Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Victoria Cross

Monday 21 September 1914 – We Lost 170 (Plus 1)

Laurence Binyon’s poem “For The Fallen” is first published in TheTimes

 With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,

England mourns for her dead across the sea.

Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,

Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal

Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,

There is music in the midst of desolation

And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,

Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.

They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;

They fell with their faces to the foe.

 They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;

They sit no more at familiar tables of home;

They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;

They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,

Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,

To the innermost heart of their own land they are known

As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,

Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;

As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,

To the end, to the end, they remain.

 Today’s casualties include:

  • A battalion commander
  • Member of the Maryleborne Cricket Club
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Godson of King George
  • Son of Clergy
  • One son of a family that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • Victoria Cross winner who was:
    • attempting to escape a from prisoner-of-war camp
    • the son of clergy
    • the son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
    • the cousin of a Baronet
    • a published author

Today’s casualty of the day is

Major Charles Allix Lavington Yate VC (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed during an attempt to escape from a prisoner-of-war camp in Germany at age 42. It is believed that when challenged by German civilians, he cut his own throat with a razor. The son of the Reverend George Edward Yate, Vicar of Madeley, son-in-law of John F Brigg JP and cousin of ‘Sir’ Charles Yate the 1st Baronet had served in the South African War. He was present at the Siege of Port Arthur during the Russo Japanese War and is a Japanese Interpreter. He is the author of an article printed in the September issue of Blackwood Magazine entitled “Moral Qualities in War”. While in command of two companies in the trenches at Le Cateau on 26 August, and, when all other officers were killed or wounded and ammunition exhausted, he led his nineteen survivors against the enemy in a charge in which he is wounded and captured.  For his actions on the 26th August he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Charles Pilleau DSO (commanding 1st Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 48 four days after his predecessor was killed. Notwithstanding his dying condition, Lieutenant Colonel Pilleau continues for four hours to direct his men.  He is the great nephew of General Thomas Addison CB, a veteran of the South African War, a lawn tennis player and member of MCC.
  • Captain Reginald Whitmore Pepys (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert George Pepys Vicar of Hallow.
  • Lieutenant George Vyvyan Naylor-Leyland(Royal Horse Guards) dies of wounds at age 22.  He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Herbert Scarisbrand Naylor-Leyland, the 1st Baronet and the godson of King George.
  • Private Samuel Wellings (Durham Light Infantry) is killed.  His brother will be killed in July 1917 in Mesopotamia.

The Plus 1

  • An Austrian swimmer at the 1906 Olympics, Leopold Mayer is killed

Saturday 19 September 1914 – We Lost 177 (Plus 1)

A small South African force lands at Luderitzbucht, German South West Africa.

Captain Harry Sherwood Ranken (Royal Army Medical Corps) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for tending to the wounded in the trenches under rifle and shrapnel fire at Hautvesnes on this and the preceding day.  On this day he is seriously wounded as his thigh and leg are shattered.  He will die of his wounds in less than a week.

At Missy under a heavy shell fire Lieutenant Robert Bradford Flint (Royal Engineers) assists Captain W H Johnson in working all the day until 19:00.  With their own hands and two rafts they bring back wounded and return with ammunition, thus enabling the advance brigade to maintain its position on the other side of the river. For this they will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Lieutenant Flint will be killed in January 1915.

Today’s losses include:

  • Grandson of the 3rd and last Baron Gardner of Uttoxeter
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Multiple examples of sons of a family that will lose two sons
  • A man whose sister will be killed in the blitz in 1940
  • Grandson of clergy

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Eric Onslow Cruikshank (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed four days short of two years from this day serving in the Royal Flying Corps and their sister will be killed during the blitz in September 1940 serving in the London Auxiliary Ambulance Service of the YMCA Central Club.

  • Captain William Alan Fuller-Maitland (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of the 3rd Baron Gardner of Uttoxeter and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Rosslyn Curzon Evelegh (Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed on Gallipoli next July.
  • Captain Henry Grattan Elliot (Devonshire Regiment) is killed on the Aisne at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and an ancestor of General G A Eliott and kinsman of the Earl of Minto Defender of Gibraltar Lord Heathfield. He has two brothers in service, including Captain G A Elliot (Irish Regiment) who is one of thirty nine British officers subjected to reprisals by the German government on account of British differential treatment of officers of German submarines who sank unarmed merchant ships. His uncles are Generals William Elliott and W O Barnard.
  • Lieutenant Claude Henry (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ J H Pelly Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Cyril Cazelet Harrison (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at the battle of the Aisne at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1916.
  • Lieutenant Herbert James Graham Gilmour (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at Vailly at age 31 attempting to save men under heavy fire. He is the grandson of Reverend J Cook and a member of the Worcestershire County Cricket Club and St John’s Worcester.

The Plus 1

  • Charles De Vendeville age 32 was French swimmer who won a Gold Medal in the 1900 Olympics in “under water swimming” and also competed in Water Polo.

Wednesday 16 September 1914 – We Lost 256 (Plus 1)

Military Cross

Military Cross

Trooper Frederick Charles Booth (British South Africa Police) dives into the Zambesi at Kakugril and saves the life of a troop horse that has broken loose and swims into thick reeds on the steep river bank where it is unable either to get a footing or extract itself.  Trooper Booth will later be awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery in action in 1917.

Today’s losses include:

  • An heir to one Baron and another Baroness whose sons will later succeed to the Barony
  • The son of a Member of Parliament
  • The first of two men who will make the same woman a widow in the war
  • Fathers of children born after their death
  • Sons of clergy, a judge, and a Baronet
  • A member of the first Military Cross awards class
  • First son from a family that will lose two sons
  • Father of a son who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandfather of a champion racehorse trainer
  • Uncle of a man named for him who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a member of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club (the mother of the sport of Curling)
  • A Scottish International Rugby player
  • Captain of the Grantham Town Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain George Armand Furse (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 34.  His widow will marry Major Ernest Cole Fleming (Royal Field Artillery) who will be killed in 1917. She is the granddaughter of the Chief Constable of Hampshire and the Reverend Frederick Wickham Master of Winchester College. Captain Furse will also have a brother killed in action in May 1918.

