Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Horse Guards

Sunday 16 July 1916 – We Lost 950

Lionel Martineau Lupton

Lionel Martineau Lupton

Captain Ernest Cowper Slade (Gloucestershire Regiment) organizes with great skill bombing attacks in order to reach two companies which are isolated in a trench further north.  Tomorrow he will be buried twice by shells but will dig himself out and carry on as if nothing has happened.  He will be killed on 4th May 1918.

Today’s losses include:

  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A polo player
  • The son-in-law of the 5th Earl of Donoughmore
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A great great uncle of Kate Middleton
  • A son of the Sheriff Substitute of Lanarkshire
  • A military chaplain
  • A family that will lose five sons
  • The former Mayor of Mulgoa, Wales

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel William Digby Oswald DSO (Dragoon Guards commanding 13th West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 36.
  • Temporary Colonel ‘Sir’ Victor Alexander Haden Horsley CB (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies in Mesopotamia at age 59. His son will be accidentally killed in August 1918 serving in the Royal Air Force.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Harold Ernest Brassey (Royal Horse Guards commanding 8th South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is a well known polo player and the son-in-law of the 5th Earl of Donoughmore of Knocklofty and has a nephew who will be killed in August 1918.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Carroll Charles MacNamara (commanding 1st Royal Irish Rifles) is killed at age 41.
  • Captain Herbert Philip Deedes (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Philip Deedes Rector of Little Parndon.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Eyre Barton (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Lieutenant Harold Reginald Morris Christie (Cameronians) is killed at age 29. A creek in the North Thompson Valley of British Columbia is named in his honor.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Martineau Lupton (Royal Field Artillery) is killed by a shell at age 24. His two brothers will also be killed in the Great War. Their great great niece Kate Middleton will become the fiancée of Prince William of Wales.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick James Hawker (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 26. His brother will die during the Great Influenza outbreak in December 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Matthew Rankin Monteith (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 20. His brother Second Lieutenant Patrick (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) will be killed in November of this year at age 27.
  • Second Lieutenant Gilbert Fyfe (Highland Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 18. He is the son of the Sheriff Substitute of Lanarkshire and has a brother who will be killed in August 1918 at age 25.
  • Second Lieutenant John Lecky (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Alexander Gourlay Lecky.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Robert Miles (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 48. He is the son of the Reverend Philip Edward Miles Rector of Odstock.
  • Second Lieutenant John Hector Rouquette (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His brother will die in Egypt four days after the Armistice during the influenza outbreak.
  • Chaplain the Reverend J A Hartigan dies on service in Mesopotamia at age 33.
  • Company Sergeant Major John Buchan Cranston (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34. He is one of five brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Corporal Bertram Robert Newberry (Hertfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 24. He is the first of three brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Gunner William Coldham Lawrence (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds received in action at age 28. His brother will die in October 1918.
  • Lieutenant Richard Henry Beindge Baynes (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of long serving alderman with the Municipality of Mulgoa, Wales, serving as mayor from 1909-1912.
  • Private Tom Atkiss (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Gideon James Vincent (Sussex Regiments) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private George Stokes (Cheshire Regiment) dies of fever in Mesopotamia at age 20. His brother was killed in May 1915.

Wednesday 19 May 1915 – We Lost 587

The Man with his Donkey

The Man with the Donkey

At 03:30 over 42,000 Turkish soldiers launch a last desperate all-out attack on the invaders at ANZAC in an attempt to drive them back into the sea.  The Turks are caught out in the open, exposed to the murderous machine gun and artillery. They suffer 3,000 killed and over 10,000 wounded in these attacks over open ground.  The one sided battle lingers on until around midday before finally being halted. The ANZACs suffer 168 killed during the attacks.

At Courtney’s Post, a section of trench that has been captured from the Turks, Lieutenant Keith George Wallace Crabbe (Australian Infantry) seeks four volunteers to cover Lance Corporal Albert Jacka’s actions that will win him the Victoria Cross. These four volunteers, including Private Francis Edward Poliness, make a heroic bayonet charge from a concealed communications trench.  When this fails, Poliness’s party throws two bombs creating a smoke screen for Jacka to launch a successful individual rear assault.  Poliness himself shoots two Turks attempting to crawl over the parapet.

The age limit for recruits is fixed at 40.

Today’s losses include:

  • The Man with the Donkey
  • A battalion commander
  • The son-in-law of the 2nd Baron Raglan
  • The son of a General
  • A football player for South Melbourne
  • The son of the 8th Chief Justice of New South Wales
  • Viscount Wendover
  • Son of the 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire
  • A holder of the Humane Society’s Bronze Medal for life saving
  • The Headmaster at Milton-of-Campsie School
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A family that will lose three sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Private John Simpson Kirkpatrick (3rd Field Ambulance, Australian Army Medical Corps) is killed in action at age 22. He had enlisted as Simpson because he had deserted from the Mercantile Marine and feared being rejected. He was the “Man with the Donkey” at Gallipoli where as a stretcher-bearer he rescued many men while leading his donkey down Monash Valley in only twenty-four days

After landing at Anzac Cove on 25th April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He continued this work for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he is killed. Kirkpatrick is one of the best known soldiers of the Australian Imperial Force. However, like many members of the AIF, he had been born in the UK; at South Shields, County Durham, England to a Scottish couple, who had moved to England in 1886. On 25th August 1914, in Perth, Western Australia, he joined the AIF and the Australian Army Medical Corps, under the name of “John Simpson”, as a stretcher bearer. He was given the service number of 202 and underwent basic training at Blackboy Hill Camp. He was assigned to C Squadron, 3rd Field Ambulance. The 3rd Field Ambulance travelled to Gallipoli with the Australian 3rd Brigade aboard HMT Devanha and transferred to her lifeboats via Royal Navy destroyer HMS Ribble which then towed them towards the beach for the landing. The 3rd Brigade was the first ANZAC unit ashore. Kirkpatrick was the only member of his bearer section of four to reach the beach unscathed. Kirkpatrick found a donkey, which he named variously “Duffy”, “Murphy” and “Abdul”, that had been landed by a field artillery unit, and began operating independently. Accounts vary as to whether he had received official approval for this practice at the time. Leading this donkey, he began his journeys from the beach, up “Shrapnel Gully” and “Monash Valley”. On his way up he would carry water, on the way back wounded, particularly those with leg wounds. At night he camps with an Indian Army field ambulance unit, near the beach.

