Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Marines

Thursday 13 May 1915 – We Lost 1,602

 

HMS Goliath

HMS Goliath

The Germans unleash a severe bombardment on the Western Front.  At 04:00 the East Lancashire Regiment is holding trenches at a place called Mouse-trap Farm when they are seriously bombarded by German artillery.  At times twelve six inch shells a minute burst along a fifty yard length of trench.  At 07:30 in heavy rain, in the face of this heavy bombardment, the regiment launches an attack on the German trenches.  The attack fails in the face of German machine gun fire, at times at a range of fifteen yards, and fierce hand to hand fighting. Over the next seven days of constant fighting this regiment will lose one hundred seventy men killed, two hundred four wounded and fifty two taken as prisoners of war.

Lance Sergeant Douglas Walter Belcher (London Rifle Brigade) is awarded the Victoria Cross for an action early on this morning, when in charge of a portion of an advanced breastwork south of the Wieltje-St Julien Road during a very fierce and continuous bombardment by the enemy, which frequently blew in the breastwork,  Lance Sergeant Belcher with a mere handful of men elects to remain and endeavor to hold his position after the troops near him have been withdrawn.  By his skill and great  gallantry he maintains his position during the day, opening rapid fire on the enemy, who are only 150 to 200 yards distant, whenever he sees them collecting for an attack. There is little doubt that the bold front shown by this NCO prevents the enemy breaking through on the Wieltje Road and averts an attack on the flank of one of our divisions.

At Ypres when the line is broken beyond the right flank of the Dragoon Guards, Major George Harold Absell Ing comes out of his trench in the front, stands on the road in the open under heavy shell fire, stops the retirement of 40 men of another unit and turns them into his section of the defense.

Captain Alfred John Hamilton Bowen (Monmouthshire Regiment) though wounded in two places in the head before dawn refuses to leave his company and continues to command it with conspicuous ability.  After the action is over and his battalion returns to La Brique he is found to be suffering from two other wounds and is immediately sent to the hospital.  For his actions this day he will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  Lieutenant Colonel Bowen will be killed in action on 2 March 1917 at age 31.

During the Second Battle of Ypres, Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Deacon (commanding Essex Yeomanry) is ordered to make a dismounted counter-attack – at all costs – against a position 1,000 yards to his front, which had been taken by the enemy. The Essex men advance with the Hussars on their left and the Royal Horse Guards on their right. They fix bayonets, and, with a resounding cheer, the Essex Yeomanry charge across 400 yards of unbroken ground and up a steep slope to capture the position known as Frezenberg Ridge. Major Charles William Henry Crichton (Hussars) shows conspicuous gallantry in collecting and rallying men who are retiring under heavy shell fire through his regiment’s position.  During our counter-attack he continues to direct operations while he lays in the open under heavy shell fire with his leg shattered. In this fierce engagement five officers, including Lieutenant Colonel Deacon, and 46 men are killed, and 5 officers and 86 men wounded. Lieutenant Colonel Deacon is killed at age 43.

The battleship HMS Goliath (Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford) is torpedoed and sunk in Morto Bay by the Turkish destroyer Muavenent. There are five hundred seventy casualties and one hundred eighty survivors.

Captain Julian Henry Francis Grenfell DSO (Dragoons) is wounded in the head by a shell splinter in the Ypres salient. He will die of these wounds in less than two weeks. Two weeks earlier he has written the poem “Into Battle” the last four stanzas of which read:

In dreary, doubtful, waiting hours,

Before the brazen frenzy starts,

The horses show him nobler powers;

O patient eyes, courageous hearts

 

And when the burning moments breaks,

And all things else are out of mind,

And only joy of battle takes

Him by the throat, and makes him blind,

 

Through joy and blindness he shall know,

Not caring much to know, but still

Nor lead nor steel shall reach him, so

That it be not the Destined Will.

 

The thundering line of battle stands,

And in the air death moans and sings;

But Day shall clasp him with strong hands,

And Night shall fold him in soft wings.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Four battalion commanders
  • The heir to Lord Redesdale
  • The son and heir to the 5th Marquess of Northampton
  • The son of the 8th Baron Carbery
  • The son of the Baron of Beaufort
  • A son of the 1st Viscount of St Davids
  • The grandson of the 3rd Earl of Norbury
  • The son-in-law of the 4th Viscount Valencia
  • The son-in-law of the 4th Marquess of Ormonde
  • The son of a Baronet
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in the Second World War
  • A Great War poet
  • A man whose grandfather fought at Waterloo
  • An author and musician
  • A former Aide de Camp to the Commander in Chief in Ireland
  • The son of the late Vice Consul at Ghent Belgium
  • A man whose brother died of wounds in the South African War
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • A son of the judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand
  • The grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a General
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Two brothers killed together
  • An Assistant Scout Master

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel George Algernon Egerton (commanding 19th Hussars) is killed in action at age 44. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Algernon Fulke Egerton and he is a South Africa War veteran.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Eustace Robert Ambrose Shearman (commanding 10th Hussars) is killed at age 39. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Colin McLean (commanding 6th Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 41. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel “the Honorable” Percy Charles Evans-Freke (commanding Leicestershire Yeomanry) is killed by a sniper at age 43. He is the son of the 8th Baron Carbery. His brother died of wounds received at Bappisfontein, South Africa in June 1900.
  • Major William Francis Martin (Leicestershire Yeomanry) is killed at age 39. He is the second son of the late Robert Trewen Martin JP for the County of Leicestershire, and the grandson of the Reverend E R Larken Rector of Burton by Lincoln. Major Martin served as a Lieutenant with the Leicestershire Yeomanry in the South African War and received the Queen’s Medal and four clasps. He went to the Front in November 1914 with the Leicestershire Yeomanry while attached to the Life Guards. He served in the trenches near Ypres during the winter and spring.
  • Major Clement Bertram Ogilvy Freeman-Mitford DSO (Hussars) the heir to Lord Redesdale is killed in action at age 38. His nephew will be killed in 1945.
  • Major William Robinson Campbell DSO (Hussars) is killed in action at age 35. He is the eldest son of ‘Sir’ Charles Ralph Campbell, 11th
  • Captain and Adjutant Gerald Charles Stewart (Hussars) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Stewart who had another son killed last month and the grandson of Hector 3rd Earl of Norbury. Captain Stewart was gazetted to the Hussars in 1907. He joined the Hussars at Rawalpindi in the autumn of 1907 and was appointed Adjutant in 1912. He took part with his Regiment in quelling riots at Johannesburg in 1913. On the outbreak of the War he went to the Front with the 7th Division in October 1914 and was twice wounded at the first Battle of Ypres.
  • Captain Maurice Arthur De Tuyll (Hussars) is killed in action. He was born on 1 November 1888 and is the son of the late Baron and the Duchess of Beaufort.
  • Captain George Dalton Leake (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in three weeks on Gallipoli.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Colwyn Erasmus Arnold Philipps (Royal Horse Guards) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of the Right Honorable 1st Viscount St Davids PC and his brother Captain Roland Erasmus Philipps will also fall in the Great War being killed in July 1916. He is a Great War Poet and has written the short story “The Sniper”. 

There is a healing magic in the night,
The breeze blows cleaner than it did by day,
Forgot the fever of the fuller light,
And sorrow sinks insensibly away
As if some saint a cool white hand did lay
Upon the brow, and calm the restless brain.
The moon looks down with pale unpassioned ray –
Sufficient for the hour is its pain.
Be still and feel the night that hides away earth’s stain.
Be still and loose the sense of God in you,
Be still and send your soul into the all,
The vasty distance where the stars shine blue,
No longer antlike on the earth to call.
Released from time and sense of great or small
Float on the pinions of the Night-Queen’s wings;
Soar till the swift inevitable fall
Will drag you back into all the world’s small things;
Yet for an hour be one with all escaped things.

