Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Scots Guards

Monday 27 September 1915 – We lost 1,606

HMS Caribbean sinks in heavy sea 35 miles off Cape Wrath in Northern Scotland killing 15 crew members.  Among those killed is Stoker 1st Class Stuart Chandler killed at age 22.  His brother will be killed in June 1916.

John Kipling

John Kipling

Second Lieutenant John Kipling (Irish Guards) the only son of Rudyard Kipling is killed in action at Loos at age 18.  His body will not be identified and he is buried in a Commonwealth War Graves Commission grave the headstone carries the words “Known Unto God”.  The phrase, standard in British war cemeteries, was created by one of the first and most diligent members of the war graves commission – Rudyard Kipling. In 1992 the War Graves Commission announced that a grave in St Mary’s Military Cemetery had been identified as his.

His father wrote the following poem in honor of his son.

“Have you news of my boy Jack?”
Not this tide.
“When d’you think that he’ll come back?”
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

“Has anyone else had word of him?”
Not this tide.
For what is sunk will hardly swim,
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

“Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?”
None this tide,
Nor any tide,
Except he did not shame his kind —
Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.

Then hold your head up all the more,
This tide,
And every tide;
Because he was the son you bore,
And gave to that wind blowing and that tide!

Today’s losses include:

  • The only son of Rudyard Kipling
  • The uncle of Queen Elizabeth II
  • The son of an Earl
  • Two Generals
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The Grandson of the 1st Lord Chelmsford
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A Baronet
  • The son of a different Baronet
  • Two Marylebone Cricket players
  • The son of the Justice of Hong Kong
  • A Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • A holder of the Humane Society Award for life saving
  • Multiple examples of families that will two or three sons in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

Fergus Bowes-Lyon

Fergus Bowes-Lyon

  • Captain Fergus Bowes-Lyon (Black Watch) the son of the 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne is killed in action at age 26. His sister will marry the future King of England and she will become queen as such he is the uncle of Queen Elizabeth II.   He was born at Glamis Castle in Angus and educated at Eton College, Berkshire. Just a fortnight after the start of World War I, he married Lady Christian Norah Dawson-Damer, daughter of the 5th Earl of Portarlington, on 17th September 1914. She bore him a daughter, Rosemary Lusia Bowes-Lyon 18th July 1915. Leading an attack on the German lines, his leg is blown off by a barrage of German artillery and he falls back into his sergeant’s arms. Bullets strike him in the chest and shoulder and he dies on the field. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial. His mother, Cecilia Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, is severely affected by the loss of her son, and after his death becomes an invalid withdrawn from public life until the marriage of her daughter Elizabeth to the future king in 1923. His brother in law will be killed in April 1917.
  • Major General ‘Sir’ Thompson Capper KCMG CB DSO General Officer Commanding 7th Division dies of wounds received in action. He dies at age 48.  He served with the Chitral Relief Force 1895, the Nile 1898 at the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum, the Nile 1899 and the South Africa War at the relief of Ladysmith.  He was shot through the lungs the previous day by a sniper as he reconnoitered the front line during an assault by his division and dies at #6 Casualty Clearing Station.
  • Major General George Handcock Thesiger General Officer commanding 9th Division is killed in action at age 46. He is the son of Lieutenant General ‘the Honorable’ Charles Thesiger and a grandson of the 1st Lord Chelmsford and he took part in the action on Wagon Hill where he was wounded on 6th January 1900.  His Brigade Major and QMG (GSO 9th Division) Edward D’Albert Le Motte (age 42) DSO (Gloucestershire Regiment) and Aide de Camp Lieutenant Gilbert Edward Burney (age 24) (Gordon Highlanders) son of Brigadier General H H Burney are killed with him in the advanced position at Loos with the General.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur de Salis Hadow (commanding 15th Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 57 leading his men up Hill 60. His son was killed last June at age 20 serving in the 2nd His suggestion led to the formation of the Green Howards Association.
  • Temporary Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Parkin (commanding 7th Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 52. He served in Tirah 1897-8 and Nandi in 1900 and South Africa War.
  • Temporary Lieutenant Colonel Michael William Henderson (commanding 9th Black Watch) is killed at age 44.
  • Captain George Reginald Houstoun-Boswall (Grenadier Guards) is killed attacking Hill 70 Loos. He is the 4th Baronet and son of the 3rd Baronet ‘Sir’ George Lauderdale Houstoun-Boswall of Blackadder and a veteran of the South Africa War.  His nephew will be killed in action in December 1941.
  • Captain Thomas Fleetwood Joseph Nicol Trout (Grenadier Guards) is killed. He has two cousins who will be killed later in the war.
  • Captain James Harold Cuthbert DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. His widow will become Lady Rayleigh OBE of Beaufront Castle.
  • Captain Arthur Jaques (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He played sixty matches for the Marylebone and Hampshire Cricket Clubs from 1912 to 1914.
  • Captain Bernard Henry Holloway (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Loos at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Henry and Lady Holloway and he played cricket for Marylebone and the Sussex Cricket Clubs.
  • Captain Edward Worrell Carrington MC (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ John Worrell Carrington Chief Justice of Hong Kong.
  • Captain Herbert Wardlaw Milne (Punjabis attached Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. His brother will die on service in June 1919 in India.
  • Captain William Murray Geddes (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 27. His brother will die of wounds in Rawalpindi next year.
  • Chaplain the Reverend Frederick Whitmore Hewitt is killed in action at age 35. He is the vicar of Brixton, Plymouth.
  • Lieutenant Campbell Tempest Eyre Crabbe (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 18. He is the son of the late Brigadier General Eyre Crabbe CB.
  • Lieutenant Edwin George Mawby (Welsh Guards) is killed at age 36. He saved a life from drowning in the Thames and was awarded The Humane Society Award for life saving and also wrote a manual on bayonet exercises which is widely used in training the ‘New Armies’.
  • Lieutenant Frank Merewether Wayet (Cameronians) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend Frank Field Wayet Vicar of Pinchbeck.
  • Lieutenant Albert William Buchan Carless (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Lieutenant James Campbell Henderson-Hamilton (Black Watch) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Greenhill Henderson-Hamilton late Rector of St Mary’s Hamilton who lost another son last month.
  • Lieutenant Gilbert Edward Burney (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of Brigadier General H H Burney.
  • Second Lieutenant James Conroy Fair (Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 24. His brother will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Second Lieutenant Ralph Smith (Welsh Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Archibald L Smith Master of the Rolls.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Forrest (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Forrest the 5th
  • Second Lieutenant Marlborough Thorne (East Surrey Regiment) is killed near Fricourt at age 20. His brother will be killed next September.
  • Second Lieutenant Walter Francis Joseph Clifford (Irish Guards) is killed at age 21. He is the elder brother of ‘Sir’ Lewis Arthur Joseph Clifford the 5th Baronet and another brother George Gilbert Joseph Clifford will be killed as a Captain in the Pioneer Corps on 21st May 1940 at age 47.
  • Second Lieutenant Edgar Geoffrey Mack (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Edgar Shapheard Paston Mack.
  • Lance Corporal Samuel Jones (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 29. His brother will die of wounds in April of next year.
  • Private Albert Searle (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private George Edward Hogg (Scots Guards) is killed in action at age 20. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private John James Duckett (Scots Guards) is killed at the Chalk Pit. His two cousins will be killed later the War.
  • Private Leslie Moore Head (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother died last year on service in England.
  • Private John Bright (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at Loos. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private John Thomas Cobley (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private William Whiteman (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in action as the middle of three brothers who will be killed in the War.
  • Private George Edgar Hall (Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in August 1920 serving in Ireland.
  • Private Percy Hill (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last January.
  • Private William John Gardner (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Private Eric James Lock (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed last May.
  • Private Alfred Rawlings (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will die of wounds as a prisoner of war in July 1918.
  • Private Charles Joseph Luff (Scots Guards) is killed. His son will lose his life in the Second World War.

