind him.  Sunset is due at about 18:30.  As the sun sets lower on the horizon, its rays will be directly in the German gunners eyes.  This will make it hard for them to see Cradock’s ships in the distance, while the German ships will be clearly outlined for the British gunners. On the other hand the advantage will swing in favor of the Germans when the sun goes below the horizon.  The British ships will be silhouetted against the suns afterglow, while their ships will be difficult to see in the waning daylight. With his superior speed Graf von Spee is able to keep the distance between the two lines at 15,000 yards, well outside of gunnery range. At 18:04 Cradock gives the order to turn 45 degrees to port.  He desperately wants to close the range before the sun begins to set, but Graf von Spee orders a similar turn and keeps his distance. At 18:18 Cradock signals HMS Canopus, ‘I am going to attack the enemy’, although the German ships are 3,000 yards beyond his range at the time. Captain Grant signals back that he still has two hundred and fifty miles to go before he can reach Cradock’s position.  Graf von Spee now allows the gap between the two lines to close steadily.  By 19:00, when the sun has just dipped below the horizon, it is down to 12,300 yards.  At 19:04 the German admiral gives the order to open fire. At this range Graf von Spee’s twelve 8.2-inch guns face Cradock’s two 9.2-inch guns. SMS Scharnhorst’s first salvo lands 500 yards short of HMS Good Hope and her second 500 yards beyond, according to an observer on HMS Glasgow.  With an awful inevitability the third salvo smashed into Good Hope.  One shell strikes her forward 9.2 inch turret, which erupts in flames that shoot higher than 100 feet into the air.  At one stroke the gun crew is wiped out before they have fired a single shot.  The turret is turned into a useless, twisted mass of steel.  Cradock’s heavy guns are now reduced to one.

 

At almost the same time, SMS Gneisenau opens fire on HMS Monmouth. She obtains a similar straddling pattern with her first three salvos. A shell from the third salvo hits the Monmouth’s forward gun turret and sets it ablaze. Within minutes Good Hope and Monmouth are suffering terrible punishment. The German gunners on each ship manage to fire a broadside of 6 shells every 20 seconds. Cradock’s flagship replies with her lone 9.2-inch gun.  HMS Monmouth can use half of her 6-inch guns, which are at the limit of their range. The ships are now heading into the teeth of a Force 6 wind. It is approaching gale conditions, and heavy seas are breaking over their bows and sweeping their forward decks. The British main deck guns cannot be used because of the danger of flooding the casemates. Also their range finders have become so encrusted with salt from the sea spray that they are useless.  No hits are registered on the two German cruisers. By this time SMS Leipzig has begun to engage Glasgow, which fires back with her 6-inch guns. SMS Dresden opens fire on HMS Otranto.  After one salvo, which falls short, the armed merchant cruiser pulls out of line toward the open sea. She is a large vulnerable target and can only help the Germans find an accurate range on the British line. Captain Edwards signals Cradock, suggesting that he keep the Otranto out of range.  The reply is not completed.  “There is danger; proceed at your utmost speed…” Edwards is not sure what the admiral intends, so he keeps on a course parallel to the squadron, just outside the Dresden’s range.

Ten minutes after Graf von Spee’s order to open fire, the battle of Coronel is as good as over. Cradock keeps closing range until it is down to 5,500 yards.  This only makes the firing by SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau more devastating, as they are now able to use their 5.9-inch guns also. By 19:30 the Good Hope has been hit between 30 and 40 times.  She is heavily damaged in the forward part of the ship, especially the bridge and foretop area where Cradock is directing his squadron. A hail of shells have smashed through her decks and started fires in the interior of the ship. In what may have been a last desperate attempt to inflict some damage on her tormentors, the crippled flagship slides out of line toward the enemy, some of its guns still firing.  Graf von Spee, fearing that she is going to fire torpedoes, orders his ships to turn away. According one of HMS Glasgow’s officers, ‘At 19:50, there was a terrible explosion between her main mast and her funnel, the flames reaching a height of over two hundred feet’.  The forward magazine must have been ignited by one of the many fires blazing on the ship. HMS Good Hope drifts off into the gloom and smoke and neither side sees her again. No one actually sees her sink, but she could not have stayed afloat for very long in her stricken condition, and must have gone down around 20:00. She takes the admiral with her into the icy depths, drowning all the men and boys who were still alive out of a crew of nine hundred. Because the battle is still raging, no one, British or German, can stop to look for possible survivors.

HMS Monmouth is in almost as much distress, having been hit in excess of thirty times.  The ship is ablaze and listing to port, although some of her six-inch guns are still firing sporadically.  For another twenty minutes SMS Gneisenau pounds her at short range with both 8.2 and 5.9 inch shells, until she yaws out of line to starboard, away from the German onslaught, sinking by the head. Captain Luce of HMS Glasgow cannot tell in the semi-darkness how bad her condition is and signals to Monmouth at 20:15, ‘Are you all right?’ Captain Brandt replies, ‘I want to get stern to sea.  I am making water badly forward’. Through a break in the smoke, Luce sees three ships approaching in the moonlight and signals to Brandt again, ‘Can you steer northwest?  The enemy are following us astern.’  There is no reply. When the Glasgow draws nearer, it is obvious that the Monmouth is in desperate straits. The captain of the Glasgow has no choice but to save his ship. The Good Hope and Monmouth are both finished as fighting ships, and the Otranto has fled to the west at 19:45 when her captain sees that the flagship is doomed. The Germans are left with the light cruiser as their only target. She has led a charmed life so far, with only four of her crew wounded, but now every time she fires her guns, the flashes light up the darkness and attract fire from all four German ships. Luce knows that just one 8.2-inch salvo from Scharnhorst or Gneisenau would blow his ship apart, and he gives the order to cease-fire. He has already taken five hits from the Leipzig and the Dresden, which has concentrated on the Glasgow after the Otranto pulled out of line. Although three of the shells fail to explode, one has caused a large hole just above the waterline. Luce can do nothing to help the Monmouth, so he gives the order to head west at full speed.  He wants to find the Otranto and heads south to warn the Canopus to turn back. Monmouth’s ordeal is not yet over. SMS Nurnberg finally catches up with the German squadron at 21:00 and comes upon the helpless cruiser, which she identifies by searchlight. The Monmouth is listing so badly that her guns can not be trained on the Nurnberg. The Monmouth’s White Ensign is still flying, so the captain of the Nurnberg gives the order to fire at point blank range, as she gives no sign of surrender. The battered ship finally rolls over on her beam-ends and disappears bow first beneath the waves. No one out of her crew of approximately seven hundred survives. Because of the high seas and the wind blowing at thirty knots, it would be dangerous and probably futile to lower boats to look for survivors in the darkness. The British later agree that the Germans could have done nothing to save any of the Monmouth’s crew who may have still been alive.