  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ William Amherst Cecil MC(Grenadier Guards) is killed by a sniper at age 28.  He is the son of Lord William Cecil CVO and Baroness Amherst. He will be among the 1st 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross. His first son will become the 3rd Baron Amherst of Hackney and his second son will be killed in North Africa in November 1942. His grandson is the champion race horse trainer ‘Sir’ Richard Henry Amherst Cecil.
  • Captain Charles William Banbury (Coldstream Guards) the only son of the Right Honorable Frederick George Banbury MP, Baronet, later the 1st Baron Banbury, dies of wounds at age 36. He was the Aide de Campe to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ J M Grierson at the time of that officer’s death. His second child and only son will be born on 18 May and become the 2nd Baron Banbury.
  • Captain Harry Brocklesby Bartram(Royal Horse Artillery) dies at home at age 36. He is the only son of the Reverend Canon Henry Bartram.
  • Captain Arthur Roe Montgomery Roe (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds received one week prior at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Roe Knight and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wiseman RN Baronet.
  • Captain Gerald Ernest Lea (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. He is the son of His Honour Judge Harris Lea and a veteran of the South African War. His only child will be born on 28 October.
  • Lieutenant Hugh Mockler-Ferryman (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at Aisne at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ C Whitehead who was a member of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club, the mother club of the sport of curling.
  • Lieutenant Victor Maynard Gordon Gordon-Ives (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. His nephew, who is named after him, will be killed on 22 January 1944 at age 22 in Italy.
  • Lieutenant James Laidlaw Huggan(Royal Army Medical Corps attached Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is a Scottish International Rugby Football player who played for London Scottish RFC and for Jed Forest Rugby Club, and had taken part in the last rugby international before the war, the Calcutta Cup match at Inverleith (Edinburgh) in March of this year. He scored one of the three tries in that match. John Will who scored the other two will be killed in 1917.
  • Lieutenant Richard William Gregory Welby(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Charles Gregory Earle Welby CB the 5th Baronet and is Captain of the Grantham Town Cricket Club.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Beddome Read (Somerset Light Infantry is killed at age 23. He is a member of MCC and rugby forward for the Richmond Rugby Club.
  • Gunner E C Howard (North Western Coast Defence Royal Garrison Artillery) dies at age 25. His brother will be killed in the Great War.

The Plus 1

  • Louis Desire Bach killed at age 31 who as a French football player earned a silver medal as a member of Club Francaise at the 1900 Olympics.

Photo from http://www.wikipedia.org

Monday 14 September 1914 – We Lost 1,203

Pickersgill-Cunliff

The first battle of Aisne begins. It will last until 20th September. The British victory at Troyon is considered one of the most brilliant achievements of the War so far. Much of the success of the day is due to the gallant behavior of the 116th Battery Royal Field Artillery when the command devolves on Captain Guy Bertram Oliver, who takes the Battery into action. Captain Oliver will be killed in September 1916.

The village of Soupir is cleared by the Brigade of Guards (Grenadier, Coldstream and Irish Guards Regiments, Black Watch and Cameron Highlanders) and on this day and for several days following heavy fighting will take place at the Farm of La Cour de Soupir near the head of the valley northwest of the village. The Guards Regiments officers and ranks killed today in the operations at Soupir include many listed below.

Bombardier A A Adie (Royal Field Artillery) will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for actions beginning on this day and carrying forward until 13th October on the Aisne. Additional actions from 21st October until 15th November both times showing consistent gallantry in keeping up communications between battery and observation stations.  The efficiency of his battery is largely due to his efforts.  He will be killed in action serving as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Lancaster Regiment on 3rd May 1918.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Sons of families that will lose two, three and four sons and a family that will lose a daughter and son
  • Sons of a current and a former Member of Parliament
  • Sons of
    • Earl
    • Dukes
    • Marquess
    • Baron
    • Baronets
  • Son-in-laws of
    • Earls
    • Baronets
  • Grandsons of
    • Dukes
    • Earls
    • Baron
  • Son of the former Governor of Hong Kong
  • Son of the former Governor General of Australia
  • Sons of Generals
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son of a Writer to the Signet
  • Brother of a Baron
  • Brothers of men who lost their lives in the South African War
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • A Victoria Cross winner
  • Brother of a future Victoria Cross winner
  • The first Rugby International for any nation to be killed in the war
  • Members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • Member of the Wanderers Football Club
  • A duel bronze medal winner at the 1912 Olympics
  • First Class cricket player for Hampshire
  • Father of the man who will create the Army’s first Commando Unit in the next war
  • Fathers whose sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • A direct descendant of a knight who accompanied William the Conqueror in 1066
  • A man who had two relatives in previous wars
    • One who fought and was wounded at Trafalgar
    • One who was killed at the Storming of the Redan in the Crimean War.
  • The Designer of the Army’s War Book
  • The author of the Guide to Army Signalling
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is Lieutenant John Reynolds Pickersgill-Cunliffe

 The leading men of the advanced guard, under Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe (Grenadier Guards), push on, and near La Cour de Soupir run right into the enemy, who are in superior numbers. All the men are taken prisoner, and Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe is wounded. The rest of the advanced guard is also pressing forward, and soon the positions are reversed. Faced with the alternative of capture or retiring before a stronger force, the German officer in command decides on the second course. This means abandoning the prisoners; but there is one thing at any rate that a German officer could still do. He deliberately walks up to Lieutenant Pickersgill-Cunliffe, who is lying wounded on the ground, pulls out his revolver, and shoots him dead.

  •  Captain William Thomas Payne-Gallwey MVO (Grenadier Guards) the only son of ‘Sir’ Ralph William Frankland-Payne Gallwey 3rd Baronet is killed at age 33. His first cousin will be killed in September 1916.
  • Captain Heneage Greville Finch‘Lord Guernsey’ (Irish Guards) is killed at age 31.  He is the son of the 8th Earl of Aylesford and his son Captain Heneage Michael Charles Finch the 9th Earl (Royal Artillery) will be killed in action on 28 May 1940 also at age 31. He served in the South African War and is the son in law of the 2nd Baron de Ramsey and grandson of the 3rd Lord Bagot.
  • Captain Hamilton Hugh Berners(Irish Guards) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Ralph Anstruther and his widow is the grand-daughter of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Walter Barttelot MP Baronet. His brother will become a Brigadier General.
  • Captain Arthur Vincent Hay, ‘Lord Hay’ (Irish Guards) the son of the 10th Marquess of Tweeddale is killed at age 25. His brother Lieutenant Colonel ‘Lord” Edward Douglas John Hay (Grenadier Guards) will be killed by enemy action at Wellington Barracks in June 1944 at age 55.
  • Lieutenant Richard Anthony Compton-Thornhill(Scots Guards) is the only son of ‘Sir’ Anthony John Compton-Thornhill, the 2nd
  • Lieutenant Frederick William Des Voeux(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ George William Des Voeux and was born at Government House, Hong Kong, during his father’s governorship of that colony.
  • Lieutenant Henry Richard Inigo-Jones(Scots Guards) is killed at age 22.  He is the son of Major General Inigo-Jones CB CVO and grandson of Lieutenant Colonel ‘the Honorable’ Richard Charteris.
  • Lieutenant Percy Lyulph Wyndham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 26 while leading his men when he is shot in the head at close range. He is the son of the late ‘Right Honorable’ George Wyndham former Member of Parliament and Countess Grosvenor, grandson of the 1st Duke of Westminster and son-in-law of the 4th Baron Ribblestone.
  • Lieutenant David Cecil Bingham (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Major General the Honorable ‘Sir’ Cecil Edward Bingham CVO CB and grandson of the 4th Earl of Lucan. His widow is the only daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard William Mark Lockwood (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of General Mark Wood.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerard Frederick Freeman-Thomas (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. He is the eldest son and heir to the 1st Marquess Willingdon and grandson of the Earl of Brassey. He played cricket for Eton against Harrow in 1912.
  • Sergeant Arthur Burchett (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Fred Hutchinson (Scots Guards) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Private Charles Glazier King (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die of wounds in September 1916.
  • Private Richard George Carpenter (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 21. His brother will die during the influenza outbreak in February 1919.