This morning after a major attack has been repulsed, Kirkpatrick begins his usual routine. He is returning down Monash Valley with two wounded men, when they come under machine gun fire near “Steele’s Post”. The three men were killed, Kirkpatrick being hit in the heart.  He will be mentioned in despatches for “gallant and distinguished service in the field”.  There is a case for Simpson being awarded a Victoria Cross based on diary entries by his Commanding Officer that express the hope he would receive either a Distinguished Conduct Medal or Victoria Cross. However this officer never makes a formal recommendation for either of these medals.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Wilfrid Robert Abel Smith CMG (commanding 2nd Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 44. He is the son-in-law of the 2nd Baron Raglan.
  • Captain and Adjutant Gordon Townshend Wallack (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at Lone Pine on Gallipoli at age 29. He is the son of Major General Ernest T Wallack.
  • Lieutenant James Anderson Kerr Johnston (Australian Imperial Forces) dies of wounds in Cairo received in action at Gallipoli at age 31. He is a football player with the South Melbourne Club.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Whistler Street (Australian Infantry) is killed at Johnston’s Jolly at age 21. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Mr. Justice Philip Whistler Street the 8th Chief Justice of New South Wales and the brother of ‘Sir” Kenneth Whistler Street the 10th Chief Justice of New South Wales.
  • Temporary Lieutenant ‘Lord’ Albert Edward Samuel Charles Robert Wynn-Carrington (Royal Horse Guards) dies of wounds at age 20. He is the Viscount Wendover and the only son of the 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire KG.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Fuller Stocker (Royal Engineers) is killed by a sniper at age 20. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Second Lieutenant Sydney William Paine (New Zealand Engineers) is killed at Quinn’s Post at age 24. He is a holder of the Humane Society Bronze Medal.
  • Sergeant William Murray Smith (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 48. He is traveling to see his wounded son who will be killed in action in June 1916. The elder Smith is the Headmaster at Milton-of-Campsie School.
  • Private Alfred Ernest Vile (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 21 three weeks after his older brother was killed. His epitaph reads: “God Have Mercy on His Soul and Let Perpetual Light Shine Upon Him”.
  • Private David Purdie Clement (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 22. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Trooper James Dilworth Bradley Mossman (Auckland Mounted Rifles) is killed at age 21. His brother died of pneumonia in Egypt before the Gallipoli landing.
  • Private Thomas Alfred Atwill (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 40. His two younger brothers will be killed later in the war, the first next August and the second in January 1917.
  • Private William Ernest Waterfield (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next May.

Thursday 13 May 1915 – We Lost 1,602

 

HMS Goliath

HMS Goliath

The Germans unleash a severe bombardment on the Western Front.  At 04:00 the East Lancashire Regiment is holding trenches at a place called Mouse-trap Farm when they are seriously bombarded by German artillery.  At times twelve six inch shells a minute burst along a fifty yard length of trench.  At 07:30 in heavy rain, in the face of this heavy bombardment, the regiment launches an attack on the German trenches.  The attack fails in the face of German machine gun fire, at times at a range of fifteen yards, and fierce hand to hand fighting. Over the next seven days of constant fighting this regiment will lose one hundred seventy men killed, two hundred four wounded and fifty two taken as prisoners of war.

Lance Sergeant Douglas Walter Belcher (London Rifle Brigade) is awarded the Victoria Cross for an action early on this morning, when in charge of a portion of an advanced breastwork south of the Wieltje-St Julien Road during a very fierce and continuous bombardment by the enemy, which frequently blew in the breastwork,  Lance Sergeant Belcher with a mere handful of men elects to remain and endeavor to hold his position after the troops near him have been withdrawn.  By his skill and great  gallantry he maintains his position during the day, opening rapid fire on the enemy, who are only 150 to 200 yards distant, whenever he sees them collecting for an attack. There is little doubt that the bold front shown by this NCO prevents the enemy breaking through on the Wieltje Road and averts an attack on the flank of one of our divisions.

At Ypres when the line is broken beyond the right flank of the Dragoon Guards, Major George Harold Absell Ing comes out of his trench in the front, stands on the road in the open under heavy shell fire, stops the retirement of 40 men of another unit and turns them into his section of the defense.

Captain Alfred John Hamilton Bowen (Monmouthshire Regiment) though wounded in two places in the head before dawn refuses to leave his company and continues to command it with conspicuous ability.  After the action is over and his battalion returns to La Brique he is found to be suffering from two other wounds and is immediately sent to the hospital.  For his actions this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  Lieutenant Colonel Bowen will be killed in action on 2 March 1917 at age 31.

During the Second Battle of Ypres, Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Deacon (commanding Essex Yeomanry) is ordered to make a dismounted counter-attack – at all costs – against a position 1,000 yards to his front, which had been taken by the enemy. The Essex men advance with the Hussars on their left and the Royal Horse Guards on their right. They fix bayonets, and, with a resounding cheer, the Essex Yeomanry charge across 400 yards of unbroken ground and up a steep slope to capture the position known as Frezenberg Ridge. Major Charles William Henry Crichton (Hussars) shows conspicuous gallantry in collecting and rallying men who are retiring under heavy shell fire through his regiment’s position.  During our counter-attack he continues to direct operations while he lays in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered. In this fierce engagement five officers, including Lieutenant Colonel Deacon, and 46 men are killed, and 5 officers and 86 men wounded. Lieutenant Colonel Deacon is killed at age 43.

