Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Ypres

Monday 3 May 1915 – We Lost 945

At the second battle of Ypres, the British withdrawal to a new line of defense is completed.  The Germans are again driven back.

Submarine E14 sinks a Turkish gunboat in the Sea of Marmora.

Nigerians led by Lieutenant Colonel Haywood capture Ndupe Cameroon.

For the third night in a row Turkish forces attack the Allies on Gallipoli, only to be beaten off with heavy casualties.

An advertisement in American newspapers states that ships flying the British flag are liable to destruction in the war zones.

Today’s losses include:

  • A football player for Ewell
  • Brothers killed on the same day serving in different units
  • A man whose twin brother will be killed later in the Great War
  • The son of the High Sheriff for County Denbigh
  • Multiple families that will lose a second son in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will two additional sons in the Great War
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Captain Walter Hayes Pickering Richards (Royal Marines) is killed on Gallipoli at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend Robert Edward Richards Rector of Little Heaton.
  • Captain Arthur Vivian Spedding (Otago Infantry) is killed on Pope’s Hill during the attack on Baby 700 at age 23. His brother will be killed in October 1916.
  • Captain Edward Grahame Mylne (Irish Guards) is killed at age 32. He is the son of Bishop Louis George Mylne Bishop of Bombay and his brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Lieutenant Lionel James Ormrod (Lancers) dies at home at age 32. He is the first of three sons of Major Oliver Ormrod JP and High Sheriff for County Denbigh to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Alexander David Deane (Portsmouth Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Marine Light Infantry) is killed at age 22. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Thomas and Lady Deane.
  • Lieutenant Hugh Liddon Richards (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Right Reverend Isaac Richards the Bishop of Dunedin. His brother will die of wounds in Egypt in twenty-days.
  • Lieutenant Sydney Giffard (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 26 on Gallipoli. He has two brothers who will be killed during the Great War.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Gordon Livingstone (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 34 in the Second Battle of Ypres. He is the youngest son of the late Henry Darley Livingston JP of Belclare Westport, Co. Mayo. Lieutenant Livingstone was in the Argentine when the War broke out and returned to England in December 1914, in order to join the Army. He was given a Commission in the Royal Field Artillery, Lahore Division Indian Expeditionary Force in the following month, and after short training at Exeter left for France in April 1915.
  • Sergeant Arthur Frederick Varcoe (Otago Infantry) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in 5 days.
  • Lance Sergeant Walter John Frampton (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds in Alexandria. He is the son of the Reverend James Frampton.
  • Lance Corporal John Latham Hampton (London Regiment) is killed at age 38. He played football for Ewell Football Club and has a brother who will die of wounds in 11 days.
  • Private George Albert Isted (Hampshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in July next year.
  • Private (Signalller) Hugh M Dickson (Black Watch) is killed at Arras at age 24. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Able Seaman Walter Emanuel De La Mare (Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Royal Naval Division) is killed in action at age 18. His younger brother will be killed in 1918 at age 20. Private Alfred Wilkins (Australian Infantry) becomes the first of four brothers to lose their lives in the Great War when he is killed on Gallipoli at age 33.
  • Brothers and Privates Benjamin Thomas age 22 and William John Ollard age 30 are killed on the same day while serving with two different units. Benjamin is killed with Middlesex Regiment and William with the Royal Fusiliers.  Both are commemorated on the Ypres Memorial.
  • Private Cecil Hamilton Kirkwell Fitzmaurice (Army Service Corps) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March 1918.
  • Private William George Bartleman (Royal Scots) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private Arthur Hoper (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private David Shaw Baillie (Auckland Regiment) is killed at age 21. His twin brother will be killed in July 1916.
  • Rifleman George Patrick Northam (London Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1917.

Sunday 2 May 1915 – We Lost 1,344

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

A German attack is repulsed near St Julien.

Turkish forces at Gallipoli attack, while British/Franco forces counter attack.  The British forces fail in an attack at Gaba Tepe. Sergeant N Roberts (Royal Marines) is awarded the DSM during operations south of Achi Baba displaying coolness and gallantry in carrying men out of fire. The Turkish Minister of War sends British and French subjects into the danger zone at Gallipoli.  Kite balloon ship Manica directs naval gunfire towards batteries at Sin that records three direct hits.  Australians take part in the Battle of Baby 700.

