Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Winston Churchill

Tuesday 27 April 1915 – We Lost 872

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

In the second battle of Ypres an allied attack north of the city is checked by the use of gas.

HMS Queen Elizabeth sinks a Turkish torpedo boat off Maidos.

Lieutenant Commander Edward Courtney Boyle is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery in command of Sub E14 when he dives his vessel under the enemy minefield and enters the Sea of Marmora.  In spite of great navigational difficulties from strong currents, of the continual neighborhood of hostile patrols and of the hourly danger of attack from the enemy, he continues to operate in the narrow waters of the straits and succeeds in sinking two Turkish gunboats and one large military transport.

Winston Churchill announces that twenty nine German prisoners from submarines will be separately confined and specially treated as a reprisal against the German submarine campaign.

The Royal Scots commence a general advance on Gallipoli at 16:00.  Heavy casualties are suffered and they must retire from the advanced position.

The battle of Gibeon Africa takes place. Major John Robertson Watt (Natal Light Horse) the brother of the Natal Minister of Public Works is killed in action.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Brigadier General
  • A Battalion Commander
  • The son of the Justice of the High Court of the United Provinces of India
  • The son of a Canadian Senator
  • The son of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • The brother of Natal’s Minister of Public Works
  • A man whose brother was killed while serving in the Tochi Field Force in 1897
  • A First Class cricket player
  • A noted football player
  • A man whose uncle and cousin will be killed later in the war
  • A member of the clergy serving in the infantry
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple families that will lose three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Brigadier General Julian Hasler (Commanding 11th Brigade, 4th Division) is killed in action at age 46 at St Jean by a shell.
  • Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Charles Augustus Vivian (commanding 15th Ludhiana Sikhs) is killed at age 41. His brother Lieutenant McIver Cample Vivian died of wounds with the Tochi Field Force in 1897.
  • Major Bernard Maynard Lucas Brodhurst (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 41. He made a single first-class cricket appearance for Hampshire in 1897 against Warwickshire is the son of the late Mr. Justice Maynard Brodhurst of the High Court United Provinces India.
  • Captain John Russell Pound (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 27. His brother died of wounds last November and they are sons of ‘Sir’ John Lulham Pound 2nd
  • Captain Caryl Lermitte Boxall (Hampshire Regiment) is dies of wounds at age 27on Gallipoli. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Alleyne Alfred Boxall, the 1st Baronet and Lady Boxall.
  • Lieutenant John Philip Beningfield (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother was killed last month.
  • Second Lieutenant Alan Williamson Kent (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of P B Kent, JP.
  • Second Lieutenant J Cartmell D Brown (Durham Light Infantry) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Frank Brown.
  • Second Lieutenant Dorrien Edward Grose-Hodge (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Grose-Hodge Rector of Birmingham.
  • CQMS Nevill Benjamin Blythe Brooke (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed.
  • Sergeant Hugh McLennan (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Senator I S McLennan and was a student of The Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris.
  • Private David Greenhalgh (Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 30. His two brothers will both be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Ray Bowen Hodges (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of gassing at age 19. His brother was killed two days earlier.

 ANZACs

  • Colonel Henry Normand MacLaurin (1st Brigade Headquarters, Australian Infantry) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 37 when he is shot by a sniper. He is the son of the Chancellor of the University of Sydney, ‘Sir’ Henry Normand MacLaurin. Several weeks after his death an order will be issued promoting Colonel MacLaurin to the temporary rank of Brigadier General.
  • Captain George Levis Blake Concanon (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at Lone Pine at age 34. His uncle will be killed on Gallipoli in December and his cousin killed while serving in the Australian Flying Corps in May 1918. Lieutenant Alan Dudley Henderson (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in action within two weeks.
  • Lieutenant Leslie John Waters (Australian Infantry) is killed by a bullet through the forehead while observing Turkish troops through binoculars. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Private ‘Reverend’ Havilland Montagu Durand (Australian Infantry) is also killed at age 33. His brother was killed three days before last Christmas and they are sons of the Reverend Havilland Durrand Vicar of Earley.
  • Private Francis Herbert Stokes (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the Reverend Francis Herbert Stokes Rector of Chafers South Australia.
  • Private Roy Alexander McNabb (Wellington Infantry) is killed in action at age 19. He is the first of three brothers who will die in the Great War, the second being killed in three days, while the final will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private William Thomas Love (Otago Infantry) is killed. He is a noted football player