  •  Captain Geoffrey Vaux Salvin Bowlby (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 31 while leading a successful afternoon counter attack up the hill across open country near Gully Farm after part of the Brigade has been driven out of their trenches earlier in the day. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mr. Geoffrey Bowlby and is the son-in-law of the 4th Viscount Valencia and his grandfather fought at Waterloo. He was previously the Aide-de-Camp to the Commander in Chief in Ireland.
  • Captain & Adjutant Thomas Gordon Davson (Westminster Dragoons, Royal Horse Guards) an author and musician is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Henry Katz Davson.
  • Captain George Martin Chapman (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Dragoon Guards) is killed when he is blown up by a shell attending wounded. He is the son of the Honorable Frederick Revans Chapman Judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. He gained a Blue for football and a half Blue for Boxing while at Cambridge. He was also decorated with a French Gold Medal in December 1914 for saving life in rough seas off Boulogne.
  • Captain Sylvester Cecil Rait Kerr (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 27. His brother was killed in November 1914. Captain Edward Brassey Egerton (Lancers) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Lady Mabelle and the son-in-law of the 4th Marquess of Ormonde.
  • Captain Henry McLaren Lambert (Dragoons) is killed at age 36. He is the son of Edward Tiley Lambert JP.
  • Lieutenant Elphinstone D’Oyly Aplin (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at #3 Casualty Clearing Station received four days before when his platoon was cut off. He dies at age 22. His brother will be killed in March 1918 and they are grandsons of Admiral E D’O Alpin.
  • Lieutenant Henry Rawlings Cowan (Wellington Infantry) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Lieutenant Lord Spencer Douglas Compton (Royal Horse Guards and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry) at age 22. He is the son and heir of the 5th Marquess of Northampton KG.
  • Second Lieutenant Geoffrey Hamilton Bagshawe (Dragoons) is killed at age 25. He is the grandson of W H G Bagshawe DL.
  • Second Lieutenant F H B Bond (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ Francis G Bond KBE CB CMG.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Bramley (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. His older brother will be killed serving in the same regiment in February 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Cyril Richard Bramley Vicar of Bonisthorpe.
  • Sergeant Douglas Ledger (Essex Yeomanry) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in December.
  • Corporal Otis Murrel Meister Meister (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die on service in August 1919.
  • Corporal Albert A Claridge (London Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed over a two year period.
  • Private Albert J Seymour (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 30. His brother will be killed in August 1918.
  • Private Henry K Mann (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Rifleman Frederick Dye (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of three brothers who will be kill in the Great War the next will be killed next month and the final in 1917.
  • Trooper Theo Bennett Hallett (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 18.  He is the son of the late George H Hallett HBM Vice Consul Ghent Belgium.

 HMS Goliath casualties include:

  •  Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford the son of Thomas Shelford CMG age 43.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Ivor Morgan Lewis killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend David Lewis Rector of Llanbede who will lose another son in June 1917.
  • Major Cyril Frederick Barber (Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Edward Barber, the Archdeacon of Chester.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Walter Julian Orde DSC is killed at age 24 and is the son of ‘Sir’ Julian Walter Order. Lieutenant Orde was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his efforts on 28 November 1914 when a party of boats are attacked unexpectedly at the Dar es Salaam harbor entrance. Although wounded and under exceptionally heavy fire he brought his ship safely through the narrow channel.
  • Brothers Seaman Richard Worth and Mark Hallow Wallis (Royal Naval Reserve) are both killed. Mark dies at age 31 while Richard is 28.
  • Stoker Walter Lamacraft is killed at age 36. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Stoker 1 William Thorne is killed age 32 three months after his brother was killed in action.
  • Leading Seaman Charles Hewett is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Able Seaman Walter Percy Hendon is killed at age 20. His twin will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Hugh Hubert Holland (London Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is an Assistant Scout Master of the 17th St Pancras (Holy Trinity) Troop.

Tuesday 11 May 1915 – We Lost 537

German artillery bombards the Ypres/Menin road in the second battle of Ypres.

The 1st Kite Balloon Section proceeds to Steenvoorde for work with the Second Army in the Ypres sector.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of a General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A Rosslyn Park footballer
  • A man whose father was killed in the South African War
  • Two brothers killed together

Today’s highlighted casulaties are:

  •  Major George Stopford Adams (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 42. He is the son of Lieutenant General Cadwallader Adams CB and husband of Ada, of Guildford. He is buried at Lancashire Landing Cemetery.
  • Captain Christopher Boyd Andrews (Royal Marines, Plymouth Royal Naval Division) is killed on Gallipoli. He is the son of the Reverend John Marshall Andrews Vicar of St Jude’s London.
  • Captain Townsend George Powell (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Townsend Powell Vicar of Quinton.
  • Acting Lieutenant Jack Clixby Barnes (Royal Marines, Plymouth Royal Naval Division) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Edward Barnes.
  • Lieutenant Mervyn William Colomb (London Regiment) dies of wounds at home received at Ypres. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant George Frederick Cottrell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald David Lomax (Welsh Regiment attached Berkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. He is the son of Captain David Alexander Napier Lomax who was killed at Driefontein in March 1900 and a Rosslyn Park rugby footballer.
  • Company Sergeant Major Cecil Alexander Gates (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Brothers Lance Corporal Henry age 27 and Private Malcolm age 23 Cuthbertson are killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Sapper Edward Oliver Ruddock (New Zealand Engineers) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother will be killed in June 1917 and they are sons of Archdeacon David Ruddock of Hawkes Bay New Zealand.
  • Private John William Hall (Northumberland Fusiliers) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war in Germany at age 18. His brother will be killed in action on Gallipoli in August.
  • Private Gregory Duncan (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed in action at age 27. His brother will be killed in September of this year.
  • Rifleman Arthur Alfred Mears (London Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will die of wounds in five days.

Sunday 9 May 1915 – We Lost 4,330

Anthony Frederick Wilding

Anthony Frederick Wilding

The British attack opposite Fromelles and La Bassee in an attempt to capture the Aubers Ridge.  In the crucial preliminary bombardment fewer than eight percent of the artillery shells fired are high explosives, and the total time during which a sustained artillery barrage is possible is only forty minutes, severely limiting the amount of damage that will be done to the German barbed wire and trench defences.  Many of the shells are too light to do serious damage to the German earthworks.  As a result of the failures of the preliminary bombardment, when the British soldiers attack the German defences are relatively undamaged.  After the failure of the first assault, British troops running back to the safety of their own lines are fired on by the Germans as they run, but as they have with them a number of German prisoners, they are thought by the troops in the British trenches to be an enemy attack, and are fired on from the British side also.  Few survive the cross fire.  In an attempt to restore order Brigadier General Arthur Willoughby George Lowry-Cole CB DSO General Officer Commanding 25th Brigade 8th Division stands on the parapet of a British trench, where as he is exhorting the retreating men to make a stand, he is shot dead by enemy machine gun fire at age 54.  This afternoon General Haig orders a second attack, despite reports from air force reconnaissance of the steady forward movement of German reinforcements.  The commander of the Indian Corps, General Wilcocks protests at the order to attack again, as he had protested earlier and successfully at Neuve Chapelle. General Gough, commanding the Seventh Division also reports to Haig that, after a personal reconnaissance of the ground, he is convinced of the certainty of any further attempt to attack by daylight being a failure.  Only General Haking, commanding the First Division, has confidence in a further assault, Haig accepts Haking’s judgment.  Led by the kilted pipers of the 1st Black Watch, playing their bagpipes, the British forces attack again.  They are savaged by German machine gun fire.  When Haig orders the attack to be pushed in with bayonet at dusk, the commanders on the spot make it known that they regard such orders as a mistake. Haig cancels the orders, and tells the commanders that they must succeed on the following day.  The losses on this day, the first and as it emerges the only day of the Battle of Aubers Ridge are 458 officers and 11,161 men including 461 members of the Northamptonshire Regiment killed.  The Gloucestershire Regiment and the South Wales Borderers go over the top at 16:00 and are devastated by machine gun fire. Between then they will lose 495 men.

For the attack at Aubers Ridge (in support of the French in Artois) three radio equipped aircraft are detailed to report the progress of the infantry who are to display white linen strips, seven feet long by two feet wide, as they reach successive lines in the German defenses.  Unfortunately, the infantry does not reach those lines, and the airmen, in the smoke and dust of battle, find the tiny earth-colored figures of friend and foe beneath them impossible to distinguish.  The aircraft send 42 messages, but they are of little value.  This is the first such air scout report used to aid ground troops.  Soon “wireless” reports from aircraft become an essential element in artillery programs, and bad visibility is to be regarded as virtually fatal to chances of  success.

The first men of Kitchener’s New Army leave for active service in France. The first to embark is the Ninth (Scottish) Division one of the many New Army volunteer Divisions that were recruited during the previous nine months with great zeal all over Britain.  The Ninth Division is followed within two weeks by the Twelfth (Eastern) Division which also goes to the Western Front.  Three more New Army Divisions are being made ready for Gallipoli.

Corporal Charles Sharpe (Lincolnshire Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Rouges Bancs.  When in charge of a blocking party sent forward to take a portion of the German trench he is the first to reach the enemy’s position and using bombs with great determination and effect, he himself clears them out of a trench fifty yards long.  By this time all his party has fallen and he is then joined by four other men with whom he attacks the enemy again with bombs and captures a further trench two hundred yards long.  Corporal James Upton (Sherwood Foresters) is also awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Rouges Bancs.  During the whole of this day Corporal Upton displays the greatest courage in rescuing the wounded while exposed to very heavy rifle and artillery fire, going close to the enemy’s parapet regardless of his own personal safety.  One wounded man is killed by a shell whilst this NCO is carrying him.  When Corporal Upton is not actually carrying in the wounded he is engaged in bandaging and dressing the serious cases in front of our parapet, exposed to the enemy’s fire.