Saturday 13 March 1915 – We Lost 662

Distinguished Service Order

Distinguished Service Order

The battle of Neuve Chapelle ends.  The British have penetrated 1,200 yards on a front of 4,000 yards.  Their casualties for the whole battle are 583 officers and 12,309 other ranks.  German losses are estimated at about 12,000, of whom 30 officers and 1,637 other ranks are taken prisoner.

A determined attempt to clear mines from the Dardanelles Straits, involving six trawlers and the cruiser Amethyst, ends when all but two of the trawlers are put out of action by shore batteries.  Lieutenant Commander John Beauchamp Waterlow will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his actions this night as he carried the attack through an area illuminated by six powerful searchlights and covered by the of forts as well as numerous light guns. Commander Waterlow will be killed serving on HMS Black Prince at Jutland.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet
  • Two battalion commanders
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son of the Consul of Adelaide, Australia
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • A family that will lose two more sons
  • A family that will lose three more sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

 Captain ‘Sir’ Edward Hamilton Westrow Hulse (Scots Guards) the 7th Baronet is killed in action at age 25 trying to aid Major Paynter his commanding officer.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Laurence Rowe Fisher-Rowe (commanding 1st Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at Neuve Chapelle at age 48. He is South Africa War veteran.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Percy Uniacke CB (commanding 2nd Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 52. He was wounded in Tirah in 1898.
  • Captain and Adjutant Allan O’Halloran (Irish Rifles) is killed in action at age 28. He is the son of the late Frederick O’Halloran JP Consul of Adelaide, Australia and had served in the South Africa War.
  • Captain Henry Owen Bridgecourt Becher (Cameronians) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Harry Becher Rector of Rosscarberry.
  • Captain Maurice Kirkman Hodgson (Sherwood Foresters) is killed in action at age 34. He is the son of Robert Kirkman Hodgson JP and Lay Honora Janet and he has a brother who will be killed in action four days later.
  • Lieutenant William Louis Tate (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 24. He was an Honor student at Corpus Christi College, Oxford.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Brooke Benson (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 30. He is the son of the late Reverend Riou George Benson.
  • Lieutenant Marlborough E B Crosse (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in May of this year.
  • Lance Sergeant Alec Chapman Atlay (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private Alfred O’Hare (East Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 16. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Ernest Hall (Leicestershire Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in July of this year.
  • Private William Lewis Gratton (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is the first of four brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Harry Shipp (Grenadier Guards) is killed in action. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Private Philip George Cogan (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed. His two brothers were killed last November together serving as Sergeants in the same Regiment.

