Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Flying Corps

Tuesday 10 November 1914 – We Lost 296

Club House at the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews

Club House at the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews

Lieutenant John Peake Knight (Royal Field Artillery) consistently shows conspicuous gallantry in assisting infantry. For his actions especially on this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Lieutenant Knight will be killed in action in August 1916 at age 26.

In what is believed to be an act of vengeance against an unpopular sergeant by a disgruntled soldier, a live hand grenade is thrown at a Royal Flying Corps lorry at St. Omer. The lorry does not blow up but the explosion wounds five men one of whom later dies in hospital. A court of inquiry is held, but the matter is never explained and the bomb thrower is never found.

Today’s losses include:

  • The first member of the House of Lords to fall in the Great War
  • 5th Baron Congleton
  • Son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon
  • A man whose widow will be killed in the Blitz in 1944
  • Battalion commander
  • A Member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two and three sons
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • Nephew of a man who will be killed tomorrow
  • Cousin of a man previously killed
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a participant in the Charge at Balaclava

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain William Alexander Henderson (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 37 in Ploegsteert Wood. He is the son of Alexander Edward Henderson the Advocate Sheriff Substitute of Edinburgh and the Lothians. He received his commission in February 1900 and served previously in the South African Campaign. He is a keen cricketer and an exceptionally good golfer member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews. In 1909 at the Amateur Championship Meeting at Muirfield he defeated the American amateur champion Jerome Travers, winner of the United States Amateur four times before the war. Travers will become only the second amateur to win the U S Open when he wins it next year.

  •  Major ‘Lord’ Bernard Charles Gordon-Lennox (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon and he served in the South African War. His widow will be killed during an air raid on London on 18 June 1944 at age 66.
  • Major Harold Herny Norman (commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 46.
  • Captain John Francis Hodgkinson (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is related to Edward Hodgkinson JP.
  • Captain William Charles Rait KerrDSO (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed next May. They are grandsons of Major General Hutchinson CB.
  • Captain Thomas Cecil de Trafford (Royal Fusiliers) dies of wounds received in action. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Joseph Edward Radcliffe 4th Baronet and the first grandson of the late ‘Sir’ Humphrey de Trafford, the Baronet, to die in the Great War. His brother will be killed in September 1915.
  • Lieutenant Albert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and the great grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. His uncle will be killed tomorrow at the same place also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Right Honorable’ Henry Bligh Fortesque Parnell (Grenadier Guards) 5th Baron Congleton is killed at Ypres at age 24 becoming the first member of the House of Lords to lose his life in the Great War. His brother will be killed in September 1916. They are sons of the late 4th Baron Major General Henry Parnell and distant cousins of Irish Policitan Charles Stewart Parnell.
  • Lieutenant Michael George Stocks(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21 just short of one month after his cousin has been killed.  He is the grandson of Colonel ‘Sir’ Richard Ellison and Major Stocks who took part in the charge at Balaclava and as a thank offering his family built the Church of St. Mary’s Halifax.
  • Corporal Lewis Waters (Leinster Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will die on service in India in November 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Samuel Whiteman (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the War.
  • Private James Joseph Mallyon (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) dies of wounds at age 39. His stepbrother drowned on service in August while his brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Robert Kilpatrick(Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) is killed. His brother-in-law will be killed in December of this year.

Friday 30 October 1914 – We Lost 984

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

After an intense bombardment the Germans attack the British line held by the 9th Lancers at Messines.  They attack from St Yves to Wytchaete, capturing St Yves and gaining a footing in Messines village.  They are driven out by a counter-attack.

The village of Zandvoorde is held by the Life Guards numbering between three and four hundred men. It is bombarded for over an hour with heavy guns and then captured by the 39th German Division.  The entire front of the 3rd Cavalry Division is driven back to the Klein-Zillebeke Ridge.

Lieutenant G N Humphreys (Royal Flying Corps) shoots up an enemy convoy firing two hundred fifty rounds from his Lewis gun.  This is most likely the first ever ground attack by an aircraft.

The trail of the accused German spy Karl Lody begins in Britain.

Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood hoists his flag on the French destroyer L’Intrepide, the first time a French warship has acted as an English flagship without having first been captured.  L’Intrepide and L’Aventurier have joined the Second Light Squadron in the English Channel earlier in the month and have fought with that British squadron off the Belgian coast. Admiral Hood will be killed at the the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Good Hope and HMS Monmouth head north from Vallenar intent on a rendezvous with the other two members of the squadron after they complete their intelligence missions that they have been dispatched to perform the previous day.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The original Boy Scout who was called Baden-Powell’s favorite
  • Brother-in-law of Douglas Haig
  • Grandson of an officer who served under Nelson at Copenhagen
  • Former Aide-de-camp to Field Marshall the Earl of Roberts
  • Former Aide-de-camp to the Governor General of Australia
  • Actor and member of the Green Room Club
  • The father of a child who will be born after his death
  • Son of the artist Ernest F Marillier
  • Great grandson of a 50-year Master at Harrow
  • Co-found and one time editor of the Yokahama (Japan) Press
  • Staff member of the Burlington Magazine
  • Champion boxer
  • The second son of the former Governor of the Windward Islands to be killed in two days
  • Multiple sons of Members of Parliament
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • A Roman Catholic Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Grandson of an Alderman
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple families who lose one of two sons killed in the Great War
  • Two examples of families that will lose four sons in the Service of King and Country
  • A family who previously lost a son in the South African War
  • Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster
  • Son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne
  • Son of the 4th Earl of Yarborough
  • Son of the 2nd Earl of Durham
  • Son of the 1st Earl of Dudley
  • Son-in-law of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Erne
  • Son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian
  • Son-in-law of Baron Knaresborough
  • Grandson of the Duke of Abercorn
  • Grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Father of the 4th and 5th Dukes of Westminster

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton (Northamptonshire Yeomanry attached Lancers) dies of wounds received when he is shot by a sniper at age 23. He is known affectionately as ‘Bob’ by his friends and family. His father was master of the Pytchley Hunt and his uncle is Philip Wrought MP JP DL. A close family friend is ‘Sir’ Robert Baden-Powell, hero of the Siege of Mafeking during the South African War, and when ‘BP’ came up with the idea of organizing a camp for boys to teach them the principles of leadership and teamwork. He immediately turned to ‘Bob’ Wroughton to join him in his venture.

