Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Royal Navy

Sunday 7 May 1916 – We Lost 203

Herbert Charles Bruce Cummins

Today’s losses include:

  •  A Naval Surgeon General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A man who will have two brothers killed in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties include:

  • Deputy Surgeon General Cyril James Mansfield MVO (Royal Navy) dies of blood poisoning. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Mansfield.
  • Captain Herbert Charles Bruce Cummins (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received in action at age 39. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry Bruce Cummins.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Oswald Griffith Williams-Meyrick (Welsh Fusiliers) dies at age 39 at Gibraltar. He is the son of the Reverend John Meyrick Williams Rector of Beaumaris.
  • Private William Henry Heaphy (Irish Guards) dies of wounds received at Ypres at age 33. He is one of three brothers who made the supreme sacrifice.
  • Private Walter Jeffs (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother was killed in action last May.
  • Private Richard F Arthur Westphal (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of Bishop Westphal.
  • Private Roderick Morgan Smith (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in December.

Wednesday 11 November 1914 – We Lost 777

 

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The torpedo gunboat HMS Niger is torpedoed in the English Channel.  She later explodes and sinks though there are no casualties.

British troops pass through the small village of Oulchy-le-Chateau in their advance on the Aisne.

At 10:00 the 2nd Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry are turned out to back up the 1st Brigade which has been attacked while holding the ground a little to the north of the Ypres-Menin road. They are ordered to Westhoek to get in touch with the 1st Division, who are holding up reinforcements on the right. In spite of a barrage that lays shells about them, the Oxfords reach Westhoek without loss. Here they get under cover and observe the Northamptonshire Regiment advancing on their right, into the southern part of the wood lying to the south of Westhoek. At the same time Colonel Lushington of the Royal Artillery sends gunners, cooks, etc armed with rifles against the Germans in Nonne Bosschen Wood.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry R Davies sends two companies to clear Nonne Bosschen Wood (Nun’s Wood) near Ypres, advancing from the northwest to southeast.  They drive the Germans before them killing and capturing many. Two more companies follow in support.  When the first two companies, ‘A’ and ‘B’ come out on the southeastern edge of the wood they are joined by the Northamptons on the right and by some Connaught Rangers and Sappers on the left. They force the Germans out of the trenches; some of the enemy turning and running when the attack is thirty or forty yards off, others surrender. Most of those who run are shot. Casualties to the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry amount to twenty-seven, of whom five are killed.  There is still another trench held by the Germans in front, but before an attack can be mounted on it French artillery begins to drop shrapnel into the British front line, not realizing how far it has advanced. It takes some time to inform the French of this error and by this time dark has set in.

Near Becelaere, Belgium, Captain Walter Lorrain Brodie (Highland Light Infantry) leads a charge to evict the enemy from a portion of our trenches that they have succeeded in occupying. He bayonets several of the enemy himself and relieves a dangerous situation. As a result of his actions, 80 of the enemy are killed and 51 taken prisoner. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Uncle of a man killed yesterday
  • Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Two members of the Surrey Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Brothers Privates James F and John William Stallard are among those killed in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. John is a boxer of some repute in the Army and had gone into strict training for a bout at the National Sporting Club when the war broke out. Because of his prowess in the ring he was known as ‘The Mad Mullah’. He dies at age 26 while his older brother is 28.  They are sons of James and Florence Stallard of St Mary Street, New Bradwell, Bucks.

Another set of brothers are killed on this day while serving together. Private Thomas and James Freemantle (Scots Guards) have both served in the Guards prior to the war then joined the Surrey Constabulary together and both resigned to rejoin the Guards upon the outbreak of the war. The brothers are both 26. They are sons of William and Sarah Freemantle of Easton, Winchester.