The battleship HMS Goliath (Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford) is torpedoed and sunk in Morto Bay by the Turkish destroyer Muavenent. There are five hundred seventy casualties and one hundred eighty survivors.

Captain Julian Henry Francis Grenfell DSO (Dragoons) is wounded in the head by a shell splinter in the Ypres salient. He will die of these wounds in less than two weeks. Two weeks earlier he has written the poem “Into Battle” the last four stanzas of which read:

In dreary, doubtful, waiting hours,

Before the brazen frenzy starts,

The horses show him nobler powers;

O patient eyes, courageous hearts

 

And when the burning moments breaks,

And all things else are out of mind,

And only joy of battle takes

Him by the throat, and makes him blind,

 

Through joy and blindness he shall know,

Not caring much to know, but still

Nor lead nor steel shall reach him, so

That it be not the Destined Will.

 

The thundering line of battle stands,

And in the air death moans and sings;

But Day shall clasp him with strong hands,

And Night shall fold him in soft wings.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Four battalion commanders
  • The heir to Lord Redesdale
  • The son and heir to the 5th Marquess of Northampton
  • The son of the 8th Baron Carbery
  • The son of the Baron of Beaufort
  • A son of the 1st Viscount of St Davids
  • The grandson of the 3rd Earl of Norbury
  • The son-in-law of the 4th Viscount Valencia
  • The son-in-law of the 4th Marquess of Ormonde
  • The son of a Baronet
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Great War poet
  • A man whose grandfather fought at Waterloo
  • An author and musician
  • A former Aide de Camp to the Commander in Chief in Ireland
  • The son of the late Vice Consul at Ghent Belgium
  • A man whose brother died of wounds in the South African War
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A son of the judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand
  • The grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a General
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Two brothers killed together
  • An Assistant Scout Master

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel George Algernon Egerton (commanding 19th Hussars) is killed in action at age 44. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Algernon Fulke Egerton and he is a South Africa War veteran.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Eustace Robert Ambrose Shearman (commanding 10th Hussars) is killed at age 39. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Colin McLean (commanding 6th Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 41. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel “the Honorable” Percy Charles Evans-Freke (commanding Leicestershire Yeomanry) is killed by a sniper at age 43. He is the son of the 8th Baron Carbery. His brother died of wounds received at Bappisfontein, South Africa in June 1900.
  • Major William Francis Martin (Leicestershire Yeomanry) is killed at age 39. He is the second son of the late Robert Trewen Martin JP for the County of Leicestershire, and the grandson of the Reverend E R Larken Rector of Burton by Lincoln. Major Martin served as a Lieutenant with the Leicestershire Yeomanry in the South African War and received the Queen’s Medal and four clasps. He went to the Front in November 1914 with the Leicestershire Yeomanry while attached to the Life Guards. He served in the trenches near Ypres during the winter and spring.
  • Major Clement Bertram Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford DSO (Hussars) the heir to Lord Redesdale is killed in action at age 38. His nephew will be killed in 1945.
  • Major William Robinson Campbell DSO (Hussars) is killed in action at age 35. He is the eldest son of ‘Sir’ Charles Ralph Campbell, 11th
  • Captain and Adjutant Gerald Charles Stewart (Hussars) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Stewart who had another son killed last month and the grandson of Hector 3rd Earl of Norbury. Captain Stewart was gazetted to the Hussars in 1907. He joined the Hussars at Rawalpindi in the autumn of 1907 and was appointed Adjutant in 1912. He took part with his Regiment in quelling riots at Johannesburg in 1913. On the outbreak of the War he went to the Front with the 7th Division in October 1914 and was twice wounded at the first Battle of Ypres.
  • Captain Maurice Arthur De Tuyll (Hussars) is killed in action. He was born on 1 November 1888 and is the son of the late Baron and the Duchess of Beaufort.
  • Captain George Dalton Leake (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in three weeks on Gallipoli.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Colwyn Erasmus Arnold Philipps (Royal Horse Guards) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Right Honorable 1st Viscount St Davids PC and his brother Captain Roland Erasmus Philipps will also fall in the Great War being killed in July 1916. He is a Great War Poet and has written the short story “The Sniper”. 

There is a healing magic in the night,
The breeze blows cleaner than it did by day,
Forgot the fever of the fuller light,
And sorrow sinks insensibly away
As if some saint a cool white hand did lay
Upon the brow, and calm the restless brain.
The moon looks down with pale unpassioned ray –
Sufficient for the hour is its pain.
Be still and feel the night that hides away earth’s stain.
Be still and loose the sense of God in you,
Be still and send your soul into the all,
The vasty distance where the stars shine blue,
No longer antlike on the earth to call.
Released from time and sense of great or small
Float on the pinions of the Night-Queen’s wings;
Soar till the swift inevitable fall
Will drag you back into all the world’s small things;
Yet for an hour be one with all escaped things.