In the space of two hours the Royal Navy has suffered the loss of two heavy cruisers and nearly sixteen hundred men and boys. This is the first serious British naval defeat for one hundred years since the budding United States navy defeated a British fleet on Lake Champlain in 1814.

 Today’s losses both on land and sea include:

  •  A Rear Admiral
  • Sons of Admirals
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Son of the Artist William Lionel Wyllie
  • Son of a Judge of the High Court of Madras
  • Son of the 5th Baron Forester
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Dunleath
  • The son of the 1st Earl of Ancaster
  • Grandson of the 4th Earl of Radnor
  • Son-in-law of the 5th Earl of Strafford
  • Godson of the 1st Lord Iddlesleigh
  • Brother of a Baronet
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Multiple sons-in-law of Baronets
  • A Member of the Victorian Order (MVO)
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father will be killed later in the War
  • Multiple men who will have children born after their death
  • Twins killed together
  • Brothers killed together
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons in this war and in the South African War
  • Winner of the 1909 Open Singles Championship at Salisbury Lawn Tennis Club
  • Scottish Rugby International
  • Member of the Foresters Cricket Club
  • Champion Boxer of the 13th Hussars
  • Son of a Writer to the Signet
  • Son of the former Editor of the Clevedon Mercury
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A Schoolmaster
  • An Aide-de-camp to the Viceroy of India from 1910-12
  • A Battalion commander
  • Great Grandson of a man who died from effects of wounds he received in the Peninsula War
  • Son of the Inspector General of Police in Berar

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Private Robert Theodore Morrison Wyllie (London Scottish) is killed on the Western Front at age 26. His brother will be killed in July 1916 and they are sons of William Lionel Wyllie artist in oils and water colors of maritime themes. Wyllie painted HMS Good Hope in 1901 the year it was launched.

 HMS Good Hope 1901HMS Good Hope 1901

 HMS Good Hope casualties include:

  •  Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ Christopher George CradockCB KCVO the 4th son of the late Christopher Cradock, Esquire.
  • Her Captain is Philip Francklin MVO who is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Baldwin W Walter the Baronet.
  • Commander Arthur Tudor Darley is killed at age 38. His son will be born 15th His brother will be killed commanding 4th Hussars in March 1918.
  • Lieutenant Commander Percival Van Straubenzeeis killed at age 33.  He is the son of Major General T Van Straubenzee.
  • Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Berkeley John Benyon is killed in the sinking of the ship at age 31. He leaves a widow with a son and a daughter who will be born on Christmas Day.
  • Lieutenant Commander Gerald Bruce Gaskell is killed. His brother will be killed in Africa in August 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Thomas Kynaston Gaskell rector of Longthorpe.
  • Captain Charles Burnett Partridge (Royal Marines Light Infantry) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed on the Western Front in two days.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Courtenay Tudorthe son of Admiral Tudor is killed at age 23.
  • Lieutenant John Maurice Haig Fisher is killed at age 22. He is the son of Brigadier General J Fisher CB.
  • Sub Lieutenant Francis John Anson Cotterkilled age 20. He is the son of Major General F G Cotter.
  • Fleet Surgeon James Joseph Walsh is killed at age 51. His son will be killed next August.
  • Paymaster George Bolster Owens is killed at age 29. He has twice been mentioned for exceptional services rendered while Secretary to Rear Admiral Cradock during the disturbances in Mexico.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Marischal Dowdingis killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Dowding Rector of Tichborne.
  • Chaplain Arthur Henry John Pittis also killed.
  • Petty Officer James Walsh is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Petty Officer Edwin Stewart Thomas Parsons is killed at age 28. His brother will die of illness on service in the Royal Navy in 1918.
  • Chief Engine Room Artificer Francs Thomas Cox drowns at age 44. His son will be killed in the Second World War.
  • Twin brothers Edward and Harry Turner are killed together while serving as Stokers First Class on HMS Good Hope. The 33-year olds have 8 children between them.
  • Able Seaman Frank Bateman is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Plumber Henry Russell is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Stoker 1st Class Thomas Booth is killed at age 22. His brother will be lost on HMS Indefatigable at Jutland.