  •  Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahonDSO, General Officer Commanding 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached 10th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Division is killed in action at age 48. The General tries to rally support troops east of Hooge, on the south side of the Ypres-Menin Road when he is suddenly seen to sink to one knee and begins to remove his legging as though hit in the leg. At that moment a shell bursts close to him killing him instantly. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon CB Baronet and he served in Burma from 1886 to 1887 and in the South African War.
  • Major Alfred Herbert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. He served in Sierra Leone 1898-9 and in the South African War. His nephew was killed yesterday at the same place while also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Major Harold Henry Norman (Temporarily commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in the above action at age 47. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and Zakka Khel in 1908. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Henry Wood.
  • Captain William Maynard Carlisle-Crowe (Warwickshire Regiment attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is a Swiss Alpine skier and the son of General Thomas Caralisle-Crowe.
  • Captain and Adjutant Ewen James Brodie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed when he is shot by a sniper at age 36 in the Nonne Bosch Wood. He is the son of J C J Brodie Lord Lieutenant of the County of Nairn.
  • Captain James William Lennox Sprot (Black Watch) is killed at age 28 less than three weeks after his brother was killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Jeune Collins (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29 while signaling for more men to protect the flank of his trench. Typically known by his initials A E J Collins is an English cricketer and soldier. He is most famous for achieving the highest-ever recorded score in cricket: as a 13-year-old schoolboy, he scored 628 not out over four afternoons in June 1899. Collins’ record-making innings drew a large crowd and increasing media interest; spectators at the Old Cliftonian match being played nearby were drawn away to watch a junior school house cricket match. One brother will be killed in August 1916 while his second brother will die of illness on service in February 1917.
  • Captain Hugh James Shaw (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in November 1915.
  • Captain Arthur Kenneth Puzey (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain William Augustus Portman Foster(South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds in a German hospital at Frankfort-on-Main of wounds received at Gheluvelt on 31 October at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Yorke Foster the 3rd Baronet and Lady Foster.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Symonds Holmes (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of Admiral of the Fleet ‘Sir’ Thomas M Symonds GCB.
  • Lance Corporal James Robert Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed less than three weeks earlier.
  • Private William Stoyan(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed later in the Great War, one in 1916 the other in 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Brown(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25.  His brother Peter Hume Brown will fall in November 1916.
  • Private John Hamon Massy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private George Etherington (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28 less than two weeks after his brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment.
  • Rifleman Robert James Adair (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service in March 1919.
  • Gunner Sidney Herbert Toll (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service at home in the first week of the war.
  • Private Edward Webster Wood (Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Turks forces attack the British camp at Sanniyeh with heavy loss and are forced to withdraw four miles.

  •  Major Richard Ducat (Infantry Indian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of Major General Claude Malet Ducat and grandson of Hugh Hamersley JP. He was member of the force that fought on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-8.

Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Doveton Sturdee departs Devonport his flag on HMS Invincible in company with HMS Inflexible on a voyage to the South Atlantic to search for the German squadron under Vice Admiral Graf Maximillan von Spee. At the same time HMS Princess Royal is dispatched to the Caribbean to guard the Panama Canal.

At a matinee at the Empire Theater John George Lambton 3rd Earl of Durham whose brother was killed on the Western Front less than two weeks earlier states the opinion that he would “wish that the Germans would drop a shell among these footballers some Saturday afternoon.  I really think it would be the best method of waking up the young men of Sunderland”.  In two weeks 16 members of The Hearts of Midlothan join the 16th Royal Scots becoming the only team in the history of British football to enlist en masse in the armed force. Seven members of the first team will lose their lives in the Great War.

Wednesday 28 October 1914 – We Lost 599

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg resigns as First Sea Lord the day after his nephew dies of wounds on the Western Front.  His resignation letter includes “I have lately been driven to the painful conclusion that at this juncture my birth and parentage have the effect of impairing…my usefulness to the Board of the Admiralty. I feel it is my duty to resign”. His German ancestry, titles, property and even his accent made him a target of the popular press and letters to the editor looking for a scapegoat for the Royal Navy’s lack of success to this point in the war.  The First Sea Lord’s wife is even the sister-in-law of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, the Kaiser’s brother and grand admiral of the German Navy.

Indian troops attack into Neuve Chapelle village, fighting house to house and hand to hand.  Within hours a sustained German counter attack drives the Sikhs from the village.  Of the two hundred eighty-nine men who manage to extricate themselves from Neuve Chapelle, only sixty-eight reach the road from which the attack has started. For his courage during the retreat Subadar Malla Singh will be awarded the Military Cross, the first Indian officer to be awarded the medal.  In the ensuing six days of fighting, more than twenty-five British officers and five hundred Indian officers and men will be killed, and 1,455 wounded.

The British force fighting its way along the railroad from Yapona reaches Edea, Cameroon two days after the French have occupied the town.  Meanwhile Lieutenant Colonel Haywood with the 2nd Nigeria Regiment successfully fights his way up the Northern Railway and captures Susa.