The camp was held on Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset, in August 1907 – and became an historic event. It was from that beginning that the World Wide Boy Scout Movement was to emerge. After the Camp, Baden Powell heaped praise on Bob’s leadership “he was a great help to me & quite set the example to other Patrol Leaders,” he wrote in a letter to Bob’s mother,  in which he also asked her for Bob’s suggestions as to how the whole Scouting movement could be established. A career in the army was a natural progression. He was commissioned in November 1913, and when war broke out he joined the 12th Lancers where again he received high praise for his courage. His Major wrote of him that he was an “excellent soldier and can turn his hand to anything”. After just a few weeks of the war, he had gained a gallantry honour, being Mentioned in Disptaches by the Commander in Chief, Sir John French. While on patrol in the Ypres salient in Belgium he is shot by a German sniper, at age 23.

A distraught Baden Powell writes to his parents soon after: “I have felt as nearly as possible like a second father to him, and to read the little testimonies to Bob’s character after all the hopes that I had formed of him, is the greatest possible comfort. I am so glad that he had made his mark already before he died.”

  •  Colonel Charles Arthur Cecil King (commanding 2nd Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 51. He served previously at the Nile 1885-6 Burma 1893 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Trevor Crispon (commanding 2nd Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 46. He served in the Nile campaign of 1898, Crete and South Africa.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Osbert Samuel Cadogan (commanding 1st Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 46 attempting to save his mortally wounded adjutant Captain Alfred Edwin Claud Toke Doonerat Zandvoorde, Ypres at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Cadogan Rector of Wicken and he served in Hazara in 1891 and China in 1900. Dooner’s brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Major (T/Lieutenant Colonel) John Murray Traill(commanding 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt when his battalion is shelled in the open.  His brother will be killed in a railway accident in November 1916.
  • Major George Geoffrey Prendergast Humphreys(Baluchi Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 41. He is the son of T W D Humphreys JP is the grandson of Major J Humphreys who served under Nelson at Copenhagen and had been an extra aide de camp to His Majesty King George in India. He is the son-in-law of Major General ‘Sir’ James Bell KCVO.
  • Major Hugh St Aubyn Wake MVO (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the late Admiral Charles Wake and he served on the North West Frontier 1897-9.
  • Major Eustance Henry Egremont AbadieDSO (Lancers) is killed at age 37. He has had two brothers die in the King’s service prior to the Great War and a fourth brother will be killed in action in 1917 and they are sons of Major General Henry Richard Abadie. One brother was killed in the South African War while the second die of fever during on service in February 1904.
  • Major ‘Lord’ Charles George Francis Mercer Nairne Petty-FitzMauriceMVO (Dragoons attached 6th Cavalry Brigade) is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the South African Medal, the Legion of Honor, Order of Military Merit, Order of the Crown, the Order of the Iron Crown Class II, Equerry-in-Ordinary to King George V when he was Prince of Wales 1909-1910 and Equerry to his Majesty 1910-1914. He had sometimes been the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Earl Roberts and is the son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne. He is the grandson of the Duke of Abercorn KG and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Hugh William Grosvenor(Life Guards) dies of wounds at age 30.  He is the son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and is married to Lady Mabel Crichton, daughter of John Crichton, 4th Earl Erne and his wife, the former Lady Florence Cole, daughter of William Cole 3rd Earl of Enniskillen.  He is the commander of ‘C’ Squadron 1st Life Guards. His sons will become the 4th and 5th Duke of Westminster.
  • Captain Alexander Moore Vandeleur(Life Guards) the son-in-law of the 1st Baron Knaresborough is killed at age 30 when his squadron is surrounded and scorning surrender fights to the last and are wiped out in hand to hand fighting.
  • Captain Frank Harrison Saker (Connaught Rangers) is killed in action. He worked as an actor before he joined the army in 1904 and was a member of the Green Room Club. His brother will be killed on the second day of the Gallipoli landing next year.
  • Captain Alfred James Woodhouse(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is one of four brothers who give their life in the service of the King. The first was killed in the South African War and the final two will be killed in 1915. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend A C Woodhouse Rector of Winterborn Monckton Dorset and gained the Sword of Honour at Woolwich.
  • Captain Otho Claude Skipwith Gilliat (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 31. He played cricket at Eton in 1899 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club and a veteran of the South Afria War.
  • Captain and Adjutant Douglas Byres Davidson (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed late next month and they are grandson of General John Clarke.
  • Captain Ernest Reginald Hayes-Sadler (Gurka Rifles) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed two days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Ian Bouverie Maxwell (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 24. He is the nephew of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Ronald Maxwell KCB and he is a member of the staff of the “Burlington Magazine”.
  • Captain Barry Hartwell (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 33. He served in the Tibet Expedition of 1903 and was awarded the Silver Medal of St John of Jerusalem for life saving in the earthquake at Dharmsala in 1905. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Brodrick Hartwell 2nd Baronet and the great grandson of General Frederick Young.
  • Captain Reginald Wickham Harland(Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Augustus Harland of Harefield Vicarge Middlesex. His brother was killed in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Charles Sackville Pelham ‘Lord Worsley’ (Royal Horse Guards) Baron Worsley is killed in action at age 27 at Zandvoorde. He is the son of the 4th Earl and Countess of Yarborough and son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian his other daughter married Douglas Haig. An order to withdraw does not reach the machine gun section he is in charge of, or some of the other soldiers. They are cut off, and Lord Worsley is first listed as ‘Missing’, and is officially recorded as killed early in 1915. However, Worsley’s body had been found and buried by the Germans, and a plan of where he had been buried is later passed on via Diplomatic channels from the Germans. In December 1918 his grave will be located by a British Officer using the plans, with the upright wooden portion of the cross which had been placed there by the Germans still standing. A replacement wooden cross will be put there in January 1919, and Lord Worsley’s widow later purchases the land.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Dennis Harding (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 22. He is the grandson of Major General Worthy Bennett (Royal Marine Light Infantry).
  • Lieutenant Philip Francis Payne-Gallwey(Lancers, Indian Army) is killed at age 21.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Henry Payne-Gallwey Rector of Sessay Thirsk, cousin of ‘Sir’ Ralph Payne Gallwey and nephew of General A Lowry Cole CB DSO.
  • Lieutenant David Rex Wilson (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Alderman Jonathan Angus.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Close-Brooks (Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the son in law of Major General Beresford Lovett and JP for Cheshire. His brother will be killed in Mesoptamia in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Lennox Harvey (Lancers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Douglas Lennox Harvey JP DL Vice Chairman of West Sussex County Council. His brother will be killed in three days serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Ernest Francis WardMVO (Life Guards) a son of the 1st Earl of Dudley is killed in at age 36. He played cricket for the Marylebone Cricket Club and is a veteran of the South African War. His body will not be found.
  • Lieutenant John Arnold St C Anstruther(Dragoon Guards attached Life Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the only son of the late Colonel commanding 2nd Life Guards and a former Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Australia.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Walter Henry Legge-Bourke(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Harry Legge-Bourke GCVO grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth and is married to the youngest daughter of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire KG. His only child will be born on 16 May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Francis Lambton(Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 43.  He is the son of the 2nd Earl and Countess of Durham.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Ludovic Carew(Hussars) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of Charles Carew a Member of Parliament and the grandson of the Reverend Robert Baker Carew.
  • Second Lieutenant Joseph Frain Webster(Black Watch attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Francis Webster.
  • Second Lieutenant Rowland Le Belward Egerton (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Philip Henry Brian Grey-Egerton 12th
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Charles Jennens Marillier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the artist Ernest F Marillier and great grandson of J F Marillier for 50 years the Master at Harrow.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Herbert Posden Burn (Dragoons) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Colonel Charles Rosdew Burn MP ADC to the King 1st Baronet who will later change his name to Forbes Leith and grandson of Lord Leith of Fyvie.
  • Second Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant Frederick Charles Hatton (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed with his Colonel at age 36. He is the part founder and one time editor of the Yokohama (Japan) Press. He fought in the South African War where he was wounded at Driefontein. He is related to ‘Sir’ Westby Brook Percival KCMG late Agent General for New Zealand. His wife is the niece of Alderman Thewlis late Lord Mayor of Manchester.
  • Sergeant Robert Henry Vanson age 28 and his brother Corporal Archibald John Vanson age 26 are killed together while serving in the Dragoons.
  • Corporal of Horse Herbert William Dawes (Life Guards) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private James Kane (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 22. He is a champion boxer at his weight.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla is wrecked when she strikes submerged rocks close to the Nab, Whitby, in a southeast easterly gale.  Out of two hundred twenty-nine on board, eighty-three are lost. The Whitby, Upgang and Tynermouth lifeboats pick up the survivors.