 HMS Monmouth casualties include:

  •  The Captain of HMS Monmouth, Frank Brandt, is killed. He is the son of a Judge of the High Court of Madras and is 42-years old.
  • Captain Geoffrey Maurice Ivan Herford(Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Percy Michener Herford (Rector of Christ Church, Trinity Road, Leith and Canon of St Mary’s Cathedral, Edinburgh) who will lose another son in May 1915.
  • Commander Spencer Dundas Forbes is killed at age 40 sixteen days before his only child a son is born.
  • Lieutenant Commander ‘the Honorable’ Peter Robert Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughbyis killed at age 29.  He is the son of the 1st Earl of Ancaster and grandson of Brigadier General ‘Sir’ Walter Ross.
  • Lieutenant Wilfred Dixon Stirling is killed. He is the first of three sons of Brigadier General J W Stirling CB CMG DL to be killed in the Great War and dies at age 28.
  • Midshipman Christopher Musgraveage 15. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Richard Musgrave, the 12th
  • Midshipman John Richardson Le Geyet Pullenis also lost on HMS Monmouth at age 15. He is the son of the late Paymaster Rear Admiral W Pullen.
  • Midshipman George Watson Muirwho is also 15 is also killed.  He is the son of Andrew Gray Muir a writer to the Signet.
  • Midshipman Gervase Ronald Bruce is lost at age 15. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Hervey Juckes Lloyd Bruce 4th
  • Clerk Basil St Merryn Cardewis killed at age 19.  He is the son of the Reverend William Berry Cardew Vicar of Perlethorpe.
  • Chief Petty Officer Frederick Sercombe is killed at age 51. He is the son of the former Editor of the Clevedon Mercury.
  • Stoker 2nd class John Fairbankis killed at at age 20. His brother will be killed on the Western Front in May 1917.
  • Leading Boatman George Neal is killed. Three months later his four year old son will die of illness.
  • Sixteen year old signal boy Alfred Stanley Appleby is also killed. His older brother will die on service at home next November.
  • Plumber Reginald Arthur Pigott is killed at age 36. His brother will die of illness on service in September 1917.
  • Sailmaker Daniel Murphy is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed when submarine H10 is sunk in January 1918.
  • Leading Seaman John Cyril Lock is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last September.
  • Able Seaman John Walter Beer is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Able Seaman Joseph Davis is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in May 1915.
  • Ordinary Seaman Charles Gaggbloom is lost at age 19. His father will be lost when the Steamship Lodaner is torpedoed in April 1918.

Captain Sidney Drury-Lowe takes HMS Chatham, making skillful use of the tide in the Rufiji River in East Africa moves as close to shore as possible to gain range on SMS Konigsberg. He fires several rounds from Chatham’s 6-inch guns but the shells land well short of the Somali and even farther short of Konigsberg which is anchored about a mile beyond Somali. Drury-Lowe orders some of Chatham’s tanks to be flooded to give the ship a five-degree list, to increase the elevation of the guns, but this still is not enough to reach the German ships.  As a result of this action Konigsberg moves another two miles upstream.

Two British destroyers HMS Scorpion (Captain Andrew B Cunningham) and HMS Wolverine (Captain Osmond J Prentice who will be killed on 28 April 1915 in the Dardanelles) attack a Turkish yacht, supposedly acting as a minelayer in Smyrna harbor.  She is set afire by her own crew and blows up.

A convoy of 36 ships sets out from Albany on the southwest tip of Australia transporting the New Zealand and Australian Expeditionary Forces. This 8-mile long convoy is protected by the heavy cruiser HMS Minotaur (Captain E B Kiddle) and HMAS Melbourne (Captain Mortimer Silver) and HMAS Sydney a matching pair of light cruisers and the Japanese battle cruiser Ibuki. From Freemantle on the southwest coast of Australia two more transports join the convoy, which heads for Colombo at a speed of 9½ knots.

The British lines are pierced at Neuve Chapelle, which the Germans reoccupy. By the light of a blazing fire at a windmill the Germans again attack Wytschaete Ridge.  For more than an hour they are held at bay but around 02:00 they rush again pressing home the attack with bayonets.  Sheer weight of numbers forces the London Scottish back over the road and the ridge is captured by the German forces.  The London Scottish retire and concentrate at Kemmel.

  •  Lieutenant John Charles Lancelot Farquharson (London Scottish) is killed at age 33. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918 commanding the 2nd Royal Marines Battalion.
  • Lance Corporal James Roy Hamilton (London Scottish) is killed at age 25. He is the son of James Hamilton JP.
  • Brothers and Privates Ashford and Leslie Francis Walford are killed together while serving in the London Scottish. Ashford dies at age 24 while Leslie is 23.
  • Private James Ross (London Scottish) is killed in action at age 34. He earned 5 caps as a Scottish Rugby International.
  • Private Albert Brian Colin Sarll (London Scottish) is killed at age 23. He is a schoolmaster at Gopsall Street LCC School and a member of Roehampton and Mitcham Football and Cricket Clubs.

A company of the Irish Guards is attacked by German Artillery where it is linked with the French on the fringe of Zillebeke Wood. In the course of the fighting every man, whether officer, orderly, batman or cook, who is able to fight, takes up a rifle and helps hold the line. Of the more than 400 men in the battalion more than 130 are killed, 88 of them when their trench is blown in by shell fire.

  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Andrew Edward Somerset Mulholland(Irish Guards) is killed in this action at age 32. He is the son of the 2nd Baron Dunleath JP High Sheriff 1884 MP and the son-in-law of 5th Earl of Strafford and his only daughter will be born in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Graham Macdowall Maitland (Irish Guards) is a rower who won the Silver Goblets at Henley Royal Regatta in 1900. He rowed for Cambridge in the Boat Race in 1901. He is killed at age 35. His brother was killed during the relief of Ladysmith in February 1900.

During the night near Le Gheer, Belgium, when his officer, the platoon sergeant and a number of men have been struck down, Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) takes command of the platoon and succeeds in holding the position.  For his actions this day and other days prior and later he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

At Tsing-tau the Bismarck forts are silenced. HMS Triumph assists the Japanese bombardment.

