Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: World War 1

Sunday 8 November 1914 – We Lost 328

 

HMAS Sydney

HMAS Sydney

A convoy that HMAS Sydney, HMAS Melbourne and the Japanese warship Ibuki are escorting is getting into waters where the chief danger is from the vigorous SMS Emden.  The German light cruiser has sunk or captured twenty-five allied steamers and two warships, raided Penang, and shelled the oil tanks at Madras.  The Australian and New Zealand convoy has learned to sail without lights.  The big staff ship Orvieto, still sometimes twinkles “like a hotel” when, on this night, the convoy approaches the solitary Cocos Islands, keeping fifty miles to the east in case Emden is near.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A grandson of two Generals
  • A grandson of the 12th Baron Petre
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain Hugh Mortimer Travers (Munster Fusiliers) is killed at age 41. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Robert Travers and Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Marion Durand. He served in the South African War and is engaged to the daughter of Surgeon General ‘Sir’ William Taylor.

  •  Captain Frederick Cleave Strickland Dunlop(Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 36. He has four brothers who will serve in the Great War two of whom will be killed in action, one in October of this year the other in September of next.
  • Lieutenant Lionel Douglas Waud (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the nephew of Baron de la Borie de la Batut and great nephew of Count Marie.
  • Lieutenant Wilfred Stanislaus Stapleton-Bretherton(Royal Fusiliers) is killed.  He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. Isabella Stapleton-Bretherton who lost another son in the South African War in January 1902 and the grandson of the 12th Baron Petre.
  • Lieutenant Francis Algernon Monckton(Scots Guards) is killed at age 24. His younger brother will be killed next January serving in the same regiment.
  • Sergeant William Thomas Challen(North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916 at age 18 serving in his brother’s regiment.
  • Corporal Herbert Stocker (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in July 1917.
  • Private John Thomas Boyle (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in a nine month period.

photo from wikipedia.org

Saturday 7 November 1914 – We Lost 741

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Tsing-tau falls to British and Japanese forces and two thousand three hundred prisoners are taken. The British casualties during the siege are 2 officers wounded, 12 men killed, and 61 wounded. Numerous congratulatory messages are exchanged between the British and the Japanese. Lord Kitchener sends his felicitations to the Japanese Minister of War at Tokyo: “Please accept my warmest congratulations on the success of the operations against Tsing-tau. Will you be so kind as to express my felicitations to the Japanese forces engaged? The British Army is proud to have been associated with its gallant Japanese comrades in this enterprise”.

Two American companies accept orders from the British Admiralty for twelve flying boats.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  A Victoria Cross winner
  • A grandson of the first victim of the India Mutiny
  • A man whose uncle was killed in the South African Wara
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • A grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Cousin of a General
  • Two brothers killed together
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons in the Great War
  • A man who had two brothers lose their lives in the service of King & Country before the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • A cousin of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a former Lord Mayor of London
  • A man who played one first class cricket match for Worcestershire

 Today’s highlighted casualties is

 At Zillebeke, Belgium, when leading an attack against the Germans under very heavy fire, Captain John Franks Vallentin (South Staffordshire Regiment) is struck down and on rising to continue the attack and immediately killed at age 32. The capture of the enemy’s trenches which immediately follows is in a great measure due to the confidence which the men have in their captain, arising from his many previous acts of great bravery and ability. For his actions Captain Vallentin will be awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross. He also served in the South Africa War. Vallentin is the nephew of the noted naturalist Rupert Vallentin. His grandfather ‘Sir’ James Vallentin was Knight Sheriff of London, and his cousin Archibald Thomas Pechey, the lyricist and author, adapted the family name for his nom-de-plune ‘Valentine’. His grandfather Colonel Finnis was the first victim of the Indian Mutiny and another uncle, Major Valentin was killed in the South African War.

  •  Captain Arnold Stearns Nesbitt (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 36. He is a cricketer who played one first class match for Worcestershire in 1914.
  • Captain Richard Alexander Noel Smyth (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend J Coke Vicar of Ilebrewers near Taunton Somerset the former Principal and Chaplain of the Lawrence Military Asylum, Sanawar India.
  • Captain Beauchamp Oswald Duff(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 34.  He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Beauchamp GCB commander of the Army in India and Lady Duff.  He had served in the Waziristan and Somaliland campaigns 1901-4.
  • Captain Lionel Alfred Francis Cane(East Lancashire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on an enemy trench at age 29. He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Granger Cane of Great Paxton Vicarage, St Neots Hunts and 1st cousin to Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby KCB.
  • Captain Edward Basil Chichester (East Kent Regiment) dies of wounds at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and has had two brothers previously die in the service of their King one dying on service in 1898 and the second being killed in 1902 in Somaliland.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Alexander Goldsmid (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the second cousin of ‘Sir’ Julian Goldsmid Baronet and related to ‘Sir’ Isaac Francis Goldsmid Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Jessie Marson Atkin(Sherwood Foresters attached Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 23.  His brother will be killed in May 1918. Lieutenant Atkin is the son of Mr H Atkin, New Westwood and entered The University College, Nottingham in the session 1910 – 11.  While at college he passed the final examinations of the Bachelor of Arts Degree of London. He received his military training under Captain Trotman in the Officers Training Corps, passing ‘A’ and ‘B’ Military examinations.  At the completion of his college career he applied and was accepted for the special reserve of officers.  A touching incident in connection with the announcement of his death is that his sister who was employed at the Jacksdale Post Office was the one to receive the message informing the family of his death.  
  • Lieutenant Reginald Nigel Gipps (Scots Guards) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Reginald Gipps GCB.
  • Lieutenant John Beauclerk Vandeleur(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of Colonel J S Vandeleur CB.
  • Second Lieutenant Gillachrist Moore (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Norman Moore the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Richard Hutton(Leicestershire Regiment attached Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Henry Hutton Rector of West Heslerton.
  • Second Lieutenant James Neil Grant McGrigor (Gordon Highlanders) dies of wounds in London received 24 October at age 19. He is the son of ‘Sir’ James McGrigor.
  • Second Lieutenant Murray Stuart Pound (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds received 21 October at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ John Lulham Pound the 2nd Baronet and grandsons of ‘Sir’ John Pound Baronet Lord Mayor of London 1904-5.
  • Sergeants and brothers Alfred James (age 29) and William John Cogan age 33 (Bedfordshire Regiment) are killed together. A third brother will be killed in next March.
  • Sergeant William Peart (Norfolk Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother Henry will also lose his life in the war.
  • Lance Corporal Jake Clarke Andrews (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Lance Corporal Percy Shaw (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed next August on Gallipoli.
  • Lance Corporal Charles Lamond (Black Watch) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Ernest Herbert Bygrave (Bedfordshire Regiment) becomes the first of three brothers who will lose their lives in the Great War. They are sons of the late Reverend Joseph Hutton.
  • Private William Gray(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 18.  His brother will be killed in May 1918.
  • Drummer George Edward Ransom (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private William Cowan Fulton (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 31. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Patrick O’Connell (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother John will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Samuel Hateley (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1918.                                                                                                                                                  

photo from wikipedia.org

Friday 6 November 1914 – We Lost 378

The Life Guards cap badge

The Life Guards cap badge

German troops are forced out of the village of Soupir. The village will remain very close to the front line for the greater part of the Great War.

A combined Anglo-Indian force of 600 troops is landed in the Shatt-al-Arab near the old fort at Fao which they soon capture. The remainder of Force ‘D’ sails on to a place where it can safely disembark at Sanniyeh.

The spy Karl Lody is shot at the Tower of London.

The Central fort at Tsing-tau is stormed and two hundred prisoners are taken. Captain Dudley G Johnson (South Wales Borderers) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for conspicuous ability during the morning of these operations and for great gallantry in rescuing several wounded men while exposed to heavy machine gun fire.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of Member of Parliament
  • The father of a future Prime Minister of Northern Ireland
  • Son of the 2nd Baron and father of the 3rd Baron O’Neill
  • Son of the 2nd Baron Leconfield
  • Son of Russian Baron DeGunzburg
  • Son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn
  • Son of the 8th Viscount Downe
  • Son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford
  • Son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Brother-in-law of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Men who will have one and two sons killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple men who will have nephew’s killed in the Second World War
  • A Battalion commander
  • Uncle by marriage of Winston Churchill
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons
  • A man whose sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Nephew of clergy
  • Multiple sons of Justice’s of the Peace
  • A former Aide-de-camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
  • Member of the Marylebone Cricket Club