The “Chessboard” is attacked by three Australian Battalions, the Otago Infantry Regiment and two battalions of Royal Marines; and on the same day a Turkish Observation Post at Lala Baba is destroyed by New Zealanders. The Canterbury Battalion, raid Nibrunesi Point, at Salt Lake, Suvla Bay capturing fifteen Turks and destroying Turkish artillery observers’ telephone wires and huts.

Private John Lynn (Lancashire Fusiliers) is awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near Ypres.  When the Germans are advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas Private Lynn, although almost overcome by the deadly fumes, handles his machine gun with very great effect against the enemy, and when he cannot see them he moves his gun to higher up on the parapet, which enabled him to bring even more effective fire to bear, and eventually checks any further advance.  The great courage displayed by this soldier has a fine effect on his comrades in the very trying circumstances.  He dies the following day from the effects of gas poisoning.

Union forces occupy Otjimbingwe, German South West Africa.

A British detachment at Chahbar, on the Gulf of Oman, commanded by Lieutenant C. M. Maltby, 95th Russell’s Infantry successfully repulses a tribal attack.

Today’s losses include:

  • The man who inspired John McCrae to compose the poem In Flanders Fields
  • A brother of future Victoria Cross winner James Thomas Byford McCudden
  • The grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • A cousin of the President of Magdalen College, Oxford
  • A father and son killed together
  • A scout master
  • A school master
  • A divinity student
  • The son of a Brigadier General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • A family that will lose three sons

Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Early on this morning Lieutenants Owen Carley Frederic Hague and Alexis Hannum Helmer (Canadian Field Artillery) leave their position to check on a battery whose personnel have positioned themselves on the bank of the Yser Canal near St. Julien close to the France-Belgium border. They have only gone a few yards when a six inch, high explosive canon shell burst killing them both instantly. Lieutenant Helmer is killed at age 22. He is the son of Brigadier General Richard Alexis Helmer. His death so affects John McCrae one of Alexis’ instructors at McGill University in Montreal that the next day he will vent his anguish by composing the poem In Flanders Field. Lieutenant Hague (Canadian Field Artillery) is killed at age 26. He is the son of Frederick Hague KC.
  • Lieutenant Richard Ewen Egglestone (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Sidney Pelham Burn (Gordon Highlanders) is killed in action at age 19. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are sons of the late Reverend William Pelham Burn (Archdeacon of Norfolk) and is planning to take Holy Orders having matriculated for New College, Oxford.
  • Lieutenant John Spencer Ruscombe Anstice (Royal Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘Sir’ Arthur Anstice KCB of Dymock, Glos. (Mentioned in Despatches) and is buried at Redoubt Cemetery.
  • Lieutenant Bernard Henry Herford (Royal Marines) a schoolmaster is dies of wounds at age 29 on a hospital ship off Gallipoli received 28th His brother was killed on HMS Monmouth in November 1914. They are sons of Percy Michener Heford (Canon of St Mary’s Cathedral and Rector of Christ Church, both in Edinburgh.
  • Lieutenant Charles Herbert George Martin (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the grandson of Charles Herbert James, for some years M.P. for Merthyr Tydfil and was first cousin of the President of Magdalen College.
  • Lieutenant Malcolm Drury Campbell (Howe Battalion, Royal Naval Division Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) is killed in action on Gallipoli at age 24. He is the son of Herbert Ernest Campbell (Chancellor of Carlisle).  While leading his company he is hit in the head by a machine gun bullet.
  • Second Lieutenant Ernest Edward Glossop (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 19. He is the son of Canon George Henry Pownall Glossop.
  • Second Lieutenant Charles Reginald Fausset (Royal Irish Regiment) is killed on the Western Front at age 36. He is the son of the late Reverend Charles Fausset and was Captain of the Trinity College Cricket XI and the mile and quarter-mile champion of Ireland.
  • Sergeant William McCudden (Royal Flying Corps) dies of injuries received in a flying accident at home at age 24. He is giving a lesson at Gosport, near Portsmouth, when a carburetor floods, causing his Bleriot plane to lurch. He tries to clear the problem by going into a nose dive, but crashes. His two brothers will be killed in the Royal Flying Corps and Air Force in 1918 including James Thomas Byford McCudden winner of the Victoria Cross.
  • Sergeant William Pritchard age 42 and his son Private Reginald J Pritchard age 19 are killed in action together while serving in the Monmouthshire Regiment.
  • Corporal Alban Shepherd Munn (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. He is the son of the Reverend Joseph Shepherd Munn.
  • Lance Corporal John Henry Rose (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 24 six weeks before his younger brother will be killed serving in the same Regiment.
  • Lance Corporal John Henry Wilton (Monmouthshire Regiment) a scout master is killed at age 22.
  • Private Claude Otto Strachey (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Private Robert Reid Fraser (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 22. His brother will be killed in August 1916.
  • Private Percy Lionel Gent (Australian Infantry) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Lewis George Pescod (Australian Infantry) is killed in action at age 34. His brother will be killed in November also serving on Gallipoli.
  • Private Isaac Charles Gosset (Otago Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Charles Hilgrove Gosset Archdeacon of Christchurch New Zealand.
  • Private Eric James Victor Davis (Australian Infantry) is killed. His brother will be killed in exactly one week.
  • Rifleman Harold David Vallentine (London Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private Henry Charles Toombs (Monmouthshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. His brother died in London on active service less than one month ago.
  • Private James Henry Royle (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. His brother will be killed in April 1918.
  • Private Peter Binks Pratt (Yorkshire Regiment) is killed.  His brother will be killed in October.

