Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Humane Society Medal

Sunday 19 December 1915 – We Lost 514

Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid

Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid

The final evacuation of Anazc begins after dark with 4,100 men leaving their posts by nightfall.  In order to deceive the Turks it is decided to hold all the front line posts, however lightly, until the last possible moment which at Anzac Cove was 01:30 after which the front is gradually uncovered.

Captain Malcolm McBean Bell-Irving (Royal Flying Corps) successfully engages three hostile aircraft between Lille and Ypres.  The first he drives off, the second he sends to the ground in flames, and the third nose-dives and disappears. He is then attacked by three other hostile machines from above, but he flies off towards Ypres, and a machine he sees in that direction.  He overhauls it and gets to within one hundred yards when he is wounded by a shell and has to return.

Lieutenant Norman Gordon-Smith and his gunner Second Lieutenant Duncan Flower Cunningham-Reid (Royal Flying Corps) are shot down and killed over Oostkampe-Bruges. They were on a sixty mile trek to protect a reconnaissance machine and fought for half an hour enabling the reconnaissance aircraft to successfully return to base. Gordon-Smith’s brother will be killed in 1918 and Cunningham-Reid is the brother of Alec Straatford Cunningham-Reid a seven victory ace.

Today’s losses include:

  • The brother of a 7-victory ace
  • A member of the Wayside Football Club
  • Multiple families that will two sons in the Great War
  • The third son to die of a family that will lose four sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Colonel Ernest Octavius Wight (49th (West Riding) Division Assistant Director of Medical services, Royal Army Medical Corps) dies on active service at age 57. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society’s bronze medal for life saving from drowning.
  • Captain Henry Colver (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed in June of this year.
  • Lieutenant Charles James Williams (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Lieutenant Albert Butler Heukensfeldt Clayton-Smith (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private Alexander Cunningham (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action at age 20. He is a member of the Wayside Football Club.
  • Private Charles Craig (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private John McClelland (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 28. He is the third of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Harold Percy Saxton (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed next June.

Saturday 8 May 1915 – We Lost 2,414

Cap badge of the Monmouthshire Regiment

Cap badge of the Monmouthshire Regiment

British forces abandon Frezenberg Ridge under a terrific shelling during the second battle of Ypres.  At 05.30 a violent German artillery bombardment begins on the British lines causing massive destruction – especially to 83rd Brigade in vulnerable trenches on the forward slopes of the Ridge. The subsequent German infantry assault is repelled by the surviving British battalions. A second German thrust on the ridge is held but a third assault at 10:00, pn either side of Frezenberg village, forces the remaining defenders to fall back. The German attack is stopped on the right by 80th Brigade but, to the north, 84th Brigade is almost totally destroyed in the onslaught; by afternoon a two-mile gap has been punched in the British line. Tenacious defence, hastily improvised counter-attacks and a crucial night advance of 10th Brigade restores a precarious situation.

Part of the new British line now runs in an exposed position along the front of the Frezenberg Ridge to the North West of Ypres. It falls to the 28th Division, which included the 1st Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment, to defend these trenches. The 1st Monmouths had reached the front line yesterday in darkness where they took over badly damaged trenches and began a desperate attempt to make repairs before dawn broke this morning. At the height of the fighting the battalion headquarters of the battalion becomes cut off from the troops of the battalion who are facing strong German attacks. In order to gain some measure of control over events the officers of the headquarters move forward to the front line. Faced with attacks from their front and from their right flank, where adjoining troops have withdrawn, the situation of the Monmouths is desperate. A particular problem was a German machine gun, located in a farm.

The Monmouths are now in danger of being overwhelmed and an attempt to provide reinforcements fails as those sent forward are decimated by shellfire. The situation is critical as the Monmouths attempt to hold off attacks from their front and deal with Germans who have taken over the trenches to their right. Captain Harold Thorne Edwards age 32 attempts to organise a flank using a communication trench, but is soon almost surrounded. Called on to surrender and uttering the phrase which becomes part of regimental history, “surrender be damned” he is last seen firing his revolver at his attackers, a scene commemorated in the painting in the entrance of Newport Civic Centre. The battalion commander, Lieutenant Colonel Charles Lawson Robinson age 45, now gives the order for the Monmouths to pull back from the front line to form a flank against the German attacks from the right, after which he is shot through the neck and killed. It is now the afternoon and the situation is clearly hopeless. With no alternative before them other than annihilation, the remaining isolated groups of the Monmouths pulled back to their support trenches. Some men attempted to get back along shallow communication trenches, others run desperately over open ground; many are wounded or killed by the continuing shellfire and machine gun fire. From these reserve trenches, however, The Monmouths and the Royal Irish Rifles are able to hold off further German advances. Here the extent of the casualties suffered becomes clear that of the 23 officers and 565 other ranks that left Brielen yesterday only 3 officers and 126 other ranks returned. Lieutenant Colonel Robinson commanding officer of the 1st Monmouthshire Regiment is among those killed. He is a veteran of the South African War.