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Edward Bruce O’Neill (Life Guards) becomes the first Member of Parliament to be killed in the Great War when he is killed today.  He is the son of the 2nd Baron O’Neill, father of the 3rd Baron who will be killed in October 1944 and the grandson of the 11th Earl of Dundonald and Member of Parliament for Mid Antrim. One son will later become Prime Minister of Northern Ireland while two others will be killed in the Second World War. He is also the son-in-law of The Marquis of Crewe and served in the South African War.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Gordon Chesney WilsonMVO (commanding Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 49. He is the eldest son of ‘Sir’ Samuel Wilson MP Kt and the son-in-law of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and by marriage the uncle of Winston Churchill. He served as Aide de camp to Major General Baden Powell from August 1899 to July 1900 in South Africa.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Hugh DawnayDSO (Life Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of the 8th Viscount Downe.  He is the veteran of the South African War and Somaliland in 1908-10 and the son-in-law of the 5th Marquess of Waterford. His son will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force in World War II.
  • Major Edward Hawtin Phillips DSO (Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 36. He was at the front three days and has previously served in 1900 in North Nigeria and Ashanti, in the South African War and again in North Nigeria in 1900. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Captain Edward Charles Stafford-King-Harman(Irish Guards) is killed at age 23.  His only child a daughter will be born in April of next year. He is the son of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Thomas Stafford-King-Harman, the 1st Baronet and his nephew Lieutenant Thomas Edward (Irish Guards) will be killed in action on 4 August 1944 at age 22. He is the grandson of the Right Honorable Edward King-Harman MP.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Arthur John Hamilton (Irish Guards). He is the son of the 2nd Duke of Abercorn KG. He is the Deputy Master of the Household. He dies at age 30 and his body will never be found. His sister will be lost in the sinking of RMS Leinster in October 1918.
  • Captain Norman Neill(Hussars) is killed at age 34. He is the son in law of Major General ‘Sir’ Gerald de Courcy Morton KCIE CB and Brigade Major 6th Cavalry Brigade and he served in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant William Edward Hope(Irish Guards) is killed at age 27.  On the outbreak of the war, he was serving as Aide de Camp to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
  • Lieutenant Robert Randle Egerton (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Robert Eyles Egerton JP.
  • Lieutenant George William Houghton Hodgson (Border Regiment) dies of wounds at age 26. He is the son of the Reverend William George Courtney Hodgson and nephew of the Bishop of Edmundsbury.
  • Lieutenant Carleton Wyndham Tufnell (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22. He is the nephew of Rear Admiral Lionel Grant Tufnell CMG and a member of I Zingfair and MCC.
  • Lieutenant George Pierse Jenings (Shropshire Light Infantry) is killed at Rue de Bois. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel Ulick Albert Jenings JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ William Reginald Wyndham (Lincolnshire Yeomanry attached Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the third son of the late 2nd Baron Leconfield and a nephew of Lord Rosebery. He is an Irish race horse owner and member of the Jockey Club. His nephew the eldest son of the 5th Baron will be killed in action on 9 October 1942 serving in the Queen’s Royal Lancers Royal Armoured Corps.
  • Second Lieutenant Alexis George DeGunzburg (Hussars attached Royal Horse Guards) the Baron is killed at age 27 while carrying a message to Colonel Gordon Wilson from General Kavanagh. He is the youngest son of the late Baron DeGunzburg and is also related to the Dowager Countess of Desart and ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald. He is Russian by birth and became a naturalized citizen to join the army in September.
  • Second Lieutenant William Sincliar Petersen (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is brother-in-law of Major Douglas Reynolds VC (Royal Field Artillery) who is married to Petersen’s sister.
  • Corporal Mark Charles Dowlen (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private William Brennock (Irish Guards) is killed. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Cecil Herbert Facey (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in January.
  • Private Edward Clarke (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will also be killed in the Great War.
  • Able Seaman Melville Franklin (Collingwood RNVR RND) dies at home of illness at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Edmund John Franklin.
  • Private Edward Edwin Clarke (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in the war also.
  • Private Frederick James Allen (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. His brother Charles will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Edward Gregory Sangster (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918.
  • Seaman Horace Reginald Horscroft (RNR HMS Victorian) drowns at age 41. He is the recipient of a Belgian Medal and Diploma for saving life at sea.

 

Friday 5 November 1914 – We Lost 281

6th Earl Annesley

6th Earl Annesley

For the second time within a month the minimum height requirement to join the British army is lowered, this time from 5’5” to 5’3”.

The British proclamation that the entire North Sea will be viewed as a military area takes effect.

Today’s losses include:

  • The 6th Earl Annesley
  • Grandson of the 1st Baron Newlands
  • A suicide by a Major General
  • Son and father of a Baronet
  • Royal Academy Artist
  • Nephew of a General
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Edward Teshmaker Busk (Royal Engineers) dies from a fire in the air while doing experimental service at Laffans Plain near Aldershot at age 28. He is a pioneer of early aircraft design, and the designer of the first full-size efficient inherently stable aeroplane. After attaining First Class Honours in Mechanical Sciences at Cambridge he became Assistant Engineer at the newly formed Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough, later the Royal Aircraft Establishment.  Here he devotes much of his time to the mathematics and dynamics of stable flight. Before the invention of mechanical control devices, inherent stability in an aircraft is a most important quality.  Busk took his theories into the air and tried them out in practice. As a result, in 1914 the RE1 (Reconnaissance Experimental) evolved and was claimed as the first inherently stable aeroplane. The remarkable feature of this design was that there was no single device that was the cause of the stability.The stable result was attributed to detailed design of each part of the aeroplane, with due regard to its relation to, and effect on, other parts in the air. Weights and areas were so arranged that under practically any conditions the machine tended to right itself.  Busk was killed while flying his own stable aeroplane, which burst into flames and came down at Laffans Plain (Farnborough Airfield), near Aldershot. He is buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery with full military honours.  His genius and his courage were recognised by the posthumous award of the Gold Medal of the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain, and among the many letters of condolence received by his mother is one from King George V. His youngest brother, Hans Acworth Busk (b.1894), will be reported missing on 6 January 1916, last seen flying a heavy bomber against the Turks at Gallipoli. They are sons of T T Busk JP.

  • Major Clive Macdonnell Dixon(Lancers) dies of wounds received in the first battle of Ypres at age 44. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Raylton Dixon DL and a Royal Academy Artist best known for the charming images in his book The Leaguer of Ladysmith, created during the four-month Siege of Ladysmith in South Africa. He served in Chitral and the South Africa War. Several of his watercolors are kept by the Africana Museum in Johannesburg.
  • Captain Graham de Montmorency Armstrong-Lushington-Tulloch (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 28. He is the great nephew and godson of General de Montmorency.
  • Captain William Frank Gardiner Baird (Bedfordshire Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) dies of wounds he received on 27 October at Neuve Chapelle. He is the 29-year-old son of the 8th Baronet ‘Sir’ William James Gardiner Baird and father of the 10th He is also the grandson of the 1st Baron Newlands.
  • Lieutenant Noel George Scott McGrath(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received 31 October at age 29. He is the son of the Honorable George McGrath.
  • Lieutenant Edward Joseph Cormac Walshe (Leinster Regiment) dies of wounds at age 22. His brother will be killed in November 1917 and they are sons of Edward Cormac Walsh JP DL.
  • Flight Lieutenant Charles Francis Beevor and Sub Lieutenant Francis Annesley (Royal Naval Air Service, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) the 6th Earl are killed when their Bristol TB8 is shot down by shell fire while he is traveling to Dunkirk and crashes into the sea. The Earl dies at age 30. Lieutenant Beevor was a skilful and daring pilot who had seen previous service in the Balkan war.
  • Private Patrick Curtis (Irish Guards) is killed at age 28. His brothers will be killed 1917.
  • Major General Robert Geoge Kekewich commander of the 13th (Western) Division commits suicide. He was promoted into the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) and commanded the 1st Battalion of that regiment in the Second Boer War. He commanded the garrison during the successful defence of Kimberley. He received the rank of Brevet-Colonel and a Companion of the Order of the Bath. In August 1902 he was specially promoted Major General after winning the Battle of Rooiwal in April of that year. He was appointed colonel of the Buffs in October 1909.

Thursday 4 November 1914 – We Lost 338

Battle of Tanga

Battle of Tanga

The Royal Sovereign Class battleship HMS Hood is sunk across the southern entrance to Portland Harbor to stop U-boats from entering or firing torpedoes at the Channel Fleet ships at anchorage.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The Aide de Camp to Highness the King at Delhi Dunbar in 1911
  • An Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Edmund Allenby
  • An Aide to Camp Governor of Bombay
  • A family member who will lose ten blood relatives including a brother in the War
  • A Margate Borough Police Officer
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson and a nephew of Generals
  • Families that will lose two and three children in the Great War
  • Son of an Australian Member of Parliament
  • Member of the Wanderers Rugby Football Club that won the Leinster Senior Cup in 1906
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Battalion commanders

 The renewed attack on Tanga is unsuccessful and the force re-embarks with some eight hundred casualties, leaving three hundred ninety-four dead on the field including:

  • Major Francis Joseph Braithwaite (The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) dead at age 42.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Joseph Braithwaite Rector of Great Waldingfield Sudbury who will lose another son in July 1916 and a daughter in March 1919. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Major Harold Talum (Grenadiers Indian Army) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of Captain William Tatum Military Secretary for Barbados.
  • Captain Ivan Dayrell Meredith Hogg (Grenadiers Indian Army) is killed at age 30. He is the son of General George Forbes Hogg.
  • Captain Bruce Edward Alexander Manson (King George’s Own Pioneers) is also killed at age 35. He served in the Boxer Rebellion and was the Aid de Camp to His Majesty the King at the Delhi Durbar in 1911.
  • Captain John Henry Middleton Fuller (Wallajahbad Light Infantry attached Palamcottah Light Infantry) is killed at age 35. His daughter will be born next March and he is the son of Deputy Surgeon General John Charles Fuller.
  • Captain Burton Howard Hall (Infantry Indian Army) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Samuel Howard Hall Rector of Sproatley and Chaplain Duke of Wellington’s Regiment.
  • Lieutenant Hubert James Tudor Hamer (Infantry Indian Army attached Grenadiers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of John Parry Hamer JP and is a hockey and polo player.