Wednesday 28 April 1915 – We Lost 686

John Lionel Calvert Booth

In the second battle of Ypres the German offensive is stopped.

Hunter-Weston attacks the Turkish lines in front of Krithia, under Achi, with the 29th Division on the left (87th Brigade left, 88th right, 86th in reserve), and the French 1st Division on the right, with the 2nd South Wales Borderers on the French right.  Although by mid-morning, with the aid of naval gunfire from Queen Elizabeth, the British actually reach the slopes of Achi Baba, the 29th having been so badly mauled in the landings that a spirited Turkish counter attack, drives them off.  Even the first British objective, the village of Krithia, only four miles from the landing beaches, proves an impossible objective: of the 14,000 men who attack this day, 3,000 are killed or wounded. The converted tramp steamer Manica, being used as the base for a Kite Balloon spotter on Gallipoli, directs naval fire that silences two field batteries while destroying several guns.

There are skirmishes east of the Suez Canal.

A German force is defeated at Gibeon, German South West Africa.

The two monitors, Severn and Mersey, are dispatched from Malta, where they have been sent in anticipation of being used in the Dardanelles campaign, and hauled by tugs 5,000 miles through the Suez Canal, into the Red Sea, and south along the African coast.

Today’s losses include:

  • An artist and war correspondent
  • A man whose two sons will be killed in the Second World War
  • A man whose father will be killed later in the Great War
  • A man whose son will be killed later in the Great War
  • A Battalion Commander
  • The brother of a General
  • The son of a General
  • The brother of a Baronet
  • The son of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a member of the clergy
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

