Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: SMS Emden

Monday 9 November 1914 – We Lost 234

SMS Emden

SMS Emden

 

At dawn the Australian and New Zealand convoy alters course to bend around the Cocos Islands, which lays out of sight over the western horizon.  Soon many wireless operators in the transports pick up, very loud and clear a short coded signal of a wireless which some of them recognize as Emden’s.  The Coco’s Island wireless is heard asking for the code and then telegraphing, “Strange warship approaching”.  This comes again, with an “SOS” and then silence.  Captain Mortimer Silver at once starts with HMAS Melbourne to make for the Cocos, but immediately afterwards, realizing that his main responsibility is the conduct of the convoy, orders the Sydney to hasten to the assist instead.

At 09:30 a wireless message comes from the Sydney that she has sighted the enemy steaming northward.  At 10:45 she reports “Am briskly engaging enemy”. Captain John Glossop of the Sydney has with his gunnery officer decided to open fire at 9,500 yards, which he believes to be beyond the Emden’s range.  As he closes to 10,500 yards and swings to a parallel course, he sees the enemy open fire and a salvo burst in the sea some 200 yards away, a second salvo lands closer and of the third salvo two shells strike the Sydney.  For ten minutes the Sydney races through showers of shell bursts, the Emden firing with speed and accuracy.

The Sydney takes longer to find the range and her salvoes are less regular, but her heavier shells soon take their toll.  The Emden quickly hit her fifteen times, though only five shells explode. From then onwards she does not score another hit. As the Emden shows signs of suffering the Sydney closes to 5,500 yards and fires a torpedo, which runs short. The Sydney’s 100-pound shells are inflicting much greater damage than the Emden’s 3.8-pounders. The Emden is on fire, two funnels shot down, one ammunition room flooded; the steering gear destroyed and half her crew is disabled.  Only one Emden’s of guns is still firing while the Sydney is virtually undamaged.  Keeling Island, a northern member of the Cocos group is in sight and Emden’s Captain runs his ship at its highest speed on to the coral reef. At 11:10, Captain Glossop reports “Emden beached and done for”. The Sydney’s hull has been hulled in three places but repairs will be easily carried out. Emden’s casualties amount to 134 killed compared to four of Sydney’’ crew.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  An Olympic hurdler who held the 440 hurdles world record
  • A footballer who player for the Corinthians
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • A son-in-law of clergy
  • Family that will lose two sons
  • A wife who will lose her son and husband
  • A great grandson of the Chief Justice of Bombay
  • A member of the Cardiff City Council

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Second Lieutenant Gerard Rupert Laurie Anderson (Cheshire Regiment) an Olympic hurdler is killed in action at age 25 leading a charge at Hooge. He is the hurdling champion of England and all-round athlete and the 440 hurdles world record holder when he ran 56.8 seconds at the Crystal Palace on 16th July 1910. He is the son of Prebendary Anderson of St George’s Hanover Square.

  •  Captain Thomas Lewis Pritchard(Royal Welsh Fusiliers) dies of wounds received 27th October at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Thomas Pritchard (Vicar of Amlwch, Anglesey) and had served in the South African Campaign. He is married to the niece of the Chancellor of the Exchequer.
  • Captain Price Vaughn Lewes (HMS Superb, Royal Navy) dies of illness at age 49. His son will die of injuries in the Royal Flying Corps in July 1916.
  • Captain George Bertram Pollock-Hodsoll(Suffolk Regiment attached Cheshire Regiment) is killed leading a counter attack at age 39. He is a well-known football player, playing for the Corinthians and captaining the Army team on occasion, and athlete. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Dr. Milne Rae of Edinburgh and great grandson of ‘Sir’ David Pollock Chief Justice of Bombay. He is also related to ‘Sir’ Frederick Pollock Chief Baron of the Exchequer and Field Marshall ‘Sir’ George Pollock “of the Khyber Pass”
  • Lieutenant Roland Henry Pank Holme(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) dies of wounds received when he is struck by a shell fragment on 31 October. His brother was killed in Cameroons last September.
  • Lieutenant Walter Francis Graves (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is a member of the Cardiff City Council.
  • Private Barnes Usherwood (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will die on service in the Royal Navy in January 1916.