Losses elsewhere include:

  •  On the Western Front Lieutenant Colonel Beauchamp Tyndall Pell DSO (commanding 1st Royal West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at Zandovoorde received in action on 31st October at Gheluvelt. He is the son of the Reverend Beauchamp Henry St John Pell Rector of Ickenham who has another son who will die on service in August 1916. Lieutenant Colonel Pell is a veteran of the North West Frontier Campaign of 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edwin Berkeley Cook MVO (commanding 1st Life Guards) dies of wounds at Sussex House received 21 October at Messines at age 45.
  • Major Aubrey John Carter DSO (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at Ypres age 42. He is the son-in-law of Reverend G H Rigby and nephew-in-law of the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ John Rigby.
  • Major John Beaumont Corry DSO (Royal Engineers attached Sappers and Miners Indian Army) is killed at Sailly-sur-Lys at gae 40. He is the son of John Corry JP and served in both Tirah 1897-9 and Metran in 1901 where he was wounded.
  • Captain Charles Fremoult Preston Battersby(Royal Field Artillery) the only child of Major General Thomas Preston Battersby CB is killed in action at age 27.
  • Captain Lionel Archibald Forster(Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds as a prisoner of war at age 35. He is the son of the Right Honorable William Forster MP of New South Wales Australia.
  • Captain Thomas McCann Phillips(Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds received yesterday at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend John Gillis Phillips Missionary of the Irish Presbyterian Church.
  • Captain and Adjutant John Francis Allen (North Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds received rescuing two men buried by a shell burst at age 33. He is the former Aide de Camp to Lord Sydenham, Governor of Bombay and is the son of William Henry Allen JP DL.
  • Captain Cecil Allen Taylor Conyngham (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed at age 31. He was a member of the Wanderers Rugby Football Club that won the Leinster Senior Cup in 1906.
  • Lieutenant George Garth Marshall(Hussars) is killed at age 29.  He is the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall ‘Sir’ Edmund Allenby. He is the grandson of General ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Alexander Hamilton Gordon KCB and nephew of Major General A Hamilton Gordon.
  • Second Lieutenant James Douglas Herbert Farmer (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of James Farmer JP and ‘Sir’ George Harris JP.
  • Second Lieutenant Rupert Coleman Laybourne Pilliner (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. He is the son of A M Pilliner JP and grandson of Richard Laybourne JP DL.
  • Signaler Basil Thomas Martin (Yorkshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 20. His brother will be killed next July.
  • Private Archibald Stanley Jones (Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at age 24. He is a Margate Police Officer.
  • Drummer Andrew Spencer Hay (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds at age 20. He has eleven blood relations who also fall in the war including his brother who will be killed next February.

 

Wednesday 3 November 1914 – We Lost 730

Royal Navy Ensign

Royal Navy Ensign

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings into cover some wounded men, who are lying, exposed to enemy fire, in the open.

Brigadier General Aitken and many of the staff of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’ disembark at 16:00 and set up shop in a building they identify as the White House on the outskirts of Tanga. A building with a red roof, called the Red House is converted into a hospital, although bandages, medicines and other medical supplies will not be landed until after the battle starts. By 20:00 the landing force is at last ashore. As expected, the landing is unopposed.  A few patrols are sent out though no one seems certain where the enemy might be. The sepoys are nervous, and when someone accidentally fires a rifle, the 13th Rajputs and the 61st Pioneers panic, rise up and rush for the shore. It is only with great difficulty that their officers persuade them to return to their bivouac.

Winston Churchill arranges with the head of Bethlehem Steel, that Great Britain will purchase eight 14-inch guns needed for newly commissioned monitors. They were originally constructed by Bethlehem for a Greek battleship under construction in Germany.

The Admiralty sends Vice Admiral Sackville H Carden the following message: “Without risking the ships a demonstration is to be made by bombardment against the forts at the entrance to the Dardanelles”.  He is ordered to retire before return fire becomes effective.  Early this morning an Allied squadron under Carden bombards the forts with the battle cruisers HMS Indefatigable and HMS Indomitable, allowing eight rounds per turret.  Two French battleships join the attack.  The fortress on the northern shore, Sedd-ul-Bahr, is hit and its powder magazine blown up, while Turkish counter-fire is ineffective.

Second Lieutenant Francis Pepys (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) performs conspicuously good work in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who are beginning to dig a new trench within 30 yards of his own. Thirty of the enemy will be shot during this engagement. Lieutenant Pepys will be killed in nine days.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  A man whose wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • Scottish International Rugby footballer
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of a Justice of the High Court of Bombay

Three German cruisers appear off Yarmouth and shell the town of Lowestoft for fifteen minutes without any significant effect. HM Submarines D5 and E10 are ordered to intercept the enemy off Terschelling. While proceeding on the surface to the interception point, D5 (Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Herbert) strikes a drifting mine and sinks.  There are six survivors including the commander while 21 of the crew are lost.

  •  Lieutenant Donald Francis O’Callaghan Brodie is among those lost at age 26. He is the grandson of the Reverend William Brodie.
  • Engine Room Artificer William John Copland killed at age 33. His brother was lost in the sinking of HMS Amphion in August.

 Others lost today include: 

  • Major Frederick Manners-Smith(Gurkha Rifles) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 43.  He is the youngest son of the late Surgeon General Charles Manners-Smith.
  • Captain George Millais James (East Kent Regiment) Brigade Major 2nd Infantry Brigade VII Division is killed by a sniper at age 34. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Millais Baronet and painter. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ James Heath Baronet who lost a son in September.
  • Captain Lewis Robertson (Cameron Highlanders) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 31. He is a Scotland International Rugby player played for a number of clubs including Fettesian-Lorettonian, London Scottish, Monkstown and the Edinburgh Wanderers.
  • Lieutenant Raymond Philip Drummond Nolan (Black Watch) is killed at age 31. He is the nephew of Lieutenant Colonel J P Nolan MP.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Dorman Partridge (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother was killed two days ago on HMS Good Hope.
  • Lieutenant Martin James Richardson (Royal Army Medical Corps) is killed by a shell. He is the nephew of Major General George B Heaste Royal Army Medical Corps. The same shell will wound Captain Thomas McCann Phillips (Royal Army Medical Corps) who will die of his wounds tomorrow.
  • Lieutenant Laurence George Hart (Pioneers Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 37. He is the nephew of Major General Fitzroy Hart-Synnot CB CMG and General ‘Sir’ Reginald Clare Hart VC KCB KCVO. His wife’s great grandfather was wounded at Waterloo.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Charles Day (Rajputs Indian Army) is killed at Tanga at age 23. He is the son of the Very Reverend Maurice W Day Dean of Waterford.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Nelson Coxe(Royal Field Artillery) dies of wounds at age 19. His two brothers will be killed later in the war, the first in January 1915 the second on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. They are sons of Justice Coxe Judge of the High Court of Calcutta.
  • Corporal Edward Hugh Mainwaring Furley (East Africa Mounted Rifles) is killed at Lungido, East Africa at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Mainwaring Furley.
  • Private Bertie Bruce(Norfolk Regiment) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in Baghdad in 1916.
  • Private William Simcox (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Albert Greenwood (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed on the same day in 1917.

Skipper George Alfred Gower (fishing trawler Will and Maggie) is killed when his ship strikes a mine and sinks seventeen miles northeast of Lowestoft. The crew of six is lost.

Tuesday 2 November 1914 – We Lost 471

Poona Horse cap badge

Poona Horse cap badge

The 1st Irish Guards are again heavily shelled.  Due to the destruction of No. 3 Company, the Battalion is re-organized from four to three companies.  All the officers of No. 3 have been listed as casualties and only 26 men answer the roll call.  The overall casualties of the battalion for 1 November are listed as forty-four killed, two hundred five wounded and eighty-eight missing.

The village of Soupir falls into German hands though it will be held less than one week.