 HMHS Rohilla casualties include:

  • Roman Catholic Chaplain the Reverend Robert Basil Gwydir lost at age 47.
  • Brothers and Junior Reserve Attendants Thomas and Walter Horsfield are also killed. Thomas is described as an enthusiastic worker in the Salvation Army and drowns at age 47 while 35 year old Walter served twice in the South African War with General Hospitals.

Monday 26 October 1914 – We Lost 825

Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis badge

Duke of Connaught’s Own Baluchis badge

The Indian Corps carries out its first attack on the Western Front. Their first British officer to be killed, Captain Percival Campbell Hampe-Vincent (Duke of Connaught’s Own Baluchis), is lost as are nine of his men.  Within four days, four more British officers, four Indian officers and more than two hundred Indian soldiers will be killed. Captain Hampe-Vincent is the son of Robert W E Hampe-Vincent the Commissioner of Police in Bombay and he served in Somalia 1903-4.

In the Ypres Salient many British troops are killed or buried alive as British artillery fire into the village of Kruiseecke, unaware that it is occupied by their own men.

The Second Battle Squadron sails from its base at Mull for gunnery practice off Tory Island.  HMS Badger sinks a German submarine.

The Manchester Commerce (Master Charles William Bloom Payne) strikes a mine twenty miles from Tory Island and is sunk. Her master is among the fourteen casualties.

Louis Botha takes the field and announces the existence of an Afrikaner rebellion in South Africa.  A convoy of ships carrying Australian troops is nearing the Cape and the Imperial government offers them to Botha, but the offer is refused.  In fact, to reduce inter-community tensions, he deliberately uses primarily loyalist Afrikaners to put down the rebellion.  He orders 6,000 horsemen and several field guns to assemble at Vereeniging in the southern Transvaal and then goes there to take personal charge.  His aim is to capture Christiaan DeWet, although no one knows where he currently is.  As soon at Botha arrives at Vereeniging, he hurries to the post office to telephone Jan Smuts, but before he can place his call, the telephone rings and a voice at the other end whispers a curious message, “several of us were put here as prisoners at the Mushroom Valley farmhouse by DeWet.  We are locked in this room with the telephone.  The general and his staff are just in front of the house.  He intends camping here until tomorrow.  I can say no more for fear of being discovered and shot.  Please tell General Botha”.  Although DeWet is, in fact, leaning against a telephone pole at the time, it never occurs to him that his prisoners can simply pick up the telephone and call for help.  Botha at once heliographs to two of his generals on his flank and sets off with his horsemen for Mushroom Valley, about sixty miles northeast of Bloemfontein.  Lieutenant Colonel Maritz is driven from South African into German territory.

A BE2a of 4th Squadron is shot down by British rifle fire over Poperinghe from 1,000 feet.  The crew of Lieutenant Cyril Gordon Hosking age 24 and Captain Theodore Crean are both killed. Though the aircraft has an ensign on both wings, this does not save the crew. The Red Cross at the center of the ensign dominated its pattern from a distance and it is likely they are mistaken for German crosses. These fatalities hasten the adoption of a form of the French cockade for the British in which the colors are swapped. Lieutenant Hosking’s brother will be killed in February 1917 in Mesopotamia.

Lieutenant Alastair Roderick MacLeod (Royal Field Artillery) is serving as an observer when he is captured by the 104th Saxon Regiment which will be overrun four hours later and he will rejoin his unit.  He will be killed on the first day of the invasion of Gallipoli.