  •  Captain Geoffrey Vaux Salvin Bowlby (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 31 while leading a successful afternoon counter attack up the hill across open country near Gully Farm after part of the Brigade has been driven out of their trenches earlier in the day. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mr. Geoffrey Bowlby and is the son-in-law of the 4th Viscount Valencia and his grandfather fought at Waterloo. He was previously the Aide-de-Camp to the Commander in Chief in Ireland.
  • Captain & Adjutant Thomas Gordon Davson (Westminster Dragoons, Royal Horse Guards) an author and musician is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Henry Katz Davson.
  • Captain George Martin Chapman (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Dragoon Guards) is killed when he is blown up by a shell attending wounded. He is the son of the Honorable Frederick Revans Chapman Judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. He gained a Blue for football and a half Blue for Boxing while at Cambridge. He was also decorated with a French Gold Medal in December 1914 for saving life in rough seas off Boulogne.
  • Captain Sylvester Cecil Rait Kerr (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed in November 1914. Captain Edward Brassey Egerton (Lancers) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Lady Mabelle and the son-in-law of the 4th Marquess of Ormonde.
  • Captain Henry McLaren Lambert (Dragoons) is killed at age 36. He is the son of Edward Tiley Lambert JP.
  • Lieutenant Elphinstone D’Oyly Aplin (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at #3 Casualty Clearing Station received four days before when his platoon was cut off. He dies at age 22. His brother will be killed in March 1918 and they are grandsons of Admiral E D’O Alpin.
  • Lieutenant Henry Rawlings Cowan (Wellington Infantry) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Lieutenant Lord Spencer Douglas Compton (Royal Horse Guards and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry) at age 22. He is the son and heir of the 5th Marquess of Northampton KG.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Hamilton Bagshawe (Dragoons) is killed at age 25. He is the grandson of W H G Bagshawe DL.
  • Second Lieutenant F H B Bond (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ Francis G Bond KBE CB CMG.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Bramley (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. His older brother will be killed serving in the same regiment in February 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Cyril Richard Bramley Vicar of Bonisthorpe.
  • Sergeant Douglas Ledger (Essex Yeomanry) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in December.
  • Corporal Otis Murrel Meister Meister (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die on service in August 1919.
  • Corporal Albert A Claridge (London Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed over a two year period.
  • Private Albert J Seymour (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 30. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Henry K Mann (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Rifleman Frederick Dye (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of three brothers who will be kill in the Great War the next will be killed next month and the final in 1917.
  • Trooper Theo Bennett Hallett (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 18.  He is the son of the late George H Hallett HBM Vice Consul Ghent Belgium.

 HMS Goliath casualties include:

  •  Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford the son of Thomas Shelford CMG age 43.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Ivor Morgan Lewis killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend David Lewis Rector of Llanbede who will lose another son in June 1917.
  • Major Cyril Frederick Barber (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Edward Barber, the Archdeacon of Chester.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Walter Julian Orde DSC is killed at age 24 and is the son of ‘Sir’ Julian Walter Order. Lieutenant Orde was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his efforts on 28 November 1914 when a party of boats are attacked unexpectedly at the Dar es Salaam harbor entrance. Although wounded and under exceptionally heavy fire he brought his ship safely through the narrow channel.
  • Brothers Seaman Richard Worth and Mark Hallow Wallis (Royal Naval Reserve) are both killed. Mark dies at age 31 while Richard is 28.
  • Stoker Walter Lamacraft is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Stoker 1 William Thorne is killed age 32 three months after his brother was killed in action.
  • Leading Seaman Charles Hewett is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Able Seaman Walter Percy Hendon is killed at age 20. His twin will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Hugh Hubert Holland (London Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is an Assistant Scout Master of the 17th St Pancras (Holy Trinity) Troop.

Sunday 14 March 1915 – We Lost 768

HMS Glasgow

HMS Glasgow

A German offensive at St Eloi begins, which results in the capture of the village and part of the British front line system where the Cambridgeshire Regiment is in action.  The Fifth London Territorial Brigade Royal Field Artillery lands in France.

HMS Glasgow and HMS Orama come into Cumberland in the Juan Fernandez Islands from the west, while HMS Kent comes in from the east at Mas a Tierra where Dresden is hiding.  They discover the Dresden anchored 500 yards offshore.  It has been a frustrating three month search for her, and Captain Luce is not about to concern himself with the niceties of international law, as no Chilean warship is present to enforce the neutrality rules.  Admiralty instruction is “destruction not internment”. Luce gives orders to close to eight thousand yards and tells the gunnery officers to make certain that the buildings on shore are out of line of sight before they open fire, which they do at 08:50.  The first two salvoes from Glasgow strike Dresden.  The Kent opens fire two minutes later and also scores several hits.  The Germans fire back, but they are heavily outgunned and in a hopeless position tactically, while at anchor.  Within five minutes the Dresden has suffered so much damage that she hoists a white flag to avoid further casualties.  Luce gives the order to cease fire.  The Germans send a cutter across to the Glasgow under a flag of truce and Luce demands unconditional surrender or a resumption of fire will begin. These talks give the Germans enough time to plant timed explosives in the Dresden’s magazine and get her men ashore.  The Chileans now send a boat to the Glasgow to protest the infringement of Chilean neutrality. They complain of damage done to civilian property by the British bombardment. Luce pays the governor 500 pounds in gold as compensation for any damage done ashore.  At 10:45 two dull explosions are heard as the charges go off and a split second later a thunderous roar is heard as the Dresden’s magazine explodes. The British ships close to within a mile and watch as first she sinks very slowly, going down by the bows. Then more quickly she lists and sinks.  Eight crewmen are killed and sixteen wounded on the Dresden during the brief but fierce bombardment.  Because there is no hospital in the Juan Fernandez Islands, Luce offers to take the injured men to Valparaiso in the Orama without requiring them to be interned in either neutral territories or in prisoner of war camps. The offer is gratefully accepted.

Today’s losses include:

  • A musician and well-known composer
  • Grandson of a veteran of the Charge of the Light Brigade
  • A man whose uncle lost his life as a result of South African War service
  • A Rear Admiral
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • The grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Grandson of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • The former Secretary to the United States Ambassador to London
  • The husband of the granddaughter of former United States Secretary of State Hamilton Fish
  • The father of a man killed on service in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1943
  • An amateur wrestling champion
  • Son of a man who will lose his life on service in September 1917

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

 Lieutenant William Gray Rawlinson (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed in action in Belgium at age 24.  He is a musician and well-known composer and reputed to be a fine shot and polo player.  He comes from a family with a military history one ancestor having fought at Marston Moor in 1644 his grandfather served throughout the Crimean War and took part in the Charge of the Light Brigade.  His uncle died in 1913 as a direct result of having served in the South African War.