Friday 26 March 1915 – We Lost 148

Winston Churchill’s instruction, “Proceed as proposed and with all dispatch”, authorizes commencement of the design of tanks.  They are to be bullet proof machines in the words of Major General ‘Sir’ Ernest Swinton “capable of destroying machine guns, of crossing country and trenches, of breaking through entanglements, and of climbing earthworks”.

Today’s losses include:

  • A son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War

Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Lieutenant Commander Charles Pleydell Mansell (HMS Celtic) dies at sea at age 43. His brother will be killed in October 1916 and they are sons of the Reverend Owen Luttrell Mansell.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Henry Greig (Indian Army Reserve of Officers attached Indian Cavalry) is killed in the operations against the Toch at age 28. His brother will die of injuries in suffered in the loss of HMS Russell in April 1917.
  • Private Albert Drew Hughes (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed on the Western Front at age 22. His brother will be killed in September 1918.

Saturday 20 March 1915 – We Lost 176

Samuel Pepys

Samuel Pepys

A violent storm hits the Dardanelles.

Winston Churchill informs de Robeck that two more Formidable Class Battleships HMS London and HMS Implacable (both 1899) and two improved Formidables, HMS Queen and HMS Prince of Wales (1902) are on their way to join him.

At 10:30 four enemy aircraft are seen flying towards Dover, one unsuccessfully aims six bombs at a small coaster in the Downs at 11:05.  At 11:25 an unidentified biplane appears out of the mist over Thameshaven and is promptly attacked by a six-pounder anti-aircraft gun and brought down with a damaged wing. The gunners jubilation at the first ‘success’ by British ground defenses is abruptly silenced by the discovery that the victim is a Royal Flying Corps Gunbus. The two officers on board are unhurt.

General Botha defeats German forces at Reit on the Swakop, in German South West Africa.

Today’s losses include:

  • A distant cousin of the diarist Samuel Pepys
  • Two men who will have brothers lost in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

Lieutenant Samuel Pepys Cockerell (Royal Flying Corps) dies of smallpox in Egypt at age 34. He is a former commercial attaché to Spain and Portugal and a distant cousin of the diarist Samuel Pepys.

  • Second Lieutenant Walter George Fletcher (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed by a sniper when shot in the head at age 27. He is a German interpreter and one night he crawled out into No Man’s Land and retrieved a captured French flag which the Germans were flying from a tree in their lines. It is sent to Eton. His brother was killed in October 1914.
  • Stoker 1st Class George Hawkes (HMS Cyclops II) dies on service. His brother will be killed serving on HMS in HMS Gaillardia in March 1918.

Thursday 18 March 1915 – We Lost 197

HMS Irresistible

HMS Irresistible

At 10:30, when the morning haze has lifted sufficiently for the Turkish forts to be clearly seen, the first ten battleships of the Allied Fleet enter the Dardanelles Straits.  Fourteen British and four French battleships, organized in three divisions, have prepared to engage the Turks; eight of the British vessels have been launched between 1895 and 1901 while four more between had been launched between 1903 and 1906 and are of pre-Dreadnought design.  The others are the battle cruiser HMS Inflexible, of Falkland’s fame, and the mighty HMS Queen Elizabeth, 27,500 tons, whose total broadside is approximately 16,000 lbs.