At 07:00 SMS Emden stops the British steamer Glen Turret after raiding Penang harbor.  The Glen Turret is carrying explosives but instead of being sunk she is used as a messenger by Emden.  The German captain apologizes to the survivors of a Russian light cruiser that he sank, for not picking them up. He also apologizes to the crew of a pilot boat for unintentionally firing on their unarmed vessel.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  One of four brothers who lose their lives in the service of their King and Country
  • The son of an author of religious pamphlets
  • Son of the 13th Baron Lovat
  • Aide de campe to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913
  • Great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor
  • Son of an Admrial
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Hockey player
  • Son of the late Governor of the Windward Islands
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley
  • An International high hurdler
  • Nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham
  • Father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Denis Holdsworth Michaela
  • An anthropologist
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Son of clergy
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons and grandson of Generals
  • Sons of Justice’s of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Major John Stanley Richardson (commanding 21st Company Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas and Lady Anna Constance Richardson and was a King Edward’s Gold Medal (1902) and King George’s Durbar Medal (1911) winner. He is one of five brothers who will lose their lives in the service of their King and Country four in the Great War after one was lost in a submarine accident in 1912. His mother is an author of religious pamphlets Prayers for Family Worship and Parish Meetings and A Simple Message to God’s Word.

  • Major William Lynn Allen DSO (Border Regiment) is killed at age 43. He is a South African War veteran and son of Bulkeley Allen JP.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh Joseph Fraser MVO(Scots Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of Simon Fraser MVO, the 13th Baron Lovat and he served as the ADC to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913.
  • Captain Rowland Latimer Almond (Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 27. He is the first and youngest of three brothers who will be killed.
  • Captain Robert Frederick Balfour (Scots Guards) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 31. He is the son of Edward Balfour JP DL and great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor and his brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Captain Edgar Wilmer Walker (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Admiral C F Walker and grandson of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Captain Robert Jim McCleverty (Sikhs) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of General W A McCleverty and Surgeon General H H Massy CB. He fought in the South African War and is a hockey player.
  • Captain Eric May Battersby (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Worsley Battersby JP.
  • Captain Edwin John Berkeley Hayes-Sadler (Royal Engineers) is killed two days before his brother is killed. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ James Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Alexander Kennedy(Royal Irish Rifles) dies of wounds received four days earlier. He is the son of the late General H F Kennedy (King’s Royal Rifle Corps). His wife is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Aylmer Hunter Weston KCB DSO.
  • Captain Bertram Lawrence (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 37 when he is shot by a sniper. He is the grandson of General Henry Lawrence and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Charles Almeric John Cholmondeley(Border Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the late Lord and Lady Cholmondeley and the grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley.
  • Captain John Mounsey Lambert(Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 30.  He is the only son of the late Major General G C Lambert.
  • Lieutenant James Booker Brough Warren (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is an international caliber high hurdler.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald Charles Melbourne Gibbs (Scots Guards) is also killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Honorable’ Henry Gibbs, grandson of General Charles Crutchley and nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham.
  • Second Lieutenant Clarence Leslie Bentley(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 20 when he is shot in the head by a sniper. He is the son of the late Alderman William Bentley JP.  He passed out of Sandhurst as war was declared.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Mary Snead-Cox(Royal Scots) is killed 8 days after his brother has been killed when he is shot in the chest while another brother will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed yesterday.
  • Sergeant Major Sydney Barnard Thompson (Lancers) is killed at Messines a day before his brother will be killed at Ypres.
  • Lance Corporal Edward Alexander Guess (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Brothers Jim and Tom Pumfrey are killed in action while serving as privates in the South Staffordshire Regiment.
  • Private Arthur Holdssworth (East Yorkshire Regiment) an archaeologist is killed in action. He is the father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Michaela Holdsworth Denis.
  • Private Frank Lawes (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918.
  • Private Richard Banks (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed one week after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private John Haines (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother William will also lose his life in the war.
  • Colonel Bertram Charles Percival Heywood(Manchester Regiment) dies at home at age 49.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas Percival Heywood, the 2nd  He served in the South African Campaign.

A British Naval Flotilla continues to support the Allies left, and since the morning of the 27th the fire of 12in. guns has been brought to bear upon the German positions and batteries. The reports received from shore testify to the effect and accuracy of the fire, and its strong results. The flank is thus thoroughly protected. The enemy brings up heavy guns and replies vigorously to the fire from Admiral Hood’s ships. The vessels receive no structural damage. The casualties are slight throughout, but one shell explodes on the destroyer HMS Falcon killing her commander along with seven other men.