  • Rear Admiral William John Grogan (Royal Navy) dies as the result of an accident at home.
  • Captain and Adjutant Thomas Joseph Fitzherbert-Brockholes (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in the Royal Navy in July 1919 and they are grandsons of Major General the Honorable ‘Sir’ Henry Hugh Clifford VC.
  • Captain William Ulick Middleton Campbell (Highland Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of the Honorable William Campbell.
  • Captain Cyril Gerald Valerian Wellesley (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 35. His brother in law died of wounds in August of last year.
  • Lieutenant Harry Spencer Hall (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies at home at age 35. His cousin Lieutenant Arthur Douglas Knapp will be killed in May 1917.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Wickstead Ethelston (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Hugh Williams 3rd
  • Second Lieutenant William Lawrence Breese (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the former Secretary to Ambassador Page in London and is married to the granddaughter of former United States Secretary of State to President Ulysses S Grant, Hamilton Fish. At the outbreak of the Great War he returned to England, and in order to accomplish his desire to serve with the British Forces to become a naturalized citizen.
  • Sergeant Henry Martin Oliver (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 27. His brother will be killed in November of this year.
  • Corporal Percy Austin (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Rifleman Harry Elderfield (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 20. His brother was killed last month.
  • Private Bertram Carnac Yates (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed on HMS Aboukir in September of last year.
  • Rifleman Leonard John Ahern (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last September.
  • Private John Henry Wren (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Sidney James Stimpson (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private William Sharp (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private James Alexander Golding (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 34. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in December 1943.
  • Private Edwin Harry Coates (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is an amateur wrestling champion. His father will volunteer shortly after his son’s death and die on service in September 1917.

Friday 8 January 1915 – We Lost 151

Cap badge of the Royal Horse Guards

Cap badge of the Royal Horse Guards

The first British naval minefield is laid off Amrun, Germany.

Today’s losses include:

  • A son of the 20th Earl of Shrewsbury & Talbot
  • A Member of the Victorian Order (MVO)
  • An Afton Thistle football player
  • A man whose brother will be killed later in the War
  • A man who will have two more brothers killed in the War
  • The first two casualties suffered by Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Temporary Captain Charles John Alton Chetwynd-Talbot MVO (Viscount Ingestre) (Royal Horse Guards) dies of pneumonia at home at age 32.  He is the son of the 20th Earl of Shrewsbury & Talbot.  “He was not passed fit for active service owing to varicose veins, but was appointed adjutant of the new reserve regiment of the Royal Horse Guards at Regent’s Park Barracks, where he had been serving until his death and it is greatly due to his hard work that the reserve regiment has become so efficient”.

  • Private Robert Martin (Scots Guards) is killed. He played football for Afton Thistle.
  • Private William Walter Ogden (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. His brother will be killed in February 1917.
  • Private Murdo MacKay (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry suffer their first casualties when Lance Corporals N Fry age 27 and Henry George Bellinger age 39 are killed by snipers.

Friday 6 November 1914 – We Lost 378

The Life Guards cap badge

The Life Guards cap badge

German troops are forced out of the village of Soupir. The village will remain very close to the front line for the greater part of the Great War.

A combined Anglo-Indian force of 600 troops is landed in the Shatt-al-Arab near the old fort at Fao which they soon capture. The remainder of Force ‘D’ sails on to a place where it can safely disembark at Sanniyeh.

The spy Karl Lody is shot at the Tower of London.