Today’s casualties include:

  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons
  • Families that will lose a third son, having lost two in the South African War
  • A member of the Hampshire Constabulary
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Son and a grandson of Generals
  • Multiple sons of Justice’s of the Peace and a grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Great nephew of the former Lieutenant Governor of Bengal
  • Son of the Commissioner of the Police in Bombay
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Multiple sons of clergy and the grandson of clergy
  • A man whose nephew will be killed later in the war
  • The grandson of both the Earl of Galloway and great grandson of the Duke of Beaufort
  • Aide de campe to the former Governor of Northern Nigeria and British East Africa
  • Great grandson of an Admiral
  • Great grandson of the 8th Earl of Leven
  • Great grandson of the 7th Earl of Melville
  • An ancestor of James Dormer who served under Marlborough at Blenheim, Mons,Leige and Namur

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Charles Francis Nunneley (Northumberland Fusiliers attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Barham Nunneley, a member of the Royal and Ancient St Andrews Golf Club and an avid photographer of churches, cathedrals, ministers and Abbey’s throughout England, many pictures being published in the books of Francis Bond. His wife is the niece of the ‘Honorable’ John Mansfield and his brother will be killed in March 1918.

  •  Captain Frank Stanley Day Rose (Hussars) the 2nd Baronet is killed in action at age 37 by a shell. He served alongside his four brothers in the South African War, one of which was killed another of which died during that campaign. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Day Rose, the 1st Baronet who was Liberal and Free Trade Member of Parliament for New Market from 1903-1910 and 1911 to 1913 and Chairman of the Royal Automobile Club in 1907 & 1908. He is the Grandson of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ John Rose PC GCMG and his daughter will be born next June.
  • Captain Evan Nanney Jones-Vaughan(Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.  He is the son of Major General Hugh Jones-Vaughan and he has a brother who will die while on active service after the Armistice in November 1918. He is also the cousin of ‘Sir’ Hugh Nanney.
  • Captain Loscombe Law Stable(Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. He is the son of Daniel Wintringham Stable JP and great nephew of ‘Sir’ Frederick Halliday KCB Lieutenant Governor of Bengal.
  • Captain Myles Lonsdale Formby (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at Neuve Chapelle at age 39. He is the son of Myles Lonsdale Formby DL JP and his brother will be killed in February 1917.
  • Captain Edmund Hastings Harcourt Lees (Border Regiment) is killed at age 38. He was wounded in the South African War and is a grandson of the Reverend John and Lady Louisa Lees.
  • Captain Arthur Cecil Beeman (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 45. He served in the South African War 1900-02 and his nephew will be killed in September 1918.
  • Lieutenant Philip Van Neck(Grenadier Guards) is killed in action at Kriesick near Ypres at age 27. His brother was killed six days earlier.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Randolph Turnor (Hussars) is killed at age 28. He is the grandson of the 9th Earl of Galloway and great grandson of the 6th Duke of Beaufort.
  • Lieutenant St John Alan Charlton (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at Aisne at age 24. He is the grandson of Lady Florentia Hughes.
  • Lieutenant Charles John Murray (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 32. He is a relative of the Earl of Mansfield and ‘Sir’ Robert D Moncrieffe. He served in the South African War and was Aide de Campe to ‘Sir’ Percy Girouard when he served as the Governor of Northern Nigeria and British East Africa from 1907-11.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Roger John Tomlinson (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed by a shell at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Roger Tomlinson Rector of St Michael Penkeveil and Victor of Bolton-le-Sands Carnforth Lancashire. He is the nephew of ‘Sir’ W E Tomlinson Baronet and great grandson of Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ W Symonds.
  • Lieutenant Clement Cottrell-Dormer(Scots Guards) is killed at at Kruiseik at age 23. His brother will be killed in action in February 1915.  They are great grandsons of the 8th Earl of Leven and the 7th Earl of Melville and ancestors of ‘Sir’ Michael Mormer Lord Mayor of London in 1541 and James Dormer who served under Marlborough at Blenheim, Mons, Leige and Namur.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Randolph Turner (Hussars) is killed at age 28. He is the son of Lady Henrietta Turner.
  • Lieutenant and Assistant Adjutant Philip Templer Furneaux (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at aged 25. He is the only son of the Reverend Walter Coppleston Furneaux Vicar of Dean Bedfordshire formerly Chaplain to the King’s Regiment.
  • Lieutenant John Greville Hobart Bird (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25 at Ypres attempting to rescue one of his men who was wounded. He is the grandson of Alderman Maycock JP former Mayor of Coventry.
  • Lieutenant Charles Geoffrey Hume (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Lieutenant James Francis Hewitt(Cameronians) is killed at age 26 twelve days after his brother has suffered the same fate. They are sons of ‘the Honorable’ William James Hewitt.
  • Lieutenant Richard Herbert Phayre(Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 24.  His brother was killed in the opening days of the Great War. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel Richard Phayre JP DL and grandsons of General ‘Sir’ Robert Phayre GCB.
  • Second Lieutenant Barry Maynard Rynd Denny(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 29.  He is the son of the Reverend Edward Denny, Rector of Codford Street.
  • Second Lieutenant Jack Maynard Harding (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. His father Lieutenant Colonel Maynard Ffolliott Harding is currently commanding 69th
  • Sergeant Ernest George Eden (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 28. His brother will die of wounds in March 1915.
  • Sergeant Don S Reid(Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at Armentiers.  He is the son of the Reverend William Reid.
  • Corporal Thomas Constable (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the first of four brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Nelson Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in less than three weeks.
  • Private George Palmer(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 19. His brother will die of wounds in September 1917.
  • Private Albert Victor Newnham (Sussex Regiment) dies of wounds in Paris received on the Aisne at age 20. His two brothers will be killed serving the Royal Navy on HMS Tiger at Jutland and in the explosion of HMS Vanguard in 1917.
  • Private William McPherson (Scots Guards) is killed at age 30. He served in the South African War with the Royal Scots and was most recently a member of the Hampshire Constabulary.
  • Private Oliver Robert Thomas (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of wounds in August 1917.
  • Private Harry Prunnell (Border Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in September 1917.

photo from wikipedia.org

Wednesday 7 October 1914 – We Lost 68

Irish Guards Cap Badge

Irish Guards Cap Badge

The 7th Division disembarks at Zeebrugge while Sixth Squadron Royal Flying Corps proceeds to Ostend.  Lieutenant Joseph Leslie Dent (South Staffordshire Regiment) locates an enemy trench by daring scouting at night subsequently rushing it with two sections and driving the enemy away.  He will be killed in April 1917.