 The losses in the other Regiments of the Guards Brigade include

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Adrian Grant DuffCB (commanding 1st Black Watch) age 44. He is the son of ‘the Right Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant Duff PC GCSI and son-in-law of the 1st Baronet Avebury who served on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-98 and in South Africa in 1902.  He was the designer of the ‘War Book’ in his position as Assistant Secretary (Military) to the Committee of Imperial Defense in 1910 which was a complete mobilization plan for the country should war happen. His son will be killed in action in June 1940 with the Black Watch.
  • Major George Stewart-Murray (Black Watch) ‘Lord Stewart-Murray’ is killed at age 41. He is the son of the 7th Duke of Atholl and had served in the South African War. His fourth cousin Major ‘the Honorable’ Alfred Henry Maitland(Cameron Highlanders) is also killed at age 41. He is the son of the 13th Earl of Lauderdale and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898 and South African War.
  • Captain Alastair Hugh Mackintosh(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Lord Kyllachy and had served in the South African War.
  • Captain Alexander Horne (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 38. He is the son of Thomas Elliott Ogilivie Horne Writer to the Signet He is the first cousin of Major General H S Horne and Lieutenant Colonel E W Horne (commanding 3rd Seaforth Highlanders).
  • Lieutenant Arthur Stuart Nicholson(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur W and Lady Nicholson. He played cricket for the Edinburgh Garrison and his Regiment. His brother will be killed next February.
  • Lieutenant Lewis Robertson Cumming (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of John Fleetwood Cumming JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander H Mackinnon Yr of Mackinnon (Cameron Highlanders) is killed. He is the son of Mackinnon of Mackinnon and the Honorable Mrs. Mackinnon.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald George Roderick Joseph Smith-Sligo (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His sister will die on service five days before the armistice is signed in 1918.
  • Private Kenneth MacKenzie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the war.
  • Private William McCartney (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 26. His brother Joseph will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Alexander McCabe (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in April 1918.

 At 03:00 the 2nd Brigade (2nd Sussex Regiment, 1st North Lancashire Regiment, 1st Northampton Regiment and 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is ordered to take the crest above Troyon in a pouring rain and dense mist.  The 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps actually makes it to the top of the ridge but finds itself faced with stiff opposition in particular from German troops holding a sugar factory.  The 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment take up the attack on the factory as does the 1st North Lancashire Regiment. The three battalions dig in on the ridge and face a number of counter attacks throughout the day. At 13:00 the Germans launch a large counter attack which pushes the 2nd Brigade and the Guards back to where they started from in the morning, taking the sugar factory back in the process.  As with the Guards the casualties have been severe on both sides.  Every battalion in the 2nd Brigade has over three hundred men killed and wounded.

  • The losses suffered by the 2nd Sussex Regiment include their commander Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Henry Montresor who is killed at age 50. He also served in the Nile Expedition in 1884, in the Hazara Expedition 1888 and the South African War. His son-in-law will be killed in six days. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Henry Tucker Montressor KCB GCB.
  • Major Mostyn Eden Cookson is killed by shrapnel at age 46. He is a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Captain Leonard Slateris killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Slater and a member of the MCC and Gentlemen of Sussex Cricket Club and played a single Minor Counties Championship for Devon against Glamorgan. His son John Durnford Slater is credited with creating the first Army commando unit in the Second World War and his brother will be killed in April 1916.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant ‘the Honorable’ Herbert Lyttelton Pelham (Sussex Regiment)is killed at age 30. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Godolphin Pelham 5th Earl of Chichester the grandson of the 1st Baron Wolverton, great nephew of the Earl of Lucan and the Earl of Cardigan and descended from Oliver Cromwell, the Duke of Marlborough and ‘Sir’ John Pelham a knight in the court of King Edward II. He also is a holder of an aviator’s and pilot’s certificate.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sladen Hughes (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is a member of the Wanderers Football Club.
  • Sergeant George William Hutsonis killed at age 24.  At the Stockholm Olympics in 1912 he was a bronze medal winner in the 5,000-meters and 3,000-meter team race. Earlier this year he set a British record for the ¾ mile run.
  • Private Thomas Still (Sussex Regiment) is killed at Troyon at age 19. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Alvah Trussler (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private Sydney Elphick Kenward (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in June 1916.