Friday 19 February 1915 – We Lost 130

HMS Queen Elizabeth

Rear Admiral Sackville Carden renews the naval bombardment on the Dardanelles.  Using twelve capital ships in three divisions, two British (Carden himself in HMS Queen Elizabeth, with Agamemnon and Inflexible; and his  deputy, Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ John de Robeck in HMS Vengeance, with Albion, Cornwallis, Irresistable and Triumph) and one French (including the battleships Bouvet, Charlemagne, Gaulois and Suffren). Beginning at 09:51 he starts a slow bombardment of the two outer forts at Sedd-el-Bahr and Kum Kale with fifteen-inch guns which continues all morning, opening at long range. At 14:00 Carden decides to close to 6,000 yards due to the fact that up to this time none of the Turkish guns have replied. At 16:45 Carden sends in Cornwallis, Vengeance and Suffren much closer drawing the fire of two of the smaller forts. The other batteries are enveloped in dust and smoke and appear to be deserted.  By now the light is failing and Carden sounds the general recall.  Vice Admiral de Robeck asks for permission to continue the attack, but is refused as the ships are now silhouetted against the sun.

The move of the 29th Division to the Dardanelles is blocked at a full meeting of the War Council by Lord Kitchener, who argues that the Australian and New Zealand troops from Egypt, which has just been redeemed from the threat of Turkish invasion, will suffice.

Today’s losses include:

  • Private Albert Elderfield (Berkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed in less than one month.
  • Private James Campbell (Scots Guards) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in September of this year.

Monday 25 January 1915 – We Lost 523

Stratheden and Campbell Coat of Arms

Stratheden and Campbell Coat of Arms

German troops carry out a large scale offensive in the Cuinchy sector penetrating into the La Bassee Canal salient, forcing the Scots Guards and Coldstream Guards back to partially prepared positions 500 yards west of the Railway Triangle.

British forces raid Alexandretta, Syria and cut telegraph wires.

Today’s losses include:

  • A son of the 3rd Baron Stratheden and Campbell
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the war
  • A well known cricket player and athlete
  • Two brothers killed together
  • A family that will lose two more sons in the war
  • Multiple families that will lose one more son
  • The son of a Baronet
  • A Rugby Union player
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • The son of the Advocate-General of Bombay

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘The Honorable’ John Beresford Campbell (Coldstream Guards) killed at age 48.  He is the eldest son of the 3rd Baron Stratheden and Campbell and has of son of his who will be killed while serving in the same regiment in July 1916.

  • Lieutenant Percy Dale Kendall (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is a former Rugby Union player.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Valentine Francis Monckton (Scots Guards) killed at age 19. His older brother was killed last November.
  • Second Lieutenant George Carlyon Armstrong (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 18. He is the son of Commander ‘Sir’ George Elliot Armstrong 2nd
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Horace Lang (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Basil Lang Advocate-General of Bombay.
  • Second Lieutenant Clive William Murray-Menzies (Black Watch) is killed in action at age 20. His younger brother will be killed in action in August 1917.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Henry Stanley (Border Regiment attached Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend John Hawkesworth Vicar of Ambleside.
  • Second Lieutenant Gareth Hamilton-Fletcher (Grenadier Guards attached Scots Guards) a well-known athlete is killed at age 21.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Sterndale Entwistle Bury (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in December of this year.
  • Brothers Arnold and Clive Baxter are killed together while serving as Lance Corporals in the Coldstream Guards.
  • Lance Corporal Walter Dent (Border Regiment) is killed at age 32. His broher will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lance Corporal Geoffrey Frisch (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 25.His two brothers will be killed in 1916.
  • Private Alfred Lovell Stone (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in July 1917 at St Julian.
  • Private James Arthur Blackmore (Scots Guards) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Wilfred Richard Facey (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother was killed last November.
  • Private James George Price (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will die of wounds in August.

Friday 8 January 1915 – We Lost 151

Cap badge of the Royal Horse Guards

Cap badge of the Royal Horse Guards

The first British naval minefield is laid off Amrun, Germany.

Today’s losses include:

  • A son of the 20th Earl of Shrewsbury & Talbot
  • A Member of the Victorian Order (MVO)
  • An Afton Thistle football player
  • A man whose brother will be killed later in the War
  • A man who will have two more brothers killed in the War
  • The first two casualties suffered by Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Temporary Captain Charles John Alton Chetwynd-Talbot MVO (Viscount Ingestre) (Royal Horse Guards) dies of pneumonia at home at age 32.  He is the son of the 20th Earl of Shrewsbury & Talbot.  “He was not passed fit for active service owing to varicose veins, but was appointed adjutant of the new reserve regiment of the Royal Horse Guards at Regent’s Park Barracks, where he had been serving until his death and it is greatly due to his hard work that the reserve regiment has become so efficient”.