The Admiralty sends the following message to Admiral Cradock, “It appears that Scharnhorst and Gneisenau are working across to South America. You must be prepared to meet them in company, possibly with a ‘Dresden’ scouting for them. Canopus should accompany Glasgow, Monmouth and Otranto, the ships to search and protect trade in combination. If you propose Good Hope to go, leave Monmouth on the east coast.”

At approximately 05:30 an expedition under the command of Brigadier General Edmund Howard Gorges sets off towards Yabassi on the Wuri River.  Lieutenant Commander Bertram Thomas Carlyle Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford, Captain of HMS Challenger, commands a naval contingent of one hundred seaman and marines with two six-inch naval guns and one twelve-pound field gun. Commander Freeman-Mitford’s brother will be killed in May 1915 serving in the Hussars and his son will be killed in Burma in March 1945.  The soldiers under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Edward Vaughan of the West Africa Regiment, include six companies of the 1st Nigeria Regiment, the Pioneer Company of the Gold Coast Regiment and about six hundred carriers. There is also a battery of four mountain guns. This little expedition is stowed into a variety of river craft that includes a dredger, six steam launches of various sizes, a steam tug, a stern wheeler, eight surf boats, eight steel lighters, two one-hundred foot motor launches, a motor pinnace and HMS Cumberland’s picket boat. One of the six inch guns is mounted on the dredger and the other on one of the steel lighters, which the sailors mockingly christen Dreadnought.  The two become, in effect, river monitors.  As the flotilla sails up the Wuri, nothing is seen for miles on the river’s banks but tangles of dense bush and tall elephant grass. Then just at sunset at a place called Nsake Hill, about ten miles below Yabassi, the flotilla is fired upon. The British mountain guns quickly silence the fire and a company from the West Africa Regiment is landed and occupies Nsake; other troops are put ashore on the opposite bank and the flotilla anchors for the night in midstream.

Four hundred eighty Germans with 6 machine guns attack Gazi but are beaten off by 850 British who also have 6 machine guns. The British suffer 10 casualties.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • An original officer of the Irish Guards when formed in 1900
  • A man whose second child will be born Christmas Eve

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant George Brooke (Irish Guards) dies of wounds received two days prior at age 37.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Brooke, the 1st Baronet. He is an original officer of the Irish Guards when the Regiment was raised in 1900 and a great nephew of ‘Sir’ Charles Shakerley Baronet. He is the son-in-law of the Right Honorable Lord Arthur Hill PC.

  •  Captain Reginald John Petty Devenish Aldridge (Sussex Regiment) is killed by a bursting shell at age 37. He is the son of Reginald Aldridge JP and the son-in-law of the Reverend J Padmore Noble Vicar of Childs Ercall Market Drayton. His second child and only son will be born on 24 December.
  • Second Lieutenant William Robert Launcelot Calrow (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the great grandson of William Calrow JP DL.

Tuesday 22 September 1914 – We Lost 1,582

HMS Aboukir

HMS Aboukir

While patrolling the Broad Fourteens, latitude 52.18 north, longitude 3.41 east, off the Dutch coast, the cruiser HMS Aboukir is torpedoed by the submarine U9. The two cruisers in company, HMS Hogue and HMS Cressy, are ordered to close to their sinking sister ship to pick up survivors.  As they stop, they too are torpedoed by U9. All three Bacchante class cruisers go to the bottom, taking 1,459 men with them while 837 are rescued.  The ships lost are insignificant, as they are obsolete; though the event is made more tragic by the fact that the majority of the crews are naval reservists. The Hogue is sunk by two torpedoes fired from a range of only three hundred yards, so close that the submarine has to execute swift maneuvers to avoid a collision with the sinking ship.

SMS Emden bombs the harbor at Madras. She hits four storage tanks containing 346,000 gallons of kerosene.  Moored at a buoy in the harbor is SS Chupra (Captain W C Morrison). A stray shell hits the bunker hatch on the boat deck at the starboard side and explodes. Cadet Joseph Saul Fletcher, age 17 receives many wounds and dies almost instantly.  This is the only fatal casualty inflicted by Emden on a Merchant Mariner during her cruise. Sub Lieutenant Bonstead of the Fort St. George battery rallies his men and manages to organize the firing of nine shells from her elderly guns, none of which find their target. The material effect of Emden’s bombardment is little when compared to the psychological. For days afterwards the trains going inland are crowded with people anxious to place themselves out of range of the shells of the “mystery ship” not only at Madras but also all along the coast.

Private George Ward (Berkshire Regiment) reports back to his battalion, having left eight days earlier claiming to be wounded. He has not been wounded and is court martialed for cowardice. Ward is shot on the recommendation of his corps commander, General ‘Sir’ Douglas Haig, to act as an example to others. Ward’s execution is in fact botched. As he is being taken out to be shot he breaks away from the guard and is shot in the back. He is then brought back on a stretcher and shot in the head by the sergeant of the guard to “finish him off”.

The Royal Naval Air Service carries out the first two British air raids of the war against German soil.  Two aircraft each set out to attack the Zeppelin sheds at Dusseldorf and Cologne. Only Lieutenant Charles Herbert Collet reaches his target, the Dusseldorf airship shed. He drops four bombs, only one of which explodes, inflicting little damage. He later states that “the surprise was complete and numerous Germans in the vicinity ran in all directions”.  All four return safely to their base.  Collet will later be killed on 19 August 1915 while serving at Gallipoli.

Lieutenant Gilbert William Mapplebeck (Royal Flying Corps), exchanges shots with an Albatross two-seater while on a kite balloon bombing mission.  He is wounded in the leg thus becoming the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to be wounded by fire from an enemy aircraft in the Great War.  He will be accidentally killed in August 1915. The airship Beta flies over London to see if Zeppelins can locate targets in foggy weather conditions. The results are inconclusive.