On Gallipoli the attack on Achi Baba in the second battle of Krithia, gains between four and six hundred yards, but not the high ground, from where the Turks maintain their artillery observation.  After today the attack is called off, the Allies having sustained 6,500 casualties.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Two battalion commanders
  • A New Zealand rugby international
  • The New Zealand heavyweight boxing champion
  • The Australian 1901 Long Jump Champion
  • An Australian Rules footballer
  • A son of the founder of the Yarrow Shipbuilders dynasty
  • A son of the Baroness Strathcona
  • The son of the first and last Baron Chalmers
  • An Olympic fencer
  • Son of a Baronet
  • A nephew of Lord Northclife
  • A 15-year old holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Certificate for Life Saving
  • A constable for the Vancouver Police Department
  • A man whose widow will remarry and lose her second husband when he is killed in October 1918
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Brothers killed in the same action
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons
  • A family that will lose four sons

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Robert Gartside (commanding 7th Australian Infantry” dies of wounds received leading the charge near Tommies’ Trench at age 52.
  • Captain Herbert Humphreys Hunter (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 33. He is an Australian Rules Footballer and the Australasian Long Jump Champion of 1901.  He played 3 games for Essendon in 1900 and is killed at age 33.
  • Captain and Adjutant Edward Charles Dimsdale (Rifle Brigade attached Monmouthshire Regiment) attempts to organize an attack on the farm with the aim of silencing the machine gun and in the process is killed at age 31. His younger brother will be killed in April 1916 in the sinking of the submarine E22.
  • Also killed is the battalion’s second in command Edward Styant Williams age 39. Captain James Lancaster (Monmouthshire Regiment) and his brother Major John Cecil Lancaster (Royal Warwickshire Regiment) are both killed in action this day. John dies at age 41.
  • Captain Frederick Hugh Sasse (East Yorkshire Regiment) dies on service at age 28. His brother in law Captain Gilbert George Downes will die of wounds in August.
  • Captain Ralph Chalmers (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He was a member of the 1908 Olympic fencing team and then the Aide-de-campe to the Governor of Ceylon in 1913 and 1914 and is a son of the first and last Baron Chalmers. His brother will die of wounds in less than three weeks.
  • Captain Eric Fernandez Yarrow (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 20. He is the son of shipbuilder ‘Sir’ Alfred Yarrow 1st Baronet who founded the shipbuilding dynasty Yarrow Shipbuilders.
  • Brothers Harry Stuart aged 30 and Ralph Edward McKie Dennison age 37 are both killed today. Harry dies serving as a Captain in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) at St Eloi. Ralph is a Second Lieutenant with the Royal Sussex Regiment.
  • Lieutenant Spencer Ruscombe Westmacott (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. His younger brother will be killed in action in July 1917 and they are sons of Canon Westmacott.
  • Lieutenant Rupert Howard Henderson (Australian Imperial Forces) is killed in action at Gallipoli less than two weeks after his brother has been killed in action. He dies at age 22.
  • Lieutenant Frederick George Smith (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received at the Anglo-American Hospital in Cairo at age 21. He was wounded on Gallipoli on the 27 April 1915 and was the Deposition clerk in the Department of Justice at the Court House in Bathusrt New South Wales.
  • Lieutenant Walter Scott Stuart Lyon (Royal Scots) a Great War poet is killed in action near Potijze Wood after an intense shelling and bombardment at age 28. He attended Bailliol College, Oxford .His two younger brothers have both been killed in the previous year. His poetry includes Easter at Ypres: 1915 and the below.

I Tracked a Dead Man Down a Trench

I tracked a dead man down a trench.

I knew not he was dead.

They told he had gone that way,

And there his foot-marks led.

 

The trench was long and close and curved,

It seemed without an end;

And as I threaded each new bay

I thought to see my friend.

 

I went there stooping to the ground.

For, should I raise my head,

Death watched to spring; and how should then

A dead man find the dead?

 

At last I saw his back.  He crouched

As still as still could be,

And when I called his name aloud

He did not answer me.