  • Private Robert Martin (Scots Guards) is killed. He played football for Afton Thistle.
  • Private William Walter Ogden (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. His brother will be killed in February 1917.
  • Private Murdo MacKay (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry suffer their first casualties when Lance Corporals N Fry age 27 and Henry George Bellinger age 39 are killed by snipers.

Friday 25 December 1914 – We Lost 149

1914 Christmas truce

1914 Christmas truce

Units behind the front lines attend church services and many have arranged Christmas dinners which are taken in barns and damaged buildings. In the front lines both British and German soldiers observe an informal, ad hoc, Christmas Day truce, meeting in No Man’s Land to exchange cigarettes and to take snapshots.  Not all units know about it and it is not universally observed but it is widespread over at least half of the British front. Outraged, the General Staff forbids this ever to happen again. In spite of the so-called Christmas Truce death still occurs on this day during the Great War. Eighty-one British soldiers die today the 2nd Grenadier Guards suffer losses in heavy fighting.

The Zeppelin sheds at Cuxhaven, at the mouth of the Elbe River, are the target of a new method of attack. Seaplanes are carried in three converted cross channel steamers, HMS Engadine, HMS Riviera and HMS Empress, to a position close to the target. Departing at 07:00 two of the nine Short seaplanes involved fail to get off the surface; the others fly to Cuxhaven, but cannot locate the sheds. The reconnaissance of the German fleet does prove valuable however and so disturbs the German command that they at once move a number of vessels, the battle cruiser Van de Tann being badly damaged in the process. Three of the seaplanes return to their carriers; three more are abandoned at sea near Norderney Gat due to low fuel, their pilots being rescued by submarine E11.  The seventh seaplane also goes down in the sea, its pilot being picked up by a Dutch trawler.

A supporting naval squadron, including HMS Arethusa and HMS Undaunted, under the command of Commodore R Y Tyrwhitt is itself attacked by two Zeppelins and a number of German seaplanes, the first air attack on naval forces at sea.  It is beaten off with comparative ease, and the Zeppelin L-6 very nearly becomes a casualty due to over six hundred bullet holes in her gasbags.  No hits are made on the British ships, though there are a number of near misses.

At 12:20 an unfamiliar engine sound is heard by the crew of the Barton’s Point (Sheerness) anti-aircraft battery and five minutes later an enemy float plane is spotted at about 7,000 feet.  It is greeted by fire from several guns and the Beacon Hill (Sheppey) gunners shoot away their own telephone wires in their enthusiasm. The enemy flies on to the north of Grain, and then turns west.  Having descended to 4,000 feet he flies along the River Thames and at 13:15 over Erith is intercepted by a Royal Flying Corps Vickers Gunbus from Joyce Green, crewed by Second Lieutenant Montagu R Chidson and Corporal Martin. Upon seeing the Gunbus the German turns and retreats down the Thames, Martin firing several bursts as the chase proceeds over Purfleet and Tilbury.  At 13:35 the enemy unloads two bombs in a field near Cliffe railway station (the pilot later claims to have attacked oil storage tanks at Sheerness).  At about this time Martin’s gun jams and as the engine is running badly, Chidson breaks off contact.

Captain Thomas Otho Fitzgerald with two companies of the King’s Africa Rifles and 1 company of the Indian Grenadiers under Colonel Ragbit Singh captures Jassin German East Africa. British losses are two killed and three wounded while the Germans losses are seven killed.

The hired trawler Night Hawk is sunk by a mine off Scarborough, six of her crew members being killed. S S Gem (Master J McKeegan) strikes a mine three miles from Scarborough and is sunk. Her master is among the ten killed, while there are two survivors. S S Therese Heymann (Master Thomas Evans age 52) sails from the Tyne on a voyage to Savona, Italy with a cargo of coal and disappears when she struck a mine off Filey. Twenty are lost.

Today’s losses include:

  • Lieutenant Leonard Castel Campbell Rogers MC (Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds received the previous day. He is the grandson of the Reverend R H Gatty.
  • Lance Corporal Herbert James Yates(Scots Guards) dies of wounds at Boulogne.
  • Lance Corporal Arthur Bertram Webb (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies on service at home. His brother will die on service at home in June 1917.

photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 19 December 1914 – We Lost 501

Mount Everest

Mount Everest

Captain Cecil Edwin Hunt MC (Sikh Pioneers) is killed at age 34. He is the father of the future Brigadier Henry Cecil John Hunt ‘Baron Hunt’ KG PC CBE DSO, who will lead the 1953 first successful expedition to conquer Mount Everest during which Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay will become the first to reach the summit. Also killed in the war will be the father of the second in command of the expedition and the father of the team’s official photographer.

Sharp fighting around Givenchy continues as Indian troops from the Lahore division launch an attack and successfully capture two lines of German trenches. Their success proves short lived as a prompt and aggressive counter-attack pushes them out. The scouts of the Gurkha Rifles, under the command of the battalion’s adjutant Captain David Inglis, are, according to the regimental history, “given the honor of cutting the enemy’s wire and guiding the attacking companies to the gaps”. Captain Inglis is immediately killed. Two of the riflemen with him are also killed while crawling toward the German wire; two others make it to the wire but are killed while cutting it; and still another pair are shot dead still gripping the guiding telephone wire.  Only four survive this debacle and two of these are awarded the Indian Order of Merit.