Others killed today include:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Evelyn Ridley Bradford (commanding 1st Seaforth Highlanders) the 2nd Baronet is killed at age 45. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Edward Bradford, 1st Baronet Commissioner of London’s Metropolitan Police Service from1890 to 1903. He is a first class cricket player for Hampshire from 1895-1905. His son will be killed as a Squadron Commander in Royal Air Force in May 1940.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Louis St Gratien Le MarchantDSO (commanding 1st East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 47. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Le Marchant Rector of Little Risington Bedfordshire and a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Reginald Lloyd (commanding 1st Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 46, three days after his predecessor was killed. He is the son of Sampson Lloyd former Chairman of Lloyd’s Bank and Member of Parliament for Plymouth and South Warwickshire. He also served in the South African War.
  • Major Hubert Francis FitzWilliam Brabazon Foljambe(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 42. He is the son of the Right Honorable F J S Foljambe PC and Lady Gertrude Foljambe and the grandson of the 3rd Earl of Gosford. He was educated at Eton and served in the South African War.
  • Major John Herbert Kerrich(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is the son of General Walter D’Oyly Kerrich and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Captain Theodore WrightVC (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at Vailly at age 31.  On this day he assists the passage of the 5th Cavalry Brigade over the pontoon bridge and is mortally wounded while helping a wounded man into shelter. Along with his actions on the 23 August where he attempted to connect up the lead to demolish a bridge, under heavy fire and although wounded in the head, he made a second attempt. he will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.
  • Captain Gabriel Roy Fitzpatrick (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Beaulne at age 30. He is the son-in-law of W F Attenborough Vicar of Fletching.
  • Captain Augustus Ernest Cathcart(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 39.  He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ A M Cathcart JP. He is a grandson of both the 2nd Earl Cathcart and the 3rd Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle. He had a brother who died of Typhoid Fever in the South African War in January 1902.
  • Captain and Adjutant Richard Howard-Vyse(The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 37.  He is the son of the late Lieutenant General E Howard-Vyse and a winner of the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.
  • Captain and Brigade Major John Banks Jenkinson(Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 33.  He is the son and heir of the 12th Baronet and he served in the South African War. His son will become the 13th Baronet next year upon the death of ‘Sir’ George Banks Jenkinson.
  • Captain Riversdale Nonus Grenfell(Buckinghamshire Hussars attached 9 Lancers) is killed at age 34. His brother Francis will be killed next year having been awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in August of this year.
  • Captain Douglas Keith Lucas Lucas-ToothDSO (Lancers) dies of wounds at age 33. He is one of three sons of the Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert Lucas-Tooth who will be killed in the Great War and he is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain Robert Harold Olivier(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) dies at age 35.  He is the youngest son of the late Reverend Canon Olivier Rector of Wilton and had served in both the South African War and the Nandi Expedition of 1905-6.
  • Captain Marwood Edwards Yeatman (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His son will be killed in December 1941 defending Hong Kong. He is the 1st cousin of the Lord Bishop of Worcester and son-in-law of Major General F Koe CB CMG.
  • Captain Algernon Foulkes Attwood (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Llewellyn Foulkes Attwood JP.
  • Captain Arthur Maitland Byng (Royal Fusiliers) is killed while looking through field glass when he is shot in the throat at age 41. He is related to Viscount Torrington. He played cricket for Hampshire in 1905 and Jamaica in 1896-97 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club.
  • Lieutenant George Godfrey Brandreth Paget (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ George Edward Paget KCB and Canon William Harper Brandreth Rector of Standish Lancashire and great nephew of ‘Sir’ James Paget Baronet. He is the nephew of Major General ‘Sir’ Alexander B Tulloch KCB CMG and Major General F W Hemming CB. He is also the cousin of Admiral ‘Sir’ Thomas Brandreth KCB.
  • Lieutenant Athelstane Key Durance George (Dorsetshire Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier when he is shot in the heart while urging his men not to expose their heads. He is the grandson of Jonathan Muckleston Key D, great nephew of ‘Sir’ John Key Baronet and a direct descendant of ‘Sir’ William Bloet who came over with William the Conqueror in 1066.
  • Lieutenant Godfrey Lyall Miller(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Ontario and Lady Miller.
  • Lieutenant John Edward Langton ClarkeMC (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at Moussy-sur-Aisne at age 24.  He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ Edward Henry St Lawrence Clarke the 4th Baronet and will be one of the first 99 members of the military to be awarded the new Military Cross on 1 January 1915.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Lieutenant Robert Harold Bond (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at Aisne at age 32. He is the nephew of General Bond CB.
  • Lieutenant John Fraser (Connaught Rangers) dies of wounds at age 30 received rescuing a fellow officer. He is the son of John Fraser JP.
  • Lieutenant Mervyn Taylor Johnson (South Wales Borderers) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Arnott Baronet.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Archibald Charles Gibson-Craig(Highland Light Infantry) the 4th Baronet is killed at age 31. He loses his life while leading his men to attack a machine gun which is hidden in a wood with sword in hand and shouting, “Charge, men! At them”. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ James Henry Gibson-Craig, the 3rd Baronet whose elder son died of dysentery in South Africa in April 1900 at age 17.
  • Lieutenant George Owen Birch(Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of the Reverend George Thomas Birch.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Lucas Quixano Henriques (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the author of the Guide to Army Signaling.
  • Lieutenant and Assistant Adjutant Edward Charles Daun (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 29. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Edward Arthur Williams CB. His great great uncle Admiral ‘Sir’ William Pierson KCB was wounded as a Midshipman on HMS Belleisle at Trafalgar and his great uncle Lieutenant Colonel the Honorable H R Handpick was killed at the storming of the Redan in the Crimea War. He is a member of the MCC.
  • Lieutenant Ronald Francis Simson (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. He is a Scotland International Rugby player and the first Rugby International of any nationality to be killed in the Great War.
  • Two Lieutenants in the Connaught Rangers killed this day will be among the first 99 officers to be awarded the Military Cross on 1 January 1915. Rhys Ivor Thomas MC is killed at age 24, while Ralph Lessingham Spreckley MC is killed at age 21. He is the first of 3 brothers who will be killed serving in the armed forces in the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Raymond Lodge (South Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Oliver Lodge.
  • Second Lieutenant John Forster(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Henry William Forster the 1st Baron of Lepe former Governor General of Australia and he has a brother who will die of wounds received late in the war in March 1919.
  • Second Lieutenant Victor Aloisius Lentaigne (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Vincent O’Neill Lentaigne.
  • Second Lieutenant Rhys Campbell Ffolliot Powell(Highland Light Infantry) is killed attempting to capture an enemy machine gun at age 22. The gun will be captured later in the day by Private Wilson of his platoon who will be awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ C H Powell KCB.
  • Second Lieutenant George Samuel Rodie Thompson(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20.  He is the only son of George Rodie Thompson JP.
  • The first Public School Master to fall in the Great War Second Lieutenant Alexander John Neeve Williamson (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action today.
  • Lance Corporal James William Pearson (Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His son will be killed in April 1943 in Tunisia, North Africa serving with the Grenadier Guards.
  • Lance Corporal William Joseph Guiver (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. His brother will die at home on service in October 1918.
  • Private George Ware(Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 20.  He is the youngest of four brothers, all of whom will lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Gunner Horace Glover (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Harold Alfred Bull (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds received at Valenciennes at age 28. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private John Charles Howe (Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21. His brother will die of wounds five days before the Armistice in 1918.
  • Private Alfred Charlesworth (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Lawrence Leith (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed. His brother will killed be in one day over two months from today.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Carmania (Captain Noel Grant) engages the German auxiliary cruiser Cap Trafalgar off the eastern coast of South America.  Despite having to abandon the bridge of the ship due to a fire, the crew of the Carmania continues to fire on the German ship. The Cap Trafalgar begins to list and goes down bow first.  The battle has lasted nearly an hour. The Carmania has been potted with holes from Cap Trafalgar’s bombardment and has lost seven men in the action. The ship will be escorted to Gibraltar and placed in dry dock.  For her courageous action she is commemorated by the British Navy League who presents her with a silver plate from Nelson’s dinner service. The duel is unique because the combatants are not men-of-war but in fact floating hotels armed with miniature artillery, the first such meeting and engaging on the high seas.

The officers and men of the destroyer HMAS Parramatta see the Australian submarine AE1 (Lieutenant Commander Thomas Fleming Besant) at 15:30 patrolling to the south west of Duke of York Island.  The crew of the destroyer assumes the submarine is returning to harbor at Herbershohe on the island of New Britain for the evening.  It never arrives and searches all along the coasts of New Britain and New Ireland and the surrounding waters turn up no trace. The fate of AE1, the first Allied submarine to be lost in the Great War, along with its three officers and thirty-two men, remains a mystery to this day.