Corporal John Ripley (Black Watch) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery at Rue du Bois.  When leading his section on the right of the right platoon in the assault, he is the first man of the battalion to ascend the enemy’s parapet and from there he directs those following him to the gaps in the German wire entanglements.  He then leads his section through a breach in the parapet to a second line of trench, which had previously been decided upon as the final objective in this part of our line.  In that position Corporal Ripley, with seven or eight men, establishes himself, blocking both flanks and arranging a fire position, which he continues to defend until all his men have fallen and he himself has been badly wounded in the head.  Lance Corporal David Finlay (Black Watch) is also awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty near Rue du Bois when he leads a bombing party of twelve men with the greatest gallantry in the attack until ten of them have fallen.  Lance Corporal Finlay then orders the two survivors to crawl back, and he himself goes to the assistance of a wounded man and carries him over a distance of one hundred yards of fire swept ground into cover, quite regardless of his own personal safety.

The 9th (Scottish) Division begins to detrain at Saint-Omer becoming the first New Army Division to go overseas.

General Louis Botha captures Windhoek, SW Africa the territorial objective of the campaign without a fight.  The negotiations for surrender are carried on by telephone from Karibib.

 Today’s losses include:

  • A seven time (including 4 singles in a row) Wimbledon tennis champion
  • A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame
  • An Olympic Silver medalist
  • Multiple Olympic Bronze medal winners
  • A Davis Cup champion
  • A solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand
  • Seven battalion commanders
  • The son of poet and playwright Oscar Wilde
  • The father of writer Christopher Isherwood whose best known work The Berlin Stories will be adapted into the musical Cabaret
  • A son of Alice Liddell Hargreaves who was the inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • Multiple brothers killed together
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of the High Sheriff of Devon
  • The son of an Alderman
  • The son of a Judge of the High Court
  • The son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • An original Boy Scout
  • Multiple actors
  • The son of a member of the Editorial Staff of The Times
  • A man killed by a lion on service
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A brother of Lawrence of Arabia
  • A General
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The grandson of a General
  • The Master of Harrow
  • An Aide de Camp to the Governor of Victoria and the Governor of Australia
  • The Principal Cellist of the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra
  • The Founder and Conductor of the Edward Mason Choir and member of his wife’s Grimson String Quartet
  • A member of St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band
  • A member of the Choir of St Paul’s Cathedral
  • A First Class English cricketer
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • An England rugby International
  • A rugby player for Newtown
  • A Rosslyn Park rugby footballer
  • A man who will have a brother and a brother-in-law killed later in the war
  • A man whose brother will die as a prisoner of war in the Second World War
  • A man whose nephew and namesake will be killed in 1944
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father will be killed later in the Great War
  • A man whose father was killed in the South African War
  • A man whose father was killed on service in 1897
  • A man whose brother will die on service as a Brigadier in 1945
  • The son of the 11th Earl of Galloway
  • The son of the 9th Earl of Harrington
  • The son of the 7th Lord Rodney
  • The son of the 3rd Viscount Hardinge
  • The son of the 4th Viscount Templetown
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A grandson of Lord Leigh
  • A grandson of the Earl of Winchelsea nd Nottingham
  • A grandson of a Baronet
  • Nephew of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 One of the greatest tennis players of the era and member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame is killed in action while serving as a Captain in the Armored Car Division, Royal Marines at age 31. Anthony Frederick Wilding is a former Wimbledon Champion, 1907 (Doubles), 1908 (Doubles), 1910 (Singles and Doubles), 1911 (Singles), 1912 (Singles) & 1913 (Singles). He also won the 1912 Olympic Indoor Singles Bronze Medal.  He was a member of the All England Lawn Tennis Club and was a qualified Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.  He was ranked #3 in the world when he went to fight the Great War. He was in the process of being on the winning Australian Davis Cup team in August 1914 when war was declared and one week earlier he and his teammate swept the German team of Oscar Kreuzer and Otto Fratzheim who will both be captured returning to Germany from the United States and made prisoners for the remainder of the Great War.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Francis Edward Bradshaw Isherwood (York and Lancaster Regiment commanding 1st battalion) is killed at age 45. He is the son of John Bradshaw Isherwood JP and he served in the South African Campaign. His son is the writer Christopher Isherwood his best known work The Berlin Stories will be adapted as the musical
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Charles France-Hayhurst (commanding 4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 43. He played cricket at Eton in 1891 and his brother died while serving in the Royal Navy in February.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Marshall Finch DSO (commanding 2nd Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas Ross Finch and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Leigh Maxwell (Royal Marines) is killed on Gallipoli at age 37. Lieutenant Colonel Victor George Howard Rickard (commanding 2nd Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 40. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Courtenay Moroe.
  • Lieutenant Colonel George Swinton Tulloh (commanding 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Osbert Clinton Baker (commanding 1st Irish Rifles) is killed at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Aylmer Richard Sancton Martin (commanding 2nd Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the Reverend H Martin Vicar of Thatcham and a South African War Veteran.
  • Major Leonard Russell (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is the son of John Russell JP.
  • Major Giles Rooke (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the late Major General W Rooke.
  • Captain Arthur Reginald French and his brother Lieutenant ‘Honorable’ George Philip French (South Wales Borderers) killed in action at ages 35 and 25. Arthur is the 5th Baron De Freyne and had succeeded to the title in 1913 and they are two of four sons of the 4th Baron to be killed in the Great War. Lord de Freyne served as an enlisted man in the United States Army in the Philippines.
  • Captain Charles Augustus Werner (Rifle Brigade) the Master of Harrow is killed at age 38.
  • Captain Wilfred John Hutton Curwen (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 32. He previously served as Aide de Campe to ‘Sir’ John Fuller Governor of Victoria and the Right Honorable Lord Denman Governor of Australia. He played Association football for Oxford and was a member of MCC.
  • Captain Alan Knyveton Hargreaves DSO (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 33. His mother is Alice Liddell Hargreaves the inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Captain Charles Mylne Mullaly (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 30. He is the first of three sons of Major General ‘Sir’ Herbert Mullaly who will lose their lives as a result of war service.
  • Captain Paul Adrian Kennedy (Rifle Brigade) is killed by a sniper while leading his Company in an attack on Aubers Ridge, near Fromelles at age 28. He is the second of three sons of ‘Sir’ John Gordon Kennedy KCMG of HM Diplomatic Service to be killed in the war. Captain Kennedy was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade in 1906. He served with his Regiment in Malta, Egypt, and India, and was at home on leave when the War broke out. He went to France the following month and was wounded in the Battle of the Aisne and invalided home. In December 1914 he was offered two Staff appointments, which he refused. He returned to the Front in March 1915 and is killed by a sniper.
  • Captain Christopher York Pease (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Alfred Pease the Baronet.
  • Captain and Adjutant George Ernest Weatherhead (Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 39. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Robert Johnston Weatherhead Vicar of Seacombe.
  • Captain Montagu Hill Clephane Wickham (Connaught Rangers) is killed age 36. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Hill Wickham and The Princess Eugenie Paleologue. He served in the South Africa War and with the West Africa Frontier Force from 1908 to 1914.
  • Captain David Dudley (Punjabi Light Infantry attached Jat Light Infantry) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Dudley Vicar of Overmunnow and he is a veteran of the South Africa War.
  • Captain and Adjutant ‘the Honorable’ Eric Edward Montagu John Upton (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Henry Upton the 4th Viscount Templetoown and grandson of Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham.
  • Captain Duncan Hamlyn Davidson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 37 at Neuve Chapelle. He is the elder son of Duncan Davidson DL JP and of Flora Frances Davidson eldest daughter of ‘Sir’ Francis Burdett Baronet. At the outbreak of the South African War Captain Davidson after having served with the Gordon Militia, obtained a commission, through the late King, in the Seaforth Highlanders, although he was over age at the time. He served with his Regiment in Egypt and India, and was then posted to the Adjutancy of the 4th Seaforth Territorial Battalion which he gave up in 1913. He was stationed at Agra when orders came for the Indian Force to proceed to France, where he arrived in October 1914. He was severely wounded on 17th December and invalided home. He returned to his Battalion on 28 March 1915.
  • Captain Frederick William Grantham (Munster Fusiliers) is killed leading his men in a charge at Richebourg at age 44. He is the second son of ‘Sir’ William Grantham Judge of the High Court, MP for East Surrey 1874-85, and for Croydon in 1885-6 and is a veteran of the South Africa War.  His elder son will be killed next month on Gallipoli while his younger son will lose his life serving as a Pilot Instructor in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in June 1942.  He is a great traveler in the Far East and an authority on Eastern philosophy. He made many journeys on foot in the interior of China and walked with Buddhist monks from Siam to Burma. Captain Grantham served in the South African War receiving the King’s Medal. On the outbreak of the War he rejoined the Royal Munster Fusiliers, with whom he had served in South Africa, and left for the Front in September 1914. He served continuously with his Regiment through the winter of 1914-15.
  • Captain Cyril Holland (Royal Field Artillery) is shot and killed at age 29 when involved in a dual with a German sniper while sniping himself. He is the eldest son of playwright and poet Oscar Wilde and Constance Lloyd Wilde. After this father’s imprisonment in 1895, his mother changed their name to Holland, which was an old family name. He was considered pompous and intolerant by his brother officers.
  • Captain Alan Geoffrey Fox (Royal Engineers attached Royal Flying Corps) is killed in an aerial combat at age 27. He is one of the first five officers in the Army taught to fly.
  • Captain Reginald Baird Trotter (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 41. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry and the Honorable Lady Trotter 11th of Mortonhall and 2nd of Charterhall.
  • Captain Walter Fairfax Richardson (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 41. He is the son of Major General Richardson CB.
  • Captain John Edmund Valentine Isaac DSO (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 35. He played first team Cricket for the Orange Free State 1906-7 and for Worcester 1907-8. He is the son of John Swinton Isaac DL and grandson of Major General R H Crofton RA. His brother will be killed in July 1916.  He was an English cricketer a right-handed batsmen who played ten first-class matches in South Africa and England between 1906 and 1908.  Isaac’s first-class debut came for the South Africa Army cricket team in the only match of that standard they ever played, when they met MCC at Thara Tswane, Pretoria in January 1906. In 1906-07 he played four times for Orange Free State in the Currie Cup.  In 1907 and 1908, Isaac made five appearances for Worcestershire County Cricket Club.  He rode in various races, winning the Cairo Grand National in 1911, on a horse trained and partly owned by him. Captain Isaac was gazetted to the Northumberland Fusiliers in 1900 and in June of that year joined his Regiment on active service in South Africa. He was dangerously wounded at Nooitgedacht and received the King’s Medal and three clasps. He was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade in 1908 and served with them in Malta and Egypt. He left the Regiment in 1911, and went to Vancouver, engaging in real estate. He hunted and shot on the Yukon and played polo in California. On the rumor of war Captain Isaac at once started for England and rejoined his Regiment. In October 1914 he went to the Front as ADC and Camp Commandant to Major-General ‘Sir’ Thompson Capper, commanding 7th He was wounded at the 1st Battle of Ypres and received the DSO for “conspicuous gallantry” on that occasion, besides being twice mentioned in Despatches. He returned to the Front in December 1914 but in the spring, after his General was wounded, he resigned his appointment on the Staff and joined his Regiment, reaching them three days before today’s action on the Aubers-Fromelles Ridge.
  • Lieutenant Charles Selwyn Cowley (Northamptonshire Regiment) killed at age 21. He is the son of John Selwyn Cowley JP.
  • Lieutenant Noel Price James Turner (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend John James Turner Vicar of Pentreheglin.
  • Lieutenant Charles Stirling Walter Greenland (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is initially wounded and is on his way back to a dressing station when he is killed by a random shell. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Albert Greenland.
  • Lieutenant Henry Mills Goldsmith (Devonshire Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) won a Bronze Medal as a member of the 1908 eight-oared shell with coxswain team. He is 29 years old.
  • Lieutenant Edward Henry Leigh (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 26. He is the second son of the Honorable ‘Sir’ E Chandos Leigh KCB KC to be killed in the war and grandson of Lord Leigh. Lieutenant Leigh received his Commission in 1911 when he joined the Rifle Brigade in India, being promoted Lieutenant in 1913. He went to the Front with his Regiment in November 1914 and took part in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, his Battalion gaining the distinction of being the first actually to enter and capture that village.