The Central fort at Tsing-tau is stormed and two hundred prisoners are taken. Captain Dudley G Johnson (South Wales Borderers) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for conspicuous ability during the morning of these operations and for great gallantry in rescuing several wounded men while exposed to heavy machine gun fire.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of Member of Parliament
  • The father of a future Prime Minister of Northern Ireland
  • Son of the 2nd Baron and father of the 3rd Baron O’Neill
  • Son of the 2nd Baron Leconfield
  • Son of Russian Baron DeGunzburg
  • Son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn
  • Son of the 8th Viscount Downe
  • Son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford
  • Son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Brother-in-law of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Men who will have one and two sons killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple men who will have nephew’s killed in the Second World War
  • A Battalion commander
  • Uncle by marriage of Winston Churchill
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • A man whose sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Nephew of clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justice’s of the Peace
  • A former Aide-de-camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
  • Member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Edward Bruce O’Neill (Life Guards) becomes the first Member of Parliament to be killed in the Great War when he is killed today.  He is the son of the 2nd Baron O’Neill, father of the 3rd Baron who will be killed in October 1944 and the grandson of the 11th Earl of Dundonald and Member of Parliament for Mid Antrim. One son will later become Prime Minister of Northern Ireland while two others will be killed in the Second World War. He is also the son-in-law of The Marquis of Crewe and served in the South African War.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Gordon Chesney WilsonMVO (commanding Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 49. He is the eldest son of ‘Sir’ Samuel Wilson MP Kt and the son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and by marriage the uncle of Winston Churchill. He served as Aide de camp to Major General Baden Powell from August 1899 to July 1900 in South Africa.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh DawnayDSO (Life Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the 8th Viscount Downe.  He is the veteran of the South African War and Somaliland in 1908-10 and the son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force in World War II.
  • Major Edward Hawtin Phillips DSO (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 36. He was at the front three days and has previously served in 1900 in North Nigeria and Ashanti, in the South African War and again in North Nigeria in 1900. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Captain Edward Charles Stafford-King-Harman(Irish Guards) is killed at age 23.  His only child a daughter will be born in April of next year. He is the son of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Thomas Stafford-King-Harman, the 1st Baronet and his nephew Lieutenant Thomas Edward (Irish Guards) will be killed in action on 4 August 1944 at age 22. He is the grandson of the Right Honorable Edward King-Harman MP.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Arthur John Hamilton (Irish Guards). He is the son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn KG. He is the Deputy Master of the Household. He dies at age 30 and his body will never be found. His sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918.
  • Captain Norman Neill(Hussars) is killed at age 34. He is the son in law of Major General ‘Sir’ Gerald de Courcy Morton KCIE CB and Brigade Major 6th Cavalry Brigade and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Hope(Irish Guards) is killed at age 27.  On the outbreak of the war, he was serving as Aide de Camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lieutenant Robert Randle Egerton (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Eyles Egerton JP.
  • Lieutenant George William Houghton Hodgson (Border Regiment) dies of wounds at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend William George Courtney Hodgson and nephew of the Bishop of Edmundsbury.
  • Lieutenant Carleton Wyndham Tufnell (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22. He is the nephew of Rear Admiral Lionel Grant Tufnell CMG and a member of I Zingfair and MCC.
  • Lieutenant George Pierse Jenings (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at Rue de Bois. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Ulick Albert Jenings JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ William Reginald Wyndham (Lincolnshire Yeomanry attached Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the third son of the late 2nd Baron Leconfield and a nephew of Lord Rosebery. He is an Irish race horse owner and member of the Jockey Club. His nephew the eldest son of the 5th Baron will be killed in action on 9 October 1942 serving in the Queen’s Royal Lancers Royal Armoured Corps.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexis George DeGunzburg (Hussars attached Royal Horse Guards) the Baron is killed at age 27 while carrying a message to Colonel Gordon Wilson from General Kavanagh. He is the youngest son of the late Baron DeGunzburg and is also related to the Dowager Countess of Desart and ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald. He is Russian by birth and became a naturalized citizen to join the army in September.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sincliar Petersen (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is brother-in-law of Major Douglas Reynolds VC (Royal Field Artillery) who is married to Petersen’s sister.
  • Corporal Mark Charles Dowlen (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private William Brennock (Irish Guards) is killed. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Cecil Herbert Facey (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in January.
  • Private Edward Clarke (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman Melville Franklin (Collingwood RNVR RND) dies at home of illness at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Edmund John Franklin.
  • Private Edward Edwin Clarke (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in the war also.
  • Private Frederick James Allen (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother Charles will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Edward Gregory Sangster (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Seaman Horace Reginald Horscroft (RNR HMS Victorian) drowns at age 41. He is the recipient of a Belgian Medal and Diploma for saving life at sea.

 

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.

Friday 30 October 1914 – We Lost 984

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

After an intense bombardment the Germans attack the British line held by the 9th Lancers at Messines.  They attack from St Yves to Wytchaete, capturing St Yves and gaining a footing in Messines village.  They are driven out by a counter-attack.

The village of Zandvoorde is held by the Life Guards numbering between three and four hundred men. It is bombarded for over an hour with heavy guns and then captured by the 39th German Division.  The entire front of the 3rd Cavalry Division is driven back to the Klein-Zillebeke Ridge.

Lieutenant G N Humphreys (Royal Flying Corps) shoots up an enemy convoy firing two hundred fifty rounds from his Lewis gun.  This is most likely the first ever ground attack by an aircraft.

The trail of the accused German spy Karl Lody begins in Britain.

Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood hoists his flag on the French destroyer L’Intrepide, the first time a French warship has acted as an English flagship without having first been captured.  L’Intrepide and L’Aventurier have joined the Second Light Squadron in the English Channel earlier in the month and have fought with that British squadron off the Belgian coast. Admiral Hood will be killed at the the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Good Hope and HMS Monmouth head north from Vallenar intent on a rendezvous with the other two members of the squadron after they complete their intelligence missions that they have been dispatched to perform the previous day.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The original Boy Scout who was called Baden-Powell’s favorite
  • Brother-in-law of Douglas Haig
  • Grandson of an officer who served under Nelson at Copenhagen
  • Former Aide-de-camp to Field Marshall the Earl of Roberts
  • Former Aide-de-camp to the Governor General of Australia
  • Actor and member of the Green Room Club
  • The father of a child who will be born after his death
  • Son of the artist Ernest F Marillier
  • Great grandson of a 50-year Master at Harrow
  • Co-found and one time editor of the Yokahama (Japan) Press
  • Staff member of the Burlington Magazine
  • Champion boxer
  • The second son of the former Governor of the Windward Islands to be killed in two days
  • Multiple sons of Members of Parliament
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • A Roman Catholic Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Grandson of an Alderman
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple families who lose one of two sons killed in the Great War
  • Two examples of families that will lose four sons in the Service of King and Country
  • A family who previously lost a son in the South African War
  • Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster
  • Son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne
  • Son of the 4th Earl of Yarborough
  • Son of the 2nd Earl of Durham
  • Son of the 1st Earl of Dudley
  • Son-in-law of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Erne
  • Son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian
  • Son-in-law of Baron Knaresborough
  • Grandson of the Duke of Abercorn
  • Grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Father of the 4th and 5th Dukes of Westminster

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton (Northamptonshire Yeomanry attached Lancers) dies of wounds received when he is shot by a sniper at age 23. He is known affectionately as ‘Bob’ by his friends and family. His father was master of the Pytchley Hunt and his uncle is Philip Wrought MP JP DL. A close family friend is ‘Sir’ Robert Baden-Powell, hero of the Siege of Mafeking during the South African War, and when ‘BP’ came up with the idea of organizing a camp for boys to teach them the principles of leadership and teamwork. He immediately turned to ‘Bob’ Wroughton to join him in his venture.