At 11:25 the leading line of ships, which include de Robeck’s four most powerful ships, Queen Elizabeth to pound the two forts at Chanak, Agamemnon, Lord Nelson and Inflexible to bombard Kilid Bahr, accompanied by Prince George on the European flank, and Triumph on the Asiatic, open fire at 14,000 yards. The position from which de Robeck’s fleet begins the action, Eren Keui Bay, is defended by Turkish mobile howitzer batteries, difficult and elusive targets which prove very effective against all classes of ship, and minefield batteries whose task is to deter the sweepers.  In addition there are mines, and in particular, in Eren Keui Bay itself which is believed to have been swept clear, a new line laid by the Turks ten days earlier. These mines, remarked Churchill wryly after the war, “play a recognizable part in the history of the Great War”.

After their first few shots in reply the Turkish and German gunners at the Narrows realize that they are out of range and the forts fall silent. Silently they endure a fearful bombardment by the the British ships for the next half hour. All five forts are hit repeatedly, and at 11:50 there is a particularly heavy explosion in Chanak. The British meanwhile are exposed to the Turkish howitzers and smaller guns which are nearer at hand, and these pour down a continuous barrage on the ships from both sides. This fire cannot be decisive against armour, but the unprotected superstructure of the battleships is hit again and again and a certain amount of minor damage is done.

A few minutes after noon, after ninety minutes action, de Robeck in Queen Elizabeth signals his second wave, HMS Majestic and Swiftsure and the French Bouvet, Charlemagne, Gaulois and Suffren, to go into action. Admiral Guepratte takes his old battleship through the British line to a point about half a mile further on where it is well within the range of all the enemy guns and in constant danger of being hit. On reaching their station the French ships fan out from the center so as to give the British astern of them a clear field of fire, and there then ensues through the next three quarters of an hour a tremendous cannonade. Soon Gaulois is badly holed below the waterline, the Inflexible has both her foremast on fire and a jagged hole in her starboard side and Agamemnon, stuck twelve times in twenty five minutes, is turning away to a better position.  These hits though spectacular have scarcely touched the crews and there are less than a dozen casualties in the whole fleet and as yet no ship is seriously affected in its fighting powers.

By 13:45 the distant forts appear to have been overcome; the howitzers are still troublesome, but although they score a number of hits they have inflicted less than forty casualties on the ship’s crews.  De Robeck signals the French to retire and for his third line to advance, HMS Albion, Ocean, Irresistible and Vengeance.  The movement begins shortly before 14:00 and the Suffren, turning to starboard, leads her sister ships out of the action along the shores of Eren Keui Bay on the Asiatic side.

The time now has come for the minesweepers to clear the Narrows, and the second division of battleships to follow them for the kill. The French battleship Bouvet almost abreast the Queen Elizabeth at 13:54 and immediately astern the Suffren, is observed to be shaken with an immense explosion as she strikes a mine. A column of smoke shoots ups from her decks and she heels over, still going very fast, capsizes and sinks in less than two minutes with the loss of nearly her entire crew.  It seems to those who observe that the Bouvet had been struck by a heavy shell which reached her magazine, and now the Turkish gunners, heartened by what they have seen, renew their attack on the other ships.

At 16:11 Inflexible, which has taken some punishment by gunfire earlier, reports striking a mine and it is apparent that her condition is dangerous.  It is only surprising that the fatal contact has not occurred earlier as she has been operating in the new minefield virtually throughout the action. Three minutes later the Formidable class (1898) battleship Irresistible is also seen to be listing heavily and apparently unable to move and it is soon learned that she too has hit a mine, on the starboard side amidships.  Immobilized with both engine rooms flooded, she drifts towards the enemy forts. Admiral de Robeck decides to break off the action and withdraw.  Inflexible, surrounded by a destroyer screen, by excellent seamanship and devoted work in the engine room is brought to Tenedos, where she will be out of action for six weeks.

Among those killed on Inflexible is:

  • Commander Rudolf Henry Cole Verner killed at age 32. He is the son of the Honorable Elizabeth Verner and had been Gunnery Lieutenant Commander of the ship at the Battle of the Falklands.