 Those lost include:

  •  Captain David Inglis dies at age 30. A brother was killed while serving with the Scottish Horse in the South African War and another brother will be killed serving in the Gurkha Rifles in September 1915. They are descendants of Colonel Inglis who fell at Waterloo.
  • Captain Thomas Campball Burke (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at Festubert at age 37 while attacking a German Trench. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Thomas Wall Langshaw.
  • Captain Robert Crooks Gilchrist (Punjabis attached Scinde Rifles) is killed at age 36. He is a holder of the Burma Police Medal and the son of Brigadier General R A Gilchrist.
  • Lieutenant John Cyril Atkinson(Scinde Rifles) is killed at age 26.  He is the son of the late Major General John Richard Atkinson (Indian Army) and his brother will be killed next May.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Bickersteth Rundall(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 24.  He is the author of “The Ibex of Sha-Ping”.  His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • During a night attack, Lieutenant William Arthur McCrae Bruce(Scinde Rifles) in command of a small party captures one of the enemy’s trenches. In spite of being severely wounded in the neck, he walks up and down the trench, encouraging his men to hold on against several counter attacks for some hours until he is killed at age 24. For his actions on this day he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

An attack by 11th Brigade (Somerset Light Infantry, Hampshire Regiment and Rifle Brigade) on the “German Birdcage” east of Ploegsteert Wood fails with heavy casualties many of which are caused by British heavy artillery firing short of their targets.

 The Brigade’s losses include:

  •  Captain ‘the Honorable’ Richard George Grenville Morgan-Grenville (Rifle Brigade) the Master of Kinlowes is killed at age 27. He is the son of Baroness Kinloss and grandson of the late Duke of Buckingham and Chandos.
  • Captain Frank Seymour Bradshaw (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 31 during the attack on Ploegsteert. He is the son of Major Frank Boyd Bradshaw who died of fever in the Burma War in July 1887 and the great grandson of General Laurence Bradshaw.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Francis Reginald Dennis Prittie(Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the 4th Baron and Baroness Dunalley and he served as the Assistant Commissioner to the Uganda Boundary Commission from 1910 to 1914. He is a French Interpreter.
  • Lieutenant George Rowarth Parr (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the only surviving son of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Hallam Parr KCB. He is a German and French Interpreter and his brother died serving in the same Regiment on Malta in February 1910. They were also grandsons of General ‘Sir’ Hallan Parr.
  • Second Lieutenant Archiabld Steuart Lindsey Daniel (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 19 leading his platoon at Ploegsteert. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Steuart Colvin Bayley GCSI.
  • Rifleman William Charles Hewitt (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 18. His younger brother will die of injuries in 1919 received on active service in April 1917.
  • Private Herbert Frank Miller (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 18. His brother will die of wounds next month.
  • Rifleman Thomas Stapleton (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the Honorable John Stapleton.
  • Rifleman Robert Barnett (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 15 making him one the young British casualties of the Great War.
  • Private John Rose (Highland Light Infantry) is killed. His brother Harris will also lose his life in the Great War.

Captain Josef Johannes Fourie and Lieutenant Johannes Petrus Fourie are condemned in South Africa for high treason.

The Hired Trawler Orianda is sunk by a mine off Scarborough. One crew member is killed.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The father of the leader of the 1953 first successful expedition to conquer Mount Everest
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the war
  • Two families that will lose three sons in service of their King and Country
  • A descendant of a man who fell at Waterloo
  • Multiple Victoria Cross winners
  • The brother of a Victoria Cross winner
  • A son of a member of the clergy
  • The son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple sons of Generals
  • The great grandson of a General
  • A 15-year old soldier
  • An Association Football referee
  • A football player for Southampton and West Ham United
  • A holder of the Burma Police Medal
  • A man whose father died on service in the Burma War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • The Master of Kinlowes
  • A son of the 4th Baron Dunalley
  • A grandson of the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
  • The grandfather of the 7th Baron Sudley
  • A prospective Unionist candidate for Parliament

 The additional losses today by name are

  •  Captain Hugh Taylor (Scots Guards) is killed at age 33. He is the prospective Unionist Candidate for the Burrough of Sunderland.
  • Captain Henry Adam Askew (Border Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is a South African War veteran and son of Canon Edmund Adam Askew Rector of Greystoke Cumberland.
  • Captain Charles Henry Anderson(Highland Light Infantry) is killed. He has three brothers who will be killed in the Great War, one of which will be awarded the Victoria Cross.
  • Captain Cecil David Woodburn Bamberger (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 30. He is an Association Football referee and his brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Felix Charles Hubert Hanbury-Tracy(Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 30. He is the son of the 4th Baron Sudeley of Toddington and his son will be killed in December 1940 while his older brother who will also have a son lost on service in the next war will die in one year while serving in the Royal Horse Guards. He is also the grandson of ‘the Honorable’ Frederick Tollemache and great nephew of the 7th Earl Dysart. He is also the grandfather of the 7th Baron Sudeley.
  • Lance Corporal William Houston (Highland Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother was killed last September.
  • Private Frederick Costello (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is a professional football player who played forward for Southampton and West Ham United.
  • Private Ernest Ebenezer Kennedy (Scots Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed in March 1918.