photo from ozebook.com

Sunday 8 November 1914 – We Lost 328

 

HMAS Sydney

HMAS Sydney

A convoy that HMAS Sydney, HMAS Melbourne and the Japanese warship Ibuki are escorting is getting into waters where the chief danger is from the vigorous SMS Emden.  The German light cruiser has sunk or captured twenty-five allied steamers and two warships, raided Penang, and shelled the oil tanks at Madras.  The Australian and New Zealand convoy has learned to sail without lights.  The big staff ship Orvieto, still sometimes twinkles “like a hotel” when, on this night, the convoy approaches the solitary Cocos Islands, keeping fifty miles to the east in case Emden is near.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A grandson of two Generals
  • A grandson of the 12th Baron Petre
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain Hugh Mortimer Travers (Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 41. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Robert Travers and Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Marion Durand. He served in the South African War and is engaged to the daughter of Surgeon General ‘Sir’ William Taylor.

  •  Captain Frederick Cleave Strickland Dunlop(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 36. He has four brothers who will serve in the Great War two of whom will be killed in action, one in October of this year the other in September of next.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Douglas Waud (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the nephew of Baron de la Borie de la Batut and great nephew of Count Marie.
  • Lieutenant Wilfred Stanislaus Stapleton-Bretherton(Royal Fusiliers) is killed.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Isabella Stapleton-Bretherton who lost another son in the South African War in January 1902 and the grandson of the 12th Baron Petre.
  • Lieutenant Francis Algernon Monckton(Scots Guards) is killed at age 24. His younger brother will be killed next January serving in the same regiment.
  • Sergeant William Thomas Challen(North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916 at age 18 serving in his brother’s regiment.
  • Corporal Herbert Stocker (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private John Thomas Boyle (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in a nine month period.

photo from wikipedia.org

Wednesday 28 October 1914 – We Lost 599

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg

Admiral Louis Alexander of Battenberg resigns as First Sea Lord the day after his nephew dies of wounds on the Western Front.  His resignation letter includes “I have lately been driven to the painful conclusion that at this juncture my birth and parentage have the effect of impairing…my usefulness to the Board of the Admiralty. I feel it is my duty to resign”. His German ancestry, titles, property and even his accent made him a target of the popular press and letters to the editor looking for a scapegoat for the Royal Navy’s lack of success to this point in the war.  The First Sea Lord’s wife is even the sister-in-law of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, the Kaiser’s brother and grand admiral of the German Navy.

Indian troops attack into Neuve Chapelle village, fighting house to house and hand to hand.  Within hours a sustained German counter attack drives the Sikhs from the village.  Of the two hundred eighty-nine men who manage to extricate themselves from Neuve Chapelle, only sixty-eight reach the road from which the attack has started. For his courage during the retreat Subadar Malla Singh will be awarded the Military Cross, the first Indian officer to be awarded the medal.  In the ensuing six days of fighting, more than twenty-five British officers and five hundred Indian officers and men will be killed, and 1,455 wounded.

The British force fighting its way along the railroad from Yapona reaches Edea, Cameroon two days after the French have occupied the town.  Meanwhile Lieutenant Colonel Haywood with the 2nd Nigeria Regiment successfully fights his way up the Northern Railway and captures Susa.

At 07:00 SMS Emden stops the British steamer Glen Turret after raiding Penang harbor.  The Glen Turret is carrying explosives but instead of being sunk she is used as a messenger by Emden.  The German captain apologizes to the survivors of a Russian light cruiser that he sank, for not picking them up. He also apologizes to the crew of a pilot boat for unintentionally firing on their unarmed vessel.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  One of four brothers who lose their lives in the service of their King and Country
  • The son of an author of religious pamphlets
  • Son of the 13th Baron Lovat
  • Aide de campe to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913
  • Great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor
  • Son of an Admrial
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Hockey player
  • Son of the late Governor of the Windward Islands
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley
  • An International high hurdler
  • Nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham
  • Father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Denis Holdsworth Michaela
  • An anthropologist
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Son of clergy
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons and grandson of Generals
  • Sons of Justice’s of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Major John Stanley Richardson (commanding 21st Company Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas and Lady Anna Constance Richardson and was a King Edward’s Gold Medal (1902) and King George’s Durbar Medal (1911) winner. He is one of five brothers who will lose their lives in the service of their King and Country four in the Great War after one was lost in a submarine accident in 1912. His mother is an author of religious pamphlets Prayers for Family Worship and Parish Meetings and A Simple Message to God’s Word.