  • Lieutenant Hubert Osmond Wauton is the son of the Reverend Atherton E Wauton age 29.
  • Able Stoker Petty Officer Charles Arthur Beaney killed at age 38. His brother was killed last month in the sinking of HMS Hogue.
  • Able Seaman William Skye is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service as a leading aircraftman in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1946.

The fishing vessel Our Tom (Skipper Albert R Larkins) is sunk by a mine 45 miles southeast from Southwold.  Her skipper and two crew men are killed.

photo from wikipedia.org

 

 

Wednesday 21 October 1914 – We Lost 818 (Plus 1)

Mr Punch and the footballer

A Punch cartoon, later made into a poster, shows Mr. Punch saying to a professional football player, “No doubt you can make money on this field, my friend, but there’s only one field today where you can get honor”.

On this morning British and French cavalry at Passchendaele, on a ridge midway between Ypres and Roulers, leave the village and fall back towards Ypres.  They have not been attacked, but seek the greater security of proximity to the larger town. Both sides begin to dig trenches, linking them in a continuous line, with machine gun emplacements, dugouts, communication trenches leading to the rear and saps going forward as close as possible to the enemy front line.  The trench lines established in the Ypres Salient become the scene over the next four years of the harshest fighting of any war in history. The Irish Guards are given the orders to “drive back the enemy wherever met”.

The first Battle of Langemark begins. It will last for four days.

In heavy fighting at Le Maisnil, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and the Middlesex Regiment are forced to retire this evening leaving on the field eight officers and men who will be buried the following day by the enemy. Captain Edward Stephen Gibbons (Middlesex Regiment) displays great coolness and zeal in action at La Maisnil during what is described as a serious emergency.  For his actions he will be awarded the DSO.  He will be killed in September 1918.

The operation to capture Edea has scarcely commenced when a whaler belonging to the Nigerian Government Yacht Ivy capsizes on a sandbar in the Njong River, drowning the superintendent of the Nigeria Marine, Commander George Smith Booth Gray (HMS Cumberland, Royal Naval Reserve), Lieutenant Herbert Alexander Child CMG (HMS Cumberland, Royal Navy) is also killed at age 44.  He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Child also killed is a French staff officer and one of the nine native soldiers on board. The lifeboat of the steamship Fullah is immediately launched and succeeds in rescuing Captain Cyril T M Fuller and the remaining eight natives. Captain Fuller is pulled exhausted from the surf after struggling valiantly to save the others.

Today’s losses include:

  • Great grandson of the Defender of Fort Detroit in the War of 1763 against the Indians
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Sons of clergy
  • Grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Heir to the 5th Viscount Monck
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Son of families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a Judge
  • A man whose father was killed in the Soudan
  • Son of Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Gladwyn Maurice Revell Turbutt (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. He is the son of William Gladwin Turbutt JP and great grandson of General Henry Gladwyn Defender of Fort Detroit Canada in the War of 1763 against the Indians.

 