 

The floor-way of the trench was wet

Where he was crouching dead;

The water of the pool was brown

And round him it was red.

 

I stole up softly where he stayed

With head hung down all slack,

And on his shoulders laid my hands

And drew him gently back.

 

And then, as I guessed, I saw

His head, and how the crown –

I saw then why he crouched so still,

And why his head hung down. 

  •  Lieutenant Lucas Henry St Aubyn King (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Lucas White King Kt and a nephew Lord Northcliffe.
  • Lieutenant Guy Nicholas Palmes (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend George Palmes Vicar of Naburn.
  • Second Lieutenant Sidney Hannaford Hellyer (East Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds received 28th April at age 25. He is the son of Charles Hellyer JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Wallace Alfred Buckworth (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Ninian Mark Kerr Bertie (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend the Honorable Alberic Edward Rector of Gelding and Lady Bertie.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Malin Clifton Sorby (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Ernest Sorby Rector of Darfield.
  • Second Lieutenant “the Honorable” Robert Henry Palmer Howard (East Surrey Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of R J and Baroness Strathcona and Mount Royal.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Phipps Hornby (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 24 at Frezenberg Ridge. He is the son of the Venerable Phipps John (Archdeacon of Lancaster) and he has a brother who will be killed in October 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Thomas Ludson Couve (Australian Imperial Forces) is killed. He is a well-known soccer player with the Dandenong Club and his brother was killed two weeks ago.
  • Sergeant Frederick Ernest Bake (London Regiment) is killed. His son will lose his life on service in April 1945.
  • Lance Sergeant Henry Morgan and his brother Private Frederick William Morgan (Monmouthsire Regiment) age 19 are killed.
  • Corporal George Stanner Price Hanney (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed over the next year.
  • Acting Corporal George Tocher (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 21. He is the first of four brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Savory (Auckland Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at Gallipoli. He played in the Rugby Union and then transferred to the Rugby League and accepted a position in the combined New Zealand and New South Wales team that toured England. He played for Auckland and New Zealand on many subsequent occasions and his last appearance was as a member of the New Zealand team that played England in August 1914.  He was also the New Zealand heavyweight-boxing champion.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Walker (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in December 1916.
  • Private Robert Clark (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will die of wounds in April 1918.
  • Private Leslie Goldie Clark (Auckland Infantry) is killed during the Daisy Patch engagement. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private William Blackmore (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last January.
  • Private Richard Cowper (Auckland Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces) is killed in action at age 26. He is one of three brothers who will lose their lives during the Great War.
  • Private Wesley Earl Varcoe (Wellington Infantry) is killed 5 days after his brother.
  • Private William Savage (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Joseph Cornelius Green (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 19. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private John Henry Dengel (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Private John Hopkinson (York and Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Walter Nutter (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in August of this year on Gallipoli.
  • Gunner Walter Gaudin Mason (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed in action. His widow will marry Sergeant Charles Isidore Laugeard DCM (Hampshire Regiment) who will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private George Robertson (Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private David Angus Morrison (Manitoba Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 27. He is a constable in the Vancouver Police Department.
  • Rifleman Percy William Arthur Philcox (London Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will die of wounds in May 1917.
  • Private Arthur Mattocks (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Private Hubert Bernard Hodson (Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas Hodson Rector of Oddington.
  • Private William Frederick Stokes (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will die of fever in Mesopotamia in July 1916.
  • Private Jacob Key (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Michael Collins (Irish Regiment) is killed by shell fire becoming the second of four sons of Agnes Collins of Waterford to be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman James Duncan (Howe Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval Division) is killed at age 15 on Gallipoli. He is a holder of the Life Saving Certificate from the Royal Humane Society received at age 12.
  • Private Samuel Higginson (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Christopher Fagan (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed. His brother was killed last November.

Thursday 15 October 1914 – We Lost 685

The 3rd Division advances and in spite of the dykes, continues to drive the enemy back.  The town of Estaire is occupied by French cavalry who immediately turn it over to British troops.

At first light the advance on Yabassi is resumed, and after some desultory fighting in the bush, the Germans completely withdraw, leaving the British to occupy the town.  The campaign against Yabassi has cost the life of one officer, three British NCOs, a few blue jackets, and some forty native soldiers.