Private J W Chance (Lincolnshire Regiment) takes a message from the firing line under heavy fire and delivers it though wounded along the way.  For this action he will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

Captain F W Cauldfield, in HMS Fox arrives off Tanga at 07:05. With his crew at action stations and his guns pointed toward the town, he lowers a boat and sends it with a demand to see the district commissioner. Because of the August agreement between Captain Sykes of HMS Astraea and the German governor guarantying neutrality of Dar es Salaam and Tanga, Cauldfield thinks it only fair to warn the Germans that the deal is off. The German commissioner hurries aboard, stopping long enough to send a message to Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck. Cauldfield greets him with the demand that he surrender the town, which he threatens to bombard if it is not given up. Being concerned about mines he asks if the harbor is mined.  The commissioner assures him that the harbor is filled with mines and asks for an hours grace to confer with his superiors. While Cauldfield waits, von Lettow-Vorbeck with a trainload of askaris rockets down the railroad tracks towards Tanga at top speed. He needs all the time the British will give him, as there are only eight locomotives on the line and they can only field one company with its baggage or two companies without baggage in one haul. Cauldfield lingers for ten minutes after the hour before he decides that Tanga is not going to surrender. Even then he does not fire a shot.  He wires for a minesweeper and rejoins the invasion convoy. British inefficiency and sheer stupidity gives the Germans even more time. The Helmuth arrives to sweep the mines; there are none and never have been any. The Helmuth collects only floating logs and empty tin cans. Captain Meinertzhagen writes in his diary of Cauldfield: “He seems nervous, yet pompous, shifty-eyed, and not at all inclined to help. It strikes me that he is definitely afraid and is always referring to the safety of his blasted ship, ignoring the fact it is his business to protect us even if he loses his ship.”  There is further delay while Cauldfield and Aitken try to decide where the troops should be landed.  Eventually they settle on the south side of Ras Kasone, a headland about two miles from the town that guards Manza Bay from the sea and the only part of the shore free of mangroves.  The transports anchor off the landing sight and HMS Fox at last fires its six-inch guns – at some unoccupied entrenchments.  It had been intended that the troops will disembark this afternoon, but is almost 22:00 before the first troops of Tighe’s brigade, the 13th Rajputs and the 61st King George’s Own Pioneers, land on the hostile, unreconnoitred shore, and it is past midnight before both battalions are landed. None of the senior officers expect serious opposition.  When a patrol reports that is has been fired upon by two machine guns on the edge of the town, the report is “received with considerable skepticism.”

The light cruiser HMS Minerva shells the unmanned fort and puts a landing party ashore, which blows up the post office at the Turkish Red Sea port of Akaba.

The British Admiralty proclaims that the North Sea will be wholly a military area as of 5 November.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Son of the 6th Earl of Castle Stewart
  • Son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Slate
  • Son of the 1st Baron Bellper
  • Son-in-law of the 8th Earl of Aylesford
  • Son-in-law of the 1st and last Baron Stamfordham
  • Grandson of the 14th Earl Carnwath
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the Acting Lieutenant Governor of the United Provinces of India
  • Grandson of the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography
  • A grand nephew of Horatio ‘Lord’ Nelson
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of Generals
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Grandson of Clergy
  • Two nephews killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose child will be born early next year
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of a Writer to the Signer
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed in the war

 Today’s casualty of the day is

 Lieutenant Colonel Charles Oliver Swanston DSO (Commanding 34th Poona Horse, Indian Army) is killed near Neuve Chapelle at age 49.  He is the son of Major General William Oliver Swanston (Indian Army) who served during the Mutiny and the grand nephew of Horatio ‘Lord’ Nelson. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and in Waziristan in 1901-2. He is the son-in-law of Bruce Johnston, writer to the Signet.

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Henry Anderson (Commanding 9th Bhopal Infantry) is killed.
  • Major Lionel Stuart Logan(Supply and Transport Corps) is accidentally killed on his way to the front at age 40.  His brother will be killed in action in September 1916 they are sons of Major General Archibald George Douglas Logan.
  • Major Eustace Crawley(Royal Lancers) is killed at age 46.  His widow is Lady Violet Crawley and the daughter of the 8th Earl of Aylesford. He served in Sierra Leone in 1898-9, commanded the Bula Expedition in 1899, the South African War and the Kano Expedition in 1902-3.
  • Captain Henry Robert Augustus Adeane(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 32.  He is the son of Vice Admiral Edward and Lady Edith Adeane the daughter of the 14th Earl of Carnwath and the son-in-law of the 1st and last Baron Stamfordham who will lose his only son in May 1915, Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ John Neville Bigge..
  • Captain ‘Viscount’ Robert Sheffield Stuart (Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at Neuve Chapelle at age 28. He will lose a brother in September next year.  They are sons of the 6th Earl Castle Stewart and grandson of General Arthur Stevens and the Right Reverend the Honorable Andrew Godfrey Stuart.  His two nephews, both sons of the 7th Earl will be killed in World War II.
  • Captain Cyril Francis Hawley(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ Henry Hawley, the 5th Baronet and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Captain Harry Vernon Gerrard (Border Regiment) is killed by a shell at Ypres. He is a South Africa War veteran and his brother will be killed during the Singapore Riots next February.
  • Captain Archibald Alastair McLeod(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on a Belgian farm at age 37.  He is the son of Lieutenant General William Kelly McLeod and the nephew of Lieutenant General John McLeod. He served in the South African War and is the son-in-law of Lord Henry Fitzwarrine of Donegall.
  • Captain Thomas Humphrey Sneyd(Lancashire Fusiliers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of Major General Thomas William Sneyd. His only child a daughter will be born next April.
  • Captain Bingham Alexander TurnerDSO (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 37. He is the son of General Edmund Penrose Bingham Turner. He served in the Nile Campaign of 1898 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant ‘The Honorable’ Geofrey Even Hugh MacDonald(Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron Macdonald of Slate and had served in the South African Campaign.
  • Lieutenant Harold Clement Montague Lucas(Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 38. He is the son of the late General H F E Lucas.
  • Lieutenant Edward Arthur Lousada (Royal Sussex Regiment) is killed. His sister’s husband will be killed in February and his brother in May of next year.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Hugh Mathews (East Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1916.
  • Lieutenant Richard Charles Graves-Sawle (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 26. He is the only son of Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ Charles Graves-Sawle the 4th Baronet, nephew of Colonel ‘Sir’ Francis Graves-Sawle MVO Baronet and son-in-law of Lieutenant Colonel Heaton-Ellis JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Dyett Abbott (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General H D Abbott CB and Major General J C Berkeley CIE.
  • Lieutenant James Lestock Ironsdie Rew (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 27. He is the 1st cousin twice removed of Brigadier General Nicholson hero of Deli.
  • Lieutenant Laurence Gail Nicholson (Royal Berkshire Regiment attached Hussars) dies of wounds at home at age 32 of wounds received when he led and commanded his platoon during an attack on German positions on the Paschendaele Becelaere road which resulted in the taking of the enemy’s trenches and seventy prisoners.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Theodore Clephane Wickham (Connaught Rangers) is killed by a sniper at age 27. He is an amateur actor and the only son of the Reverend James Douglas Clephane Wickham JP.
  • Lieutenant Duncan Baillie (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed next year. They are sons of ‘Sir’ Duncan Colvin Baillie Acting Lieutenant Governor of the United Provinces.
  • Lieutenant Arthur George Murray-Smith(Life Guards) dies of wounds received 20th October as a prisoner of war at age 28.  He is the son-in-law of J S Ainsworth.. His younger brother will be killed in September 1915. They are grandsons of the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography the 1st Baron Belper.
  • Second Lieutenant Leslie George Hamlyn Harris(Sherwood Foresters) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of the late Major General Noel H Harris (Royal Artillery).
  • Second Lieutenant Claude Joseph O’Conor Mallins (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 20. He is the grandson of Roderick Joseph O’Conor JP.
  • Second Lieutenant William Ronald Morley Crossman (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 20. He is the son of Major Lawrence Morley Crossman JP and grandson of Major General ‘Sir’ William Crossman KCMG MP.
  • Second Lieutenant Douglas Lennox Harvey (Lancers) is killed by a shell three days after his older brother was killed serving the same regiment. They are sons of the Reverend Edward Douglas Lennox Harvey JP DL and Vice Chairman of West Sussex County Council.
  • Battery Sergeant Major John Marks Gilbert(Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 42. He was the organizing secretary to Lord Roberts in the National Service League and had served in the Army for twenty-one years.
  • Private James Healy (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 35. His brother will die on service in October 1917.
  • Rifleman Vance Edmund Quicke (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the late Reverend A G D Quicke.
  • Drummer Charles Watts (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother George and Will also lose their lives in the War.
  • Private James Healy (Connaught Rangers) is killed at age 35. His brother will die on service at home in October 1917.

photo from ebay.com

Monday 1 November 1914 – We Lost 2,447

HMS Good Hope 1914

HMS Good Hope 1914

Shortly after noon Cradock’s squadron is whole again, HMS Glasgow having rejoined.  The admiral signals for his ships to spread out at 25-mile intervals and sweep north to look for the enemy. Graf von Spee hopes to cut off HMS Glasgow before she can rejoin Cradock, realizing she will have to leave Coronel because of the 24-hour rule. Cradock’s ships hear a great deal of wireless traffic between German supply ships and SMS Leipzig as Graf von Spee has been using Leipzig to transmit and receive all wireless messages between his squadron and its supply ships so as not to give away the presence of the other cruisers. This works as Cradock heads north to trap the Leipzig before she can rejoin Graf von Spee. This action leads to the dramatic situation this afternoon when each admiral believes he is taking his full squadron to cut off a single enemy light cruiser. In reality the two formations are steaming towards each other at a combined speed of almost forty knots. The admirals, friends since their days on the China Station during the Boxer rebellion, are about to meet again. By late afternoon Cradock’s squadron is still fanning out and moving in a northerly direction. They are about thirty miles from Arauco Bay, where the port of Coronel is situated. The flagship is the outermost ship, close to forty miles from HMS Glasgow.  At 16:30 the light cruiser’s lookouts sight smoke on the eastern horizon. Captain Luce gives orders to turn to starboard and increase speed.  A few minutes later HMS Monmouth and HMS Good Hope turn east in support of HMS Glasgow. Very soon the lookouts are able to recognize the hull and upper works of SMS Leipzig.  As HMS Glasgow gets closer the lookouts see more patches of smoke on the horizon. These are soon identified as coming from four funneled cruisers, and HMS Glasgow turns back and signals, ‘Enemy armored cruisers in sight’.  The Glasgow’s wireless operators can hear the high pitched scream in their earphones coming from German Telefunken sets trying to jam their transmissions.  They are not certain whether the flagship has received their signal. All three British ships head at full speed toward HMS Good Hope to warn Cradock that instead of trapping a single light cruiser, he is running into Graf von Spee’s entire squadron.