  • Major Nigel Lucius Samuel Lysons(Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 38. He is the son of the late Canon Samuel Lysons Vicar of Rowsley and served in the South African War.
  • Major Charles Inglis Stockwell(Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received 20 October at age 38.  He is the son of General C M Stockwell CB and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Charles Henry Stanley Monck(Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son and heir of the 5th Viscount Monck. He had served previously in the South African War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wyndham Portal 2nd Baronet and he is a member of the MCC.
  • Captain S G Roe(Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.  His widow will marry Lord Gravers.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Gerald Malpas Robertsof the same Regiment is killed at age 19.  He was the “Victor Ludorum” three years in succession at Ardingly College, Sussex.
  • Captain William Miles DSO (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He served in the South African War and is a member of the MCC, the I Zinjari and the Free Foresters.
  • Captain Penry Bruce Lendon MVO (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P Lendon and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon Richardson Vicar of Northop Flints.
  • Captain John Ralph Mylton Thornycroft (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed last month.
  • Captain Cameron O’Bryen Harford Methuen (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is related to Field Marshall Methuen GCB and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Allan Humphrey Harden (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when shot in the head at age 33. He is the grandson of Judge Harden of Cheshire and General Atkinson of the Madras Army. His wife is the granddaughter of John Howe JP DL and a cousin of the Right Honorable Lord Musketry.
  • Captain William Miles Kington (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. His brother will die on service at home in September 1943.
  • Captain Arthur Howell Romilly (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next September and he is the son of Captain Francis J Romilly Royal Engineers who was killed in Soudan at Trofek. He is also a descendant of ‘Sir’ Samuel Somilly Solicitor General and law reformer of the early 19th He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Daniel George Harold Auchinleck (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of Major Thomas Auchinleck DL and played cricket for the Winchester XI in 1894 & 1895 against Eton.
  • Captain Logan Deare Passy (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed in August next year.
  • Lieutenant Henry Stanley Lowe(Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds in Paris received over a month ago on the Aisne at age 24. He is a son of the late Reverend E J Lowe Vicar of Stallingborough.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Fowler Murphy (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Richard William Murphy Canon of Tuam.
  • Lieutenant Theodore Prain(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ David Prain, CMG, CIE and Lady Prain.
  • Second Lieutenant Theodore Hugh Galton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are grandsons of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Hugh Clifford VC.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Holmes Watkins (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds next February.
  • Second Lieutenant William Woodthorpe Barnard-Smith (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Barnard Gooh Barnard-Smith Rector of North Cove.
  • Second Lieutenant Leonard Amauri Filleul(Somerset Light Infantry attached Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the chest at age 26. He is the Master at Monkton Combe School, Bath and had rowed in the winning Oxford trial eights in 1910.  He is also the Secretary of the Lincoln College Boat Club and the son of the Reverend Philip William Girdlestone Filleul, Rector of Devizes Wiltsire.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Fydell Walker (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day. He is the son the Reverend David Walker Vicar of Darlington and nephew of General J T Walker Royal Engineers the Surveyor General of India.
  • Private Lionel Vernon Brown (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds at home in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Dowing Lake (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother James will also lose his life in the war.
  • Private William Turner (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Walter John will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private John Banks (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother Richard will be killed in one week.
  • Private John Charles Howell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Arthur will also be killed in the war.
  • Private Lewis Pelgrena Mazzei (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in May 1917 and they are the only Mazzei to lose their lives in the service of King and Country in the Great War.

The Plus 1 is Hungarian Gymnast Arpad Pedery who was a member of the Silver medal winning Men’s Team European System Gymnastics team at he 1912 Olympics.

Monday 19 October 1914 – We Lost 343

 

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

I Corps arrives at Ypres. ‘Sir’ Henry Rawlinson is unable to occupy Menin.

The 2nd Royal Irish Regiment is surrounded and more than 300 men (nearly all wounded) surrender after a very stiff fight at Le Pilly on the Aubers Ridge.  (The Battalion will be withdrawn to be rebuilt shortly after this affair).

HMS Chatham, responding to a report that German ships have been seen at the settlement of Lindi, steams into the mouth of the Lukuledi River, clears for action, but the only vessel he finds there is the merchant ship Prasident. She is flying the flag of the International Red Cross.  Notes are exchanged between Captain Drury-Lowe and the governor of Lindi. The Chatham’s first officer, Commander R Fitzmaurice, discovers documents showing Prasident has been supplying SMS Konigsberg with both intelligence and provisions at a place called Salale.  Drury-Lowe disables Prasident’s engines.  Salale is not shown on any British maps, so its location is unknown.  Also found on board is a recent survey of the waters off the Rufiji River.  The British also discover an out of date copy of the “Handbuch der Ostkurste Afrikas” in which the village of Salale is mentioned as being on the Rufiji.  Drury-Lowe heads for the Rufiji.

A new naval decoration the Distinguished Service Medal is established for “bravery and resource under fire”. Two hundred twenty nine holders will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include”

  • Cousin of Winston Churchill
  • Son and son-in-law of Baronets
  • Grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Norman Jerome Beauchamp Leslie (Rifle Brigade) a son of Colonel ‘Sir’ John Leslie the 2nd Baronet and cousin of Winston Churchill is killed in action at age 25 when he is shot by a sniper at Armentieres.

  • Captain John Hugh Gardiner McCormick (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 28. He is the son of S S McCormick JP.
  • Captain George Ryefield Taylour(Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Major General ‘Lord’ John Henry Taylour and grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort KP. He was wounded and made a prisoner of war during the South African War and is a keen amateur heavyweight boxer.
  • Captain Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton (Life Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the only son of Canon T Percy Pemberton Prebendary of York Minster and a member of the MCC. He is also the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Worsley Baronet.
  • Captain Leicester William le Marchant Carey(Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 36. He is the only son of the late Major General Constantine Carey CB.
  • Private Frank William Farrant(Cheshire Regiment) is killed his brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Stephen Collins (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 16. He is the first of four sons of Agnes Collins of Waterford who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Thomas Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

 

Thursday 15 October 1914 – We Lost 685

The 3rd Division advances and in spite of the dykes, continues to drive the enemy back.  The town of Estaire is occupied by French cavalry who immediately turn it over to British troops.