Today’s losses include:

  •  Holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving
  • An England International and Blackheath Rugby Footballer
  • Sons of clergy
  • Families that will lose two sons
HMS Hawke

HMS Hawke

The Edgar Class cruiser HMS Hawke (Captain Hugh Powell Evan Tudor Williams) is torpedoed and sunk by U9 with the loss of 524 men (only seventy survive).  U9 was also responsible for the sinking of the cruisers HMS Aboukir, HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue last month.

 Losses on HMS Hawke include:

  •  Captain Williams a holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for Life Savings dies at age 40.
  • Surgeon James Henry Digby Watson CB an English International Rugby player killed at age 24. He also played Rugby for Blackheath and London Hospital and was also the Edinburgh University Middleweight Boxing Champion and he represented Scotland versus Ireland in the Long Jung in 1912 which he won.
  • The Paymaster on the Hawke is Alan Murray Austin who dies at age 30. He is the son of Francis Murray Austin, the sometime Archdeacon of Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana.
  • Midshipman Harry Escombe Ravenhill Jerramis also killed when the ship is sunk. He is the son of the Reverend Arnold Jerram.
  • Petty Officer David Hookham is killed at age 38. His brother will be killed in the sinking of HMS Hampshire in June 1916.
  • Ordinary Seaman Ernest Edward Corder is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in action in April 1918.
  • Stoker Frederick George Ralph is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed next May. Many of the survivors are picked up by the destroyer Swift, the steamer Modesta and the trawler Ben Rinnes including Chief Gunner James Dennis, who will be killed in July 1917 in the explosion of HMS Vanguard.

Others lost today include:

  • Lieutenant Richard Christopher Gorges Foote (Royal Marine Light Infantry) dies of wounds received nine days earlier at Antwerp at age 20.  He is the son of the Reverend John Vicars Foote.
  • Private Robert MacDonald (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received at Hazebrouck. His brother will be killed in July 1916.

photo from Wikipedia.org

Tuesday 22 September 1914 – We Lost 1,582

HMS Aboukir

HMS Aboukir

While patrolling the Broad Fourteens, latitude 52.18 north, longitude 3.41 east, off the Dutch coast, the cruiser HMS Aboukir is torpedoed by the submarine U9. The two cruisers in company, HMS Hogue and HMS Cressy, are ordered to close to their sinking sister ship to pick up survivors.  As they stop, they too are torpedoed by U9. All three Bacchante class cruisers go to the bottom, taking 1,459 men with them while 837 are rescued.  The ships lost are insignificant, as they are obsolete; though the event is made more tragic by the fact that the majority of the crews are naval reservists. The Hogue is sunk by two torpedoes fired from a range of only three hundred yards, so close that the submarine has to execute swift maneuvers to avoid a collision with the sinking ship.

SMS Emden bombs the harbor at Madras. She hits four storage tanks containing 346,000 gallons of kerosene.  Moored at a buoy in the harbor is SS Chupra (Captain W C Morrison). A stray shell hits the bunker hatch on the boat deck at the starboard side and explodes. Cadet Joseph Saul Fletcher, age 17 receives many wounds and dies almost instantly.  This is the only fatal casualty inflicted by Emden on a Merchant Mariner during her cruise. Sub Lieutenant Bonstead of the Fort St. George battery rallies his men and manages to organize the firing of nine shells from her elderly guns, none of which find their target. The material effect of Emden’s bombardment is little when compared to the psychological. For days afterwards the trains going inland are crowded with people anxious to place themselves out of range of the shells of the “mystery ship” not only at Madras but also all along the coast.

Private George Ward (Berkshire Regiment) reports back to his battalion, having left eight days earlier claiming to be wounded. He has not been wounded and is court martialed for cowardice. Ward is shot on the recommendation of his corps commander, General ‘Sir’ Douglas Haig, to act as an example to others. Ward’s execution is in fact botched. As he is being taken out to be shot he breaks away from the guard and is shot in the back. He is then brought back on a stretcher and shot in the head by the sergeant of the guard to “finish him off”.

The Royal Naval Air Service carries out the first two British air raids of the war against German soil.  Two aircraft each set out to attack the Zeppelin sheds at Dusseldorf and Cologne. Only Lieutenant Charles Herbert Collet reaches his target, the Dusseldorf airship shed. He drops four bombs, only one of which explodes, inflicting little damage. He later states that “the surprise was complete and numerous Germans in the vicinity ran in all directions”.  All four return safely to their base.  Collet will later be killed on 19 August 1915 while serving at Gallipoli.