  • Lieutenant Talbot FitzRoy Eden Stanhope (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the 9th Earl of Harrington.
  • Lieutenant Robert Larmour Neill (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lieutenant Kenneth Herbert Clayton Woodroffe (Rifle Brigade attached Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He was a cricketer for Hampshire and Sussex from 1912 to 1914. His two brothers, including Second Lieutenant Sidney Clayton Woodroffe VC, will be killed in the next 13 months.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Keith Anthony Stewart (Black Watch) is killed leading his men in the charge from Bois du Biez towards the Aubers Ridge at age 20. He is the younger son of Randolph, 11th Earl of Galloway. Lieutenant Stewart was gazetted to the Black Watch in August 1914 and went to the Front in the following December. He served at the Battles of Givenchy, Neuve Chapelle, and Festubert.
  • Lieutenant Robert Lamour Neill (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme.
  • Lieutenant James Augustus Stewart (Royal Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. He is a nephew of the late ‘Sir’ Augustus A J Stewart, 9th Baronet of Fort Stewart.
  • Lieutenant Edward Phillips Jackson (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend William Edward Jackson Rector of Loughton.
  • Lieutenant Wilfrid Stanley Bird (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend George Bird Rector of Newdigate.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Roland Juckes (Sussex Regiment) is killed in the Battle of Aubers Ridge at age 19. His brother will be killed in July of this year.
  • Lieutenant Bertie Charles Lousada (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother was killed in November 1914 and his brother-in-law last February.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Edward Mapletoft Atkinson (Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of Major General John Richard Breeks Atkinson who has already had one son killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Reginald John Legard (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘Sir’ James Legard KCB.
  • Lieutenant George Robert Murray Crofts (Welsh Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. He is the son of the late Reverend J Crofts Vicar of Dalton Wigan Christ’s Hospital 1903-1911. He was also the Senior Grecian Scholar of Jesus College, Oxford.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Lenthall Loder-Symonds (Cameronians) is killed in action at age 22. He is one of four brothers who will die in the Great War and they are sons of Captain Frederick Cleave Loder-Symonds JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Ralph Hardinge (Rifle Brigade) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of the 3rd
  • Second Lieutenant Edward Mason (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 36. He was for seventeen years on the Music Staff at Eton College, the principal Cellist of the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra and founder and conductor of the Edward Mason Choir. His wife was a violinist who performed professionally as Jessie Grimson of the Grimson String Quartet which included her husband.
  • Second Lieutenant William Patrick Heffernan (Irish Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He was a prize winning athlete at boxing and running at Dublin University and was the son of Dr W K Heffernan JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Swayne Pearce (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward C Pearce.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Stewart Waddington (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 22. His father Major F S W Raikes was killed in action in 1897 and his brother will die on service as a Brigadier in April 1945.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘Sir’ William Graham Hoste 4th Baronet (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 19. He is the only son of the 3rd Baronet the late ‘Sir’ William H C Hoste Baronet. Lieutenant Hoste left for France in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant George Pickersgill Cable (Rifle Brigade) is killed while leading his platoon in the attack at age 23. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Ernest Cable, High Sheriff of Devon and ex-President of the Bengal Chamber of Commerce.  Lieutenant Cable obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade on the outbreak of the War in August 1914 and went to the Front in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Henry Powell (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of a member the Editorial Staff of “The Times”.
  • Second Lieutenant Kenneth Rose Dennys (Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. He is a young actor who appeared in Maeterlinck’s Blue Bird and was Private Secretary to Monsignor R H Benson.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ William Francis Rodney (Rifle Brigade attached Royal Flying Corps) dies of wounds received in action at the end of a long and continuous ranging of guns which have silenced several German batteries. He was an original Boy Scout and the son of the 7th Lord Rodney.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert George Ferguson-Davie (Portsmouth Battalion, Royal Marines) is also killed. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Arthur Francis Ferguson-Davie Baronet CIE DSO who will be killed next year in Mesopotamia.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Cecil Brian (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds in October 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Russell Eagar (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1918 and their father Captain Edward Boaz Eagar (Northumberland Fusiliers) was killed during the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant William Lionel Brownlow (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 18. He is the son of Brigadier General D’Arcy Charles Brownlow.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Banes-Walker (Devonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He played five matches for the Somerset Cricket Club in 1914. He also played rugby for the Clifton Rugby Football Club and hockey for Gloucestershire. The Devonshire Regiment are not involved in the initial assault but are ordered into the front British trenches in support. As they are moving up, they come under heavy German artillery and machine-gun fire, and between 18:45 and 19:30 Banes-Walker is killed His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Maurice Day (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend Benjamin William Day Rector of St Peter’s Sandwich.
  • Second Lieutenant James Ingleby Farmer (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the late Reverend James Farmer.
  • Second Lieutenant Jasper Moore Mayne (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in February 1916.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Ellis Cunliffe (Berkshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the brother of ‘Sir’ Cyril Henley Cunliffe the 8th
  • Second Lieutenant Kenneth Henry Anderson (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 20 at Quinn’s Post. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Hudson Anderson.
  • Second Lieutenant Roy Fazan (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is a Rosslyn Park rugby footballer and his nephew and namesake will be killed in the same regiment in 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Frank Helier Lawrence (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the brother of Thomas Edward Lawrence “of Arabia”
  • Sergeant Major James Sharp Armour DCM is killed. His brother will die of illness in April 1919.
  • Sergeant Walter Fellowes and his brother Private Albert Edward Fellowes age 20 are killed together.
  • Sergeant Norman Baird (Black Watch) is killed at age 25. His son will lose his life in July 1944 serving in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
  • Sergeant Henry William Sheppard (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in December 1917.
  • Sergeant Robert Watson (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Alexandria. His brother will be killed in November 1917 and they are nephews of the Bishop of St David’s.
  • The actor Corporal Robert Vincent (Australian Imperial Forces) is killed in action at Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Alfred Tame age 28 and his brother Acting Corporal William George Tame (Berkshire Regiment) are killed together. Another brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Corporal Henry Berry (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is an English International Rugby player who earned four caps and scored in two games in the Five Nations tournament of 1910.  After service in the South African War as a guard on St Helena, he played rugby for the Regiment from 1902 until his discharge in 1909.  He then played for Gloucester between 1909 and 1913.  In 1909 he was selected as a reserve for the England team.  He is one of one hundred eleven international rugby players who will lose their lives in the Great War including three other members of that 1910 England team, L Haigh, R H M Hands and E R Mobbs.
  • Corporal Joseph Oxby (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 28. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lance Corporal James Henry Hunt (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Lance Corporal William Wright is killed. His brother will die of wounds in October 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Pridham (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. His younger brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private James Brawn (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die as a prisoner of war of the Japanese in May 1944.
  • Brothers and Privates Frederick age 19 and George Clarke age 21 are killed serving in the Northamptonshire Regiment.
  • Private Jack Deans (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Jack Anker is killed at age 19 four months after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Harold Robert Burchnell is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in two years.
  • Private Joseph Garside is killed. His brother will die of pneumonia on service next December.
  • Private Ernest Burrough Lock is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Private Samuel Woodcock is killed at age 27. His brother will die of wounds in August 1917.
  • Private James Simmons is killed. His brother will die at home from gas poisoning and shell shock in December 1918.
  • Albert age 19 and Harry Hughes age 18 are killed serving as Privates with the ‘A’ Company 2nd Gloucestershire Regiment in action neaer Sanctuary Wood, Zillebeke.
  • Private Henry George Cooke (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in August.
  • Sapper Fred Grubb (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 23. The silver medalist in both the Road Race (Cycling) and the Team Time Trial at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics,
  • Rifleman Paul Frederick Hebert (Rifle Brigade) is killed at Ypres. He is the son of Alderman H F Hebert.
  • Rifleman Frederick Kennard (Rifle Brigade) is killed near Ypres at age 26. His brother will die of wounds in the same general vicinity in December.
  • Private Joseph Hancock (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private James Bain (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 28. His brother will be killed in September 1915 serving in the Royal Naval Reserve.
  • Private Harold Arthur Croxford (London Regiment) is killed in action. He was a member of the choir of St Paul’s Cathedral.
  • Private George Henry Gaston (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Richebourg at age 24. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Wilfred Johns (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in Mesopotamia in December 1916.
  • Private Edward Shadwell (Canterbury Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Sidney Ames Trout (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brothers were killed last year.
  • Private Arthur Maurice Tweed Newman (London Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Edwin Tweed Newman Vicar of St Andrew’s Whittlesey.
  • Private Richard Roy Davis (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed exactly one week before.
  • Driver James Edward Clifford Williams (Australian Army Service Corps) dies of injuries in Egypt at age 27. He played Rugby for Newtown in 1908.
  • Private Arthur Henry Coppack (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Johns (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in December 1916 in Mesopotamia.
  • Private James Harper Shepherd (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed near Richebourg L’Avoue at age 18. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private Joseph M Adamson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918.
  • Private John McNamara (Munster Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 35. He is the second of three members of the St Mary’s Fife and Drum Band who will be killed in the first year of the Great War.
  • Private Percy Etherington (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Private Reuben Wheatley (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed in the explosion of HMS Bulwark last November.
  • Private Frederick Wadey (Queens West Surrey Regiment) is killed at Festubert. He is the first of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Randle Newcombe Griffin (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in December 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Horatio John Griffin Rector of Broxholme.
  • Private Thomas Edwin Lyons (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in November 1916.
  • Private Edward Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed. He is the middle of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Harry Fletcher (Sherwood Foresters) is killed one month after his brother was killed.
  • Private William Francis Elmes (Sussex Regiment) a veteran of the South African War is killed at age 34. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private William Joseph Bull (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at Frezenburg Ridge. His brother died of wounds in September 1914.
  • Private William Monaghan (Royal Scots) is killed in action at age 27. His brother Frank was killed in February 1915. Private Donald Royan DCM (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 30. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Three sets of brothers serving in the London Regiment, Privates Dudley Graham Millington age 29 and Arthur Gordon Millington age 30. Privates Charles Albert and George Harry Heaver and Corporal William Henry and Private Walter Sydney Belsten are killed side by side at Aubers Ridge.
  • At least two other sets of brothers will be killed today serving together. Lance Corporal Aubrey age 25 and Private Jack Brooks age 26 and Albert age 20 and William Hawkins age 24 are killed serving in the Sussex Regiment.
  • Scout Norman Sinclair (Northern Rhodesia Police) is killed by a lion on active service on the Rhodesian frontier.