SMS Leipzig identifies HMS Glasgow at about the same time and follows her.  She soon sees the smoke from the rest of Cradock’s squadron.  Leipzig reverses her direction and signals the news to Admiral Graf von Spee. The German admiral realizes that he has found the British squadron, not a single light cruiser. He orders his ships to close up and form a line-heading southwest. Cradock orders his ships to change direction to southeast by east and form a line headed by HMS Good Hope, followed by HMS Monmouth, HMS Glasgow and HMS Otranto. They complete these maneuvers by 17:45. The two squadrons are now approximately 17 miles apart and the Germans soon change course to southwest by west. This brings the battle lines into rapidly converging paths.  At this point Cradock still has time to break off contact and move south to join forces with HMS Canopus, which is about three hundred miles away.  He realizes that if he does, Graf von Spee will not have enough time to catch him before nightfall.  He could then return the next morning, strengthened with HMS Canopus, to attack the German squadron, if he can find it. Even if it slipped by him, the Admiralty has assured him that Admiral Stoddart has a strong force waiting for the Germans in the Atlantic. Cradock has to know that he has little or no chance against Graf von Spee’s superior force, but his orders are, ‘Destroy enemy cruisers’.  If he cannot do this, he might at least damage them enough that they will have to seek internment in a Chilean port, or else face the next British squadron at a disadvantage.  One or two telling hits on the German large ships might weaken Graf von Spee’s squadron so much that it is no longer a serious threat.

Cradock resolves to attack as soon as possible, while he still has the sun behind him.  Sunset is due at about 18:30.  As the sun sets lower on the horizon, its rays will be directly in the German gunners eyes.  This will make it hard for them to see Cradock’s ships in the distance, while the German ships will be clearly outlined for the British gunners. On the other hand the advantage will swing in favor of the Germans when the sun goes below the horizon.  The British ships will be silhouetted against the suns afterglow, while their ships will be difficult to see in the waning daylight. With his superior speed Graf von Spee is able to keep the distance between the two lines at 15,000 yards, well outside of gunnery range. At 18:04 Cradock gives the order to turn 45 degrees to port.  He desperately wants to close the range before the sun begins to set, but Graf von Spee orders a similar turn and keeps his distance. At 18:18 Cradock signals HMS Canopus, ‘I am going to attack the enemy’, although the German ships are 3,000 yards beyond his range at the time. Captain Grant signals back that he still has two hundred and fifty miles to go before he can reach Cradock’s position.  Graf von Spee now allows the gap between the two lines to close steadily.  By 19:00, when the sun has just dipped below the horizon, it is down to 12,300 yards.  At 19:04 the German admiral gives the order to open fire. At this range Graf von Spee’s twelve 8.2-inch guns face Cradock’s two 9.2-inch guns. SMS Scharnhorst’s first salvo lands 500 yards short of HMS Good Hope and her second 500 yards beyond, according to an observer on HMS Glasgow.  With an awful inevitability the third salvo smashed into Good Hope.  One shell strikes her forward 9.2 inch turret, which erupts in flames that shoot higher than 100 feet into the air.  At one stroke the gun crew is wiped out before they have fired a single shot.  The turret is turned into a useless, twisted mass of steel.  Cradock’s heavy guns are now reduced to one.

 

At almost the same time, SMS Gneisenau opens fire on HMS Monmouth. She obtains a similar straddling pattern with her first three salvos. A shell from the third salvo hits the Monmouth’s forward gun turret and sets it ablaze. Within minutes Good Hope and Monmouth are suffering terrible punishment. The German gunners on each ship manage to fire a broadside of 6 shells every 20 seconds. Cradock’s flagship replies with her lone 9.2-inch gun.  HMS Monmouth can use half of her 6-inch guns, which are at the limit of their range. The ships are now heading into the teeth of a Force 6 wind. It is approaching gale conditions, and heavy seas are breaking over their bows and sweeping their forward decks. The British main deck guns cannot be used because of the danger of flooding the casemates. Also their range finders have become so encrusted with salt from the sea spray that they are useless.  No hits are registered on the two German cruisers. By this time SMS Leipzig has begun to engage Glasgow, which fires back with her 6-inch guns. SMS Dresden opens fire on HMS Otranto.  After one salvo, which falls short, the armed merchant cruiser pulls out of line toward the open sea. She is a large vulnerable target and can only help the Germans find an accurate range on the British line. Captain Edwards signals Cradock, suggesting that he keep the Otranto out of range.  The reply is not completed.  “There is danger; proceed at your utmost speed…” Edwards is not sure what the admiral intends, so he keeps on a course parallel to the squadron, just outside the Dresden’s range.

Ten minutes after Graf von Spee’s order to open fire, the battle of Coronel is as good as over. Cradock keeps closing range until it is down to 5,500 yards.  This only makes the firing by SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau more devastating, as they are now able to use their 5.9-inch guns also. By 19:30 the Good Hope has been hit between 30 and 40 times.  She is heavily damaged in the forward part of the ship, especially the bridge and foretop area where Cradock is directing his squadron. A hail of shells have smashed through her decks and started fires in the interior of the ship. In what may have been a last desperate attempt to inflict some damage on her tormentors, the crippled flagship slides out of line toward the enemy, some of its guns still firing.  Graf von Spee, fearing that she is going to fire torpedoes, orders his ships to turn away. According one of HMS Glasgow’s officers, ‘At 19:50, there was a terrible explosion between her main mast and her funnel, the flames reaching a height of over two hundred feet’.  The forward magazine must have been ignited by one of the many fires blazing on the ship. HMS Good Hope drifts off into the gloom and smoke and neither side sees her again. No one actually sees her sink, but she could not have stayed afloat for very long in her stricken condition, and must have gone down around 20:00. She takes the admiral with her into the icy depths, drowning all the men and boys who were still alive out of a crew of nine hundred. Because the battle is still raging, no one, British or German, can stop to look for possible survivors.

HMS Monmouth is in almost as much distress, having been hit in excess of thirty times.  The ship is ablaze and listing to port, although some of her six-inch guns are still firing sporadically.  For another twenty minutes SMS Gneisenau pounds her at short range with both 8.2 and 5.9 inch shells, until she yaws out of line to starboard, away from the German onslaught, sinking by the head. Captain Luce of HMS Glasgow cannot tell in the semi-darkness how bad her condition is and signals to Monmouth at 20:15, ‘Are you all right?’ Captain Brandt replies, ‘I want to get stern to sea.  I am making water badly forward’. Through a break in the smoke, Luce sees three ships approaching in the moonlight and signals to Brandt again, ‘Can you steer northwest?  The enemy are following us astern.’  There is no reply. When the Glasgow draws nearer, it is obvious that the Monmouth is in desperate straits. The captain of the Glasgow has no choice but to save his ship. The Good Hope and Monmouth are both finished as fighting ships, and the Otranto has fled to the west at 19:45 when her captain sees that the flagship is doomed. The Germans are left with the light cruiser as their only target. She has led a charmed life so far, with only four of her crew wounded, but now every time she fires her guns, the flashes light up the darkness and attract fire from all four German ships. Luce knows that just one 8.2-inch salvo from Scharnhorst or Gneisenau would blow his ship apart, and he gives the order to cease-fire. He has already taken five hits from the Leipzig and the Dresden, which has concentrated on the Glasgow after the Otranto pulled out of line. Although three of the shells fail to explode, one has caused a large hole just above the waterline. Luce can do nothing to help the Monmouth, so he gives the order to head west at full speed.  He wants to find the Otranto and heads south to warn the Canopus to turn back. Monmouth’s ordeal is not yet over. SMS Nurnberg finally catches up with the German squadron at 21:00 and comes upon the helpless cruiser, which she identifies by searchlight. The Monmouth is listing so badly that her guns can not be trained on the Nurnberg. The Monmouth’s White Ensign is still flying, so the captain of the Nurnberg gives the order to fire at point blank range, as she gives no sign of surrender. The battered ship finally rolls over on her beam-ends and disappears bow first beneath the waves. No one out of her crew of approximately seven hundred survives. Because of the high seas and the wind blowing at thirty knots, it would be dangerous and probably futile to lower boats to look for survivors in the darkness. The British later agree that the Germans could have done nothing to save any of the Monmouth’s crew who may have still been alive.