Today’s casualties include:

  • A member of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s last Antarctic expedition
  • Families that will lose sons
    • Multiple of examples of families that will lose two and three sons
    • Two families that will lose four sons
    • A family that will lose five sons
  • A man whose wife’s first husband was killed in the South African War
  • A Royal Marine whose son will be killed as a 14-year old bugler in the Royal Marines
  • Thirteen young naval Midshipmen
  • Brothers who are killed on the same day, one at sea in the Naval battle and one in the Army on the Western Front
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Two men whose sons will be born after their fathers deaths
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of clergy
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of the 8th Earl of Shaftesbury
  • Son of an Admiral and a son of a General
  • A holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving

Today’s casualties of the day

Lieutenant Oscar William Tottie serving on HMS Aboukir is killed in the sinking at age 22.  His brother Lieutenant Eric Harold Tottie is killed in action as a Lieutenant in the Northumberland Fusiliers during the Battle of the Aisne in France at age 19. These two brothers die on the same day but in very different places. They are sons of W H and Mary Barron Tottie (nee Blake, grand-daughter of Commodore Blake, U S Navy) of Sherlocks, Ascot, Berkshire.

HMS Aboukir casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Commander Thomas Edmund Harrisonis killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in the explosion of HMS Natal in December 1915.  The Engineer Commander on HMS Aboukir is Alfred Everitt Everitt and he is killed.  He is the son of the Reverend William Everitt.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey George Gore-Browne dies at age 15; he is the grandson of Colonel H G Gore-Browne VC DL JP who won his Victoria Cross at Lucknow. He had been the Chief Cadet Captain at the Royal Naval College, Osborne earlier this year.
  • Midshipman Alan Diarmid Campbell Robertson is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Bruce Barchard is killed at age 15
  • Midshipman Herbert Lawson Riley is killed at age 15
  • Midshipman John Duncan Stubbs is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Anthony Victor George Allsopp age 15 the son of the late Honorable George Higginson Allsopp MP and Lady Mildred Allsopp, the third daughter of the 8th Earl of Shaftesbury.
  • Chaplain Edward Gleadall Uphill Robsonis killed at age 32.
  • Cook’s Mate 2nd Class Edward Milleris killed at age 20.  His brother will be killed in action in May 1918 while serving in the Bedfordshire Regiment.
  • Private James Prior (Royal Marines) becomes the first of five brothers to lose their lives in the Great War. A sixth brother was killed while serving in the Royal Marines in 1912 in the accidental explosion of a gun during exercises on HMS King Edward VII.
  • Leading Stoker John Robert Fendley is killed. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak three days after the Armistice while serving in the Army Cyclist Corps.
  • Stoker 1st Class Lenham Yates dies at age 21. His brother will be killed next March in France.
  • Able Seaman Charles Tulloch Finlayson is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed on the merchant ship Vineyard in November 1916.
  • Able Seaman William Pointer is killed at age 29. His brother will be lost in the sinking of Royal Edward next year.
  • Able Seaman Sidney Thomas Claw is killed at age 34. His nephew will be killed in the loss of HMS Clan McNaughton next February.

The Cressy’s casualties include:

  • Captain Robert Warren Johnson who is killed at age 47. He is the son of Vice Admiral John Ormsby Johnson.
  • Lieutenant Commander Walter Bousfield Watkins Grubb is lost at age 35. His only child a son will be born next year.
  • Lieutenant Commander Bernard Matheson Harvey is last seen helping his men to keep afloat. He was the son of the Honorable Augustus Harvey.
  • Midshipman Claude Phillipe Delmege is killed. He is the son of the Deputy Inspector General of the Royal Navy.
  • Midshipman John Aubrey Froudeis killed at age 16.  He is the only son of Ashley Froude CMG and the grandson of James Anthony Froude, late Regius Professor of Modern History Oxford University.
  • Midshipman Frank George Matthewsis also killed at age 16.  He is the son of Brigadier General F B Matthews CB DSO.
  • Midshipman Vernon Hector Crobyn is killed at age 16.
  • Stoker 1st Class Frank Herbert Browning age 21 is one of seven sons who serve, four of whom are killed.
  • Able Seaman Alfred Augustus Dunk age 32. He was awarded the Medal for life saving by the King at the wreck of ‘Delhi’.
  • Able Seaman Arthur Chestney is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman Coulson Henry Crascall is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Seaman Robert John Ladd is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next June serving in the East Kent Regiment.
  • Stoker 1st Class William Burgess is killed at age 18. He is the first of four sons of Thomas and Mary Ann Burgess who will die as a result of war service.
  • Able Seaman William James Frederick is killed. He is a holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for life saving.
  • Leading Cook’s Mate Walter Charles Nelson Hall is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1916.

The casualties on HMS Hogue include:

  • Lieutenant Commander Henry Edward de Parny Rennick (HMS Hogue) who was a member of Captain Scott’s last expedition and during the voyage of the Terra Nova and was charge of tracking the depth soundings.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Charles Harold is killed at age 15. His brother will be killed in 1918.
  • Midshipman Harold Henshaw Ward is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Cecil William Holt is killed at age 15. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Petty Officer 1st Class George William Emptage is killed at age 39. His wife’s first husband was killed in the South African War.
  • Ship’s Chief Cook William Neill is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the Messina Medal.
  • Able Seaman Albert Edward Beaney is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in 5 weeks when his ship HMS Falcon is shelled off the Belgian coast.
  • Private John Llewellyn Timmins (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 45. His son will be killed on HMS Cardiff in November 1917 as a fourteen year old bugler.
  • Stoker 1st Class William Charles Harris is lost at age 27. His brother was killed five days before.

Others lost today include:

  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Cusack Forsyth (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Gilliat Meautys(West Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25.  He is the son of Thomas Arrowsmith Meautys JP and his only son will be born in April 1915 and will die on service shortly after the end of World War II at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed in action in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Machin (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 22. His is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the war.

photo – wikipedia.org

Friday 18 September 1914 – We Lost 130

Lieutenant Herbert Musgrave (Royal Flying Corps) carries out the first experiments with dropping bombs from the air. One bomb is dropped, it explodes, but not exactly where or how it was expected to explode. Lieutenant Musgrave will be killed in action serving in the Royal Engineers in June 1918 at age 42.