  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Leopold Florence Scarlettis one of the officers killed, when this boat is lost, at age 25 His brother the 5th Baron Abinger will die on service in May 1917.
  • Able Seaman George Hodgkin is lost at age 27. His brother will be killed in August 1916 in Mesopotamia.

Photo from http://www.findagrave.com

Wednesday 9 September 1914 – We Lost 106 (Plus 1)

The British Naval Mission to Turkey is withdrawn.

Maurice Farman Shorthorn

Maurice Farman Shorthorn

The Allied counter attack from the west finally stops the German advance on the Western Front. British forces move forward with tremendous determination, crucially aided by the detailed intelligence proved by the Royal Flying Corps. The remaining “C” flight of 4th Squadron arrives in France.  Its Maurice Farman Shorthorns are fitted with machine guns making them the first armed British machines to arrive in France.  In the area of the Nogent the Royal Artillery fire on British cavalry wounding eighteen.

Captain Douglas Reynolds (Royal Field Artillery) reconnoiters German positions at Pisseloup, discovers a battery holding up the advance and silences it. This action along with one performed on 26th August will win him the Victoria Cross.

At 03:00 the siege of Abercorn is reinforced by one hundred men under Major H M Sennett, who comes up by forced marches, covering ninety-nine miles in seventy-two hours. Three hours later the Germans launch an all-out attack, which is repulsed.

Today’s losses include

  • Son of clergy
  • Son of a father of will die on service during the war
  • The son in a family that will lose another son this month

 Today’s highlighted casualty

 Among those killed at Abercorn is Lieutenant John Leslie Caldecott (Royal Garrison Artillery) at age 28.  He is the son of the Reverend Andrew Caldecott Rector of West Chiltington and the Aide de Camp to the Governor of Nyasaland.

  • Private Arthur Jordan (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. His father will die on service in July 1918 in Mesopotamia.
  • Private Sidney Perkins Rooth (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in fifteen days.

The Plus 1 

  • Carl Heinrich Gobler age 29 the coxswain for the Germania Ruder Club Hamburg which won the Gold Medal in the Coxed fours at the 1900 Olympics. He was the youngest participant in those Olympic games.

Tuesday 8 September 1914 – We Lost 96

Shot a dawn memorial

Shot a dawn memorial

When the Allied Armies have retreated to almost within sight of Paris, they are given the order to advance. All three Battalions of the Coldstream Guards take part in the Battle of the Marne, without, however, being engaged in any heavy fighting.

Mr. Lloyd George gives his “silver bullet” speech at the Local Government Board to Deputation from the Association of Municipal Corporations.  He points out the necessity for curtailing expenditures and foretells heavy outgoings.

Today’s losses include:

  • The first British soldier executed for desertion
  • A Victoria Cross winner from the South African War
  • Sons and a son-in-law of clergy
  • Sons-in-law and grandsons of Generals
  • The descendent of a Waterloo soldier
  • Son of an Alderman and a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose brother lost his life in the South African War

 Today’s highlighted casualty

Private Thomas James Highgate (Royal Went Kent Regiment), age 19, becomes the first of over three hundred twelve British soldiers executed by firing squad for desertion or cowardice during the Great War when he is shot at dawn.  He has been arrested two days prior, after being found hiding in a barn wearing civilian clothes after going missing the day his battalion started an advance on the Aisne. In the post war years, the War Graves Commission will be unable to locate his body and his name appears on the monument to the missing at Le Ferte-sous-Jouarre and the official records show that he was “killed in action”.

  • Captain John NorwoodVC (Dragoon Guards) is killed attempting to save a wounded Sergeant at age 38.  He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Ladysmith on 30th October 1899 during the South African War. He is the son-in-law of Major General ‘Sir’ Edwin Collen.
  • Captain Robert Charles Partridge (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend William Adolophus Partridge.
  • Captain John Kenneth Tulloch Whish (East Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 37. He is the grandson of the late General G P Whish, great grandson of ‘Sir’ William Sampson Whish and his great great grandfather fought at Waterloo. He also served in the South African War and Somalia 1905-6.
  • Captain Anthony Morris Coats Hewat (Royal Scots) is killed at age 29. He is the son in law of the Reverend Rhys Bishop.
  • Captain and Adjutant Robert Edward Drake (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 36. He is the son of the Reverend John Drake Rector of Wraiting.
  • Captain Thomas Scatchard (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 36. He is the son-in-law of General Hervey CB.
  • Lieutenant Reginald Fitzroy Lewis Johnstone (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 30. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Montague Cholmeley Johnstone.
  • Lieutenant Reginald Fitzroy Lewis Johnston (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 30. He is the first casualty in the Regiment in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant John Bloomfield Gough (Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ John Bloomfield Gough who fought at Sobraon in the Gwalior campaign.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Streatfeild Woodgate (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of Alderman Ernest Woodgate JP and is related to Major General ‘Sir’ Edward R P Woodgate KCMG CB. His brother William Ernest Streatfeild Woodgate (Lancaster Regiment) died of wounds in South Africa in 1900.

Thursday 3 September 1914 – We Lost 35

Corporal Charles Ernest Garforth (Hussars) when under fire extricates a sergeant whose horse has been shot and by opening fire for three minutes enables the sergeant to get safely away.  For this action and that of 23rd August, Corporal Garforth will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

An infantry brigade under Brigadier General James M Stewart arrives at Mombasa.  This is the first contingent of what will be labeled the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘C’.

After discussions between Winston Churchill and Lord Kitchener the cabinet agrees that the Admiralty will formally assume responsibility for home air defense.

A mine sinks the torpedo boat HMS Speedy thirty miles off the Humber River in the North Sea.  An officer’s steward is killed.  Another mine off the Outer Dowsing sinks the hired drifter Lindsell (Skipper Charles A Woodgate killed at age 30).  Four others are lost.

Admiral Cradock signals the Admiralty “HMS Good Hope arrived at Fernando Noronha. HMS Cornwall is proceeding south.  HMS Glasgow is proceeding with HMS Monmouth and HMS Otranto to Magellan Straits, where German colliers reported, and where concentration of German cruisers from China, Pacific and Atlantic appears possible”.

  • Son of a Baronet and Justice of the Peace office holder

Lieutenant Lynton Woolmer White (Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received in action at the Affair of Nery at age 28.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Woolmer Rudolph Donati White JP the 1st Baronet.

Wednesday 26 August 1914 – We Lost 887

The Battle of Le Cateau begins.  The close pursuit by the German First Army causes the British II Corps (3rd and 5th Divisions) to halt in its retirement from Mons and give battle on the high ground west of Le Cateau. Strengthened by most of the 4th Division on its left and the 19th Brigade on its right, the II Corps (‘Sir’ Horace Smith-Dorrien) withstands a terrific artillery fire and attacks by the enemy until about 15:00. At this time when its right is being penetrated and rolled up, it continues the retirement on St. Quentin in good spirits, the Germans being too exhausted by their losses to pursue in force.  A French cavalry corps comes up during the battle and assists on the left.  During the battle German forces occupy Caudry, which they will hold until October 1918.  The 1st Gordon Highlanders are trapped and almost annihilated at Bertry.