At first light the advance on Yabassi is resumed, and after some desultory fighting in the bush, the Germans completely withdraw, leaving the British to occupy the town.  The campaign against Yabassi has cost the life of one officer, three British NCOs, a few blue jackets, and some forty native soldiers.

Today’s losses include:

  •  Holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for Life Saving
  • An England International and Blackheath Rugby Footballer
  • Sons of clergy
  • Families that will lose two sons
HMS Hawke

HMS Hawke

The Edgar Class cruiser HMS Hawke (Captain Hugh Powell Evan Tudor Williams) is torpedoed and sunk by U9 with the loss of 524 men (only seventy survive).  U9 was also responsible for the sinking of the cruisers HMS Aboukir, HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue last month.

 Losses on HMS Hawke include:

  •  Captain Williams a holder of the Royal Humane Society’s Medal for Life Savings dies at age 40.
  • Surgeon James Henry Digby Watson CB an English International Rugby player killed at age 24. He also played Rugby for Blackheath and London Hospital and was also the Edinburgh University Middleweight Boxing Champion and he represented Scotland versus Ireland in the Long Jung in 1912 which he won.
  • The Paymaster on the Hawke is Alan Murray Austin who dies at age 30. He is the son of Francis Murray Austin, the sometime Archdeacon of Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana.
  • Midshipman Harry Escombe Ravenhill Jerramis also killed when the ship is sunk. He is the son of the Reverend Arnold Jerram.
  • Petty Officer David Hookham is killed at age 38. His brother will be killed in the sinking of HMS Hampshire in June 1916.
  • Ordinary Seaman Ernest Edward Corder is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in action in April 1918.
  • Stoker Frederick George Ralph is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed next May. Many of the survivors are picked up by the destroyer Swift, the steamer Modesta and the trawler Ben Rinnes including Chief Gunner James Dennis, who will be killed in July 1917 in the explosion of HMS Vanguard.

Others lost today include:

  • Lieutenant Richard Christopher Gorges Foote (Royal Marine Light Infantry) dies of wounds received nine days earlier at Antwerp at age 20.  He is the son of the Reverend John Vicars Foote.
  • Private Robert MacDonald (Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received at Hazebrouck. His brother will be killed in July 1916.

photo from Wikipedia.org

Sunday 11 October 1914 – We Lost 40

HMS Active

The minimum height requirement to join the British Army is lowered from 5’ 8” to 5’ 5”.

  • A family that will lose the first of two sons lost in the Navy

Stoker 1st Class Ernest Herbert Carpenter (Royal Navy, HMS Active) dies of illness at age 22.  His brother will be killed serving on HMS Indefatigable at the Battle of Jutland.

photo from naval-history.net

Saturday 3 October 1914 – We Lost 80

MI6

The British Admiralty notifies the world of the laying down of a defensive minefield. The merchant ship Dawdon (Master John Steel) strikes a mine ten miles from the Wandelaar Light Vessel and sinks killing her crew of ten.

HMS Monmouth and HMS Glasgow leave Port Stanley to meet HMS Otranto and search for rumored German trade on the West Coast of South America.  HMS Good Hope stays at Port Stanley in case SMS Dresden re-enters the Atlantic.

  • The son of the Director of the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6)

Lieutenant Alastair Mansfield Smith Cumming (Seaforth Highlanders attached Intelligence Corps) dies as a result of a motor car accident at age 24.  He is the son of Captain ‘Sir’ Mansfield Smith-Cumming KCMG, CB, Royal Navy. His father lost his left foot in the accident and was the first Director of what would become the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) also known as MI6.

photo from Wikipedia.org

Wednesday 30 September 1914 – We Lost 53

The first British merchant ship, the Selby, to be torpedoed without warning is sunk by a German submarine thirty-four miles southeast by south from the Newarp Light Vessel. There are no casualties and at the time the loss is blamed on a mine.