De Robeck orders Commodore Roger Keyes to rescue the drifting Irresistible, whose crew has been taken off by destroyers.  Commanding from the destroyer HMS Wear, Keyes is given the Canopus class (1898) battleship Ocean and HMS Swiftsure.  The Captain of the former is unwilling to close in to tow the crippled ship, so Keyes orders Ocean to withdraw.  Then, Ocean is ripped by an explosion (probably a mine) and her steering gear is destroyed by a shell.  Her crew is evacuated and Keyes and Swiftsure withdraw. Keyes returns after dark in the destroyer Jed in the attempt to sink Irresistible and, if possible, rescue Ocean; but both have sunk before he reaches them. In the French squadron the battleship Gaulois is so seriously damaged by gunfire that it is for sometime doubted whether she can be saved, while Suffren also requires major repair.  The final reckoning is three capital units sunk and three more put out of action, one third of the fleet. The great attempt to force the Narrows with the fleet has ended in what can only be regarded as a severe defeat. It is an illustration of the curiosities of naval warfare and its all or nothing quality, that despite this very considerable material loss, British casualties are only sixty one killed and wounded.  Furthermore, for the British the lost ships will easily be replaced (see 20 March).

Among those killed on Irresistible are:

  • Lieutenant Edward Cromwell Colchester is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Midshipman Ivon Gordon Fellowes is killed at age 17. He is the youngest son of late Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ Thomas Hounsom Butler KCB and Lady Margaret Fellowes. His elder brother will be killed in action in August 1918.

The battleship Dreadnought, in the only real action of her career, rams and sinks the submarine U-29 while returning to Scapa Flow with the Grand Fleet at about lat 58.21 north long 1.12 east.  The commander of U-29 is Otto von Weddigen, who in U-9 had sunk the cruisers Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue in September 1914. He and his entire crew are lost.

Today’s additional losses include:

  • The son of the Chief Justice of Western Australia
  • A man whose brother was killed last October

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Major Francis Maitland Wyborn Parker DSO (Australian Field Artillery) dies on service in Cairo at age 38. He is the son of the Honorable ‘Sir’ Henry Stephen Parker KCMG Chief Justice of Western Australia.
  • Lance Corporal William Reginald Eden (Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. His brother was killed last October.

Wednesday 17 March 1915 – We Lost 183

Winston Churchill cables his agreement to de Robeck taking command in the following message:  “Personal and Secret from First Lord.  In entrusting to you with great confidence the command of the Mediterranean Detached Fleet I presume…that you consider, after separate and independent judgment, that the immediate operations proposed are wise and practicable.  If not, do not hesitate to say so.  If so, execute them without delay and without further reference at the first favorable opportunity…All good fortune attend you.”  De Robeck replies that weather permitting he will attack on the following day.

Today’s losses include:

  • The brother of a Baronet
  • A man whose brother was killed less than one week previously
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man who will have two brothers killed later in the Great War

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Lieutenant Colonel George Francis Reginald Forbes (Irish Regiment) dies of wounds at Bailleui received two days before at St Eloi at age 48. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ W F Forbes.
  • Captain Eric Samuel Pennant James (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed in action at age 27. He has been an open Classical Exhibitioner and M A of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge and a Foundation Scholar at St Paul’s School.
  • Captain Arbuthnott John Dunbar (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 29. He is the brother of the 10th
  • Captain Michael Reginald Kirkman Hodgson (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 35 five days after his younger brother has been killed. They are sons of Robert Kirman JP and Lady Honora Janet Hodgson.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexander Dalziel Sprunt (Bedfordshire Regiment attached South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received in action leading a charge one week earlier at Neuve Chapelle. The 24 year old has two brothers the first will be killed in June while the second will die of wounds in 1919.

Thursday 11 March 1915 – We Lost 892

Military Cross

Military Cross

A British attack shortly after midday at Neuve Chapelle takes place five minutes after the supporting artillery fire has stopped, leading to heavy casualties. General Haig orders a frontal attack, and almost all those who take part in it are killed. This evening he gives the order for a renewed advance on the following day. Some British forces do make progress occupying the village of l’Epinette.