  •  Lieutenant John Lionel Calvert Booth (Australian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 38. He is a talented artist who, as a child, illustrated and wrote stories.  He was educated at Forest School, Epping Forest Essex and went on to become a war correspondent for, among others, Punch. In the Boer War, a photo exists of him on-board a ship en-route to South Africa, along with a young Winston Churchill.  He illustrated a number of publications and had a few books of his own published – he loved to draw hunting scenes, which had formed a large part of his childhood, as both his parents were keen hunters. He also had a very keen sense of humor which shines through in both his writing and illustrations.  He married Margaret ‘Daisy’ Dockerill also a talented artist in 1905, and they had two sons John Calvert and Arthur Frank, both of whom will to die in The Second World War. Booth covered the Balkans conflict, for Punch, from 1912 to 1913, after which he and his family immigrated to Western Australia in 1914. He had only been there for 9 months when The First World War broke out and he enlisted in the Australian Infantry. Among his possessions listed as being returned to his wife was his beloved banjo which went everywhere with him.
  •  Colonel Augustus David Geddes (commanding 2nd East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 48. His brother will die on service after the Armistice as a Brigadier General.
  • Major George Cecil Brooke (Border Regiment) is killed in action at age 44. He is the son of the late Brigadier General Henry Brooke. He was educated at Wellington College and the Royal Military College at Sandhurst. He served in the Wazirstan Expedition of 1895, the Malakand Expedition 1897-8, the Siege of Tientsin and the relief of Peking during the Boxer Rebellion and is qualified as a Chinese Interpreter.
  • Major Aeneas Charles Perkins (Pathans) is killed at age 43. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Aeneas Perkins KCB.
  • Captain William Duncan Hepburn (Seaforth Highlanders attached Royal Scots) is killed on Gallipoli. His brother was killed in November 1914.
  • Captain Claude Apsinall Wythes (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 29. He is the son of Francis Aspinall JP.
  • Captain Alexander Murray McGregor Bell (Scots Fusiliers) dies of wounds in London received last month. His brother will be killed in April 1917.
  • Captain Alan Arthur Fowler (Cameron Highlanders) is killed by a shell at age 28. His only brother the 3rd Baronet will be killed in June of this year and they are the grandsons of ‘Sir’ John Fowler engineer of the Forth Bridge and ‘Sir” Edward Clive Bayley KCSI. Captain Fowler married Alice Mary youngest daughter of ‘Sir’ Charles Bayley GCIE Lieutenant Governor of Bihar and Orissa. Captain Fowler received his Commission in 1907, joining his battalion in South Africa and accompanying it to China and India. He returned to England in November 1914 and three weeks later left with his Regiment for France. At this time he acted as Transport Officer and was afterwards on the Staff of his Brigadier. By the middle of April the greater portion of his brother-officers have been killed, wounded, or invalided home, and when his battalion is sent to the relief of other troops on Hill 60, he is in command of B Company, which occupied the front trench on the lip of a huge crater 40 feet deep, formed by the explosion of a mine.
  • Sub Lieutenant Jeffreys Ivor Jones-Parry (HMS Wolverine, Royal Naval Reserve) is killed in action at sea. His father will be killed as a Major in Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in July.
  • Second Lieutenant James Cartmell Dennison Brown (Durham Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Frank and Lady Brown.
  • Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard Dale (HMS Canopus) dies of wounds during the battle of Krithia at age 49. His son will be killed in March 1916.
  • Corporal Benjamin Anderson (Seaforth Highlanders) a veteran of the South Africa War is killed. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Sergeant Cedric Hasledine Collisson (British Columbia Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend Sydney Garbertt Collisson Vicar of Bradford.
  • Private Anthony Byrne (Leinster Regiment) is killed in action two days after his brother was also killed.
  • Private George Litchfield (East Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed on HMS Tartar in June 1917.
  • Private James McIntosh (Central Ontario Regiment) dies of wounds at age 25. His brother will be killed in the same regiment in June 1916.
  • Private Peter Christensen (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. His brother will also be killed in the Great War.

Saturday 24 April 1915 – We Lost 969

Frederick William Hall VC

Frederick William Hall VC

German forces capture St Julien in the second battle of Ypres. The third Canadian brigade is withdrawn.  6th Squadron’s aerodrome at Poperinghe is shelled during the Germans advance and the squadron withdraws to Abeele.

This evening General Smith-Dorrien, who has been on the Western front since the battle of Mons eight months earlier, drives to ‘Sir’ John French’s headquarters to urge him not to order further attacks. His mission is in vain.

There is fighting around Kilimanjaro in German East Africa.

Company Sergeant Major Frederick William Hall (Manitoba Rifles) is awarded the Victoria Cross in the neighborhood of Ypres. When hearing a wounded man who is lying some fifteen yards from the trench calling for help, CSM Hall endeavors to reach him in the face of a very heavy enfilade fire which is being poured in by the enemy. The first attempt fails, and an NCO and private soldier who are attempting to give assistance are both wounded. CSM Hall then makes a second attempt and is in the act of lifting up the wounded man to bring him in when he is mortally wounded in the head. The man he is attempting to save is also killed.