Lieutenant Gilbert William Mapplebeck (Royal Flying Corps), exchanges shots with an Albatross two-seater while on a kite balloon bombing mission.  He is wounded in the leg thus becoming the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to be wounded by fire from an enemy aircraft in the Great War.  He will be accidentally killed in August 1915. The airship Beta flies over London to see if Zeppelins can locate targets in foggy weather conditions. The results are inconclusive.

Today’s casualties include:

  • A member of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s last Antarctic expedition
  • Families that will lose sons
    • Multiple of examples of families that will lose two and three sons
    • Two families that will lose four sons
    • A family that will lose five sons
  • A man whose wife’s first husband was killed in the South African War
  • A Royal Marine whose son will be killed as a 14-year old bugler in the Royal Marines
  • Thirteen young naval Midshipmen
  • Brothers who are killed on the same day, one at sea in the Naval battle and one in the Army on the Western Front
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Two men whose sons will be born after their fathers deaths
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of clergy
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of the 8th Earl of Shaftesbury
  • Son of an Admiral and a son of a General
  • A holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving

Today’s casualties of the day

Lieutenant Oscar William Tottie serving on HMS Aboukir is killed in the sinking at age 22.  His brother Lieutenant Eric Harold Tottie is killed in action as a Lieutenant in the Northumberland Fusiliers during the Battle of the Aisne in France at age 19. These two brothers die on the same day but in very different places. They are sons of W H and Mary Barron Tottie (nee Blake, grand-daughter of Commodore Blake, U S Navy) of Sherlocks, Ascot, Berkshire.

HMS Aboukir casualties include:

  • Lieutenant Commander Thomas Edmund Harrisonis killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in the explosion of HMS Natal in December 1915.  The Engineer Commander on HMS Aboukir is Alfred Everitt Everitt and he is killed.  He is the son of the Reverend William Everitt.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey George Gore-Browne dies at age 15; he is the grandson of Colonel H G Gore-Browne VC DL JP who won his Victoria Cross at Lucknow. He had been the Chief Cadet Captain at the Royal Naval College, Osborne earlier this year.
  • Midshipman Alan Diarmid Campbell Robertson is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Bruce Barchard is killed at age 15
  • Midshipman Herbert Lawson Riley is killed at age 15
  • Midshipman John Duncan Stubbs is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Anthony Victor George Allsopp age 15 the son of the late Honorable George Higginson Allsopp MP and Lady Mildred Allsopp, the third daughter of the 8th Earl of Shaftesbury.
  • Chaplain Edward Gleadall Uphill Robsonis killed at age 32.
  • Cook’s Mate 2nd Class Edward Milleris killed at age 20.  His brother will be killed in action in May 1918 while serving in the Bedfordshire Regiment.
  • Private James Prior (Royal Marines) becomes the first of five brothers to lose their lives in the Great War. A sixth brother was killed while serving in the Royal Marines in 1912 in the accidental explosion of a gun during exercises on HMS King Edward VII.
  • Leading Stoker John Robert Fendley is killed. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak three days after the Armistice while serving in the Army Cyclist Corps.
  • Stoker 1st Class Lenham Yates dies at age 21. His brother will be killed next March in France.
  • Able Seaman Charles Tulloch Finlayson is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed on the merchant ship Vineyard in November 1916.
  • Able Seaman William Pointer is killed at age 29. His brother will be lost in the sinking of Royal Edward next year.
  • Able Seaman Sidney Thomas Claw is killed at age 34. His nephew will be killed in the loss of HMS Clan McNaughton next February.

The Cressy’s casualties include:

  • Captain Robert Warren Johnson who is killed at age 47. He is the son of Vice Admiral John Ormsby Johnson.
  • Lieutenant Commander Walter Bousfield Watkins Grubb is lost at age 35. His only child a son will be born next year.
  • Lieutenant Commander Bernard Matheson Harvey is last seen helping his men to keep afloat. He was the son of the Honorable Augustus Harvey.
  • Midshipman Claude Phillipe Delmege is killed. He is the son of the Deputy Inspector General of the Royal Navy.
  • Midshipman John Aubrey Froudeis killed at age 16.  He is the only son of Ashley Froude CMG and the grandson of James Anthony Froude, late Regius Professor of Modern History Oxford University.
  • Midshipman Frank George Matthewsis also killed at age 16.  He is the son of Brigadier General F B Matthews CB DSO.
  • Midshipman Vernon Hector Crobyn is killed at age 16.
  • Stoker 1st Class Frank Herbert Browning age 21 is one of seven sons who serve, four of whom are killed.
  • Able Seaman Alfred Augustus Dunk age 32. He was awarded the Medal for life saving by the King at the wreck of ‘Delhi’.
  • Able Seaman Arthur Chestney is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman Coulson Henry Crascall is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Seaman Robert John Ladd is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next June serving in the East Kent Regiment.
  • Stoker 1st Class William Burgess is killed at age 18. He is the first of four sons of Thomas and Mary Ann Burgess who will die as a result of war service.
  • Able Seaman William James Frederick is killed. He is a holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for life saving.
  • Leading Cook’s Mate Walter Charles Nelson Hall is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1916.