Monday 3 May 1915 – We Lost 945

At the second battle of Ypres, the British withdrawal to a new line of defense is completed.  The Germans are again driven back.

Submarine E14 sinks a Turkish gunboat in the Sea of Marmora.

Nigerians led by Lieutenant Colonel Haywood capture Ndupe Cameroon.

For the third night in a row Turkish forces attack the Allies on Gallipoli, only to be beaten off with heavy casualties.

An advertisement in American newspapers states that ships flying the British flag are liable to destruction in the war zones.

Today’s losses include:

  • A football player for Ewell
  • Brothers killed on the same day serving in different units
  • A man whose twin brother will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of the High Sheriff for County Denbigh
  • Multiple families that will lose a second son in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will two additional sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Captain Walter Hayes Pickering Richards (Royal Marines) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Edward Richards Rector of Little Heaton.
  • Captain Arthur Vivian Spedding (Otago Infantry) is killed on Pope’s Hill during the attack on Baby 700 at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1916.
  • Captain Edward Grahame Mylne (Irish Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the son of Bishop Louis George Mylne Bishop of Bombay and his brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Lieutenant Lionel James Ormrod (Lancers) dies at home at age 32. He is the first of three sons of Major Oliver Ormrod JP and High Sheriff for County Denbigh to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Alexander David Deane (Portsmouth Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Thomas and Lady Deane.
  • Lieutenant Hugh Liddon Richards (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Right Reverend Isaac Richards the Bishop of Dunedin. His brother will die of wounds in Egypt in twenty-days.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Giffard (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 26 on Gallipoli. He has two brothers who will be killed during the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Gordon Livingstone (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34 in the Second Battle of Ypres. He is the youngest son of the late Henry Darley Livingston JP of Belclare Westport, Co. Mayo. Lieutenant Livingstone was in the Argentine when the War broke out and returned to England in December 1914, in order to join the Army. He was given a Commission in the Royal Field Artillery, Lahore Division Indian Expeditionary Force in the following month, and after short training at Exeter left for France in April 1915.
  • Sergeant Arthur Frederick Varcoe (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in 5 days.
  • Lance Sergeant Walter John Frampton (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Alexandria. He is the son of the Reverend James Frampton.
  • Lance Corporal John Latham Hampton (London Regiment) is killed at age 38. He played football for Ewell Football Club and has a brother who will die of wounds in 11 days.
  • Private George Albert Isted (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in July next year.
  • Private (Signalller) Hugh M Dickson (Black Watch) is killed at Arras at age 24. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Able Seaman Walter Emanuel De La Mare (Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval Division) is killed in action at age 18. His younger brother will be killed in 1918 at age 20. Private Alfred Wilkins (Australian Infantry) becomes the first of four brothers to lose their lives in the Great War when he is killed on Gallipoli at age 33.
  • Brothers and Privates Benjamin Thomas age 22 and William John Ollard age 30 are killed on the same day while serving with two different units. Benjamin is killed with Middlesex Regiment and William with the Royal Fusiliers.  Both are commemorated on the Ypres Memorial.
  • Private Cecil Hamilton Kirkwell Fitzmaurice (Army Service Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private William George Bartleman (Royal Scots) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Arthur Hoper (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private David Shaw Baillie (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His twin brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Rifleman George Patrick Northam (London Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1917.

Sunday 2 May 1915 – We Lost 1,344

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

A German attack is repulsed near St Julien.

Turkish forces at Gallipoli attack, while British/Franco forces counter attack.  The British forces fail in an attack at Gaba Tepe. Sergeant N Roberts (Royal Marines) is awarded the DSM during operations south of Achi Baba displaying coolness and gallantry in carrying men out of fire. The Turkish Minister of War sends British and French subjects into the danger zone at Gallipoli.  Kite balloon ship Manica directs naval gunfire towards batteries at Sin that records three direct hits.  Australians take part in the Battle of Baby 700.

The “Chessboard” is attacked by three Australian Battalions, the Otago Infantry Regiment and two battalions of Royal Marines; and on the same day a Turkish Observation Post at Lala Baba is destroyed by New Zealanders. The Canterbury Battalion, raid Nibrunesi Point, at Salt Lake, Suvla Bay capturing fifteen Turks and destroying Turkish artillery observers’ telephone wires and huts.