During a German attack on the Ypres salient Lieutenant Edward Donald Bellew (British Columbia Regiment), as Battalion Machine Gun Officer, has two guns in action on the high ground overlooking Keerselaere. The enemy attacks in full force this morning against the front and right flank of the Battalion – the latter being exposed owing to a gap in the line. The right Company is soon put out of action, but the advance is temporarily stayed by Captain Bellew, who has sighted his guns on the left of the right Company.  Reinforcements are sent forward but they in turn are surrounded and destroyed.  With the enemy in strength less than 100 yards from him, with no further assistance in sight, and with his rear threatened, Captain Bellew and Sergeant Hugh Nisbet Peerless DCM, each operating a gun, decide to stay where they are and fight it out. Sergeant Peerless is killed at age 30 and Captain Bellew is wounded and falls. Nevertheless, he gets up and maintains his fire until ammunition fails and the enemy rushes the position. Captain Bellew then seizes a rifle, smashes his machine gun and fighting to the last he is finally taken prisoner. For his efforts Captain Bellew will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

A naval armoured car unit under Lieutenant Commander Whittall arrives at Trekkopjes.

AE2 attempts the passage of the Dardanelles Straits but fails due to a broken rudder shaft.

Today’s losses include:

  • A who will die of wounds while performing deeds for which he will be awarded the Victoria Cross
  • Two battalion commanders
  • Great great uncle of British Prime Minister David Cameron
  • A cousin of Field Marshall Sir John French
  • 1913 Champion Rifle Shot of North America
  • A noted yachtsman, rugby player and amateur boxer
  • Son of a Brigadier General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Football player for Bradford City and Leeds United
  • A son of a family that will lose four sons in the Great War
  • A son of a family that will lose three sons in the Great War
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the Great War
  • A man whose step-father was killed last year
  • A father and son killed together
  • Two brothers killed together
  • The brother a man who will be awarded the Victoria and killed shortly thereafter in the Second World War
  • An Isle of Wight Constable

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Lieutenant Colonel George Hubert Shaw (commanding 4th East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 50.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Frederick Richard Hart-McHarg (commanding British Columbia Regiment) is killed at age 46. He was the 1913 Champion Rifle Shot of North America.
  • Captain John Geddes (Canadian Scottish) is killed at age 37. He is the great great uncle of British Prime Minister David Cameron.
  • Captain Charles Alexander Antrobus (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed in September.
  • Lieutenant John Gibson Kenworthy (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Rowland George Prichard (Suffolk Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will die of wounds at home in August and they are sons of the Reverend Charles Collwyn Prichard Rector of Alresford.
  • Lieutenant Wilfrid Fitzpatrick (Saskatchewan Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend Henry Fitzpatrick Chaplain of the St George’s Hyderabad.
  • Lieutenant William Dummer Powell Jarvis (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 23. He is a noted yachtsman, rugby football player and amateur boxer.
  • Lieutenant Philip Warden Bradley (Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Brigadier General C E Bradley CB.
  • Lieutenant Herbert Assheton Bromley (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 36. He is the son of the late 5th Baronet ‘Sir’ Harry Bromley.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Kirk (Lancashire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. He played for the Bradford City and Leeds United Football Clubs.
  • Corporal William Hugh Twynam (British Columbia Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is the second of four brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Lance Corporal Sidney Oliver age 50 and his son Private William Evelyn Oliver age 21 (British Columbia Regiment) are killed together. The senior Oliver’s second son will be killed in April 1917.
  • Private George Munns (Suffolk Regiment) is killed in action at age 30. His brother will die of wounds in September 1918.
  • Private Hugh Galfried Duplix Kemp (Eastern Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a cousin of ‘Sir’ John French.
  • Private Percy Noel Rudd (Suffolk Regiment) is killed. His step-father was killed in August 1914.
  • Private Robert McKendrick (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds in less than a week.
  • Private Basil Edward Clarke (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action. He is the son of the Reverend James Sanderson Clarke Vicar of Goudhurst who will lose another a son in October.
  • Private George William English (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend William Henry English Rector of Saskatchewan.
  • Private Cuthbert Richard Page Fothergill (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the Reverend Matthew Monkhouse Fothergill.
  • Private Frank Bussell (Highlanders of Canada) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Private Harington Wilbraham-Taylor (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 20. His brother will be killed in September 1916.
  • Brothers and Privates J & J Ross (British Columbia Regiment) are killed together.
  • Private John Francklyn Peters (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 22. His two brothers will be killed in the service of their King and Country, the first next year and the second days after performing acts that will win him the Victoria Cross in November 1942.
  • Acting Bombardier Fred Burton (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 30. He is an Isle of Wight constable.
  • Private Henry Beaumont (British Columbia Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. His brother will be killed in April 1918.