The British ambassador leaves Constantinople.

  • Major John Frederick Loder-Symonds (commanding 1st South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received nine days prior at age 40. He is the son of Frederick Cleave Loder-Symonds JP and the first of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Vavasour the 3rd
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Robert Page (Lancashire Fusiliers attached #7 General Base Depot) dies on service in France at age 57. He is the son of the Reverend and Mrs. J Page.
  • Major (Brigade Major 3rd Division Royal Artillery) Francis Julian Audley Mackworth(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 38. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur William Mackworth, the 6th Baronet who had another son killed at Ladysmith 6 January 1900 in the South Africa War while another will die on service in November 1917.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Orlando Wolstan Cecil Weld-ForesterMVO (commanding 1st Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at King Edward VII Hospital received 29 October at age 37. He is the son of the 5th Baron Forester, grandson of ‘Sir’ Willoughby Wolstan Dixie 8th Baronet and served at the Aide de Camp to Lord Hardinge Viceroy of India from 1910 to 1912.
  • Major Charles Napier North (Royal Engineers) is killed by a sniper at age 41. His great grandfather Captain Roger North fought in the Peninsula and died after his retirement from of the effects of wounds he received in that campaign. His daughter will be born next March.
  • Captain Hugh Seymour Blane (Lancers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 29. He is the nephew of the 3rd Baronet Blane and brother of the 4th His brother will be killed at Jutland as a Royal Naval Commander on HMS Queen Mary.
  • Captain Gerard Gloag Sadler(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 33. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Samuel Sadler Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Hugh Stafford Northcote Wright (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 37. He is the son of Frederick Wright, Inspector General of Police in Berar and god son and name sake of the 1st Lord Iddlesleigh to whom he was related. He served in the South African War and is a tennis player who won the Open Singles Championship at Salisbury Lawn Tennis Club in 1909.
  • Captain Charles Paget O’Brien Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds at age 33 while attempting to aid wounded. His two brothers are also killed in the service of King and Country the first in South Africa in January 1902 and the other in June 1917.
  • Captain Leo de Orellana Tollemache (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Ralph William Lyonel Tollmache-Tollemache JP Vicar of South Witham Lincolnshire who will lose another son in February 1917.
  • Captain Robert Giffard(Royal Field Artillery and ADC General Lomax) dies of wounds received the previous day by a shell burst at Divisional Headquarters at age 30.  He has two brothers who will be killed during the Great War and is a member of the Foresters Cricket Club.
  • Lieutenant William Beresford Gosset (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Honorable Beresford Smyly Gosset.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Theodore Clephane Wickham(Connaught Rangers) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend James Douglas Clephane Wickham.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Edward Lawson-Smith(Hussars) is killed at age 25 ten days after his younger brother has been killed.
  • Lieutenant William Hugh Holbech (Scots Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Walrond 1st
  • Lieutenant Jacob Edward Pleydell-Bouverie (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 27. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Duncombe Pleydell-Bouverie, the grandson of the 4th Earl of Radnor and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Edward Hulse 5th
  • Lieutenant Arthur Gilliat Smith (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. He is related to ‘Sir’ Edmund Bainbridge KCB.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Aden Ley (East Kent Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Francis Ley the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Barnes(Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in at age 20.  His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Drummer Frederick Whittingham (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private William Murray (Hussars) is killed at age 26. He is the champion boxer of the 13th

Photos from wikipedia.org

 

Wednesday 16 September 1914 – We Lost 256 (Plus 1)

Military Cross

Military Cross

Trooper Frederick Charles Booth (British South Africa Police) dives into the Zambesi at Kakugril and saves the life of a troop horse that has broken loose and swims into thick reeds on the steep river bank where it is unable either to get a footing or extract itself.  Trooper Booth will later be awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery in action in 1917.

Today’s losses include:

  • An heir to one Baron and another Baroness whose sons will later succeed to the Barony
  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • The first of two men who will make the same woman a widow in the war
  • Fathers of children born after their death
  • Sons of clergy, a judge, and a Baronet
  • A member of the first Military Cross awards class
  • First son from a family that will lose two sons
  • Father of a son who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandfather of a champion racehorse trainer
  • Uncle of a man named for him who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a member of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club (the mother of the sport of Curling)
  • A Scottish International Rugby player
  • Captain of the Grantham Town Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain George Armand Furse (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 34.  His widow will marry Major Ernest Cole Fleming (Royal Field Artillery) who will be killed in 1917. She is the granddaughter of the Chief Constable of Hampshire and the Reverend Frederick Wickham Master of Winchester College. Captain Furse will also have a brother killed in action in May 1918.