Private John Lynn (Lancashire Fusiliers) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Ypres.  When the Germans are advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas Private Lynn, although almost overcome by the deadly fumes, handles his machine gun with very great effect against the enemy, and when he cannot see them he moves his gun to higher up on the parapet, which enabled him to bring even more effective fire to bear, and eventually checks any further advance.  The great courage displayed by this soldier has a fine effect on his comrades in the very trying circumstances.  He dies the following day from the effects of gas poisoning.

Union forces occupy Otjimbingwe, German South West Africa.

A British detachment at Chahbar, on the Gulf of Oman, commanded by Lieutenant C. M. Maltby, 95th Russell’s Infantry successfully repulses a tribal attack.

Today’s losses include:

  • The man who inspired John McCrae to compose the poem In Flanders Fields
  • A brother of future Victoria Cross winner James Thomas Byford McCudden
  • The grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • A cousin of the President of Magdalen College, Oxford
  • A father and son killed together
  • A scout master
  • A school master
  • A divinity student
  • The son of a Brigadier General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Early on this morning Lieutenants Owen Carley Frederic Hague and Alexis Hannum Helmer (Canadian Field Artillery) leave their position to check on a battery whose personnel have positioned themselves on the bank of the Yser Canal near St. Julien close to the France-Belgium border. They have only gone a few yards when a six inch, high explosive canon shell burst killing them both instantly. Lieutenant Helmer is killed at age 22. He is the son of Brigadier General Richard Alexis Helmer. His death so affects John McCrae one of Alexis’ instructors at McGill University in Montreal that the next day he will vent his anguish by composing the poem In Flanders Field. Lieutenant Hague (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 26. He is the son of Frederick Hague KC.
  • Lieutenant Richard Ewen Egglestone (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Sidney Pelham Burn (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of the late Reverend William Pelham Burn (Archdeacon of Norfolk) and is planning to take Holy Orders having matriculated for New College, Oxford.
  • Lieutenant John Spencer Ruscombe Anstice (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘Sir’ Arthur Anstice KCB of Dymock, Glos. (Mentioned in Despatches) and is buried at Redoubt Cemetery.
  • Lieutenant Bernard Henry Herford (Royal Marines) a schoolmaster is dies of wounds at age 29 on a hospital ship off Gallipoli received 28th His brother was killed on HMS Monmouth in November 1914. They are sons of Percy Michener Heford (Canon of St Mary’s Cathedral and Rector of Christ Church, both in Edinburgh.
  • Lieutenant Charles Herbert George Martin (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of Charles Herbert James, for some years M.P. for Merthyr Tydfil and was first cousin of the President of Magdalen College.
  • Lieutenant Malcolm Drury Campbell (Howe Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 24. He is the son of Herbert Ernest Campbell (Chancellor of Carlisle).  While leading his company he is hit in the head by a machine gun bullet.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Edward Glossop (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Canon George Henry Pownall Glossop.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Reginald Fausset (Royal Irish Regiment) is killed on the Western Front at age 36. He is the son of the late Reverend Charles Fausset and was Captain of the Trinity College Cricket XI and the mile and quarter-mile champion of Ireland.
  • Sergeant William McCudden (Royal Flying Corps) dies of injuries received in a flying accident at home at age 24. He is giving a lesson at Gosport, near Portsmouth, when a carburetor floods, causing his Bleriot plane to lurch. He tries to clear the problem by going into a nose dive, but crashes. His two brothers will be killed in the Royal Flying Corps and Air Force in 1918 including James Thomas Byford McCudden winner of the Victoria Cross.
  • Sergeant William Pritchard age 42 and his son Private Reginald J Pritchard age 19 are killed in action together while serving in the Monmouthshire Regiment.
  • Corporal Alban Shepherd Munn (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Shepherd Munn.
  • Lance Corporal John Henry Rose (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 24 six weeks before his younger brother will be killed serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lance Corporal John Henry Wilton (Monmouthshire Regiment) a scout master is killed at age 22.
  • Private Claude Otto Strachey (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private Robert Reid Fraser (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Percy Lionel Gent (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Pescod (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 34. His brother will be killed in November also serving on Gallipoli.
  • Private Isaac Charles Gosset (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Hilgrove Gosset Archdeacon of Christchurch New Zealand.
  • Private Eric James Victor Davis (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in exactly one week.
  • Rifleman Harold David Vallentine (London Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Henry Charles Toombs (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. His brother died in London on active service less than one month ago.
  • Private James Henry Royle (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Peter Binks Pratt (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed.  His brother will be killed in October.

Saturday 1 May 1915 – We Lost 626

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

History records the first repulse of a gas attack. The men who defeat it are the men of the British 15th Brigade (5th Division) by sheer courage and determination. If any single unit can be singled out, it is the 1st Dorsetshire Regiment, who maintain rapid fire from their trench, ignoring the gas swirling around them; for this they pay a price. Ninety men dead of gas poisoning in the trenches, 207 more admitted to dressing stations, of which 46 die almost immediately, and twelve more after long suffering. Out of 2,413 British gas cases admitted to hospital during this period, 277 die.  After the repulse of the German attack on Hill 60, British forces are ordered to withdraw to a new line.

Private Edward Warner (Bedfordshire Regiment) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Hill 60. After Trench 46 has been vacated by our troops consequent to the gas attack, Private Warner enters it alone in order to prevent the enemy from taking possession.  Re-enforcements are sent to Private Warner but cannot reach him owing to the gas. He then comes back and brings up more men, by which time he is completely exhausted but the trench is held until the enemy attack ceases. This very gallant soldier dies shortly afterwards from the effects of gas poisoning.

A small battle takes place in the North Sea in which the Trawler Columbia (Lieutenant Commander Walter Hawthorn killed) is sunk with a loss of all seventeen crew members except one. The German torpedo boats A2 and A6 are also sunk by British destroyers in the North Sea.  The destroyer Recruit (Commander C A Wrightson, survives) is torpedoed by UB-6 off the Galloper light.  The ship sinks causing forty-three casualties. There are twenty-six survivors.

Navigation resumes between England and Holland.

Turkish forces, 16,000 strong, attack the entire Allied line on the Gallipoli peninsula.  The attacks are futile and the Turks are driven back. Lieutenant Colonel Richard Nelson Bendyshe (commanding Deal Battalion, Royal Marines) the grandnephew of Lord Horatio Nelson is killed.  The Colonel, visiting a section of his trenches, is shot by his own men, who in a fit of spy mania, kill him, wound three others, and slightly bayonet Colonel McNicoll.

The 1st/5th Royal Scots come under heavy bombardment.  During the night the enemy attack and the Turks break through the first line of trenches and come rushing down the gully, but then are met by the battalion with fixed bayonets. Captain D C McLagan restores the situation with a brilliant counter-attack.

The Lusitania leaves New York’s Pier 54 on its final voyage.  The cargo is entered on the manifest as foodstuffs, metal rods, ingots and boxes of cartridges.  Controversy concerning the true nature of the cargo will persist for many years.

Submarine E14 sinks the Turkish gunboat Nurelbahr in the Sea of Marmora.

Lieutenant James Cheetham (Royal Marines) is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he conducts himself with gallantry during operations south of Achi Baba.  When the enemy in strength of about a battalion attack an outpost of thirty men under Lieutenant Cheetham he calls for two volunteers and dashes out to a flank under very heavy fire into the open, bringing rapid fire to bear on the enemy and thus checks the attack and saves the outpost.  Private C J Braddock (Royal Marines) is awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal as one of the volunteers in this action.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Two battalion commanders
  • A grand nephew of Lord Horatio Nelson
  • A man accidentally shot by his own men
  • The son of a Baronet
  • An Otago football player
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Robert Ouseley Cuthbert Hume (commanding 1st Border Regiment) dies of wounds on Gallipoli at age 48.
  • Captain John Cockburn Jessop Teague (Portsmouth Royal Marines) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in October 1915 and they are sons of Chaplain of the Collegiate Church Crediton the Reverend John Jessop Teague.
  • Captain Perceval Christian Chapman (Mountain Battery Royal Artillery) dies of wounds in Alexandria received 25 April at Gallipoli at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Theodore Charles Chapman Vicar of Langley and he has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.
  • Lieutenant Herbert George Ferguson Davie (Royal Marines) is killed at age 42. His brother will die of wounds next April and they are sons of ‘Sir’ William Augustus Ferguson Davie 3rd
  • Private Ambrose Alphonsus Falconer (Otago Infantry) is killed. He is a well-know Otago football wing and forward who played versus Canterbury and Southland in 1908.
  • Private Walter Silcox (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother was lost when HMS Aboukir was sunk last September.
  • Private Henry Raymond Fisher (Montreal Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in August 1917.

Thursday 29 April 1915 – We Lost 515

HMHS Gascon

HMHS Gascon

In the second battle of Ypres there are artillery duels north of the city.  Canadians are withdrawn from the salient.