Friday 23 April 1915 – We Lost 877

Rupert Chawner Brooke

Rupert Chawner Brooke

Sub Lieutenant Rupert Chawner Brooke (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) the poet dies of sunstroke at age 27 just before the landing on Gallipoli.  Brooke was born into a well to do, academic family, his father a housemaster at Rugby School, where Rupert was educated before going on the King’s College, Cambridge in 1913.  He was a good student and athlete.  He numbered among his friends E M Forster, Maynard Keynes, Virginia Woolf, and Edward Thomas. He was made a Sub Lieutenant September last year, accomplanied the Antwerp Expedition in October and sailed with the British Mediteranean Expeditionary Force on 28 February. His war petry appears in the volume entitled 1914 and other poems and in his Collected Poems. Brooke’s reputation, aside from the myth of the fallen ‘golden warrior’ that his friends set about creating almost immediately after his death rests on the five war sonnets of 1914.

The German attack on the allied lines at Ypres begun the previous day is resumed, however, the Germans find Canadians filling the gap in the line left by the gassed Algerians during the preceding afternoon.  Resistance is stiff, and, in classic Western front style, the attack bogs down with no further significant gains though the Germans take several hamlets.

The British government declares a blockade of Cameroon.

Lance Corporal Frederick Fisher (Highlanders of Canada) is awarded the Victoria Cross in the neighborhood of St Julian.  He goes forward with the machine gun which he is in charge of, under heavy fire and most gallantly assists in covering the retreat of a battery, losing four men of his team.  Later, after obtaining four more men, he goes forward again to the firing line and is himself killed while bringing his machine gun into action under very heavy fire, in order to cover the advance of supports. He is the first Canadian born soldier to win the Victoria Cross serving in the Canadian Army.

Today’s losses include:

  • Two Great War Poets
  • The grandson of naturalist Charles Darwin
  • The winner of the 1914 Boston Marathon
  • The great great grandson of Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant who sided with the English during the American Revolution
  • The father of a World War II Victoria Cross winner and future Canadian Member of Parliament
  • The son of a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario who will be killed with his wife when RMS Lusitania will be sunk next month
  • Captain of the British Columbian Rugby team
  • Three battalion commanders
  • The son of a Baronet
  • The son-in-law of the 1st Lord Farrer
  • The son of a Major General
  • The son of a Surgeon General
  • Multiple sons of members of the clergy
  • The grandson of a member of the clergy
  • An Olympic Marathon runner
  • Multiple families that will lose one of three sons
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons in the war
  • An example of two brothers killed together
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose twin brother will be killed later in the war

Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Percival Dearman Birchall (Royal Fusiliers commanding 4th Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 38. His brother will die of wounds in August 1916.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Ernest William Rokeby Stephenson (commanding 3rd Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 46. He is the son of the Reverend W Stephenson.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arthur George Burt (commanding 1st York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 50.
  • Captain Walter Leslie Lockhart Gordon (Eastern Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Captain Bertie Noel Lumsden (Seaforth Highlanders) is killed at age 29. He is the middle of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.
  • Captain Cecil Mack Merritt (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 38 when during a charge he is hit in the leg after which he stands up to shoot and is himself shot in the head. He is the father of Lieutenant Colonel Charles Cecil Ingersoll Merritt Victoria Cross winner in the Second World War and Member of the Canadian Parliament from 1945 to 1949.
  • Captain Gilbert Davidson Pitt Eykyn (Royal Scots attached Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 34. He is the son of the late Reverend Pitt Eykyn.
  • Captain George Crowther Ryerson (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed in action at age 32. He is the son of Major General George Stirling Ryerson Memaber of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario for Toronto from 1893-98 and his wife Mary Crowther Ryerson who will be killed in two weeks in the sinking of RMS Lusitania.
  • Lieutenant Robert William Sterling (Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed in action at Ypres after holding a length of trench all day with fifteen men. He gained the classical scholarship to Pembroke College, Oxford in 1912 and won the 1914 Newdigate Prize with his poem “The Burial of Sophocles” and was one of the Great War Poets. He dedicated the poem To J H S M killed in action March 13th 1915 to John Hewitt Sutton Moxly.
  • Lieutenant John Raphael Hamilton-Dalrymple (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ W Hamilton-Dalrymple 8th
  • Lieutenant Zouch Austin Turton (Norfolk Regiment attached East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the Reverend Zouch Horace Turton Vicar of St Mary’s Southtown who has a second son who will be killed in September 1917.
  • Lieutenant Cameron Donald Brant (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed at age 27 leading his platoon. He is the great great grandson of Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant who sided with the British in the War for American Independence.
  • Second Lieutenant Erasmus Darwin (Yorkshire Regiment) the grandson of the naturalist Charles Darwin is killed in action at age 33. He was also the son-in-law of Thomas Henry, 1st Lord Farrer.
  • CSM Reginald Unsworth Green (Honorable Artillery Corps) is killed at age 26. His two brothers will be killed in 1917.
  • Private John Rupert Weigall Hollands (Quebec Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the son of the Reverend Charles William Hollands Rector of Carbonear.
  • Private Richard Huartson (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 41. His brother was killed at home last September when struck by a train while guarding the railway near Reading.
  • Private James Draycott (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother died of wounds one week ago.
  • Private Francis Jackson Reid (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the son of Surgeon General Sir A Scott Reid KCB.
  • Private James Duffy (Manitoba Regiment) dies of wounds at age 24. He was the winner of the 1914 Boston Marathon. He also raced in the 1912 Olympic Marathon finishing fifth.
  • Private Henry Gulliford (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother-in-law will die of wounds in June 1917.
  • Private Villiers Henry Plantagent Somerset (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of the Reverend Villiers Henry Pantagenet Somerset.
  • Private Oliver Fyson (Manitoba Regiment) is killed in action north of Ypres when taking part in the charge of the Canadians that saves the British line. He is a twin who was born in October 1884 and went to Canada where he captained the British Columbian Rugby team. His twin brother will be killed in Salonika in September 1918 and they are sons of the Right Reverend Philip K Fyson DD formerly Bishop of Hokkaido, Japan.
  • Private C H Collins-Williams (Central Ontario Regiment) is killed in action at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend T C Collins-Williams.
  • Brothers Arthur age 34 and Reginald Lawrence age 32 are killed together while serving in the Alberta Regiment at Kitcheners Wood.

Thursday 22 April 1915 – We Lost 548

Distinguished Service Cross

Distinguished Service Cross

At 17:00 hours on a ‘glorious spring day’ the Germans begin a furious bombardment of Ypres with heavy artillery.  What follows staggers the imagination. As seen by the Canadians, who stand to the right of the main attack, an area of the line manned by Algerians, two greenish-yellow clouds form on the ground and spread laterally to form a terrifying single cloud of bluish white mist. Blown by a light wind, the cloud moves down on the Algerian trenches. The Canadians notice a peculiar odor, smarting eyes, a tingling sensation of the nose and throat, and hear a dull, confused murmuring underlying everything.  Soon, Algerian stragglers begins to drift toward the rear, followed by horses and men pouring down the road and finally mobs of Algerian infantry streaming across the fields, throwing away their rifles.  As seen by the Germans, the effects of the attack are horrible, the dead lying on their backs with clenched fists, the whole field bleached to a yellow color.  The Germans advance until dusk, when the assigned objectives for the day are reached. This gas attack finds the allied troops entirely unprepared; they have no respirators, no anti-gas measures of any description are at hand.  The best that can be done at first is to cover the nose and mouth with a wet cloth – a handkerchief, piece of toweling, a cotton bandolier, or in privilege cases a gauze pad.  This attack marks the beginning of the second battle of Ypres, which will not end until 25th May.

The bombardment of the forts at Smyrna is resumed.

Anglo-French forces land at Enos.

Chief Officer Alfred R Murley, HMT Cardiganshire is awarded the Distinguished Service Cross as he responds to the call for volunteers to man SS Jessie and for the next few weeks during the first landing operations at Gallipoli he does invaluable work in keeping up an unfailing supply of ammunition to the beaches.

The Admiralty suspends passenger traffic between England and Holland.