  • Major William Lynn Allen DSO (Border Regiment) is killed at age 43. He is a South African War veteran and son of Bulkeley Allen JP.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh Joseph Fraser MVO(Scots Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of Simon Fraser MVO, the 13th Baron Lovat and he served as the ADC to the Viceroy of India from 1910-1913.
  • Captain Rowland Latimer Almond (Sappers and Miners, Indian Army) is killed at age 27. He is the first and youngest of three brothers who will be killed.
  • Captain Robert Frederick Balfour (Scots Guards) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 31. He is the son of Edward Balfour JP DL and great grandson of the 1st Earl of Cawdor and his brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Captain Edgar Wilmer Walker (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Admiral C F Walker and grandson of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Captain Robert Jim McCleverty (Sikhs) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of General W A McCleverty and Surgeon General H H Massy CB. He fought in the South African War and is a hockey player.
  • Captain Eric May Battersby (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Worsley Battersby JP.
  • Captain Edwin John Berkeley Hayes-Sadler (Royal Engineers) is killed two days before his brother is killed. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ James Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Alexander Kennedy(Royal Irish Rifles) dies of wounds received four days earlier. He is the son of the late General H F Kennedy (King’s Royal Rifle Corps). His wife is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Aylmer Hunter Weston KCB DSO.
  • Captain Bertram Lawrence (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 37 when he is shot by a sniper. He is the grandson of General Henry Lawrence and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Charles Almeric John Cholmondeley(Border Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the late Lord and Lady Cholmondeley and the grandson of the 3rd Marquess of Cholmondeley.
  • Captain John Mounsey Lambert(Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 30.  He is the only son of the late Major General G C Lambert.
  • Lieutenant James Booker Brough Warren (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is an international caliber high hurdler.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald Charles Melbourne Gibbs (Scots Guards) is also killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Honorable’ Henry Gibbs, grandson of General Charles Crutchley and nephew of the 2nd Baron Aldenham.
  • Second Lieutenant Clarence Leslie Bentley(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 20 when he is shot in the head by a sniper. He is the son of the late Alderman William Bentley JP.  He passed out of Sandhurst as war was declared.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Mary Snead-Cox(Royal Scots) is killed 8 days after his brother has been killed when he is shot in the chest while another brother will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed yesterday.
  • Sergeant Major Sydney Barnard Thompson (Lancers) is killed at Messines a day before his brother will be killed at Ypres.
  • Lance Corporal Edward Alexander Guess (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Brothers Jim and Tom Pumfrey are killed in action while serving as privates in the South Staffordshire Regiment.
  • Private Arthur Holdssworth (East Yorkshire Regiment) an archaeologist is killed in action. He is the father of wildlife documentary filmmaker Michaela Holdsworth Denis.
  • Private Frank Lawes (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918.
  • Private Richard Banks (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed one week after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private John Haines (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother William will also lose his life in the war.
  • Colonel Bertram Charles Percival Heywood(Manchester Regiment) dies at home at age 49.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Thomas Percival Heywood, the 2nd  He served in the South African Campaign.

A British Naval Flotilla continues to support the Allies left, and since the morning of the 27th the fire of 12in. guns has been brought to bear upon the German positions and batteries. The reports received from shore testify to the effect and accuracy of the fire, and its strong results. The flank is thus thoroughly protected. The enemy brings up heavy guns and replies vigorously to the fire from Admiral Hood’s ships. The vessels receive no structural damage. The casualties are slight throughout, but one shell explodes on the destroyer HMS Falcon killing her commander along with seven other men.

  • Lieutenant Hubert Osmond Wauton is the son of the Reverend Atherton E Wauton age 29.
  • Able Stoker Petty Officer Charles Arthur Beaney killed at age 38. His brother was killed last month in the sinking of HMS Hogue.
  • Able Seaman William Skye is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service as a leading aircraftman in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1946.