In the space of two hours the Royal Navy has suffered the loss of two heavy cruisers and nearly sixteen hundred men and boys. This is the first serious British naval defeat for one hundred years since the budding United States navy defeated a British fleet on Lake Champlain in 1814.

 Today’s losses both on land and sea include:

  •  A Rear Admiral
  • Sons of Admirals
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • A Naval Chaplain
  • Sons of Clergy
  • Son of the Artist William Lionel Wyllie
  • Son of a Judge of the High Court of Madras
  • Son of the 5th Baron Forester
  • The son of the 2nd Baron Dunleath
  • The son of the 1st Earl of Ancaster
  • Grandson of the 4th Earl of Radnor
  • Son-in-law of the 5th Earl of Strafford
  • Godson of the 1st Lord Iddlesleigh
  • Brother of a Baronet
  • Multiple sons of Baronets
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Multiple sons-in-law of Baronets
  • A Member of the Victorian Order (MVO)
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father will be killed later in the War
  • Multiple men who will have children born after their death
  • Twins killed together
  • Brothers killed together
  • Families that will lose two, three and four sons in this war and in the South African War
  • Winner of the 1909 Open Singles Championship at Salisbury Lawn Tennis Club
  • Scottish Rugby International
  • Member of the Foresters Cricket Club
  • Champion Boxer of the 13th Hussars
  • Son of a Writer to the Signet
  • Son of the former Editor of the Clevedon Mercury
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A Schoolmaster
  • An Aide-de-camp to the Viceroy of India from 1910-12
  • A Battalion commander
  • Great Grandson of a man who died from effects of wounds he received in the Peninsula War
  • Son of the Inspector General of Police in Berar

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Private Robert Theodore Morrison Wyllie (London Scottish) is killed on the Western Front at age 26. His brother will be killed in July 1916 and they are sons of William Lionel Wyllie artist in oils and water colors of maritime themes. Wyllie painted HMS Good Hope in 1901 the year it was launched.

 HMS Good Hope 1901HMS Good Hope 1901

 HMS Good Hope casualties include:

  •  Rear Admiral ‘Sir’ Christopher George CradockCB KCVO the 4th son of the late Christopher Cradock, Esquire.
  • Her Captain is Philip Francklin MVO who is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Baldwin W Walter the Baronet.
  • Commander Arthur Tudor Darley is killed at age 38. His son will be born 15th His brother will be killed commanding 4th Hussars in March 1918.
  • Lieutenant Commander Percival Van Straubenzeeis killed at age 33.  He is the son of Major General T Van Straubenzee.
  • Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Berkeley John Benyon is killed in the sinking of the ship at age 31. He leaves a widow with a son and a daughter who will be born on Christmas Day.
  • Lieutenant Commander Gerald Bruce Gaskell is killed. His brother will be killed in Africa in August 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Thomas Kynaston Gaskell rector of Longthorpe.
  • Captain Charles Burnett Partridge (Royal Marines Light Infantry) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed on the Western Front in two days.
  • Lieutenant Douglas Courtenay Tudorthe son of Admiral Tudor is killed at age 23.
  • Lieutenant John Maurice Haig Fisher is killed at age 22. He is the son of Brigadier General J Fisher CB.
  • Sub Lieutenant Francis John Anson Cotterkilled age 20. He is the son of Major General F G Cotter.
  • Fleet Surgeon James Joseph Walsh is killed at age 51. His son will be killed next August.
  • Paymaster George Bolster Owens is killed at age 29. He has twice been mentioned for exceptional services rendered while Secretary to Rear Admiral Cradock during the disturbances in Mexico.
  • Midshipman Geoffrey Marischal Dowdingis killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Dowding Rector of Tichborne.
  • Chaplain Arthur Henry John Pittis also killed.
  • Petty Officer James Walsh is killed. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Petty Officer Edwin Stewart Thomas Parsons is killed at age 28. His brother will die of illness on service in the Royal Navy in 1918.
  • Chief Engine Room Artificer Francs Thomas Cox drowns at age 44. His son will be killed in the Second World War.
  • Twin brothers Edward and Harry Turner are killed together while serving as Stokers First Class on HMS Good Hope. The 33-year olds have 8 children between them.
  • Able Seaman Frank Bateman is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Plumber Henry Russell is killed. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Stoker 1st Class Thomas Booth is killed at age 22. His brother will be lost on HMS Indefatigable at Jutland.

 HMS Monmouth casualties include:

  •  The Captain of HMS Monmouth, Frank Brandt, is killed. He is the son of a Judge of the High Court of Madras and is 42-years old.
  • Captain Geoffrey Maurice Ivan Herford(Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 32. He is the son of the Reverend Percy Michener Herford (Rector of Christ Church, Trinity Road, Leith and Canon of St Mary’s Cathedral, Edinburgh) who will lose another son in May 1915.
  • Commander Spencer Dundas Forbes is killed at age 40 sixteen days before his only child a son is born.
  • Lieutenant Commander ‘the Honorable’ Peter Robert Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughbyis killed at age 29.  He is the son of the 1st Earl of Ancaster and grandson of Brigadier General ‘Sir’ Walter Ross.
  • Lieutenant Wilfred Dixon Stirling is killed. He is the first of three sons of Brigadier General J W Stirling CB CMG DL to be killed in the Great War and dies at age 28.
  • Midshipman Christopher Musgraveage 15. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Richard Musgrave, the 12th
  • Midshipman John Richardson Le Geyet Pullenis also lost on HMS Monmouth at age 15. He is the son of the late Paymaster Rear Admiral W Pullen.
  • Midshipman George Watson Muirwho is also 15 is also killed.  He is the son of Andrew Gray Muir a writer to the Signet.
  • Midshipman Gervase Ronald Bruce is lost at age 15. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Hervey Juckes Lloyd Bruce 4th
  • Clerk Basil St Merryn Cardewis killed at age 19.  He is the son of the Reverend William Berry Cardew Vicar of Perlethorpe.
  • Chief Petty Officer Frederick Sercombe is killed at age 51. He is the son of the former Editor of the Clevedon Mercury.
  • Stoker 2nd class John Fairbankis killed at at age 20. His brother will be killed on the Western Front in May 1917.
  • Leading Boatman George Neal is killed. Three months later his four year old son will die of illness.
  • Sixteen year old signal boy Alfred Stanley Appleby is also killed. His older brother will die on service at home next November.
  • Plumber Reginald Arthur Pigott is killed at age 36. His brother will die of illness on service in September 1917.
  • Sailmaker Daniel Murphy is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed when submarine H10 is sunk in January 1918.
  • Leading Seaman John Cyril Lock is killed at age 24. His brother was killed last September.
  • Able Seaman John Walter Beer is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed next March.
  • Able Seaman Joseph Davis is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in May 1915.
  • Ordinary Seaman Charles Gaggbloom is lost at age 19. His father will be lost when the Steamship Lodaner is torpedoed in April 1918.

Captain Sidney Drury-Lowe takes HMS Chatham, making skillful use of the tide in the Rufiji River in East Africa moves as close to shore as possible to gain range on SMS Konigsberg. He fires several rounds from Chatham’s 6-inch guns but the shells land well short of the Somali and even farther short of Konigsberg which is anchored about a mile beyond Somali. Drury-Lowe orders some of Chatham’s tanks to be flooded to give the ship a five-degree list, to increase the elevation of the guns, but this still is not enough to reach the German ships.  As a result of this action Konigsberg moves another two miles upstream.

Two British destroyers HMS Scorpion (Captain Andrew B Cunningham) and HMS Wolverine (Captain Osmond J Prentice who will be killed on 28 April 1915 in the Dardanelles) attack a Turkish yacht, supposedly acting as a minelayer in Smyrna harbor.  She is set afire by her own crew and blows up.

A convoy of 36 ships sets out from Albany on the southwest tip of Australia transporting the New Zealand and Australian Expeditionary Forces. This 8-mile long convoy is protected by the heavy cruiser HMS Minotaur (Captain E B Kiddle) and HMAS Melbourne (Captain Mortimer Silver) and HMAS Sydney a matching pair of light cruisers and the Japanese battle cruiser Ibuki. From Freemantle on the southwest coast of Australia two more transports join the convoy, which heads for Colombo at a speed of 9½ knots.

The British lines are pierced at Neuve Chapelle, which the Germans reoccupy. By the light of a blazing fire at a windmill the Germans again attack Wytschaete Ridge.  For more than an hour they are held at bay but around 02:00 they rush again pressing home the attack with bayonets.  Sheer weight of numbers forces the London Scottish back over the road and the ridge is captured by the German forces.  The London Scottish retire and concentrate at Kemmel.

  •  Lieutenant John Charles Lancelot Farquharson (London Scottish) is killed at age 33. His brother will die of wounds in March 1918 commanding the 2nd Royal Marines Battalion.
  • Lance Corporal James Roy Hamilton (London Scottish) is killed at age 25. He is the son of James Hamilton JP.
  • Brothers and Privates Ashford and Leslie Francis Walford are killed together while serving in the London Scottish. Ashford dies at age 24 while Leslie is 23.
  • Private James Ross (London Scottish) is killed in action at age 34. He earned 5 caps as a Scottish Rugby International.
  • Private Albert Brian Colin Sarll (London Scottish) is killed at age 23. He is a schoolmaster at Gopsall Street LCC School and a member of Roehampton and Mitcham Football and Cricket Clubs.