  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ William Amherst Cecil MC(Grenadier Guards) is killed by a sniper at age 28.  He is the son of Lord William Cecil CVO and Baroness Amherst. He will be among the 1st 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross. His first son will become the 3rd Baron Amherst of Hackney and his second son will be killed in North Africa in November 1942. His grandson is the champion race horse trainer ‘Sir’ Richard Henry Amherst Cecil.
  • Captain Charles William Banbury (Coldstream Guards) the only son of the Right Honorable Frederick George Banbury MP, Baronet, later the 1st Baron Banbury, dies of wounds at age 36. He was the Aide de Campe to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ J M Grierson at the time of that officer’s death. His second child and only son will be born on 18 May and become the 2nd Baron Banbury.
  • Captain Harry Brocklesby Bartram(Royal Horse Artillery) dies at home at age 36. He is the only son of the Reverend Canon Henry Bartram.
  • Captain Arthur Roe Montgomery Roe (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds received one week prior at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Roe Knight and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wiseman RN Baronet.
  • Captain Gerald Ernest Lea (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. He is the son of His Honour Judge Harris Lea and a veteran of the South African War. His only child will be born on 28 October.
  • Lieutenant Hugh Mockler-Ferryman (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at Aisne at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ C Whitehead who was a member of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club, the mother club of the sport of curling.
  • Lieutenant Victor Maynard Gordon Gordon-Ives (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. His nephew, who is named after him, will be killed on 22 January 1944 at age 22 in Italy.
  • Lieutenant James Laidlaw Huggan(Royal Army Medical Corps attached Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is a Scottish International Rugby Football player who played for London Scottish RFC and for Jed Forest Rugby Club, and had taken part in the last rugby international before the war, the Calcutta Cup match at Inverleith (Edinburgh) in March of this year. He scored one of the three tries in that match. John Will who scored the other two will be killed in 1917.
  • Lieutenant Richard William Gregory Welby(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Gregory Earle Welby CB the 5th Baronet and is Captain of the Grantham Town Cricket Club.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Beddome Read (Somerset Light Infantry is killed at age 23. He is a member of MCC and rugby forward for the Richmond Rugby Club.
  • Gunner E C Howard (North Western Coast Defence Royal Garrison Artillery) dies at age 25. His brother will be killed in the Great War.

The Plus 1

  • Louis Desire Bach killed at age 31 who as a French football player earned a silver medal as a member of Club Francaise at the 1900 Olympics.

Photo from http://www.wikipedia.org

Tuesday 15 September 1914 – We Lost 318 (Plus 1)

Seal Chart murder

The British Expeditionary Force begins building trenches on the Western Front.

Bombardier Ernest George Horlock (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry near Vendressse. When his battery is in action under a heavy shellfire in that although twice wounded he persists on each occasion in returning to lay his gun after his wounds have been dressed.  He will be killed in the sinking of the troopship Aragon in December 1917.

Lieutenant George Frederick Prettyman (Royal Flying Corps) carries out the first ever photo reconnaissance flight, exposing five plates over Belgium.

A South African rebellion against the Allied cause begins. The rebels meet at Potchestroom. Lieutenant Colonel Maritz who is in command of the troops set to invade German Southwest Africa refuses General Smuts summons to Pretoria and will resign in ten days.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Baron
  • First son to lose his life of a family that will lose two sons
  • Son and son-in-law of clergy
  • A man whose daughter will be born next January
  • A man who will be in the first class of Military Cross winners when they are awarded in January
  • Nephew of the novelist ‘Sir’ Henry Rider Haggard creator of the character Allan Quartermain

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Major Charles Elmhirst Luard DSO (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 38. His brother died on service in 1903 of fever in Africa and they are the only sons of Major General Charles Edward Luard who committed suicide by jumping in front of a train less than one month after his wife was murdered in late August 1908. The murder of his mother was never solved and is known as the “Seal Chart Murder” and his father received many accusations that he was the murderer before his suicide. He is the son-in-law of Major William Barrett JP DL and he was wounded in the Ashanti campaign of 1900.

  •  Major John Trefusis Carpenter-Garnier(Scots Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 40. He is the son of Mr. John T Carpenter-Garnier JP DL MP and the ‘Honorable’ Mrs. Mary Louisa Carpenter-Garnier and the grandson of the 19th Baron Clinton. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Bertram Noel Denison(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 30. He is the son of Admiral John Denison. He served in South Africa in the Royal Naval Division.
  • Captain Mark Haggard(Welsh Regiment) dies of the wounds he received the previous day at age 38.  He is the nephew of a well-known novelist ‘Sir’ Henry Rider-Haggard and ‘Sir” W D Haggard. He served in the South Africa War.
  • Lieutenant John Rudolph Wissman (Royal Field Artillery) a German interpreter is killed at age 23. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Worthington Jukes Rector of Shobrooke near Credition and his daughter will be born on 9th January 1915.
  • Lieutenant Frederic Hornby Lever Rushton (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is among the first 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross on 1st January 1915.
  • Lance Sergeant Leonard Henry Russell Gray (Ceylon Planters Rifle Corps) dies on service at age 21 in Ceylon. He is the son of the Reverend A W Gray.
  • Corporal C E Neill (Black Watch) is killed at age 23. His brother will also lose his life in the Great War.

The Plus 1

  • Eduard von Lutchken killed at age 31. He is a German equestrian rider who as  a member of the 1912 Olympic team for his country won a silver medal in the team event.

Photo from wikipedia.org

Monday 14 September 1914 – We Lost 1,203

Pickersgill-Cunliff

The first battle of Aisne begins. It will last until 20th September. The British victory at Troyon is considered one of the most brilliant achievements of the War so far. Much of the success of the day is due to the gallant behavior of the 116th Battery Royal Field Artillery when the command devolves on Captain Guy Bertram Oliver, who takes the Battery into action. Captain Oliver will be killed in September 1916.

The village of Soupir is cleared by the Brigade of Guards (Grenadier, Coldstream and Irish Guards Regiments, Black Watch and Cameron Highlanders) and on this day and for several days following heavy fighting will take place at the Farm of La Cour de Soupir near the head of the valley northwest of the village. The Guards Regiments officers and ranks killed today in the operations at Soupir include many listed below.