Turks retreat from the neighborhood of the Suez Canal.

Submarine E14 sinks a Turkish transport in the Sea of Marmora.

On Gallipoli the 1st/5th Royal Scots move to the left flank and build a redoubt.  Lieutenant Colonel J T R Wilson is wounded but eventually finds his way back to the battalion.  A Turkish sniper had appeared from a bush about twelve yards from him.  The first bullet fired hits the bolt of Wilson’s rifle and a second Sergeant Allsop.  A third passes through the Colonel’s arm.  Having made his escape, the Colonel comes across a party of Turks from whom he asks directions.  They seem not interested in taking him prisoner, and at the same time offer him no assistance.  Moving on, Colonel Wilson then encounters another sniper who fires three shots at him.  He then lays on his back pretending to be dead until he can make his escape.

The hospital ship Gascon reaches Alexandria, Egypt with the first 548 casualties from Anzac, fourteen of whom died in the one and a half-day voyage.

Today’s losses include:

  • The grandson of the New Zealand Postmaster General
  • A schoolmaster
  • The son of a General
  • The grandson of a Rear Admiral
  • The brother-in-law of the 7th Earl of Poulett who will die on service later in the war
  • Another man whose brother-in-law will be killed later in the war
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A man who is one of three sons in a family that will be lost

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Major Godfrey Barker (Drake Battalion Royal Marines) is killed on Gallipoli at age 32. He is the son of the late Colonel ‘Sir’ Francis Barker Kt.
  • Major Macelesfield Heptinstall Anderson (33rd Light Cavalry, Indian Army) is killed in Mesopotamia at age 41. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Horace Searle Anderson.
  • Major Edward Charles Talbot (47 Sikhs, Indian Army) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in August 1918. They are grandsons of Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ Charles Talbot and Edward’s brother-in-law will be killed in September 1918.
  • Captain Cecil John Talbot Rhys Wingfield (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 33. He is the son-in-law of the 6th Earl Poulett and brother-in-law of Captain William John Lydston Poulett the 7th Earl who will die on service in July 1918.
  • Captain Edward Allen Smeathman Hatton (Royal Marines) is killed in action at age 31. He is the son of the late Reverend J L S Hatton.
  • Corporal Philip Gardner Tattle (Wellington Infantry) is killed. He is a schoolmaster at Longbush.
  • Lance Corporal Cecil Herbert Norton (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Philip Norton Rector of Brindon Parva.
  • Private Percy Edgar Vile (Australian Infantry) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. His epitaph reads “May God’s Perpetual Light Shine on Him”. His brother will be killed in May.
  • Private Edward Herbert Fisher (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of the late James Temple Fisher the New Zealand Postmaster General.
  • Private Bernard Eyre Baxter (Wellington Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Thomas Dolan (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.

Monday 26 April 1915 – We Lost 1,609

Charles Doughty-Wylie

Charles Doughty-Wylie

In the second battle of Ypres German forces pierce the British line at Broodseinde while again the British fail to recover St Julien. “Gas Masks, Type I”, rather useless patches of blue flannel mouth covering, are distributed to the British and Canadian troops in the line. Jemadar Mir Dast (55th Rifles attached 57th Rifles IOM) is awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability at Ypres. He leads his platoon with great gallantry during the attack, and afterwards collects various parties of the regiment (when no British officers are left) and keeps them under his command until the retirement is ordered. Jemadar Mir Dast subsequently on this day displays remarkable courage in helping to carry eight British and Indian officers into safety while exposed to very heavy fire.

After his company commander has been wounded Lieutenant George Stuart Henderson (Manchester Regiment) leads his company to within 70 yards of the enemy’s trenches with great gallantry and determination and holds on through several hours of daylight and finally establishes himself there. Throughout the operations he set a final example after most of the senior officers have become casualties.  On 24th July 1920 Captain Henderson will lead his company during the Iraqi revolt in three charges against the enemy who had opened fire from the flank. At one time when the situation was extremely critical, the captain, by sheer pluck and coolness, steadied his command and prevented his company from being cut up. During the second charge he will fall wounded but refuses to leave his command and just as the company reaches the trench, he is again wounded, this time mortally. For his actions he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

British airmen bomb Courtrais and various neighboring places. Second Lieutenant William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse (Royal Flying Corps) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery in flying to Courtrais and dropping bombs on the railway line near that station. On starting the return journey he is mortally wounded but succeeds in flying for thirty-five miles to his destination at a very low altitude and reports the successful accomplishment of his mission.  He will die of his wounds tomorrow at age 27. This is the first air Victoria Cross ever awarded, his aircraft is a BE2. Lieutenant Rhodes-Moorhouse had been engaged on monoplane experiments, chiefly at Huntingdon, during 1910 and 1911, and has been described as “one of the pioneers of aviation in England” and “the finest cross-country flier of his time.” He took his Pilot’s certificate after flying over 1,000 miles in October 1911 and made the first Channel flight with two passengers in August, 1912. He gave up flying after his marriage but on the outbreak of the War, received a Commission in the Royal Flying Corps. He was at first placed in charge of the workshops at South Farnborough, and then in March 1915 he transferred to the Front. His son William Henry ‘Willie’ Rhodes-Moorhouse is less than a year old when his father dies will represent England as a skier. In 1937 he will joined the Royal Air Force, flying in Bristol Blenheims, then Hawker Hurricanes with No. 601 Squadron RAF. He will be shot down and killed over Kent during the Battle of Britain in 1940, shortly after being awarded the DFC.

At Gallipoli, Hill 141 is stormed by allied forces and V beach is secured.  By nightfall more than 30,000 Allied troops are ashore on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Sedd-el-Bahr is captured, and as the Turks withdraw the landing beaches are linked, the line now encompassed the tip of the peninsula.

On Y Beach the Royal Marines commander, Colonel Godfrey E Matthews realizing that half his position has been abandoned, has no option but to withdraw despite driving off a renewed Turkish attack early this morning.  Ironically, at this moment the Turks also think that they have been beaten and retire, enabling Matthew’s detachment to get away without further loss.

Subsequent to a landing have been effected on the beach at a point on the Gallipoli Peninsula Lieutenant Colonel Charles Hotham Montagu Doughty-Wylie (Welsh Fusiliers attached as G.S.O.2 to H.Q. Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.) age 46 and Captain Garth Neville Walford age 32 (Royal Artillery) organize and lead an attack through and on both sides of the village of Sedd-en-Bahr on the old castle at the top of the hill inland. The enemy’s position is very strongly held and entrenched and defended, with concealed machine guns and pom poms. It is mainly due to the initiative of these two officers that the attack is a complete success.  Both officers are killed in the moment of victory. For their efforts both men will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

  • Doughty-Wylie was the British consul in Mersina, Turkey, during the Turkish revolution of 1909. Richard Bell-Davies (later a VC winner, then a lieutenant on the battleship HMS Swiftsure) met him at the time and gives an account in his autobiography Sailor in the Air (1967). Massacres of Armenians started along with the revolution, and Bell-Davies says that it was largely due to the efforts of Doughty-Wylie that these were halted in Mersina. Doughty-Wylie went to Adana, forty miles away. He persuaded the local Vali (Governor) to give him a small escort of Turkish troops and a bugler and with these managed to restore order. Mrs. Doughty-Wylie turned part of the dragoman’s house into a hospital for wounded Armenians. Bell-Davies says that by the time an armed party from Swiftsure arrived, Doughty-Wylie had almost stopped the massacre single-handedly. Newspaper reports of the period record that Doughty-Wylie was shot in the arm, while trying to prevent these massacres. Doughty-Wylie was the recipient of the Order of the Medjidie from the Turkish Government. He was awarded the Medjidie because of his work during the Balkan Wars when he served with the British Red Cross helping the Turkish Military. He is the only soldier to have been awarded military honors by both the British Empire and the Ottoman Empire. Doughty-Wylie is shot in the face by a sniper at age 46 and in the force attacking Gallipoli “owing to his great knowledge of things Turkish”
  • Walford is the son-in-law of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ J S Trefusis. He entered the Royal Artillery in December 1902 and he became Captain in 1914 and Brigade-Major in January 1915. When war broke out he was at the Staff College and went out to France in the middle of August being present at the Battle of the Aisne, and all the major engagements until January 1915 when he was at Ypres, serving with two batteries and holding temporary Staff appointments. He then returned to England and sailed for the Dardanelles as Brigade-Major Royal Artillery 29th

Two German batteries of artillery attack Trekkopjes at first light.  Colonel Skinner cannot reply to the German guns for his only artillery is a home-made anti-aircraft contraption, (a fifteen pounder mounted on a wagon wheel which can only shoot at the sky).  The armored car unit under Lieutenant Commander Whittall now sees action for the first time.  Moving quickly to the German flank, the armored cars’ machine guns prove decisive when the Germans put in their infantry attack.  After a five hour battle the Germans draw off, having lost fourteen dead, fourteen wounded and thirteen taken prisoner. The Union forces lose eight killed and thirty four wounded.