South African forces occupy Luderitz Bay in South West Africa, which the Germans have evacuated militarily on 10 August.

The German cruiser Dresden comes upon the freighter Ortega, bound from Valparaiso to Europe.  The Germans fire two blank shells across her bow, but instead of surrendering, Captain Douglas Kinnier takes the Ortega at full speed into the uncharted Nelson Strait aware that the cruiser will not follow, due to the Straits uncharted nature. For his bravery Kinnier will be given a temporary commission in the Royal Naval Reserve so that he can be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. His son will be killed in September 1916 while serving as a private in the Saskatchewan Regiment.

Today’s losses include: 

  • Assistant Director of Medical Service Royal Army Medical Corps who was also:
    • A Royal Humane Society Medal winner for life saving
    • A member of the Pembroke Rowing Club
    • President of the Monkstown Rugby Football Club
    • An Arnott Gold Medal for gallantry holder
    • A man whose letters home will be published after the war as Journal of the R.A.M.C
  • Honorary Secretary of the Canterbury (NZ) Society of Arts
  • Member of the Wes Sussex Constabulary
  • The first son of a family that will lose another son in the war

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dalton (Assistant Director of Medical Services with the Staff of the 2nd Division, Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed as a result of being hit by a shell fragment in the spine, while carrying wounded men to Verneuil Chateau at age 47. He is the son of John Edward Dalton and was awarded a Silver Medal 1st Class by the French Government and the Gold Medal by the Royal Humane Society for saving lives at sea during the sinking of RMS Cotopaxi in 1889 when he was acting as the ship’s surgeon. He is a member of the Pembroke Rowing Club and player and President at the time of his death of the Monkstown Football Club. He also saved the life of Lieutenant Craig-Brown in India in 1898. He was wounded during the South African War and was the first winner of the Arnott Gold Medal for gallantry distinguished in the field by the Irish Medical School and Graduates Association. His letters home will be published next January under the title “Journal of the R.A.M.C”.

  • Lieutenant Oliver Dunham Melville Garsia (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 28. He is the Honorary Secretary of the Canterbury (NZ) Society of Arts. His elder brother was killed in India serving in the Durham Light Infantry.
  • Corporal Stephen Hickmott (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private James William Cudby(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 26.  He was a member of the West Sussex Constabulary and the first of twenty-two members of that force killed in the Great War.

Tuesday 15 September 1914 – We Lost 318 (Plus 1)

Seal Chart murder

The British Expeditionary Force begins building trenches on the Western Front.

Bombardier Ernest George Horlock (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry near Vendressse. When his battery is in action under a heavy shellfire in that although twice wounded he persists on each occasion in returning to lay his gun after his wounds have been dressed.  He will be killed in the sinking of the troopship Aragon in December 1917.

Lieutenant George Frederick Prettyman (Royal Flying Corps) carries out the first ever photo reconnaissance flight, exposing five plates over Belgium.

A South African rebellion against the Allied cause begins. The rebels meet at Potchestroom. Lieutenant Colonel Maritz who is in command of the troops set to invade German Southwest Africa refuses General Smuts summons to Pretoria and will resign in ten days.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Baron
  • First son to lose his life of a family that will lose two sons
  • Son and son-in-law of clergy
  • A man whose daughter will be born next January
  • A man who will be in the first class of Military Cross winners when they are awarded in January
  • Nephew of the novelist ‘Sir’ Henry Rider Haggard creator of the character Allan Quartermain

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Major Charles Elmhirst Luard DSO (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 38. His brother died on service in 1903 of fever in Africa and they are the only sons of Major General Charles Edward Luard who committed suicide by jumping in front of a train less than one month after his wife was murdered in late August 1908. The murder of his mother was never solved and is known as the “Seal Chart Murder” and his father received many accusations that he was the murderer before his suicide. He is the son-in-law of Major William Barrett JP DL and he was wounded in the Ashanti campaign of 1900.

  •  Major John Trefusis Carpenter-Garnier(Scots Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 40. He is the son of Mr. John T Carpenter-Garnier JP DL MP and the ‘Honorable’ Mrs. Mary Louisa Carpenter-Garnier and the grandson of the 19th Baron Clinton. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Bertram Noel Denison(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 30. He is the son of Admiral John Denison. He served in South Africa in the Royal Naval Division.
  • Captain Mark Haggard(Welsh Regiment) dies of the wounds he received the previous day at age 38.  He is the nephew of a well-known novelist ‘Sir’ Henry Rider-Haggard and ‘Sir” W D Haggard. He served in the South Africa War.
  • Lieutenant John Rudolph Wissman (Royal Field Artillery) a German interpreter is killed at age 23. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Worthington Jukes Rector of Shobrooke near Credition and his daughter will be born on 9th January 1915.
  • Lieutenant Frederic Hornby Lever Rushton (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is among the first 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross on 1st January 1915.
  • Lance Sergeant Leonard Henry Russell Gray (Ceylon Planters Rifle Corps) dies on service at age 21 in Ceylon. He is the son of the Reverend A W Gray.
  • Corporal C E Neill (Black Watch) is killed at age 23. His brother will also lose his life in the Great War.

The Plus 1

  • Eduard von Lutchken killed at age 31. He is a German equestrian rider who as  a member of the 1912 Olympic team for his country won a silver medal in the team event.