Bombardier A A Adie (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for actions beginning on this day and carrying forward until 13th October on the Aisne. Additional actions from 21st October until 15th November both times showing consistent gallantry in keeping up communications between battery and observation stations.  The efficiency of his battery is largely due to his efforts.  He will be killed in action serving as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Lancaster Regiment on 3rd May 1918.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Sons of families that will lose two, three and four sons and a family that will lose a daughter and son
  • Sons of a current and a former Member of Parliament
  • Sons of
    • Earl
    • Dukes
    • Marquess
    • Baron
    • Baronets
  • Son-in-laws of
    • Earls
    • Baronets
  • Grandsons of
    • Dukes
    • Earls
    • Baron
  • Son of the former Governor of Hong Kong
  • Son of the former Governor General of Australia
  • Sons of Generals
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son of a Writer to the Signet
  • Brother of a Baron
  • Brothers of men who lost their lives in the South African War
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Brother of a future Victoria Cross winner
  • The first Rugby International for any nation to be killed in the war
  • Members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • Member of the Wanderers Football Club
  • A duel bronze medal winner at the 1912 Olympics
  • First Class cricket player for Hampshire
  • Father of the man who will create the Army’s first Commando Unit in the next war
  • Fathers whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • A direct descendant of a knight who accompanied William the Conqueror in 1066
  • A man who had two relatives in previous wars
    • One who fought and was wounded at Trafalgar
    • One who was killed at the Storming of the Redan in the Crimean War.
  • The Designer of the Army’s War Book
  • The author of the Guide to Army Signalling
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is Lieutenant John Reynolds Pickersgill-Cunliffe

 The leading men of the advanced guard, under Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe (Grenadier Guards), push on, and near La Cour de Soupir run right into the enemy, who are in superior numbers. All the men are taken prisoner, and Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe is wounded. The rest of the advanced guard is also pressing forward, and soon the positions are reversed. Faced with the alternative of capture or retiring before a stronger force, the German officer in command decides on the second course. This means abandoning the prisoners; but there is one thing at any rate that a German officer could still do. He deliberately walks up to Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe, who is lying wounded on the ground, pulls out his revolver, and shoots him dead.

  •  Captain William Thomas Payne-Gallwey MVO (Grenadier Guards) the only son of ‘Sir’ Ralph William Frankland-Payne Gallwey 3rd Baronet is killed at age 33. His first cousin will be killed in September 1916.
  • Captain Heneage Greville Finch‘Lord Guernsey’ (Irish Guards) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of the 8th Earl of Aylesford and his son Captain Heneage Michael Charles Finch the 9th Earl (Royal Artillery) will be killed in action on 28 May 1940 also at age 31. He served in the South African War and is the son in law of the 2nd Baron de Ramsey and grandson of the 3rd Lord Bagot.
  • Captain Hamilton Hugh Berners(Irish Guards) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Ralph Anstruther and his widow is the grand-daughter of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Walter Barttelot MP Baronet. His brother will become a Brigadier General.
  • Captain Arthur Vincent Hay, ‘Lord Hay’ (Irish Guards) the son of the 10th Marquess of Tweeddale is killed at age 25. His brother Lieutenant Colonel ‘Lord” Edward Douglas John Hay (Grenadier Guards) will be killed by enemy action at Wellington Barracks in June 1944 at age 55.
  • Lieutenant Richard Anthony Compton-Thornhill(Scots Guards) is the only son of ‘Sir’ Anthony John Compton-Thornhill, the 2nd
  • Lieutenant Frederick William Des Voeux(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George William Des Voeux and was born at Government House, Hong Kong, during his father’s governorship of that colony.
  • Lieutenant Henry Richard Inigo-Jones(Scots Guards) is killed at age 22.  He is the son of Major General Inigo-Jones CB CVO and grandson of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Richard Charteris.
  • Lieutenant Percy Lyulph Wyndham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 26 while leading his men when he is shot in the head at close range. He is the son of the late ‘Right Honorable’ George Wyndham former Member of Parliament and Countess Grosvenor, grandson of the 1st Duke of Westminster and son-in-law of the 4th Baron Ribblestone.
  • Lieutenant David Cecil Bingham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Major General the Honorable ‘Sir’ Cecil Edward Bingham CVO CB and grandson of the 4th Earl of Lucan. His widow is the only daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard William Mark Lockwood (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of General Mark Wood.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerard Frederick Freeman-Thomas (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. He is the eldest son and heir to the 1st Marquess Willingdon and grandson of the Earl of Brassey. He played cricket for Eton against Harrow in 1912.
  • Sergeant Arthur Burchett (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Fred Hutchinson (Scots Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Glazier King (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Private Richard George Carpenter (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak in February 1919.

 The losses in the other Regiments of the Guards Brigade include

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Adrian Grant DuffCB (commanding 1st Black Watch) age 44. He is the son of ‘the Right Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant Duff PC GCSI and son-in-law of the 1st Baronet Avebury who served on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-98 and in South Africa in 1902.  He was the designer of the ‘War Book’ in his position as Assistant Secretary (Military) to the Committee of Imperial Defense in 1910 which was a complete mobilization plan for the country should war happen. His son will be killed in action in June 1940 with the Black Watch.
  • Major George Stewart-Murray (Black Watch) ‘Lord Stewart-Murray’ is killed at age 41. He is the son of the 7th Duke of Atholl and had served in the South African War. His fourth cousin Major ‘the Honorable’ Alfred Henry Maitland(Cameron Highlanders) is also killed at age 41. He is the son of the 13th Earl of Lauderdale and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898 and South African War.
  • Captain Alastair Hugh Mackintosh(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Lord Kyllachy and had served in the South African War.
  • Captain Alexander Horne (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Thomas Elliott Ogilivie Horne Writer to the Signet He is the first cousin of Major General H S Horne and Lieutenant Colonel E W Horne (commanding 3rd Seaforth Highlanders).
  • Lieutenant Arthur Stuart Nicholson(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur W and Lady Nicholson. He played cricket for the Edinburgh Garrison and his Regiment. His brother will be killed next February.
  • Lieutenant Lewis Robertson Cumming (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of John Fleetwood Cumming JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander H Mackinnon Yr of Mackinnon (Cameron Highlanders) is killed. He is the son of Mackinnon of Mackinnon and the Honorable Mrs. Mackinnon.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald George Roderick Joseph Smith-Sligo (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His sister will die on service five days before the armistice is signed in 1918.
  • Private Kenneth MacKenzie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William McCartney (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 26. His brother Joseph will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Alexander McCabe (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in April 1918.