Captain John William Mapplebeck (Liverpool Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps) and Lieutenant Alastair St John Munro Warrand (Black Watch attached) carryout the first night bombing raid of the Great War.  Each aircraft carries two 100-lb bombs on carriers designed and built by the squadron.  Preparations include fitting the cockpits with electric lights and, to direct the crews, two signaling lamps are placed on the ground, five miles apart.  They depart for Lille at 04:45.  Both aircraft are shot down and though Captain Mapplebeck is able to make it back to the British lines, Lieutenant Warrand will die of his wounds in eight days.

With intelligence concerning Turkish ammunition shortages Churchill and the Admiralty order Admiral Carden to shift from his methodical bombardment of the Dardanelles forts to an attack to obtain victory. The results to be gained are enough to justify loss of ships and men if success cannot be obtained without. Efforts to sweep the Kephez minefields at night with trawler minesweepers continue to be unsuccessful when the warships are unable to knock out the searchlights which expose the trawlers to the deadly fire of the batteries protecting the minefields. Carden and his staff concludes that the only method to succeed will be a daylight attack to silence the forts at the Narrows as well as the batteries protecting the Kephez minefields.  The trawlers can then clear a channel at night and permit the fleet to destroy the Narrows forts at short range the following day. This, in turn, will permit the trawlers to sweep the Narrows minefields and open the way into the Sea of Marmara.

British Cavalry make a reconnaissance to Nakaila, west of Basra.

The Armed Merchant Cruiser HMS Bayano (Commander Henry Cecil Carr) is sunk by the submarine U27 ten miles west of Corsewell Point off the River Clyde.  There are one hundred ninety-five casualties including her commanding officer along with twenty-six survivors.

Britain announces a blockade of German ports.

Third Squadron Royal Naval Air Service sails for the Dardanelles.

Captain Trevor Howard Beves (Border Regiment) is awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and exceptionally good work performed at Neuve Chapelle.  He leads his men with great ability in the attack and is wounded twice.  Captain Beves will be killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

Today’s losses include:

  • The son of the Duke of Stacpoole
  • The 3rd Baron Brabourne
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn
  • Multiple families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • A family that will lose two more sons in the Great War
  • The son of a Baronet
  • An International Cricket player
  • A man who was awarded the Military Cross in the first class in January 1915
  • A son of a Justice of the Peace
  • A man whose father was killed in the South African War
  • A son of a member of the clergy
  • A brother of a man who will be awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously in the war
  • The Captain of the 1st football eleven at Leys School Cambridge

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

 Major Charles Ernest Higginbotham (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 48. He played three cricket matches for the Straits Settlements against Hong Kong between 1890 and 1891 and two first class matches and served in the South African War.

  • Captain Rupert Auriol Conant Murray (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed in action at age 32. His brother was killed on 30 November 1914.  He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Henry Edwrd Dering 10th Baronet
  • Captain John Rowley Lunell Heyland (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 28. He was awarded the Military Cross in the first group awarded that award. His brother will be killed in May of this year.
  • Captain Wyndham Wentworth Knatchbull-Hugessen (Grenadier Guards), 3rd Baron Brabourne is killed in action at age 29. His cousin once removed the 6th Baron will be killed serving as Lieutenant Norton Cecil Michael Knatchbull on 15th September 1943 while serving in the Grenadier Guards.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ George Henry Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards) at age 38. He is the second and last surviving son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn to be killed in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Archibald Charles Edward Alexander (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of W R E Alexander JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Henry Scott Turner (Black Watch) dies of pneumonia at age 18. He is the son of Major Scott Turner (Black Watch) who was killed in the South African War.
  • Second Lieutenant Roderick Algernon Anthony De Stacpoole (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) is killed in action at age 19. He is the son of the 4th Duke and Duchess of Stacpoole and has a brother who was killed in September 1914 and a nephew who will be killed in 1944.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Sanderson Paterson (Royal Field Artillery attached Royal Horse Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Very Reverend W P Paterson DD Professor of Divinity at University of Edinburgh.
  • Sergeant George Reay (Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 26. His brother will be killed in February of next year.
  • Private Archibald Ware (Wiltshire Regiment) is the first of three brothers to lose his life in the Great War. The other two will lose their lives in 1916 the first Corporal Sidney William Ware will die of wounds in April of that year less than two weeks after performing deeds that will win him the Victoria Cross.
  • Private William Fane Dalzell Dalrymple-Sewell (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed by a shell in front of Bois de Blez at age 18. He is the grandson of Colonel Henry Fane Haylell Sewell, great grandson of General ‘Sir’ William Henry Sewell and great great grandson of ‘Sir’ Thomas Sewell.
  • Private John Leslie Elmslie (Honorable Artillery Company) is killed at age 18. He was the best swimmer and Captain of the 1st football eleven at Leys School Cambridge.