The camp was held on Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset, in August 1907 – and became an historic event. It was from that beginning that the World Wide Boy Scout Movement was to emerge. After the Camp, Baden Powell heaped praise on Bob’s leadership “he was a great help to me & quite set the example to other Patrol Leaders,” he wrote in a letter to Bob’s mother,  in which he also asked her for Bob’s suggestions as to how the whole Scouting movement could be established. A career in the army was a natural progression. He was commissioned in November 1913, and when war broke out he joined the 12th Lancers where again he received high praise for his courage. His Major wrote of him that he was an “excellent soldier and can turn his hand to anything”. After just a few weeks of the war, he had gained a gallantry honour, being Mentioned in Disptaches by the Commander in Chief, Sir John French. While on patrol in the Ypres salient in Belgium he is shot by a German sniper, at age 23.

A distraught Baden Powell writes to his parents soon after: “I have felt as nearly as possible like a second father to him, and to read the little testimonies to Bob’s character after all the hopes that I had formed of him, is the greatest possible comfort. I am so glad that he had made his mark already before he died.”

  •  Colonel Charles Arthur Cecil King (commanding 2nd Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 51. He served previously at the Nile 1885-6 Burma 1893 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Trevor Crispon (commanding 2nd Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 46. He served in the Nile campaign of 1898, Crete and South Africa.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Osbert Samuel Cadogan (commanding 1st Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 46 attempting to save his mortally wounded adjutant Captain Alfred Edwin Claud Toke Doonerat Zandvoorde, Ypres at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Cadogan Rector of Wicken and he served in Hazara in 1891 and China in 1900. Dooner’s brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Major (T/Lieutenant Colonel) John Murray Traill(commanding 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt when his battalion is shelled in the open.  His brother will be killed in a railway accident in November 1916.
  • Major George Geoffrey Prendergast Humphreys(Baluchi Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 41. He is the son of T W D Humphreys JP is the grandson of Major J Humphreys who served under Nelson at Copenhagen and had been an extra aide de camp to His Majesty King George in India. He is the son-in-law of Major General ‘Sir’ James Bell KCVO.
  • Major Hugh St Aubyn Wake MVO (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the late Admiral Charles Wake and he served on the North West Frontier 1897-9.
  • Major Eustance Henry Egremont AbadieDSO (Lancers) is killed at age 37. He has had two brothers die in the King’s service prior to the Great War and a fourth brother will be killed in action in 1917 and they are sons of Major General Henry Richard Abadie. One brother was killed in the South African War while the second die of fever during on service in February 1904.
  • Major ‘Lord’ Charles George Francis Mercer Nairne Petty-FitzMauriceMVO (Dragoons attached 6th Cavalry Brigade) is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the South African Medal, the Legion of Honor, Order of Military Merit, Order of the Crown, the Order of the Iron Crown Class II, Equerry-in-Ordinary to King George V when he was Prince of Wales 1909-1910 and Equerry to his Majesty 1910-1914. He had sometimes been the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Earl Roberts and is the son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne. He is the grandson of the Duke of Abercorn KG and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Hugh William Grosvenor(Life Guards) dies of wounds at age 30.  He is the son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and is married to Lady Mabel Crichton, daughter of John Crichton, 4th Earl Erne and his wife, the former Lady Florence Cole, daughter of William Cole 3rd Earl of Enniskillen.  He is the commander of ‘C’ Squadron 1st Life Guards. His sons will become the 4th and 5th Duke of Westminster.
  • Captain Alexander Moore Vandeleur(Life Guards) the son-in-law of the 1st Baron Knaresborough is killed at age 30 when his squadron is surrounded and scorning surrender fights to the last and are wiped out in hand to hand fighting.
  • Captain Frank Harrison Saker (Connaught Rangers) is killed in action. He worked as an actor before he joined the army in 1904 and was a member of the Green Room Club. His brother will be killed on the second day of the Gallipoli landing next year.
  • Captain Alfred James Woodhouse(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is one of four brothers who give their life in the service of the King. The first was killed in the South African War and the final two will be killed in 1915. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend A C Woodhouse Rector of Winterborn Monckton Dorset and gained the Sword of Honour at Woolwich.
  • Captain Otho Claude Skipwith Gilliat (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 31. He played cricket at Eton in 1899 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club and a veteran of the South Afria War.
  • Captain and Adjutant Douglas Byres Davidson (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed late next month and they are grandson of General John Clarke.
  • Captain Ernest Reginald Hayes-Sadler (Gurka Rifles) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed two days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Ian Bouverie Maxwell (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 24. He is the nephew of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Ronald Maxwell KCB and he is a member of the staff of the “Burlington Magazine”.
  • Captain Barry Hartwell (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 33. He served in the Tibet Expedition of 1903 and was awarded the Silver Medal of St John of Jerusalem for life saving in the earthquake at Dharmsala in 1905. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Brodrick Hartwell 2nd Baronet and the great grandson of General Frederick Young.
  • Captain Reginald Wickham Harland(Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Augustus Harland of Harefield Vicarge Middlesex. His brother was killed in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Charles Sackville Pelham ‘Lord Worsley’ (Royal Horse Guards) Baron Worsley is killed in action at age 27 at Zandvoorde. He is the son of the 4th Earl and Countess of Yarborough and son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian his other daughter married Douglas Haig. An order to withdraw does not reach the machine gun section he is in charge of, or some of the other soldiers. They are cut off, and Lord Worsley is first listed as ‘Missing’, and is officially recorded as killed early in 1915. However, Worsley’s body had been found and buried by the Germans, and a plan of where he had been buried is later passed on via Diplomatic channels from the Germans. In December 1918 his grave will be located by a British Officer using the plans, with the upright wooden portion of the cross which had been placed there by the Germans still standing. A replacement wooden cross will be put there in January 1919, and Lord Worsley’s widow later purchases the land.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Dennis Harding (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 22. He is the grandson of Major General Worthy Bennett (Royal Marine Light Infantry).
  • Lieutenant Philip Francis Payne-Gallwey(Lancers, Indian Army) is killed at age 21.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Henry Payne-Gallwey Rector of Sessay Thirsk, cousin of ‘Sir’ Ralph Payne Gallwey and nephew of General A Lowry Cole CB DSO.
  • Lieutenant David Rex Wilson (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Alderman Jonathan Angus.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Close-Brooks (Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the son in law of Major General Beresford Lovett and JP for Cheshire. His brother will be killed in Mesoptamia in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Lennox Harvey (Lancers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Douglas Lennox Harvey JP DL Vice Chairman of West Sussex County Council. His brother will be killed in three days serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Ernest Francis WardMVO (Life Guards) a son of the 1st Earl of Dudley is killed in at age 36. He played cricket for the Marylebone Cricket Club and is a veteran of the South African War. His body will not be found.
  • Lieutenant John Arnold St C Anstruther(Dragoon Guards attached Life Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the only son of the late Colonel commanding 2nd Life Guards and a former Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Australia.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Walter Henry Legge-Bourke(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Harry Legge-Bourke GCVO grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth and is married to the youngest daughter of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire KG. His only child will be born on 16 May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Francis Lambton(Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 43.  He is the son of the 2nd Earl and Countess of Durham.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Ludovic Carew(Hussars) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of Charles Carew a Member of Parliament and the grandson of the Reverend Robert Baker Carew.
  • Second Lieutenant Joseph Frain Webster(Black Watch attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Francis Webster.
  • Second Lieutenant Rowland Le Belward Egerton (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Philip Henry Brian Grey-Egerton 12th
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Charles Jennens Marillier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the artist Ernest F Marillier and great grandson of J F Marillier for 50 years the Master at Harrow.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Herbert Posden Burn (Dragoons) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Colonel Charles Rosdew Burn MP ADC to the King 1st Baronet who will later change his name to Forbes Leith and grandson of Lord Leith of Fyvie.
  • Second Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant Frederick Charles Hatton (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed with his Colonel at age 36. He is the part founder and one time editor of the Yokohama (Japan) Press. He fought in the South African War where he was wounded at Driefontein. He is related to ‘Sir’ Westby Brook Percival KCMG late Agent General for New Zealand. His wife is the niece of Alderman Thewlis late Lord Mayor of Manchester.
  • Sergeant Robert Henry Vanson age 28 and his brother Corporal Archibald John Vanson age 26 are killed together while serving in the Dragoons.
  • Corporal of Horse Herbert William Dawes (Life Guards) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private James Kane (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 22. He is a champion boxer at his weight.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla is wrecked when she strikes submerged rocks close to the Nab, Whitby, in a southeast easterly gale.  Out of two hundred twenty-nine on board, eighty-three are lost. The Whitby, Upgang and Tynermouth lifeboats pick up the survivors.