The casualties on HMS Hogue include:

  • Lieutenant Commander Henry Edward de Parny Rennick (HMS Hogue) who was a member of Captain Scott’s last expedition and during the voyage of the Terra Nova and was charge of tracking the depth soundings.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Charles Harold is killed at age 15. His brother will be killed in 1918.
  • Midshipman Harold Henshaw Ward is killed at age 15.
  • Midshipman Cecil William Holt is killed at age 15. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Petty Officer 1st Class George William Emptage is killed at age 39. His wife’s first husband was killed in the South African War.
  • Ship’s Chief Cook William Neill is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the Messina Medal.
  • Able Seaman Albert Edward Beaney is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in 5 weeks when his ship HMS Falcon is shelled off the Belgian coast.
  • Private John Llewellyn Timmins (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 45. His son will be killed on HMS Cardiff in November 1917 as a fourteen year old bugler.
  • Stoker 1st Class William Charles Harris is lost at age 27. His brother was killed five days before.

Others lost today include:

  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Cusack Forsyth (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Gilliat Meautys(West Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25.  He is the son of Thomas Arrowsmith Meautys JP and his only son will be born in April 1915 and will die on service shortly after the end of World War II at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed in action in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Machin (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 22. His is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the war.

photo – wikipedia.org

Friday 18 September 1914 – We Lost 130

Lieutenant Herbert Musgrave (Royal Flying Corps) carries out the first experiments with dropping bombs from the air. One bomb is dropped, it explodes, but not exactly where or how it was expected to explode. Lieutenant Musgrave will be killed in action serving in the Royal Engineers in June 1918 at age 42.

South African forces occupy Luderitz Bay in South West Africa, which the Germans have evacuated militarily on 10 August.

The German cruiser Dresden comes upon the freighter Ortega, bound from Valparaiso to Europe.  The Germans fire two blank shells across her bow, but instead of surrendering, Captain Douglas Kinnier takes the Ortega at full speed into the uncharted Nelson Strait aware that the cruiser will not follow, due to the Straits uncharted nature. For his bravery Kinnier will be given a temporary commission in the Royal Naval Reserve so that he can be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. His son will be killed in September 1916 while serving as a private in the Saskatchewan Regiment.

Today’s losses include: 

  • Assistant Director of Medical Service Royal Army Medical Corps who was also:
    • A Royal Humane Society Medal winner for life saving
    • A member of the Pembroke Rowing Club
    • President of the Monkstown Rugby Football Club
    • An Arnott Gold Medal for gallantry holder
    • A man whose letters home will be published after the war as Journal of the R.A.M.C
  • Honorary Secretary of the Canterbury (NZ) Society of Arts
  • Member of the Wes Sussex Constabulary
  • The first son of a family that will lose another son in the war

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dalton (Assistant Director of Medical Services with the Staff of the 2nd Division, Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed as a result of being hit by a shell fragment in the spine, while carrying wounded men to Verneuil Chateau at age 47. He is the son of John Edward Dalton and was awarded a Silver Medal 1st Class by the French Government and the Gold Medal by the Royal Humane Society for saving lives at sea during the sinking of RMS Cotopaxi in 1889 when he was acting as the ship’s surgeon. He is a member of the Pembroke Rowing Club and player and President at the time of his death of the Monkstown Football Club. He also saved the life of Lieutenant Craig-Brown in India in 1898. He was wounded during the South African War and was the first winner of the Arnott Gold Medal for gallantry distinguished in the field by the Irish Medical School and Graduates Association. His letters home will be published next January under the title “Journal of the R.A.M.C”.

  • Lieutenant Oliver Dunham Melville Garsia (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 28. He is the Honorary Secretary of the Canterbury (NZ) Society of Arts. His elder brother was killed in India serving in the Durham Light Infantry.
  • Corporal Stephen Hickmott (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private James William Cudby(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 26.  He was a member of the West Sussex Constabulary and the first of twenty-two members of that force killed in the Great War.