Two hundred ninety officers and men of the 2nd Connaught Rangers are cut off and fight the “Rearguard Affair of Le Grand Fayt”.

Major Charles Allix Lavington Yate (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) commands one of the two companies that remain to the end in the trenches at Le Cateau when all other officers have been killed or wounded and ammunition exhausted.  He leads his nineteen survivors against the enemy in a charge in which he is severely wounded.  He will be picked up by the enemy and subsequently be killed attempting to escape from a prisoner of war camp next month.  For his actions on this day Major Yate will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

Sergeant Major Arthur Cox (Royal Field Artillery) is awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for exceptionally good services and gallantry in bringing away wounded at Le Cateau.  Sergeant Cox will be killed on 24 April 1915 at age 40.

Lieutenant Colonel John Ford Elkington (Warwickshire Regiment) commanding a battalion exhausted by its efforts at Le Cateau, and unable to regroup for action, falls back to St. Quentin.  Here he agrees to the request of the town Mayor to sign a document surrendering his men, should the Germans enter the town while they regain their strength. The Germans do not enter the town and Elkington and his men rejoin the main British force, but the surrender document is made public.  Elkington is court martialed and dismissed from the army.  Desperate to prove his desire to fight, he joins the French Foreign Legion with which he will be wounded in action and later gain reinstatement in the British Army. Elkington will survive the Great War while his son will be killed in 1943 in North Africa.

Today’s losses include:

  • Two battalion commanders who served in the South African War
  • The brother of someone killed in the South African War
  • A descendant of two family members who fought Napoleon
  • Two holders of the Humane Society Medal for life saving
  • Father of Mary Patricia ‘Mollie” Panter-Downes, novelist and columnist for the New York Times
  • The 6th Viscount Hawarden and Baron de Montalt
  • Grandson of Baron
  • The Master of Burleigh
  • Members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • Sons of families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons and grandsons of Generals
  • Great grandson of the Governor of Fort William Calcutta known for his bravery during the Indian Mutiny
  • Multiple men who will have children born after their deaths
  • A prospective candidate for Parliament
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of an Admiral
  • England hockey International
  • Boxing champion of the west of England
  • Assistant Scout Master
  • Brothers killed together

Today’s highlighted casualty is the first player for a football club

(we would describe as professional) to be killed

Southend United

Sergeant William Urquhart Sutherland (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 30.  He served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in the South African Campaign of 1899-1902. He is a keen footballer and gym instructor for his regiment but on leaving the military he signed to play for Southend United. He played two and half seasons for the Blues scoring many goals along the way and was also part of the team that toured Germany in 1910. He also met his wife Enid while living in Southend and by 1914 they had two children. On leaving Southend United he signed with Plymouth Argyle later he moved to Chatham FC. After his football career came to an end he returned to Southend where he lived with his wife and was upon the opening of the Jones Memorial Ground for children at Southend, appointed grounds man and caretaker under the Southend Education Committee. It appears that Sutherland is the first footballer playing for what are today professional clubs that is killed in the Great War.

At the declaration of war, being on the reserve list he joins his old regiment on 5 August and is sent to France immediately,.The battalion becomes part of the 19th Infantry Brigade and is sent forward to meet the German advance. The day starts early at 04:00 as his battalion marches through Le Cateau with bayonets fixed following reports that German troops have entered the town. By 09:00 the unit is moving across the Le Cateau-Estrees road. They take up position on a south facing slope overlooking Le Cateau. Shell and machine gun fire increase throughout the day but despite this, four platoons move through the shell swept slope and on towards the German Infantry. Many become casualties as the machine gun fire is accurate and deadly against any man who shows himself. This party, when called on again to go forward goes straight through the storm of fire, past the retreating firing line and forces a desperate attack onto the frontline German infantry advancing from Le Cateau. ‘A’ company goes into the attack again when ordered to do so to and succeeds in holding up the vastly superior forces opposing them from advancing. All the men of Major Alexander MacLean’s unit involved in this attack are not heard from again and it would appear it was this action that cost William Sutherland his life.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Alfred McNair Dykes (commanding 1st King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 40. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Arthur Hugh Brett DSO (commanding 2nd Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 49. He is a South African War veteran who was wounded and made a prisoner of war and his maternal grandfather and great uncle fought against Napoleon.
  • Brevet Major Edward Martin Panter-Downes (Royal Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at age 40. He had been awarded the Royal Humane Society’s Bronze Medal for saving the life of a drowning man at Kilkee in 1898. He is a veteran of the South African War and the father of Mary Patricia “Mollie” Panter-Downes novelist and newspaper columnist for The New Yorker. At age sixteen, she wrote The Shoreless Sea which became a bestseller; eight editions were published in 1923 and 1924, and the book was serialized in The Daily Mirror. Her second novel The Chase was published in 1925.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Robert Bruce the Master of Burleigh is killed at age 33. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Alexander Hugh Bruce, the 6th Lord Balfour. He fought in the South African War where he won two medals with five clasps.  He also fought in the Sudan Campaign in 1912 again winning a medal and a clasp.
  • Captain Archibald Edward Kennedyis also killed this day.  He is the first son of ‘Sir’ John Gordon and Lady Kennedy to be killed in the war and dies at age 35.  His two younger brothers will be killed in action the first next May and the second in 1918.
  • Captain Frederick George Theobald (King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 38.  He is the son of the Reverend Frederick Theobald Rector of Gt Wigborough and is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Captain and Adjutant Frank Scobell Nisbett (Manchester Regiment) is killed in action at age 36.  He is the son of the Reverend Canon Nisbet Ickham Rectory and nephew of the Venerable E C Scobell Archdeacon of Gloucester. He served in the South African War. He is the 1896 winner of the Singles Tournament of the Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club Deal and a member of MCC.
  • Captain Charles Fitzgerald Hamilton Truemanat age 37. He is a veteran of the South African War and his brother will die on active service weeks after the end of the Great War.
  • Captain Arthur Claud Ward DSO (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 36. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ C J Ward CMG and served in the South African War. His great grandfather was J Z Holwell Governor of Fort William Calcutta who is known for his bravery and leadership in the defense of the old Fort of Calcutta in June 1756. He survived the Black Hole and erected a monument to those who perished.
  • Captain Edward Harington Reid (Suffolk Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain Rowland Harry Mainwaring Moody (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 39. He is a member of the MCC and served in the South African War.
  • Captain John Alexander Fraser (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 41. He is the nephew of ‘Sir’ Thomas Fraser and he served in the South African War. His daughter will be born next month.
  • Captain Charles Hunter Browning (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. He is the prospective Liberal Member of Parliament candidate for Windsor, a South African War veteran and a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club. Captain Arthur Duncombe Shafto DSO (Royal Scots) is killed at age 34.  His brother was killed at Spion Kop in February 1900.
  • Captain Charles Ramsay Lumsden (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 34. One brother will die of injuries received in a flying accident next June and a second will be killed next April.
  • Captain Arthur Claude Ward DSO (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 36.  He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ C J Ward and had served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Edward Montague Swayne Kent (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Colonel G E Kent JP.
  • Lieutenant David Erskine Boyle (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Rear Admiral Robert Hornby Boyle.
  • Lieutenant Anson Northey(Essex Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of George Wilbraham-Northey JP DL.
  • Lieutenant James David Gilkison (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Kirkpatrick MacLeanis killed at age 27.  He is the son of the Reverend George Gavin MacLean Vicar of Wadhusrt.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant James Arthur Bowles(Royal Field Artillery) who is killed at age 31.  He is the son of Major General F A Bowles CB.
  • Lieutenant Charles Morgan Hoare (Hussars) is killed at Mons at age 21. He is the grandson of the 1st Baron Tredegar.
  • Lieutenant James Keith Trotter(Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 25. He is the only son of Major General ‘Sir’ J K Trotter KCB CMG.
  • Lieutenant Robert Cornwallis Maude (Coldstream Guards) the 6th Viscount Hawarden and Baron de Montalt dies of wounds at age 23. He is the 1st cousin once removed of Lord Dunalley.
  • Second Lieutenant Ronald Campbell Ross(Royal Scots) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Colonel ‘Sir’ Ronald Ross KCB KCMG.
  • Second Lieutenant William Humphrey Coghlan (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Colonel Charles Coghlan CB DL.
  • Second Lieutenant Archibald Frederick Ritchie (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the grandson of Major General J Ritchie.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Henderson Cowan (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is an England hockey international.
  • Another holder of the Royal Humane Society Medal for life saving is Chief Petty Officer George Thomas Bentleyof HMS Faulknor, Royal Naval Reserve who accidentally drowns at Portsmouth.  He was a holder of the Long Service and Good Conduct Medals and had been awarded the Royal Humane Society Medal for life saving in 1907
  • Sergeant Jesse Woolger (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed in less than a month and neither man’s body will be found and they are memorialized on the same war memorial.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Tadd (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 24. He is the light weight regimental boxing champion and champion of the west of England.
  • Lance Corporal Frederick Lee (Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His two brothers will be killed in 1917.
  • Private Sidney Young (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 29. His two brothers will be killed later in the war the first in December 1916 and the second the following August.
  • Private Frank Burrowes (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 31. His two brothers will be killed by 1917.
  • Private Thomas Salmon (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Privates David Oakman (age 19) and his brother Ernest Oakman (age 17) are killed together in the Suffolk Regiment.
  • Private Harold Byfield (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 19. His is the Assistant Scout Master 15th Croydon Troop.
  • Private Frederick Upshall (King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed. His brother will die on service at home in September 1915.