Private James Mackenzie (Scots Guards) rescues a severely wounded man from in from of the German trenches at Rouges Bancs under very heavy fire and after a stretcher bearer party has been compelled to abandon the attempt. His is subsequently killed today while performing a similar act of gallant conduct. For his actions he will be awarded the posthumous Victoria Cross.

Lieutenant Philip Neame (Royal Engineers) is awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Neave Chapelle, when, notwithstanding the very heavy fire and bomb throwing by the enemy he succeeds in holding them back and rescuing all the wounded men whom it is possible to move.

The landing party from the Doris at Alexandretta destroys a railway bridge. Threatened by the cruisers six inch guns, the Turks agrees to destroy railway material and stores, but having no explosives they have to ask the Royal Navy to supply some. This is duly done, and the ludicrous spectacle ensues of British sailors laying explosive charges while Turkish officials supervised their detonation.

Lieutenant Charles Vernon Crossley (Royal Naval Reserve) is awarded the DSC while mine sweeping off Scarborough three violent explosions under the stern of his ship trawler #465 (Star of Britain).  He controls the crew and then crawls into a confined space near the screw shaft, discovered the damage and stopped the leak sufficiently to enable the pumps to keep the water down and save the ship. Lieutenant Crossley will die on service in February 1918.

 

Friday 13 November 1914 – We Lost 254

 

Herbert Kitchener

Herbert Kitchener

Sanctuary Wood is shelled during this night while being used to screen troops behind the front line.

The British 8th Division is deployed to the front providing much needed reinforcement.

Today’s losses include:

  • A former Aide de camp to Lord Kitchener
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead
  • A Swinton Town Football Club player
  • Grandson of the 9th Lord Digby
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • The brother of a ‘war poet’
  • Son of a General
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of General
  • Brother-in-law killed later in the war
  • Nephew of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Colonel Raymond John Marker DSO (Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, I Army Corps Headquarters) on the General Staff dies of wounds at Boulogne received 4 November at age 47. His body is one of the few repatriated to England for burial during the War. He is the son of Richard Marker JP and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Marker and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Thomas Jackson 1st Baronet. He is the grandson of the 9th Lord Digby and during the South African War served as Aide de Camp to Lord Kitchener. His brother-in-law Claude Stewart Jackson will be killed in October 1917.

  •  Captain Charles James Lyon(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the youngest of three brothers to be killed in the Great War.  The first was killed in the first month of the war while the oldest, a war poet, will be killed in May 1915.
  • Captain Robert Guy Incledon Chichester(Highland Light Infantry) the son of the late Reverend Richard Chichester the Rector of Drewsteignton is killed at age 41. He served on the North West Frontier 1897-8 and South African War.
  • Captain William Ernest Rogerson (Durham Light Infantry) dies of heart failure at age 42 at home. He is the son-in-law of Lieutenant General W H Mackesy.
  • Captain John Alexander Halliday (Hussars) died of wounds at Le Touquet at age 39 received 31 October Messines. He is the nephew of R Howell Brown Vicar of Enfield and a member of MCC.
  • Captain Archibald William Roberson-Glasgow (Garhwal Rifles Indian Army) is killed at age 34. He is the son of R B Robertson-Glasgow DL and his wife is the niece of Lady Robertson of Forteviot. He served in the Somaliland Campaign in 1901.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Archibald Loyd (Scots Guards) is killed at Zonnebeke by shrapnel at age 24. He is the son of A K Loyd KC MP North Berks.
  • Lieutenant David Scott Dodgson(Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 29 when he is shot by a sniper while attempting to lay cable for his battery at Gorre. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ David Scott Dodgson KCB.
  • Lieutenant N Ramsay (Dragoon Guards attached Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Humfrey Richard Talbot (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 25 after his trench is hit by a shell killing and wounding many men. He attends to the wounds of his men despite his own wounds before dying. He is the son of the Mayor of Hemel Hempstead, Gustavus Talbot.
  • Private Edwin Charles Waite (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Private William Arthur Brewer (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is a member of the Swinton Town Football Club.
  • Boy George Leonard Hamshire (HMS Shannon) dies on service at age 16. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Wednesday 11 November 1914 – We Lost 777

 

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The torpedo gunboat HMS Niger is torpedoed in the English Channel.  She later explodes and sinks though there are no casualties.

British troops pass through the small village of Oulchy-le-Chateau in their advance on the Aisne.