 At 03:00 the 2nd Brigade (2nd Sussex Regiment, 1st North Lancashire Regiment, 1st Northampton Regiment and 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is ordered to take the crest above Troyon in a pouring rain and dense mist.  The 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps actually makes it to the top of the ridge but finds itself faced with stiff opposition in particular from German troops holding a sugar factory.  The 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment take up the attack on the factory as does the 1st North Lancashire Regiment. The three battalions dig in on the ridge and face a number of counter attacks throughout the day. At 13:00 the Germans launch a large counter attack which pushes the 2nd Brigade and the Guards back to where they started from in the morning, taking the sugar factory back in the process.  As with the Guards the casualties have been severe on both sides.  Every battalion in the 2nd Brigade has over three hundred men killed and wounded.

  • The losses suffered by the 2nd Sussex Regiment include their commander Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Henry Montresor who is killed at age 50. He also served in the Nile Expedition in 1884, in the Hazara Expedition 1888 and the South African War. His son-in-law will be killed in six days. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Henry Tucker Montressor KCB GCB.
  • Major Mostyn Eden Cookson is killed by shrapnel at age 46. He is a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Captain Leonard Slateris killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Slater and a member of the MCC and Gentlemen of Sussex Cricket Club and played a single Minor Counties Championship for Devon against Glamorgan. His son John Durnford Slater is credited with creating the first Army commando unit in the Second World War and his brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant ‘the Honorable’ Herbert Lyttelton Pelham (Sussex Regiment)is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Godolphin Pelham 5th Earl of Chichester the grandson of the 1st Baron Wolverton, great nephew of the Earl of Lucan and the Earl of Cardigan and descended from Oliver Cromwell, the Duke of Marlborough and ‘Sir’ John Pelham a knight in the court of King Edward II. He also is a holder of an aviator’s and pilot’s certificate.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sladen Hughes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is a member of the Wanderers Football Club.
  • Sergeant George William Hutsonis killed at age 24.  At the Stockholm Olympics in 1912 he was a bronze medal winner in the 5,000-meters and 3,000-meter team race. Earlier this year he set a British record for the ¾ mile run.
  • Private Thomas Still (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Troyon at age 19. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Alvah Trussler (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private Sydney Elphick Kenward (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Others killed today include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Evelyn Ridley Bradford (commanding 1st Seaforth Highlanders) the 2nd Baronet is killed at age 45. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Bradford, 1st Baronet Commissioner of London’s Metropolitan Police Service from1890 to 1903. He is a first class cricket player for Hampshire from 1895-1905. His son will be killed as a Squadron Commander in Royal Air Force in May 1940.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Louis St Gratien Le MarchantDSO (commanding 1st East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Le Marchant Rector of Little Risington Bedfordshire and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Reginald Lloyd (commanding 1st Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 46, three days after his predecessor was killed. He is the son of Sampson Lloyd former Chairman of Lloyd’s Bank and Member of Parliament for Plymouth and South Warwickshire. He also served in the South African War.
  • Major Hubert Francis FitzWilliam Brabazon Foljambe(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 42. He is the son of the Right Honorable F J S Foljambe PC and Lady Gertrude Foljambe and the grandson of the 3rd Earl of Gosford. He was educated at Eton and served in the South African War.
  • Major John Herbert Kerrich(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is the son of General Walter D’Oyly Kerrich and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Captain Theodore WrightVC (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at Vailly at age 31.  On this day he assists the passage of the 5th Cavalry Brigade over the pontoon bridge and is mortally wounded while helping a wounded man into shelter. Along with his actions on the 23 August where he attempted to connect up the lead to demolish a bridge, under heavy fire and although wounded in the head, he made a second attempt. he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.
  • Captain Gabriel Roy Fitzpatrick (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Beaulne at age 30. He is the son-in-law of W F Attenborough Vicar of Fletching.
  • Captain Augustus Ernest Cathcart(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 39.  He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ A M Cathcart JP. He is a grandson of both the 2nd Earl Cathcart and the 3rd Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle. He had a brother who died of Typhoid Fever in the South African War in January 1902.
  • Captain and Adjutant Richard Howard-Vyse(The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 37.  He is the son of the late Lieutenant General E Howard-Vyse and a winner of the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.
  • Captain and Brigade Major John Banks Jenkinson(Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 33.  He is the son and heir of the 12th Baronet and he served in the South African War. His son will become the 13th Baronet next year upon the death of ‘Sir’ George Banks Jenkinson.
  • Captain Riversdale Nonus Grenfell(Buckinghamshire Hussars attached 9 Lancers) is killed at age 34. His brother Francis will be killed next year having been awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in August of this year.
  • Captain Douglas Keith Lucas Lucas-ToothDSO (Lancers) dies of wounds at age 33. He is one of three sons of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert Lucas-Tooth who will be killed in the Great War and he is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Robert Harold Olivier(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) dies at age 35.  He is the youngest son of the late Reverend Canon Olivier Rector of Wilton and had served in both the South African War and the Nandi Expedition of 1905-6.
  • Captain Marwood Edwards Yeatman (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His son will be killed in December 1941 defending Hong Kong. He is the 1st cousin of the Lord Bishop of Worcester and son-in-law of Major General F Koe CB CMG.
  • Captain Algernon Foulkes Attwood (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Llewellyn Foulkes Attwood JP.