 

Monday 24 August 1914 – We Lost 406

Today’s losses are the highest in any one day of the war so far and bring the total losses in the Empire’s forces to over one thousand.

Included in those losses today are:

  •  Son and grandson of General
  • Families that lost two and three sons
  • Sons and grandsons of clergy
  • A man whose stepson will be killed later in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be born after his death

The Fifth Division finds itself in a very tight position and Cavalry is sent to its assistance the 2nd Cavalry Brigade reaching the scene of the action first. The Germans are advancing in heavy numbers, so near the village of Audregnies, General De Lisle orders his men to dismount and open fire on them.  This they do but the enemy continues to advance in good order. The General then decides on a charge, and for this he chose the 9th Lancers who mount their horses and ride steadily at the enemy.  In the face of a torrent of shot and shell from guns and rifles, they dash on until they find themselves against two lines of barbed wire, where men and horses fall over in all directions. This ends the charge. The survivors are ordered to return to shelter, and out of more than four hundred who have ridden out, only seventy-two at first answer their names.  Later, some two hundred others turn up, but the regiment has lost heavily. Lieutenant Charles William North Garstin of the 9th Lancers is killed during these operations at age 20. He is the son of Major General ‘Sir’ William Garstin GCMG CBE. Captain Douglas Keith Lucas-Tooth (Lancers) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for gallantry in this action. He will be killed in action in less than one month.

Still the Lancers have not finished their day’s work.  When the survivors arrive at a railway embankment near Doubon, they find themselves in the company of some artillerymen who have been driven from their guns with heavy loss. Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell now the senior officer of the Lancers, who had been wounded in the original charge but has managed to keep his squadron together, goes out into the open and finds a way to help save the guns. He has his men follow him and leaving their horses they rush out, reach the abandoned guns and assist in saving the guns of the 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. For his actions on this day Captain Grenfell will be awarded the Victoria Cross as will the commander of the 119th Battery Major Ernest Wright Alexander. This is part of an action when the Lancers charge a battery of eleven German guns posted in Compiegne Wood.  The guns have been causing terrible loss to the British infantry.  According to the press account published at the time, the 9th make a furious charge, reach the battery, and cut down all the gunners and put the guns out of action. After this charge, the survivors volunteer to a man to save the British guns whose teams have all been killed. Captain Grenfell will be hit in both legs and has two fingers shot off during this action. The action is successful but Grenfell is so badly wounded he is taken by his friend, the Duke of Westminster, in his Rolls Royce to the nearby town of Bavai where he will be treated by French nuns in a convent hospital. Major Alexander will go on to achieve the rank of Major General, while Captain Grenfell will be killed on 24 May 1915.

Francis Octavius Grenfell

Francis Grenfell

  • Major Charles George Pack-Beresford (Royal West Kent Regiment) killed at age 45. He is the son of Denis William Pack-Beresford MP JP DL and he served on the North West Frontier in 1897 and 1898 and during the South African War. He is the grandson of Major General ‘Sir’ Denis Pack KCB.
  • Major Percy Belcher Strafford (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 41. He served in the South African War and played cricket for the Yorkshire Gentlemen. His wife is the daughter of Major General Hamilton Chapman.
  • Captain and Adjutant Cyril Oswald Denman-Jubb (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Denman-Jubb.
  • Captain Walter Richard Augustus Aston Dawes (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 36. His son will be born in December.
  • Captain and Adjutant Francis Joseph Cresswell (Norfolk Regiment) is killed carrying a message at age 31. He married the niece of ‘Sir’ W H B Ffolkes Baronet and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Ernest Felix Victor Briard (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 25. His fourteen year old brother will be killed in 5 years serving as a Second Lieutenant in a Sikh Regiment of the Indian Army fighting in the Khyber Pass.
  • Lieutenant Charles Esmond Redlin Albrecht (South Lancashire Regiment) killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Lieutenant Eric Llewellyn Welchman (Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action at age 21. He is the son of the Venerable Canon W Welchman Archdeacon of Bristol. Lieutenant Leslie Montagu Buller (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 28.  He was educated at Eton where he was in his House Cricket XI when they won the House Cup in 1904. He is the grandson of the Reverend Richard Buller.
  • Lieutenant Lawrence Edward Russell (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in May of next year.
  • Sergeant Frederick Davison (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme.
  • Private Lawrence R Foster (Duke of Wellington’s Regiment) killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in 1916.
  • Private John Mann (Norfolk Regiment) is killed he is the step-father of Private Percy Rudd (Suffolk Regiment) who will be killed in September 1915.
  • Private Percy Frederick Ashton (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1916. Private Francis James Heffernan (Cheshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of John Heffernan a foreign correspondent.
  • Private William Barnard (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the first of three brothers who will be killed in the Great War.