Wednesday 3 November 1914 – We Lost 730

Royal Navy Ensign

Royal Navy Ensign

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings into cover some wounded men, who are lying, exposed to enemy fire, in the open.

Brigadier General Aitken and many of the staff of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’ disembark at 16:00 and set up shop in a building they identify as the White House on the outskirts of Tanga. A building with a red roof, called the Red House is converted into a hospital, although bandages, medicines and other medical supplies will not be landed until after the battle starts. By 20:00 the landing force is at last ashore. As expected, the landing is unopposed.  A few patrols are sent out though no one seems certain where the enemy might be. The sepoys are nervous, and when someone accidentally fires a rifle, the 13th Rajputs and the 61st Pioneers panic, rise up and rush for the shore. It is only with great difficulty that their officers persuade them to return to their bivouac.

Winston Churchill arranges with the head of Bethlehem Steel, that Great Britain will purchase eight 14-inch guns needed for newly commissioned monitors. They were originally constructed by Bethlehem for a Greek battleship under construction in Germany.

The Admiralty sends Vice Admiral Sackville H Carden the following message: “Without risking the ships a demonstration is to be made by bombardment against the forts at the entrance to the Dardanelles”.  He is ordered to retire before return fire becomes effective.  Early this morning an Allied squadron under Carden bombards the forts with the battle cruisers HMS Indefatigable and HMS Indomitable, allowing eight rounds per turret.  Two French battleships join the attack.  The fortress on the northern shore, Sedd-ul-Bahr, is hit and its powder magazine blown up, while Turkish counter-fire is ineffective.

Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) performs conspicuously good work in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who are beginning to dig a new trench within 30 yards of his own. Thirty of the enemy will be shot during this engagement. Lieutenant Pepys will be killed in nine days.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A man whose wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • Scottish International Rugby footballer
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of a Justice of the High Court of Bombay

Three German cruisers appear off Yarmouth and shell the town of Lowestoft for fifteen minutes without any significant effect. HM Submarines D5 and E10 are ordered to intercept the enemy off Terschelling. While proceeding on the surface to the interception point, D5 (Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Herbert) strikes a drifting mine and sinks.  There are six survivors including the commander while 21 of the crew are lost.

  •  Lieutenant Donald Francis O’Callaghan Brodie is among those lost at age 26. He is the grandson of the Reverend William Brodie.
  • Engine Room Artificer William John Copland killed at age 33. His brother was lost in the sinking of HMS Amphion in August.