A company of the Irish Guards is attacked by German Artillery where it is linked with the French on the fringe of Zillebeke Wood. In the course of the fighting every man, whether officer, orderly, batman or cook, who is able to fight, takes up a rifle and helps hold the line. Of the more than 400 men in the battalion more than 130 are killed, 88 of them when their trench is blown in by shell fire.

  • Captain ‘The Honorable’ Andrew Edward Somerset Mulholland(Irish Guards) is killed in this action at age 32. He is the son of the 2nd Baron Dunleath JP High Sheriff 1884 MP and the son-in-law of 5th Earl of Strafford and his only daughter will be born in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant Graham Macdowall Maitland (Irish Guards) is a rower who won the Silver Goblets at Henley Royal Regatta in 1900. He rowed for Cambridge in the Boat Race in 1901. He is killed at age 35. His brother was killed during the relief of Ladysmith in February 1900.

During the night near Le Gheer, Belgium, when his officer, the platoon sergeant and a number of men have been struck down, Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) takes command of the platoon and succeeds in holding the position.  For his actions this day and other days prior and later he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

At Tsing-tau the Bismarck forts are silenced. HMS Triumph assists the Japanese bombardment.

The British ambassador leaves Constantinople.

  • Major John Frederick Loder-Symonds (commanding 1st South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds received nine days prior at age 40. He is the son of Frederick Cleave Loder-Symonds JP and the first of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Vavasour the 3rd
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Robert Page (Lancashire Fusiliers attached #7 General Base Depot) dies on service in France at age 57. He is the son of the Reverend and Mrs. J Page.
  • Major (Brigade Major 3rd Division Royal Artillery) Francis Julian Audley Mackworth(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 38. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur William Mackworth, the 6th Baronet who had another son killed at Ladysmith 6 January 1900 in the South Africa War while another will die on service in November 1917.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Arthur Orlando Wolstan Cecil Weld-ForesterMVO (commanding 1st Grenadier Guards) dies of wounds at King Edward VII Hospital received 29 October at age 37. He is the son of the 5th Baron Forester, grandson of ‘Sir’ Willoughby Wolstan Dixie 8th Baronet and served at the Aide de Camp to Lord Hardinge Viceroy of India from 1910 to 1912.
  • Major Charles Napier North (Royal Engineers) is killed by a sniper at age 41. His great grandfather Captain Roger North fought in the Peninsula and died after his retirement from of the effects of wounds he received in that campaign. His daughter will be born next March.
  • Captain Hugh Seymour Blane (Lancers) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 29. He is the nephew of the 3rd Baronet Blane and brother of the 4th His brother will be killed at Jutland as a Royal Naval Commander on HMS Queen Mary.
  • Captain Gerard Gloag Sadler(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 33. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Samuel Sadler Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Hugh Stafford Northcote Wright (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 37. He is the son of Frederick Wright, Inspector General of Police in Berar and god son and name sake of the 1st Lord Iddlesleigh to whom he was related. He served in the South African War and is a tennis player who won the Open Singles Championship at Salisbury Lawn Tennis Club in 1909.
  • Captain Charles Paget O’Brien Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps) dies of wounds at age 33 while attempting to aid wounded. His two brothers are also killed in the service of King and Country the first in South Africa in January 1902 and the other in June 1917.
  • Captain Leo de Orellana Tollemache (Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the Reverend Ralph William Lyonel Tollmache-Tollemache JP Vicar of South Witham Lincolnshire who will lose another son in February 1917.
  • Captain Robert Giffard(Royal Field Artillery and ADC General Lomax) dies of wounds received the previous day by a shell burst at Divisional Headquarters at age 30.  He has two brothers who will be killed during the Great War and is a member of the Foresters Cricket Club.
  • Lieutenant William Beresford Gosset (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Honorable Beresford Smyly Gosset.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Theodore Clephane Wickham(Connaught Rangers) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend James Douglas Clephane Wickham.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Edward Lawson-Smith(Hussars) is killed at age 25 ten days after his younger brother has been killed.
  • Lieutenant William Hugh Holbech (Scots Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Walrond 1st
  • Lieutenant Jacob Edward Pleydell-Bouverie (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 27. He is the son of the ‘Honorable’ Duncombe Pleydell-Bouverie, the grandson of the 4th Earl of Radnor and son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Edward Hulse 5th
  • Lieutenant Arthur Gilliat Smith (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 26. He is related to ‘Sir’ Edmund Bainbridge KCB.
  • Lieutenant Maurice Aden Ley (East Kent Regiment attached Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Francis Ley the 1st
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Barnes(Lincolnshire Regiment) is killed in at age 20.  His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Drummer Frederick Whittingham (West Surrey Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23. His brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Private William Murray (Hussars) is killed at age 26. He is the champion boxer of the 13th

Photos from wikipedia.org

 

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.

Friday 30 October 1914 – We Lost 984

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton during his Boy Scout years

After an intense bombardment the Germans attack the British line held by the 9th Lancers at Messines.  They attack from St Yves to Wytchaete, capturing St Yves and gaining a footing in Messines village.  They are driven out by a counter-attack.

The village of Zandvoorde is held by the Life Guards numbering between three and four hundred men. It is bombarded for over an hour with heavy guns and then captured by the 39th German Division.  The entire front of the 3rd Cavalry Division is driven back to the Klein-Zillebeke Ridge.

Lieutenant G N Humphreys (Royal Flying Corps) shoots up an enemy convoy firing two hundred fifty rounds from his Lewis gun.  This is most likely the first ever ground attack by an aircraft.

The trail of the accused German spy Karl Lody begins in Britain.

Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood hoists his flag on the French destroyer L’Intrepide, the first time a French warship has acted as an English flagship without having first been captured.  L’Intrepide and L’Aventurier have joined the Second Light Squadron in the English Channel earlier in the month and have fought with that British squadron off the Belgian coast. Admiral Hood will be killed at the the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Good Hope and HMS Monmouth head north from Vallenar intent on a rendezvous with the other two members of the squadron after they complete their intelligence missions that they have been dispatched to perform the previous day.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  The original Boy Scout who was called Baden-Powell’s favorite
  • Brother-in-law of Douglas Haig
  • Grandson of an officer who served under Nelson at Copenhagen
  • Former Aide-de-camp to Field Marshall the Earl of Roberts
  • Former Aide-de-camp to the Governor General of Australia
  • Actor and member of the Green Room Club
  • The father of a child who will be born after his death
  • Son of the artist Ernest F Marillier
  • Great grandson of a 50-year Master at Harrow
  • Co-found and one time editor of the Yokahama (Japan) Press
  • Staff member of the Burlington Magazine
  • Champion boxer
  • The second son of the former Governor of the Windward Islands to be killed in two days
  • Multiple sons of Members of Parliament
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC)
  • A Roman Catholic Chaplain
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Grandson of clergy
  • Sons of Generals
  • Son-in-law of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Grandson of an Alderman
  • Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • Multiple families who lose one of two sons killed in the Great War
  • Two examples of families that will lose four sons in the Service of King and Country
  • A family who previously lost a son in the South African War
  • Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster
  • Son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne
  • Son of the 4th Earl of Yarborough
  • Son of the 2nd Earl of Durham
  • Son of the 1st Earl of Dudley
  • Son-in-law of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Erne
  • Son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian
  • Son-in-law of Baron Knaresborough
  • Grandson of the Duke of Abercorn
  • Grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Father of the 4th and 5th Dukes of Westminster

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Musgrave Cazenove Wroughton (Northamptonshire Yeomanry attached Lancers) dies of wounds received when he is shot by a sniper at age 23. He is known affectionately as ‘Bob’ by his friends and family. His father was master of the Pytchley Hunt and his uncle is Philip Wrought MP JP DL. A close family friend is ‘Sir’ Robert Baden-Powell, hero of the Siege of Mafeking during the South African War, and when ‘BP’ came up with the idea of organizing a camp for boys to teach them the principles of leadership and teamwork. He immediately turned to ‘Bob’ Wroughton to join him in his venture.

The camp was held on Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset, in August 1907 – and became an historic event. It was from that beginning that the World Wide Boy Scout Movement was to emerge. After the Camp, Baden Powell heaped praise on Bob’s leadership “he was a great help to me & quite set the example to other Patrol Leaders,” he wrote in a letter to Bob’s mother,  in which he also asked her for Bob’s suggestions as to how the whole Scouting movement could be established. A career in the army was a natural progression. He was commissioned in November 1913, and when war broke out he joined the 12th Lancers where again he received high praise for his courage. His Major wrote of him that he was an “excellent soldier and can turn his hand to anything”. After just a few weeks of the war, he had gained a gallantry honour, being Mentioned in Disptaches by the Commander in Chief, Sir John French. While on patrol in the Ypres salient in Belgium he is shot by a German sniper, at age 23.