The fishing vessel Our Tom (Skipper Albert R Larkins) is sunk by a mine 45 miles southeast from Southwold.  Her skipper and two crew men are killed.

photo from wikipedia.org

 

 

Sunday 18 October 1914 – We Lost 318

Huddersfield Town FC

Huddersfield Town FC

Ypres is recaptured by the Germans.

Enemy shells set alight two ricks at Beaupuits, the flames clearly showing to the enemy the position of our trenches.  Under heavy fire from machine guns, Lance Corporal W H Stoneman (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) endeavors to extinguish the flames for which he will be award the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

The first destruction of a submarine by another submarine occurs when E3 (Lieutenant Commander George Francis Cholmley age 32) wanders too far into the Western Ems looking for likely targets on the third day of a patrol in the area off Borkum in Heligoland Bight.  It is sighted on the surface at 10:25 by the German U27 which fires a torpedo from a range of 300 yards that cuts E3 in half sending both halves to the bottom. There are no survivors among the 28 members of the crew. ERA Charles Ellman Blake is lost at age 28. He has two brothers-in-law who will lose their lives later in the war, Thomas Gawn in 1915 and Arthur James Woodford in 1918.

British monitors under Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood aid the Belgians in the battle of Yser.  Admiral Hood will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.

SMS Emden finds three more victims. Number one is the cargo liner Troilus on her maiden voyage. The master, Captain George Long, is furious with the naval intelligence officer in Colombo who has told him that if he passes thirty miles north of Minicoy he will be safe.  Her cargo is rubber, copper, tin and other items. The 10,000 tons in her holds and her own value make this ship the most valuable catch of Emden’s career. The loss represents probably an excess of one million pounds sterling, which in the monetary values of the period is enough to build three light cruisers.  Shortly thereafter the St. Egbert carrying 6,600 tons to the United States is captured. This ship is used to carry away the crews of previously captured ships and she is released to do so.  Finally at about midnight the collier Exford laden with 5,500 tons of the best Cardiff coal, destined for the Royal Navy is captured.  A prize crew is put aboard and she goes into tow. SMS Emden captures her final British merchant ship, S S Chilkana with a valuable cargo of piece goods on her way to Calcutta from Britain, and is immediately sunk.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of the Earl of Glasgow
  • Huddersfield Town Football player
  • Olympic Silver Medalist
  • British Isles Rugby International
  • Three uncles lost in the Crimean War
  • Two brothers-in-law
  • Two sons will be killed on service (one pre-World War II and one in that war)
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Seymour Frederick Auckland Albert Hurt (Scots Fusiliers) is killed on his thirty-fifth birthday. He is the son of Albert Frederick Hurt JP DL. Two paternal uncles were killed in the Crimea while a maternal uncle died of wounds received at Inkerman.

  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ James Boyle(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at Chateau Warneton at age 34.  He is the son of the 7th Earl and Countess of Glasgow.  His widow will marry ‘Sir’ Hugh Trenchard.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Longman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Evans.
  • Lieutenant Villiers Chernocke Downes(Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23.  His two sons will be killed on service, the first serving as a Lieutenant in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers will be killed in an airplane accident in 1938 while the other will be killed in action serving as a Lieutenant Colonel in the 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers at Anzio on 27 May 1944 also dying at age 34. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Cunningham Gillespie (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1915. He won a Silver Medal at the 1912 Olympics as a member of the New College Rowing Eight team.
  • Lieutenant Edwin Maurice Bishop (Dorsetshire Regiment attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother will die at home on service in April 1915.
  • Corporal Sidney Nelson Crowther (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 39. A medical doctor, he served and was killed as a motor cycle dispatch rider. He earned four caps in Rugbyfor the British Isles in the 1904 tour of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Lance Corporal Harold Whitehorn Ahern (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March next year.
  • Lance Corporal Larrett Roebuck (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 25. He played 17 football games for Huddersfield Town last season.
  • Private Percy A Shorter (East Kent Regiment) is killed at Ploegsteert. His two brothers will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private George Frederick White (Lancers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Samuel Reuben Hibbert (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Private Percy Turner (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Henry will lose life in the Great War.

Photos from Wikipedia.org