HMS Chatham is near the small offshore East African island of Koma.  Her lookouts spot several white men in khaki uniforms carrying rifles, accompanied by a group of armed natives.  Drury-Lowe turns in toward land and anchors his ship. A few rounds from the cruisers three-pound guns cause a general panic on shore and most flee into the bush. An armed landing party goes ashore without meeting any opposition. They destroy wireless masts and a signaling station and capture several dhows and catamarans being used to supply the German defenders.  They also find one German who has not run away.  He claims to be a planter, but his papers show him to be an army reserve officer recalled to active service to help with Konigsberg’s intelligence system. He is fortunate not to be shot as a spy.  Among the effects that are discovered is a diary that provides Drury-Lowe with two valuable pieces of information.  One entry gives the details of an elaborate signaling system based on the use of white flags. The British are incensed over this misuse of white flags to signal information to Konigsberg. Drury-Lowe immediately telegraphs the Governor of Dar es Salaam to inform him that in the future any white flag seen along the coast will be fired on without warning.  A second diary entry references the Konigsberg being anchored at a certain location, but the British officer doing the translation has great difficulty deciphering the German script.  All he can say for certain is that she is anchored at a place whose name is six letters long and might be Falalo, Galalo or Salalo. The British are unfamiliar with the obscure village of Salale where Konigsberg is hiding.  Drury-Lowe is now confident that his quarry has not left East Africa.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of clergy
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A family that will lose another son later in the war

 

  • Flight Lieutenant Basil Drummond Ash (Royal Naval Air Service) is accidentally lost at sea at age 24.  He is the son of the Reverend Cyril Alfred Drummond Ash Vicar of Saxton and has been awarded the Naval General Service Medal for his previous service in the Persian Gulf.
  • Lieutenant Rowland Charles Mason (The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds at home received 14 September at age 31. He is the son of the late Rowland Mason JP.
  • Lieutenant Aubrey Wells Hudson (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 31. His brother will die of wounds in October 1916.
  • Private John Huartson (Lancaster Regiment) is killed when he is struck by a train while guarding the railway at Reading at age 25. His brother will be killed next April.

Sunday 20 September 1914 – We Lost 524 (Plus 1)

At exactly 05:10 SMS Konigsberg raises its battle ensigns in Zanzibar harbor and fires on the surprised light cruiser HMS Pegasus (Commander John Ingles), which is anchored broadside to and two hundred yards from the shore. While still four miles away Konigsberg fires ranging shots from the 105 mm guns on her port side. The first salvo passes beyond Pegasus.  The second salvo falls short.  Aim is corrected and the gun layers adjust their sights.  This time the shells land on target – and searing yellow flames and smoke rise from the still motionless British cruiser. Despite the unexpected shock of the attack, however, Commander Ingles has already brought his ship’s company to Action Stations and, as Konigsberg’s third salvo screams across the harbor, the gallant little Pegasus fires back in reply. But it is a one-sided contest. The British ship, a worn out relic of the Victorian age dating back to 1896 and mounting only eight old-pattern 4-inch guns firing 25-pound shells, can only get off one salvo for every four loosed by Konigsberg. There can be only one result of this battle. After twenty minutes of relentless bombardment, the British vessel is a blackened hulk. In all Pegasus takes more than two hundred hits; thirty-eight of her crew including two officers are dead or dying, and fifty five are wounded; Konigsberg suffers no casualties.

Admiral Thomas H M Jerram reports to London that he can do nothing about the news that Graf von Spee’s cruisers have been seen on 14 September off Samoa.  All his available ships are taken up by the hunt for the Emden and by the need to protect the first troop convoy from Australia and New Zealand.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of the 4th Duke De Stacpoole
  • A Rosslyn Park Rugby football player
  • First of three sons of a member of His Majesties Body Guard
  • A man whose brother will be killed in the Second War as an Air Raid Warden in the Air Raid Protection organization at age 71
  • A family that will lose the second son in less than a month
  • Sons of clergy
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Grandson of the 2nd Earl of Listowel
  • A man who will have two brothers-in-law killed
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of a Justice of the Peace
  • Former Aide-de-Campe to the Governor General of the Leeward Islands
  • A former Unionist candidate of Parliament
  • Son-in-law of the 6th Marquess of Sligo
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Sons and grandson of Generals
  • Brother killed in the South African War
  • Nephew killed in the Second World War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Colin Landseer Mackenzie (Highland Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the head at age 21. He is the grandnephew of ‘Sir’ Edwin Landseer the great animal painter whose best known works are the lions in London’s Trafalgar Square. He is also a cousin of Major General Douglas Scott.