A distraught Baden Powell writes to his parents soon after: “I have felt as nearly as possible like a second father to him, and to read the little testimonies to Bob’s character after all the hopes that I had formed of him, is the greatest possible comfort. I am so glad that he had made his mark already before he died.”

  •  Colonel Charles Arthur Cecil King (commanding 2nd Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 51. He served previously at the Nile 1885-6 Burma 1893 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Trevor Crispon (commanding 2nd Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 46. He served in the Nile campaign of 1898, Crete and South Africa.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Henry Osbert Samuel Cadogan (commanding 1st Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 46 attempting to save his mortally wounded adjutant Captain Alfred Edwin Claud Toke Doonerat Zandvoorde, Ypres at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Cadogan Rector of Wicken and he served in Hazara in 1891 and China in 1900. Dooner’s brother will be killed in July 1918.
  • Major (T/Lieutenant Colonel) John Murray Traill(commanding 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt when his battalion is shelled in the open.  His brother will be killed in a railway accident in November 1916.
  • Major George Geoffrey Prendergast Humphreys(Baluchi Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 41. He is the son of T W D Humphreys JP is the grandson of Major J Humphreys who served under Nelson at Copenhagen and had been an extra aide de camp to His Majesty King George in India. He is the son-in-law of Major General ‘Sir’ James Bell KCVO.
  • Major Hugh St Aubyn Wake MVO (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 44. He is the son of the late Admiral Charles Wake and he served on the North West Frontier 1897-9.
  • Major Eustance Henry Egremont AbadieDSO (Lancers) is killed at age 37. He has had two brothers die in the King’s service prior to the Great War and a fourth brother will be killed in action in 1917 and they are sons of Major General Henry Richard Abadie. One brother was killed in the South African War while the second die of fever during on service in February 1904.
  • Major ‘Lord’ Charles George Francis Mercer Nairne Petty-FitzMauriceMVO (Dragoons attached 6th Cavalry Brigade) is killed at age 40. He is a holder of the South African Medal, the Legion of Honor, Order of Military Merit, Order of the Crown, the Order of the Iron Crown Class II, Equerry-in-Ordinary to King George V when he was Prince of Wales 1909-1910 and Equerry to his Majesty 1910-1914. He had sometimes been the Aide de Camp to Field Marshall Earl Roberts and is the son of the 5th Marquess of Lansdowne. He is the grandson of the Duke of Abercorn KG and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Minto.
  • Captain ‘Lord’ Hugh William Grosvenor(Life Guards) dies of wounds at age 30.  He is the son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and is married to Lady Mabel Crichton, daughter of John Crichton, 4th Earl Erne and his wife, the former Lady Florence Cole, daughter of William Cole 3rd Earl of Enniskillen.  He is the commander of ‘C’ Squadron 1st Life Guards. His sons will become the 4th and 5th Duke of Westminster.
  • Captain Alexander Moore Vandeleur(Life Guards) the son-in-law of the 1st Baron Knaresborough is killed at age 30 when his squadron is surrounded and scorning surrender fights to the last and are wiped out in hand to hand fighting.
  • Captain Frank Harrison Saker (Connaught Rangers) is killed in action. He worked as an actor before he joined the army in 1904 and was a member of the Green Room Club. His brother will be killed on the second day of the Gallipoli landing next year.
  • Captain Alfred James Woodhouse(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 28. He is one of four brothers who give their life in the service of the King. The first was killed in the South African War and the final two will be killed in 1915. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend A C Woodhouse Rector of Winterborn Monckton Dorset and gained the Sword of Honour at Woolwich.
  • Captain Otho Claude Skipwith Gilliat (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 31. He played cricket at Eton in 1899 and was a member of the Marylebone Cricket Club and a veteran of the South Afria War.
  • Captain and Adjutant Douglas Byres Davidson (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed late next month and they are grandson of General John Clarke.
  • Captain Ernest Reginald Hayes-Sadler (Gurka Rifles) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed two days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ John Hayes Sadler KCMG CB late Governor of the Windward Islands.
  • Captain Ian Bouverie Maxwell (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 24. He is the nephew of Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ Ronald Maxwell KCB and he is a member of the staff of the “Burlington Magazine”.
  • Captain Barry Hartwell (Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 33. He served in the Tibet Expedition of 1903 and was awarded the Silver Medal of St John of Jerusalem for life saving in the earthquake at Dharmsala in 1905. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Brodrick Hartwell 2nd Baronet and the great grandson of General Frederick Young.
  • Captain Reginald Wickham Harland(Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend Albert Augustus Harland of Harefield Vicarge Middlesex. His brother was killed in the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Charles Sackville Pelham ‘Lord Worsley’ (Royal Horse Guards) Baron Worsley is killed in action at age 27 at Zandvoorde. He is the son of the 4th Earl and Countess of Yarborough and son-in-law of the 3rd Baron Vivian his other daughter married Douglas Haig. An order to withdraw does not reach the machine gun section he is in charge of, or some of the other soldiers. They are cut off, and Lord Worsley is first listed as ‘Missing’, and is officially recorded as killed early in 1915. However, Worsley’s body had been found and buried by the Germans, and a plan of where he had been buried is later passed on via Diplomatic channels from the Germans. In December 1918 his grave will be located by a British Officer using the plans, with the upright wooden portion of the cross which had been placed there by the Germans still standing. A replacement wooden cross will be put there in January 1919, and Lord Worsley’s widow later purchases the land.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Dennis Harding (Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day at age 22. He is the grandson of Major General Worthy Bennett (Royal Marine Light Infantry).
  • Lieutenant Philip Francis Payne-Gallwey(Lancers, Indian Army) is killed at age 21.  He is the son of the Reverend Francis Henry Payne-Gallwey Rector of Sessay Thirsk, cousin of ‘Sir’ Ralph Payne Gallwey and nephew of General A Lowry Cole CB DSO.
  • Lieutenant David Rex Wilson (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is the grandson of Alderman Jonathan Angus.
  • Lieutenant John Charles Close-Brooks (Life Guards) is killed at age 38. He is the son in law of Major General Beresford Lovett and JP for Cheshire. His brother will be killed in Mesoptamia in January 1917.
  • Lieutenant Frank Lennox Harvey (Lancers) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Edward Douglas Lennox Harvey JP DL Vice Chairman of West Sussex County Council. His brother will be killed in three days serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Gerald Ernest Francis WardMVO (Life Guards) a son of the 1st Earl of Dudley is killed in at age 36. He played cricket for the Marylebone Cricket Club and is a veteran of the South African War. His body will not be found.
  • Lieutenant John Arnold St C Anstruther(Dragoon Guards attached Life Guards) is killed at age 25.  He is the only son of the late Colonel commanding 2nd Life Guards and a former Aide de Camp to the Governor General of Australia.
  • Lieutenant Nigel Walter Henry Legge-Bourke(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 24. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ ‘Sir’ Harry Legge-Bourke GCVO grandson of the 5th Earl of Dartmouth and is married to the youngest daughter of the 1st and Last Marquess of Lincolnshire KG. His only child will be born on 16 May 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Francis Lambton(Royal Horse Guards) is killed at age 43.  He is the son of the 2nd Earl and Countess of Durham.
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Ludovic Carew(Hussars) is killed at age 19.  He is the son of Charles Carew a Member of Parliament and the grandson of the Reverend Robert Baker Carew.
  • Second Lieutenant Joseph Frain Webster(Black Watch attached Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Francis Webster.
  • Second Lieutenant Rowland Le Belward Egerton (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in October 1918 and they are sons of ‘Sir’ Philip Henry Brian Grey-Egerton 12th
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick Charles Jennens Marillier (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 26. He is the son of the artist Ernest F Marillier and great grandson of J F Marillier for 50 years the Master at Harrow.
  • Second Lieutenant Arthur Herbert Posden Burn (Dragoons) is killed at age 22. He is the son of Colonel Charles Rosdew Burn MP ADC to the King 1st Baronet who will later change his name to Forbes Leith and grandson of Lord Leith of Fyvie.
  • Second Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant Frederick Charles Hatton (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed with his Colonel at age 36. He is the part founder and one time editor of the Yokohama (Japan) Press. He fought in the South African War where he was wounded at Driefontein. He is related to ‘Sir’ Westby Brook Percival KCMG late Agent General for New Zealand. His wife is the niece of Alderman Thewlis late Lord Mayor of Manchester.
  • Sergeant Robert Henry Vanson age 28 and his brother Corporal Archibald John Vanson age 26 are killed together while serving in the Dragoons.
  • Corporal of Horse Herbert William Dawes (Life Guards) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private James Kane (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 22. He is a champion boxer at his weight.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla is wrecked when she strikes submerged rocks close to the Nab, Whitby, in a southeast easterly gale.  Out of two hundred twenty-nine on board, eighty-three are lost. The Whitby, Upgang and Tynermouth lifeboats pick up the survivors.

 HMHS Rohilla casualties include:

  • Roman Catholic Chaplain the Reverend Robert Basil Gwydir lost at age 47.
  • Brothers and Junior Reserve Attendants Thomas and Walter Horsfield are also killed. Thomas is described as an enthusiastic worker in the Salvation Army and drowns at age 47 while 35 year old Walter served twice in the South African War with General Hospitals.