Photo from wikipedia.org

Sunday 13 September 1914 – We Lost 167

Submarine E9 (Max Horton)

Submarine E9 (Max Horton)

E9 becomes the first British submarine to sink an enemy warship in action at sea when it torpedoes the German cruiser Hela off Heligoland. Following the introduction of submarines in several navies, Admiral Sir Arthur Wilson, the First Sea Lord of the British Royal Navy in 1902, stated that submarines were “underhanded, unfair, and damned un English” and that he would convince the British Admiralty to have the crews of enemy submarines captured during wartime be hanged as pirates. Remembering Wilson’s statements, commanding officer Max Horton instructed his submariners to manufacture a Jolly Roger, which was flown from the submarine as she entered port. Each successful patrol will see Horton’s submarine fly an additional Jolly Roger until there was no more room for flags, at which point Horton had a large Jolly Roger manufactured, onto which symbols indicating E9’s achievements were sewn

The British Army is advancing north from the Marne, with the intention of crossing the Aisne. The Aisne is both a river and a canal, and at the village of Bourg, it is intersected by the Oise-Aisne canal as well.  Before Bourg is the 4th Dragoon Guards. Here there are three bridges that cross the two canals and the river. Advanced patrols note that the two canal bridges are intact, but that the road bridge over the Aisne River has been blown. A plan is made to seize the two canal bridges, and the aqueduct, which will allow a passage into Bourg itself. The area is held by German infantry, supported by machine-guns at key points on the bridges.

The commanding officer meets with his men on the south side of the Aisne canal and orders a charge on the outposts that guards the first bridge. His men are already coming under fire from Bourg, which sits on a high point, but the charge takes the Aisne canal bridge quickly. A machine gun from a building on the other side of the Aisne-Oise canal is laying down heavy fire, and the Dragoon Guards are also taking fire from a second gun on the aqueduct. At this point up rides Captain Gerald Hugh Fitzgerald, the Dragoon’s machine gun officer, dismounts his guns and soon silences the German fire. This enables the infantry to move up, cross the bridges and use the aqueduct to cross the river and enter Bourg. At this point a shot rings out from the church tower in Bourg; and Captain Fitzgerald is shot between the eyes.

Troops of the 11th Brigade, 4th Division, III Corps – the left most unit of the British Army on the Western Front cross the partially destroyed bridge at Venizel in the early morning hours.  On the Aisne, the fledgling Wireless Flight of 4th Squadron Royal Flying Corps is used effectively for the first time, gaining notoriety for their work above the battle of Aisne.  Lieutenants Donald Swain Lewis and Baron Trevenen James in their BE2a’s are the first airmen to observe for the artillery, a completely novel aspect of army cooperation work.  Within two years both men, members of the Royal Engineers attached to the Royal Flying Corps will be killed in action.

 Today’s losses include:

  • A man who will be in the first group awarded the newly created Military Cross which will be announced on 1 January 1915
  • Grandson of the Duke of Leinster
  • A son and grandson of clergy
  • Sons of Generals
  • Man who lost a brother in the South African War

 Today’s highlighted casualty

Sergeant Major Norman Henry MacWhinnie MC (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 37. He will be one of the first 99 to be awarded the new Military Cross announced 1 January 1915.

  •  Captain Gerald Hugh Fitzgerald of the Dragoon Guards is killed at age 28. He is the only son of the late Lord Maurice and Lady Fitzgerald of Johnstown Castle and a grandson of the 4th Duke of Leinster and the 7th Earl of Granard KP.
  • Captain Harry Stanley Toppin(Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the late Major General James Morris Toppin, is a French Interpreter and served in Egypt in 1898 and the South African War. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Lieutenant Horatio John Vicat (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Lieutenant Archibald John Denroche-Smith (Hussars) is killed at age 23. He is the son of General John Bayly CB.
  • Second Lieutenant Ingle Francis Rowley Miller (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war received 26th August at age 21. He is the grandson of the Reverend Alexander Rawley Miller and his brother Lieutenant Alexander Rawley Miller was killed in the South African War.

photo britsub.zxq.net

Wednesday 9 September 1914 – We Lost 106 (Plus 1)

The British Naval Mission to Turkey is withdrawn.

Maurice Farman Shorthorn

Maurice Farman Shorthorn

The Allied counter attack from the west finally stops the German advance on the Western Front. British forces move forward with tremendous determination, crucially aided by the detailed intelligence proved by the Royal Flying Corps. The remaining “C” flight of 4th Squadron arrives in France.  Its Maurice Farman Shorthorns are fitted with machine guns making them the first armed British machines to arrive in France.  In the area of the Nogent the Royal Artillery fire on British cavalry wounding eighteen.

Captain Douglas Reynolds (Royal Field Artillery) reconnoiters German positions at Pisseloup, discovers a battery holding up the advance and silences it. This action along with one performed on 26th August will win him the Victoria Cross.

At 03:00 the siege of Abercorn is reinforced by one hundred men under Major H M Sennett, who comes up by forced marches, covering ninety-nine miles in seventy-two hours. Three hours later the Germans launch an all-out attack, which is repulsed.

Today’s losses include

  • Son of clergy
  • Son of a father of will die on service during the war
  • The son in a family that will lose another son this month

 Today’s highlighted casualty

 Among those killed at Abercorn is Lieutenant John Leslie Caldecott (Royal Garrison Artillery) at age 28.  He is the son of the Reverend Andrew Caldecott Rector of West Chiltington and the Aide de Camp to the Governor of Nyasaland.

  • Private Arthur Jordan (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. His father will die on service in July 1918 in Mesopotamia.
  • Private Sidney Perkins Rooth (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in fifteen days.

The Plus 1 

  • Carl Heinrich Gobler age 29 the coxswain for the Germania Ruder Club Hamburg which won the Gold Medal in the Coxed fours at the 1900 Olympics. He was the youngest participant in those Olympic games.

Monday 7 September 1914 – We Lost 34

BE8

A single BE8 flown by Lieutenant Victor Somerset Erskine Lindop (Royal Flying Corps) is burned near Signy, the pilot becoming the first Royal Flying Corps prisoner of the war. His brother Captain Eugene Lancelot Erskine Linop (Dogras) will be killed in January 1918.

During their march north to cross the Marne River the Irish Guards come under heavy machine gun fire from Boitron Wood. The Guards charge the guns and capture the entire German machine gun company of six guns, three officers and ninety men.  These are the first prisoners taken by the Irish Guards in the Great War.

Today’s highlighted loss is a Baronet

Second Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Gawaine George Stuart Baillie (Dragoons) dies of wounds received in action at age 21.  He is the 5th Baronet and son of ‘Sir’ Robert Baillie, the 4th Baronet.

photo from Wikipedia.org