 Trafalgar Square Lion

  • Major D’Arcy Wentworth Mander (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 51. He is related to General F D Mander and his brother will be killed engaged on Air Raid Precaution duty in the Second World War at age 71.
  • Major William Stopford Sarsfield (Connaught Rangers) dies of wounds at age 46. He fought in the South African War. He is related to General Patrick Sarsfield and is the son-in-law of Percy Maynard DL.
  • Major Alexander Wighton Ingles(West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 45.  He is the son of the Reverend Canon D Ingles Vicar of Whitham and Canon of St Albans and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Captain Henry Vivian Hare(Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 33.  He is the son of Admiral ‘the Honorable’ Richard Hare and grandson of the 2nd Earl of Listowel. He is also the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Edward Hudson-Kinahan Baronet, whose sons will be killed in December 1915 and April 1916.
  • Captain (Brigade Major) Dugald Stewart (Cameronians and 5th Infantry Brigade) is killed at age 32. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend I Harcourt-Vernon of South Africa and his brother was killed last month.
  • Captain Eric Lea Priestley Edwards (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is the son of Lea Priestley Edwards JP and grandson of ‘Sir’ Henry Edwards Baronet CB and served in 1897-8 in Tirah.
  • Lieutenant Aubrey Wells Hudson(Worcestershire Regiment) will die of wounds at age 31. His older brother will be killed in October 1916.
  • Lieutenant Raymond Montgomerie Hume Henderson (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 30. His brother will die of wounds in Egypt received next year on Gallipoli.
  • Lieutenant Basil Claudius Ash (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 28. He is a Rosslyn Park rugby footballer.

Rosslyn Park Rugby

  • Lieutenant Patrick Maxwell Murray (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 24. He is related to Colonel ‘Sir” Wyndham Murray CB.
  • Lieutenant Murray Robertson Sweet-Escott(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at Missy at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Dr. Edward Herbert Sweet-Escott of Dulwich College and was the ADC to ‘Sir’ E B Sweet-Escott Governor and Commander in Chief Leeward Islands 1912-13.
  • Lieutenant Kenneth Stanes Ruegg (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Ferdinand Stanes Ruegg Rector of Wetherden.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Russell Fenton (Connaught Rangers) is killed by a sniper at age 24. He is the son of William Russell Fenton DL and his father-in-law Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Henry Montresor was killed less than a week earlier.
  • Lieutenant Allan William George Campbell (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 39. In June he was accepted as the Unionist Candidate for the Doncaster Division of Yorkshire and he is the son-in-law of the 6th Marquess of Sligo.
  • Lieutenant James Adam Hamilton Fergusson (Highland Light Infantry) is killed while attending a wounded man at age 22. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James Ranken Fergusson 2nd Baronet and his brother will be murdered by natives on his farm in Kenya in January 1953.
  • Lieutenant Offley Charles Wycliffe Thompson (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 23. He is the son of Major General C W Thompson CB DSO.
  • Lieutenant Cyril Cazalet Harrison (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23 when he is shot in the head. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General M W Willoughby.
  • Lieutenant William Laurence Eliot (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Aubrey Hampden Barrington-Kennett (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) dies of wounds received from a shell at age 24. He is the first of three sons of His Majesties Body Guard who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Gordon Alic Brodrick Birdwood (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 18. He is the grandson of General Christopher Birdwood and his brother will be killed next June while a cousin will die on service in November.
  • Second Lieutenant Evan Ronald Horatio Keirnan MacDonald (Highland Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the head at age 21. His brother was killed in the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold William Roseveare(Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Richard Polgreen Roseveare Rector of St Paul’s Deptford and Rural Dean of Greenwich. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Andrew De Stacpoole(Connaught Rangers) is killed by rifle fire at age 22. His brother will be killed in March 1915 and his nephew will be killed in 1944. They are sons of the 4th Duke and Duchess De Stacpoole JP.
  • Company Quarter Master Sergeant William Joseph Woolger (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 31 less than one month after his brother was killed.
  • Gunner Frederick Charles Challis (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 19. His brother will die in Mesopotamia in June 1916.
  • Drummer Oliver Percy Holroyd Haines (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend F W Haines.
  • Private William Goodchild (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action. His brother will also lose his life in the Great War.

The Plus 1

  • Emmanuel Iguinitz is killed at age 24. He played his only Rugby International match against England in April of this year. He is an artisan, jeweler and watchmaker.