At 10:00 the 2nd Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry are turned out to back up the 1st Brigade which has been attacked while holding the ground a little to the north of the Ypres-Menin road. They are ordered to Westhoek to get in touch with the 1st Division, who are holding up reinforcements on the right. In spite of a barrage that lays shells about them, the Oxfords reach Westhoek without loss. Here they get under cover and observe the Northamptonshire Regiment advancing on their right, into the southern part of the wood lying to the south of Westhoek. At the same time Colonel Lushington of the Royal Artillery sends gunners, cooks, etc armed with rifles against the Germans in Nonne Bosschen Wood.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry R Davies sends two companies to clear Nonne Bosschen Wood (Nun’s Wood) near Ypres, advancing from the northwest to southeast.  They drive the Germans before them killing and capturing many. Two more companies follow in support.  When the first two companies, ‘A’ and ‘B’ come out on the southeastern edge of the wood they are joined by the Northamptons on the right and by some Connaught Rangers and Sappers on the left. They force the Germans out of the trenches; some of the enemy turning and running when the attack is thirty or forty yards off, others surrender. Most of those who run are shot. Casualties to the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry amount to twenty-seven, of whom five are killed.  There is still another trench held by the Germans in front, but before an attack can be mounted on it French artillery begins to drop shrapnel into the British front line, not realizing how far it has advanced. It takes some time to inform the French of this error and by this time dark has set in.

Near Becelaere, Belgium, Captain Walter Lorrain Brodie (Highland Light Infantry) leads a charge to evict the enemy from a portion of our trenches that they have succeeded in occupying. He bayonets several of the enemy himself and relieves a dangerous situation. As a result of his actions, 80 of the enemy are killed and 51 taken prisoner. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Uncle of a man killed yesterday
  • Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Two members of the Surrey Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Brothers Privates James F and John William Stallard are among those killed in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. John is a boxer of some repute in the Army and had gone into strict training for a bout at the National Sporting Club when the war broke out. Because of his prowess in the ring he was known as ‘The Mad Mullah’. He dies at age 26 while his older brother is 28.  They are sons of James and Florence Stallard of St Mary Street, New Bradwell, Bucks.

Another set of brothers are killed on this day while serving together. Private Thomas and James Freemantle (Scots Guards) have both served in the Guards prior to the war then joined the Surrey Constabulary together and both resigned to rejoin the Guards upon the outbreak of the war. The brothers are both 26. They are sons of William and Sarah Freemantle of Easton, Winchester.

  •  Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahonDSO, General Officer Commanding 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached 10th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Division is killed in action at age 48. The General tries to rally support troops east of Hooge, on the south side of the Ypres-Menin Road when he is suddenly seen to sink to one knee and begins to remove his legging as though hit in the leg. At that moment a shell bursts close to him killing him instantly. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon CB Baronet and he served in Burma from 1886 to 1887 and in the South African War.
  • Major Alfred Herbert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. He served in Sierra Leone 1898-9 and in the South African War. His nephew was killed yesterday at the same place while also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Major Harold Henry Norman (Temporarily commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in the above action at age 47. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and Zakka Khel in 1908. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Henry Wood.
  • Captain William Maynard Carlisle-Crowe (Warwickshire Regiment attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is a Swiss Alpine skier and the son of General Thomas Caralisle-Crowe.
  • Captain and Adjutant Ewen James Brodie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed when he is shot by a sniper at age 36 in the Nonne Bosch Wood. He is the son of J C J Brodie Lord Lieutenant of the County of Nairn.
  • Captain James William Lennox Sprot (Black Watch) is killed at age 28 less than three weeks after his brother was killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Jeune Collins (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29 while signaling for more men to protect the flank of his trench. Typically known by his initials A E J Collins is an English cricketer and soldier. He is most famous for achieving the highest-ever recorded score in cricket: as a 13-year-old schoolboy, he scored 628 not out over four afternoons in June 1899. Collins’ record-making innings drew a large crowd and increasing media interest; spectators at the Old Cliftonian match being played nearby were drawn away to watch a junior school house cricket match. One brother will be killed in August 1916 while his second brother will die of illness on service in February 1917.
  • Captain Hugh James Shaw (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in November 1915.
  • Captain Arthur Kenneth Puzey (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain William Augustus Portman Foster(South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds in a German hospital at Frankfort-on-Main of wounds received at Gheluvelt on 31 October at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Yorke Foster the 3rd Baronet and Lady Foster.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Symonds Holmes (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of Admiral of the Fleet ‘Sir’ Thomas M Symonds GCB.
  • Lance Corporal James Robert Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed less than three weeks earlier.
  • Private William Stoyan(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed later in the Great War, one in 1916 the other in 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Brown(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25.  His brother Peter Hume Brown will fall in November 1916.
  • Private John Hamon Massy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private George Etherington (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28 less than two weeks after his brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment.
  • Rifleman Robert James Adair (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service in March 1919.
  • Gunner Sidney Herbert Toll (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service at home in the first week of the war.
  • Private Edward Webster Wood (Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Turks forces attack the British camp at Sanniyeh with heavy loss and are forced to withdraw four miles.

  •  Major Richard Ducat (Infantry Indian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of Major General Claude Malet Ducat and grandson of Hugh Hamersley JP. He was member of the force that fought on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-8.

Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Doveton Sturdee departs Devonport his flag on HMS Invincible in company with HMS Inflexible on a voyage to the South Atlantic to search for the German squadron under Vice Admiral Graf Maximillan von Spee. At the same time HMS Princess Royal is dispatched to the Caribbean to guard the Panama Canal.