Photo wikipedia

Sunday 23 August 1914 – We Lost 293

Today marks the first battle between the British and German Armies on what was to become the Western Front of the Great War. By the morning the British Expeditionary Force is deployed along a 20-mile front, II Corps to the west of Mons and I Corps to the east. Opposing them from the north is the entire German First Army. The British force numbers 70,000 men and 300 guns while the German numbers doubled that. Early in the morning German artillery begins massive barrages followed by infantry attacks. The British troops dug in along the canal and among the slag heaps and mining villages defend with sustained rifle fire. The German attacks continue until the afternoon with little success due to the strength and rapid British rifle fire which is so heavy the Germans believe they are facing many machine guns when in fact each battalion has only two.

At 05:30 Field Marshall French meets with Generals Douglas Haig, Edmund Allenby and Horace Smith-Dorrien at his advanced headquarters at a chateau in Sars-la-Bruyere, where he orders the outpost line on the canal to be strengthened and the bridges at the Mons canal to be prepared for demolition. They recognize that the British position is not a good one, as the canal turn is very exposed on three sides.

Lieutenant Colonel Norman Reginald McMahon commander of the 4th Royal Fusiliers gives his battalion the order to retire from Nimy. Colonel McMahon will be killed in less than three months serving as a Brigadier General.

 Today’s casualties include:

  • The first posthumous Victoria Cross recipient
  • The first British officer killed with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF)
  • The son of the 7th Earl of Granard
  • Son of a future Member of Parliament
  • Inventor of the Marsden Band Trestle bridge
  • Grandson of a Governor of Jamaica
  • Great grandfather of the singer James Blount
  • Sons and/or grandsons Clergy, Justice’s of the Peace, Judges and Generals
  • Members of families that will lose two or three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is Lieutenant Maurice James Dease

 The bridges at Nimy are defended by the Royal Fusiliers. While in command of his machine gun unit at Nimy Bridge, Mons Lieutenant Maurice James Dease is wounded in the neck. In spite of being told to “lie still and don’t move”, he stands up and is hit again.  He continues to struggle up to handle one of his guns himself and is hit once more, this time seriously.  He still crawls to the right-hand gun and drags a wounded gunner away. He then begins to fire the gun himself and rolls the wounded man down an embankment, no doubt saving the man’s life.  Dease is exposed to murderous rifle, machine gun and artillery fire and still keeps calling for gunners to take the place of the men who have been killed or wounded in the fight.  Eventually he is shot again and he dies of his wounds at around 15:30. Lieutenant Dease is the son of Edmund Fitzlaurance Dease JP, author of “History of the Westmeath Hunt” and grandson of James Arthur Dease JP DL, the Vice-Lieutenant of Cavan and he dies at age 24.  He will become the first posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross in the Great War.

  • There are some early exchanges between German cavalry and British infantry outposts around 06:30, near Obourg, Nimy and Ville Pommeroeul. The morning has broken with mist and rain, which clears about 10:00. Near Abourgear, Mons a group of German soldiers is seen emerging from a wood by troops of the Middlesex Regiment. The commanding of the British company, Major William Henry Abell is killed, shot through the head, the first British officer killed with the British Expeditionary Force. As the rifle fire continues his second in command, Captain Jonathan Edward Knowles is also killed. After a prolonged exchange of fire, with many deaths on both sides, the British troops withdraw.
  • Major John Southern Maidlow (commanding 49th Battery Royal Field Artillery) dies wounds riding forward to take up a new position for his guns at age 39. His wife is the niece of ‘Sir’ Edward and ‘Sir’ Frederick Lugard.
  • Captain Oswald Bethell Walker(Hussars) killed at age 39. One brother of his will be killed in October of this year while another will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918. They are grandsons of ‘Sir James Walker Baronet.
  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Fergus George Arthur Forbes (Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at age 32. He is the son of the 7th Earl of Granard.
  • Captain John Penrice Benson (East Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 36. He is a South Africa War veteran and the son of Judge William Denman Benson and the grandson of General H R Benson whose son Lieutenant Colonel Richard Erle Benson will be killed next month commanding the 1st East Yorkshire Regiment.
  • Captain Kenneth James Roy (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 37. He is the son of the Reverend James Roy Rector of Stockton-on-Forest Yorkshire.
  • Captain Walton Mellor (Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at age 36. His brother in law Captain Cyril Gerald Valerian Wellesley will die of wounds in March next year.
  • Captain Greville Hubert Robins Blount (Royal Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. His father died of fever during the South Africa War and his wife is the daughter of the Reverend Canon Wilson. He is the great grandfather of singer James Blount. He has two brothers both will be accidentally killed serving in the Royal Air Force the first in 1918 while the other will be killed in 1940 as an Air Vice Marshall.
  • Captain Charles Harold Bass (Lancashire Fusiliers) dies of wounds at Cambrai at age 24. He is the only child of the Reverend Charles Bass of Steeple Claydon Vicarage.
  • Lieutenant Colin Knox Anderson (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in December 1917 and they are sons of George Knox Anderson JP MP.
  • Lieutenant Everard Cecil Smith (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 29.  He is the son of the Reverend Cecil Evan Smith, Rector of Titsey and grandson of Charles Rushworth, Governor of Jamaica,
  • Lieutenant John Rothes Marlow Wilkinson (Middlesex Regiment) killed at age 26.  He is the son of the Reverend Henry Marlow Wilkinson Vicar of Milford-on-Sea.
  • Second Lieutenant Neville Lascelles Ward (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the grandson of General Lascelles of the Court of George IV and the grandson of a judge in India.
  • Second Lieutenant John Pepys (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 23. His younger brother will be killed in November.
  • 2nd Corporal Edwin Marsden (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He was the inventor of an improved trestle for bridge building accepted by the war office and known as the Marsden Band Trestle.
  • Private Edwin John Bywaters(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21.  His two brothers will die in the service of their King later in the Great War.
  • Private William Streeter (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private Eric Fennell Trevor Morgan (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Morgan Rector of Holy Trinity Newport.