  • Captain Arthur Maitland Byng (Royal Fusiliers) is killed while looking through field glass when he is shot in the throat at age 41. He is related to Viscount Torrington. He played cricket for Hampshire in 1905 and Jamaica in 1896-97 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Lieutenant George Godfrey Brandreth Paget (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ George Edward Paget KCB and Canon William Harper Brandreth Rector of Standish Lancashire and great nephew of ‘Sir’ James Paget Baronet. He is the nephew of Major General ‘Sir’ Alexander B Tulloch KCB CMG and Major General F W Hemming CB. He is also the cousin of Admiral ‘Sir’ Thomas Brandreth KCB.
  • Lieutenant Athelstane Key Durance George (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier when he is shot in the heart while urging his men not to expose their heads. He is the grandson of Jonathan Muckleston Key D, great nephew of ‘Sir’ John Key Baronet and a direct descendant of ‘Sir’ William Bloet who came over with William the Conqueror in 1066.
  • Lieutenant Godfrey Lyall Miller(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Ontario and Lady Miller.
  • Lieutenant John Edward Langton ClarkeMC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at Moussy-sur-Aisne at age 24.  He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Edward Henry St Lawrence Clarke the 4th Baronet and will be one of the first 99 members of the military to be awarded the new Military Cross on 1 January 1915.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Lieutenant Robert Harold Bond (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at Aisne at age 32. He is the nephew of General Bond CB.
  • Lieutenant John Fraser (Connaught Rangers) dies of wounds at age 30 received rescuing a fellow officer. He is the son of John Fraser JP.
  • Lieutenant Mervyn Taylor Johnson (South Wales Borderers) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Arnott Baronet.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Archibald Charles Gibson-Craig(Highland Light Infantry) the 4th Baronet is killed at age 31. He loses his life while leading his men to attack a machine gun which is hidden in a wood with sword in hand and shouting, “Charge, men! At them”. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ James Henry Gibson-Craig, the 3rd Baronet whose elder son died of dysentery in South Africa in April 1900 at age 17.
  • Lieutenant George Owen Birch(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Birch.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Lucas Quixano Henriques (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the author of the Guide to Army Signaling.
  • Lieutenant and Assistant Adjutant Edward Charles Daun (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Edward Arthur Williams CB. His great great uncle Admiral ‘Sir’ William Pierson KCB was wounded as a Midshipman on HMS Belleisle at Trafalgar and his great uncle Lieutenant Colonel the Honorable H R Handpick was killed at the storming of the Redan in the Crimea War. He is a member of the MCC.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Francis Simson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. He is a Scotland International Rugby player and the first Rugby International of any nationality to be killed in the Great War.
  • Two Lieutenants in the Connaught Rangers killed this day will be among the first 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross on 1 January 1915. Rhys Ivor Thomas MC is killed at age 24, while Ralph Lessingham Spreckley MC is killed at age 21. He is the first of 3 brothers who will be killed serving in the armed forces in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Raymond Lodge (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Oliver Lodge.
  • Second Lieutenant John Forster(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Henry William Forster the 1st Baron of Lepe former Governor General of Australia and he has a brother who will die of wounds received late in the war in March 1919.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor Aloisius Lentaigne (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Vincent O’Neill Lentaigne.
  • Second Lieutenant Rhys Campbell Ffolliot Powell(Highland Light Infantry) is killed attempting to capture an enemy machine gun at age 22. The gun will be captured later in the day by Private Wilson of his platoon who will be awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ C H Powell KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant George Samuel Rodie Thompson(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20.  He is the only son of George Rodie Thompson JP.
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the Great War Second Lieutenant Alexander John Neeve Williamson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action today.
  • Lance Corporal James William Pearson (Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in April 1943 in Tunisia, North Africa serving with the Grenadier Guards.
  • Lance Corporal William Joseph Guiver (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. His brother will die at home on service in October 1918.
  • Private George Ware(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 20.  He is the youngest of four brothers, all of whom will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Gunner Horace Glover (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Harold Alfred Bull (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Valenciennes at age 28. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private John Charles Howe (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will die of wounds five days before the Armistice in 1918.
  • Private Alfred Charlesworth (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Lawrence Leith (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. His brother will killed be in one day over two months from today.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Carmania (Captain Noel Grant) engages the German auxiliary cruiser Cap Trafalgar off the eastern coast of South America.  Despite having to abandon the bridge of the ship due to a fire, the crew of the Carmania continues to fire on the German ship. The Cap Trafalgar begins to list and goes down bow first.  The battle has lasted nearly an hour. The Carmania has been potted with holes from Cap Trafalgar’s bombardment and has lost seven men in the action. The ship will be escorted to Gibraltar and placed in dry dock.  For her courageous action she is commemorated by the British Navy League who presents her with a silver plate from Nelson’s dinner service. The duel is unique because the combatants are not men-of-war but in fact floating hotels armed with miniature artillery, the first such meeting and engaging on the high seas.

The officers and men of the destroyer HMAS Parramatta see the Australian submarine AE1 (Lieutenant Commander Thomas Fleming Besant) at 15:30 patrolling to the south west of Duke of York Island.  The crew of the destroyer assumes the submarine is returning to harbor at Herbershohe on the island of New Britain for the evening.  It never arrives and searches all along the coasts of New Britain and New Ireland and the surrounding waters turn up no trace. The fate of AE1, the first Allied submarine to be lost in the Great War, along with its three officers and thirty-two men, remains a mystery to this day.

  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Leopold Florence Scarlettis one of the officers killed, when this boat is lost, at age 25 His brother the 5th Baron Abinger will die on service in May 1917.
  • Able Seaman George Hodgkin is lost at age 27. His brother will be killed in August 1916 in Mesopotamia.

Photo from http://www.findagrave.com