 HMHS Rohilla casualties include:

  • Roman Catholic Chaplain the Reverend Robert Basil Gwydir lost at age 47.
  • Brothers and Junior Reserve Attendants Thomas and Walter Horsfield are also killed. Thomas is described as an enthusiastic worker in the Salvation Army and drowns at age 47 while 35 year old Walter served twice in the South African War with General Hospitals.

Monday 21 September 1914 – We Lost 170 (Plus 1)

Laurence Binyon’s poem “For The Fallen” is first published in TheTimes

 With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,

England mourns for her dead across the sea.

Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,

Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal

Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,

There is music in the midst of desolation

And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,

Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.

They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;

They fell with their faces to the foe.

 They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;

They sit no more at familiar tables of home;

They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;

They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,

Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,

To the innermost heart of their own land they are known

As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,

Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;

As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,

To the end, to the end, they remain.

 Today’s casualties include:

  • A battalion commander
  • Member of the Maryleborne Cricket Club
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Godson of King George
  • Son of Clergy
  • One son of a family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Victoria Cross winner who was:
    • attempting to escape a from prisoner-of-war camp
    • the son of clergy
    • the son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
    • the cousin of a Baronet
    • a published author

Today’s casualty of the day is

Major Charles Allix Lavington Yate VC (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed during an attempt to escape from a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany at age 42. It is believed that when challenged by German civilians, he cut his own throat with a razor. The son of the Reverend George Edward Yate, Vicar of Madeley, son-in-law of John F Brigg JP and cousin of ‘Sir’ Charles Yate the 1st Baronet had served in the South African War. He was present at the Siege of Port Arthur during the Russo Japanese War and is a Japanese Interpreter. He is the author of an article printed in the September issue of Blackwood Magazine entitled “Moral Qualities in War”. While in command of two companies in the trenches at Le Cateau on 26 August, and, when all other officers were killed or wounded and ammunition exhausted, he led his nineteen survivors against the enemy in a charge in which he is wounded and captured.  For his actions on the 26th August he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Charles Pilleau DSO (commanding 1st Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 48 four days after his predecessor was killed. Notwithstanding his dying condition, Lieutenant Colonel Pilleau continues for four hours to direct his men.  He is the great nephew of General Thomas Addison CB, a veteran of the South African War, a lawn tennis player and member of MCC.
  • Captain Reginald Whitmore Pepys (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert George Pepys Vicar of Hallow.
  • Lieutenant George Vyvyan Naylor-Leyland(Royal Horse Guards) dies of wounds at age 22.  He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Herbert Scarisbrand Naylor-Leyland, the 1st Baronet and the godson of King George.
  • Private Samuel Wellings (Durham Light Infantry) is killed.  His brother will be killed in July 1917 in Mesopotamia.

The Plus 1

  • An Austrian swimmer at the 1906 Olympics, Leopold Mayer is killed