Lord Kitchener states that Germany has stooped to acts that vie with those of the Dervishes.  Mr. Asquith, in the House of Commons, states that reparations will be extracted from all proven to have been guilty of such acts.

The Treaty of London 1915, a secret pact between Italy and Triple Entente, is signed in London today by the Kingdom of Italy, the United Kingdom, France and Russia. According to the pact, Italy is to leave the Triple Alliance and join Triple Entente, as already stated in a secret agreement signed in London, on 5th September 1914. Furthermore, Italy is to declare war against Germany and Austria-Hungary within a month — and in fact the declaration of war will be published 23 May.

Today’s losses include:

  • Three battalion commanders
  • A Brigadier General
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • An Olympic runner
  • A winner of the Strathcona Gold Medal for shooting
  • The winner of the 1905 880 yard race in the Scotland versus Ireland games
  • Multiple men whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The grandson of a General
  • Multiple First Class cricket players
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The heir to the 1st and last Baron Kirkley
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The Assistant Master at St Mark’s School
  • A noted Rugby football player
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Brigadier General James Foster Riddell (149th Brigade, 50th Division) is killed in action at St Julien at age 52. He is shot through the head at a point about one hundred fifty yards south of Vanheule Farm. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Henry Scott.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry William Ernest Hitchins (commanding 1st Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 49. He is the only son of the late Major General Henry White Hitchins and the grandson of Lieutenant General Bejamin Hitchins.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frank Robert Rennick (commanding 40th Pathans) is killed.
  • Captain Percy d’Aguilar Banks (Queen Victoria’s Own Corps of Guides attached 57th Wilde Rifles) is killed at age 29. He played first class cricket for Somerset in 1903 and 08.
  • Captain Edward Nugent Bankes (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the Honorable Lalage Letitaa Caroline Vivian Bankes and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain William George Henry Bates (Leinster Regiment) is killed. He is the son of the Reverend William Wheatley Bates.
  • Captain Herbert Quintus Irwin (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Edward Irwin.
  • Captain George Amelius Crawshay Sandeman (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is a first class cricketer for Hampshire and Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Captain George Neville Mackie (Sikh Frontier Force) is killed at age 31. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel William Mackie JP and a South African War veteran. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force in April 1941.
  • Flight Lieutenant Stephen Medlicott (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally killed testing an airplane at home at age 22. He is the grandson of the Reverend Joseph Medlicott.
  • Lieutenant William Black Noble (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. He is the son and heir to the 1st and last Baron Kirkley.
  • Lieutenant Colin McDiarmid Allardice (Sikhs) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Richmond Garton (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. His younger brother will be killed on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916.  His fiancé Una Tomlin Hunter also lost two brothers in the same action. Captains George Edward Hunter age 28 and Howard Tomlin Hunter, 26 (Northumberland Fusiliers) are both killed.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick William Polehampton (Royal Flying Corps) is accidentally killed at age 42 the day after he arrived in France. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Polehampton Rector of Hartfield.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Lancelot Rolleston (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 20. He is the son of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Humphry Davy Rolleston, GCVO, KCB, 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Robert Blackett (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend William Robert Blackett Rector of Smethcote.
  • Sergeant Joseph Byrne (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in two days.
  • Lance Corporal W Paramore (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brothers will be killed in March and April 1918.
  • Private Leonard John Ricketts (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Private Albert Herbert (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at Aubers Ridge at age 20. He is the Assistant Master at St Mark’s School and his two brothers will be killed on the same day in October 1917 serving in different regiments.
  • Private Bert Arthur Presant (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 16. He won the Strathcona Gold Medal at Toronto for shooting and at the Cadet School.
  • Rifleman George Thomas Haffenden (London Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in June 1916 and their father will take his own life after the death of his two sons.
  • Private Peter Galt (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William Davidson Anderson (Saskachewan Regiment) dies of wounds. He is an Olympic athlete who competed in the 1906 games in the 400 and 800 meters. He won the 1905 880 yard race in the Scotland versus Ireland games.

On Gallipoli the Australians continue to suffer heavy casualties.

  •  Major Richard Saker (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 37. He is a veteran of the South African War and his brother was killed last October.
  • Lieutenant Alan Morris Crawford Couve (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds received in action. His brother will be killed two weeks.
  • Lieutenant Robert Bernard (Royal Dublin Fusiliers) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 23. He is the son of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable J H Bernard DD Archbishop of Dublin.
  • Private Philip Zahnleiter (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 24. His older brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Thomas Stephen Downes (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Rifleman Frederick Eve (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in exactly one year to the day next 26 April.

Heavy losses are also reported by the King’s Own Scottish Borderers.

  •  Captain Maurice Andrew Noel Becher is killed at age 30. He is the only son of Major General Andrew Craycroft Becher. Captain Becher was gazetted to the King’s Own Scottish Borderers in 1905, and was promoted Captain in 1914. He was in India when the war broke out and left with his Regiment for Ismailia, in October 1914. After being there for six or eight weeks, during which time there was no fighting, he returned with the Regiment to England. In March 1915 they were ordered to the Dardanelles, with the 29th
  • Captain Alexander Stewart Cooper is killed at age 33. He is the son of the late W S Cooper JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Alexander Grant Miller is killed at age 21. He is a noted Rugby Football player and his brother will be killed in July 1917.  They are sons of the Reverend Thomas Duncan Miller and grand nephew of the late General ‘Sir’ Archibald Galloway Buchanan.
  • Lance Corporal John Nixon is killed in action at age 22. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Peter McDonnell (Dublin Fusiliers) is killed at age 42. His two brothers will be killed together in less than one month serving in the same regiment.

Tuesday 23 February 1915 – We Lost 123

The entrance to the North Channel, except south of Rathlin Island, is closed by the British government.

Goanikas, German South West Africa is occupied by Union forces.

The island of Lemnos is occupied by a force of Royal Marines in preparation for the military attack on Gallipoli.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of an Admiral
  • The son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • A Science Master at Bideford Grammar School
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties are

Lieutenant William Dukinfield Nicholson (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 26. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend John Martin. His brother was killed last September and they are sons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Arthur W Nicholson KCB.

  • Lieutenant Samuel Tudor Barr (Hussars) is killed at Zillebeke at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James and Lady Barr.
  • Private Edgar Robinson (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies at home while on active service. His brother will be killed in action in September 1916.
  • Ordinary Seaman Harry Champness Britten (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) dies on service at home at age 23. He is a Science Master at Bideford Grammar School and his brother will be killed on Gallipoli in August.
  • Private Arthur Young (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will die on service in January 1919.

Thursday 15 October 1914 – We Lost 685

The 3rd Division advances and in spite of the dykes, continues to drive the enemy back.  The town of Estaire is occupied by French cavalry who immediately turn it over to British troops.

At first light the advance on Yabassi is resumed, and after some desultory fighting in the bush, the Germans completely withdraw, leaving the British to occupy the town.  The campaign against Yabassi has cost the life of one officer, three British NCOs, a few blue jackets, and some forty native soldiers.

Today’s losses include:

  •  Holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving
  • An England International and Blackheath Rugby Footballer
  • Sons of clergy
  • Families that will lose two sons
HMS Hawke

HMS Hawke

The Edgar Class cruiser HMS Hawke (Captain Hugh Powell Evan Tudor Williams) is torpedoed and sunk by U9 with the loss of 524 men (only seventy survive).  U9 was also responsible for the sinking of the cruisers HMS Aboukir, HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue last month.

 Losses on HMS Hawke include:

  •  Captain Williams a holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for Life Savings dies at age 40.
  • Surgeon James Henry Digby Watson CB an English International Rugby player killed at age 24. He also played Rugby for Blackheath and London Hospital and was also the Edinburgh University Middleweight Boxing Champion and he represented Scotland versus Ireland in the Long Jung in 1912 which he won.
  • The Paymaster on the Hawke is Alan Murray Austin who dies at age 30. He is the son of Francis Murray Austin, the sometime Archdeacon of Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana.
  • Midshipman Harry Escombe Ravenhill Jerramis also killed when the ship is sunk. He is the son of the Reverend Arnold Jerram.
  • Petty Officer David Hookham is killed at age 38. His brother will be killed in the sinking of HMS Hampshire in June 1916.
  • Ordinary Seaman Ernest Edward Corder is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in action in April 1918.
  • Stoker Frederick George Ralph is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed next May. Many of the survivors are picked up by the destroyer Swift, the steamer Modesta and the trawler Ben Rinnes including Chief Gunner James Dennis, who will be killed in July 1917 in the explosion of HMS Vanguard.

Others lost today include:

  • Lieutenant Richard Christopher Gorges Foote (Royal Marine Light Infantry) dies of wounds received nine days earlier at Antwerp at age 20.  He is the son of the Reverend John Vicars Foote.
  • Private Robert MacDonald (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received at Hazebrouck. His brother will be killed in July 1916.

photo from Wikipedia.org