 Others lost today include: 

  • Major Frederick Manners-Smith(Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 43.  He is the youngest son of the late Surgeon General Charles Manners-Smith.
  • Captain George Millais James (East Kent Regiment) Brigade Major 2nd Infantry Brigade VII Division is killed by a sniper at age 34. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Millais Baronet and painter. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ James Heath Baronet who lost a son in September.
  • Captain Lewis Robertson (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 31. He is a Scotland International Rugby player played for a number of clubs including Fettesian-Lorettonian, London Scottish, Monkstown and the Edinburgh Wanderers.
  • Lieutenant Raymond Philip Drummond Nolan (Black Watch) is killed at age 31. He is the nephew of Lieutenant Colonel J P Nolan MP.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Dorman Partridge (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed two days ago on HMS Good Hope.
  • Lieutenant Martin James Richardson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed by a shell. He is the nephew of Major General George B Heaste Royal Army Medical Corps. The same shell will wound Captain Thomas McCann Phillips (Royal Army Medical Corps) who will die of his wounds tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Laurence George Hart (Pioneers Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 37. He is the nephew of Major General Fitzroy Hart-Synnot CB CMG and General ‘Sir’ Reginald Clare Hart VC KCB KCVO. His wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Charles Day (Rajputs Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 23. He is the son of the Very Reverend Maurice W Day Dean of Waterford.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Nelson Coxe(Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 19. His two brothers will be killed later in the war, the first in January 1915 the second on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. They are sons of Justice Coxe Judge of the High Court of Calcutta.
  • Corporal Edward Hugh Mainwaring Furley (East Africa Mounted Rifles) is killed at Lungido, East Africa at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Mainwaring Furley.
  • Private Bertie Bruce(Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in Baghdad in 1916.
  • Private William Simcox (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Albert Greenwood (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed on the same day in 1917.

Skipper George Alfred Gower (fishing trawler Will and Maggie) is killed when his ship strikes a mine and sinks seventeen miles northeast of Lowestoft. The crew of six is lost.

Monday 19 October 1914 – We Lost 343

 

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

I Corps arrives at Ypres. ‘Sir’ Henry Rawlinson is unable to occupy Menin.

The 2nd Royal Irish Regiment is surrounded and more than 300 men (nearly all wounded) surrender after a very stiff fight at Le Pilly on the Aubers Ridge.  (The Battalion will be withdrawn to be rebuilt shortly after this affair).

HMS Chatham, responding to a report that German ships have been seen at the settlement of Lindi, steams into the mouth of the Lukuledi River, clears for action, but the only vessel he finds there is the merchant ship Prasident. She is flying the flag of the International Red Cross.  Notes are exchanged between Captain Drury-Lowe and the governor of Lindi. The Chatham’s first officer, Commander R Fitzmaurice, discovers documents showing Prasident has been supplying SMS Konigsberg with both intelligence and provisions at a place called Salale.  Drury-Lowe disables Prasident’s engines.  Salale is not shown on any British maps, so its location is unknown.  Also found on board is a recent survey of the waters off the Rufiji River.  The British also discover an out of date copy of the “Handbuch der Ostkurste Afrikas” in which the village of Salale is mentioned as being on the Rufiji.  Drury-Lowe heads for the Rufiji.

A new naval decoration the Distinguished Service Medal is established for “bravery and resource under fire”. Two hundred twenty nine holders will lose their lives in the Great War.

Today’s losses include”

  • Cousin of Winston Churchill
  • Son and son-in-law of Baronets
  • Grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son of clergy
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Norman Jerome Beauchamp Leslie (Rifle Brigade) a son of Colonel ‘Sir’ John Leslie the 2nd Baronet and cousin of Winston Churchill is killed in action at age 25 when he is shot by a sniper at Armentieres.

  • Captain John Hugh Gardiner McCormick (Warwickshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 28. He is the son of S S McCormick JP.
  • Captain George Ryefield Taylour(Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Major General ‘Lord’ John Henry Taylour and grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Headfort KP. He was wounded and made a prisoner of war during the South African War and is a keen amateur heavyweight boxer.
  • Captain Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton (Life Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the only son of Canon T Percy Pemberton Prebendary of York Minster and a member of the MCC. He is also the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Worsley Baronet.
  • Captain Leicester William le Marchant Carey(Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 36. He is the only son of the late Major General Constantine Carey CB.
  • Private Frank William Farrant(Cheshire Regiment) is killed his brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Stephen Collins (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 16. He is the first of four sons of Agnes Collins of Waterford who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Thomas Kavanagh (Irish Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.