At a matinee at the Empire Theater John George Lambton 3rd Earl of Durham whose brother was killed on the Western Front less than two weeks earlier states the opinion that he would “wish that the Germans would drop a shell among these footballers some Saturday afternoon.  I really think it would be the best method of waking up the young men of Sunderland”.  In two weeks 16 members of The Hearts of Midlothan join the 16th Royal Scots becoming the only team in the history of British football to enlist en masse in the armed force. Seven members of the first team will lose their lives in the Great War.

Saturday 7 November 1914 – We Lost 741

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Tsing-tau falls to British and Japanese forces and two thousand three hundred prisoners are taken. The British casualties during the siege are 2 officers wounded, 12 men killed, and 61 wounded. Numerous congratulatory messages are exchanged between the British and the Japanese. Lord Kitchener sends his felicitations to the Japanese Minister of War at Tokyo: “Please accept my warmest congratulations on the success of the operations against Tsing-tau. Will you be so kind as to express my felicitations to the Japanese forces engaged? The British Army is proud to have been associated with its gallant Japanese comrades in this enterprise”.

Two American companies accept orders from the British Admiralty for twelve flying boats.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  A Victoria Cross winner
  • A grandson of the first victim of the India Mutiny
  • A man whose uncle was killed in the South African Wara
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • A grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Cousin of a General
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who had two brothers lose their lives in the service of King & Country before the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A cousin of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a former Lord Mayor of London
  • A man who played one first class cricket match for Worcestershire

 Today’s highlighted casualties is

 At Zillebeke, Belgium, when leading an attack against the Germans under very heavy fire, Captain John Franks Vallentin (South Staffordshire Regiment) is struck down and on rising to continue the attack and immediately killed at age 32. The capture of the enemy’s trenches which immediately follows is in a great measure due to the confidence which the men have in their captain, arising from his many previous acts of great bravery and ability. For his actions Captain Vallentin will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. He also served in the South Africa War. Vallentin is the nephew of the noted naturalist Rupert Vallentin. His grandfather ‘Sir’ James Vallentin was Knight Sheriff of London, and his cousin Archibald Thomas Pechey, the lyricist and author, adapted the family name for his nom-de-plune ‘Valentine’. His grandfather Colonel Finnis was the first victim of the Indian Mutiny and another uncle, Major Valentin was killed in the South African War.

  •  Captain Arnold Stearns Nesbitt (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is a cricketer who played one first class match for Worcestershire in 1914.
  • Captain Richard Alexander Noel Smyth (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend J Coke Vicar of Ilebrewers near Taunton Somerset the former Principal and Chaplain of the Lawrence Military Asylum, Sanawar India.
  • Captain Beauchamp Oswald Duff(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Beauchamp GCB commander of the Army in India and Lady Duff.  He had served in the Waziristan and Somaliland campaigns 1901-4.
  • Captain Lionel Alfred Francis Cane(East Lancashire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on an enemy trench at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Granger Cane of Great Paxton Vicarage, St Neots Hunts and 1st cousin to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby KCB.
  • Captain Edward Basil Chichester (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and has had two brothers previously die in the service of their King one dying on service in 1898 and the second being killed in 1902 in Somaliland.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Alexander Goldsmid (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the second cousin of ‘Sir’ Julian Goldsmid Baronet and related to ‘Sir’ Isaac Francis Goldsmid Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Jessie Marson Atkin(Sherwood Foresters attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed in May 1918. Lieutenant Atkin is the son of Mr H Atkin, New Westwood and entered The University College, Nottingham in the session 1910 – 11.  While at college he passed the final examinations of the Bachelor of Arts Degree of London. He received his military training under Captain Trotman in the Officers Training Corps, passing ‘A’ and ‘B’ Military examinations.  At the completion of his college career he applied and was accepted for the special reserve of officers.  A touching incident in connection with the announcement of his death is that his sister who was employed at the Jacksdale Post Office was the one to receive the message informing the family of his death.  
  • Lieutenant Reginald Nigel Gipps (Scots Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Reginald Gipps GCB.
  • Lieutenant John Beauclerk Vandeleur(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Colonel J S Vandeleur CB.
  • Second Lieutenant Gillachrist Moore (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Norman Moore the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Hutton(Leicestershire Regiment attached Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Henry Hutton Rector of West Heslerton.
  • Second Lieutenant James Neil Grant McGrigor (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds in London received 24 October at age 19. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James McGrigor.
  • Second Lieutenant Murray Stuart Pound (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received 21 October at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ John Lulham Pound the 2nd Baronet and grandsons of ‘Sir’ John Pound Baronet Lord Mayor of London 1904-5.
  • Sergeants and brothers Alfred James (age 29) and William John Cogan age 33 (Bedfordshire Regiment) are killed together. A third brother will be killed in next March.
  • Sergeant William Peart (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother Henry will also lose his life in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Jake Clarke Andrews (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Percy Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed next August on Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Lamond (Black Watch) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Ernest Herbert Bygrave (Bedfordshire Regiment) becomes the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War. They are sons of the late Reverend Joseph Hutton.
  • Private William Gray(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 18.  His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Drummer George Edward Ransom (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private William Cowan Fulton (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Patrick O’Connell (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother John will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Samuel Hateley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.                                                                                                                                                  

photo from wikipedia.org