 Today’s losses include:

  • The first son lost of a family that will lose four sons
  • The first son lost of a family that will lose three sons
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons
  • The son of a member of the clergy

 Today’s highlighted casualties are

  •  Lieutenant Guy Melfort Drummond (Quebec Regiment) is killed in action at age 27. He is the son of the Honorable ‘Sir’ George Drummond KCMG.
  • Private Robert T Sloan (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action. He is the first of four brothers to be killed in the Great War.
  • Private Anton Leone Van Schepdael (Alberta Regiment) is killed in action at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Rifleman William Henry Philpott (Rifle Brigade) dies of wounds in Boulogne at age 35. His brother will be killed in July of this year.
  • Private John St Claire Gunning (Manitoba Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in November 1917.
  • Private Howard Crich (Sherwood Foresters) dies on service at home. He is the first of three Crich’s to lose their lives in the Great War, the three are brothers.
  • Private Joseph Maxwell Boultbee (Alberta Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in March 1917 and they are sons of the Reverend Frederick Croxall Boultbee Rector of Hargrave.

Wednesday 11 November 1914 – We Lost 777

 

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The torpedo gunboat HMS Niger is torpedoed in the English Channel.  She later explodes and sinks though there are no casualties.

British troops pass through the small village of Oulchy-le-Chateau in their advance on the Aisne.

At 10:00 the 2nd Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry are turned out to back up the 1st Brigade which has been attacked while holding the ground a little to the north of the Ypres-Menin road. They are ordered to Westhoek to get in touch with the 1st Division, who are holding up reinforcements on the right. In spite of a barrage that lays shells about them, the Oxfords reach Westhoek without loss. Here they get under cover and observe the Northamptonshire Regiment advancing on their right, into the southern part of the wood lying to the south of Westhoek. At the same time Colonel Lushington of the Royal Artillery sends gunners, cooks, etc armed with rifles against the Germans in Nonne Bosschen Wood.

Lieutenant Colonel Henry R Davies sends two companies to clear Nonne Bosschen Wood (Nun’s Wood) near Ypres, advancing from the northwest to southeast.  They drive the Germans before them killing and capturing many. Two more companies follow in support.  When the first two companies, ‘A’ and ‘B’ come out on the southeastern edge of the wood they are joined by the Northamptons on the right and by some Connaught Rangers and Sappers on the left. They force the Germans out of the trenches; some of the enemy turning and running when the attack is thirty or forty yards off, others surrender. Most of those who run are shot. Casualties to the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry amount to twenty-seven, of whom five are killed.  There is still another trench held by the Germans in front, but before an attack can be mounted on it French artillery begins to drop shrapnel into the British front line, not realizing how far it has advanced. It takes some time to inform the French of this error and by this time dark has set in.

Near Becelaere, Belgium, Captain Walter Lorrain Brodie (Highland Light Infantry) leads a charge to evict the enemy from a portion of our trenches that they have succeeded in occupying. He bayonets several of the enemy himself and relieves a dangerous situation. As a result of his actions, 80 of the enemy are killed and 51 taken prisoner. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the Victoria Cross.

 Today’s losses include:

  •  Multiple examples of brothers killed together
  • A General
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son of a former Member of Parliament
  • Grandson of an Admiral
  • Grandson of a Justice of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • Uncle of a man killed yesterday
  • Battalion commander
  • Multiple families that will lose two and three sons
  • A man whose daughter will be born next year
  • Two members of the Surrey Constabulary

 Today’s highlighted casualties are:

 Brothers Privates James F and John William Stallard are among those killed in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. John is a boxer of some repute in the Army and had gone into strict training for a bout at the National Sporting Club when the war broke out. Because of his prowess in the ring he was known as ‘The Mad Mullah’. He dies at age 26 while his older brother is 28.  They are sons of James and Florence Stallard of St Mary Street, New Bradwell, Bucks.

Another set of brothers are killed on this day while serving together. Private Thomas and James Freemantle (Scots Guards) have both served in the Guards prior to the war then joined the Surrey Constabulary together and both resigned to rejoin the Guards upon the outbreak of the war. The brothers are both 26. They are sons of William and Sarah Freemantle of Easton, Winchester.

  •  Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahonDSO, General Officer Commanding 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached 10th Infantry Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Division is killed in action at age 48. The General tries to rally support troops east of Hooge, on the south side of the Ypres-Menin Road when he is suddenly seen to sink to one knee and begins to remove his legging as though hit in the leg. At that moment a shell bursts close to him killing him instantly. He is the son of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon CB Baronet and he served in Burma from 1886 to 1887 and in the South African War.
  • Major Alfred Herbert Tyler (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 43. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ H W Tyler MP and grandson of General ‘Sir’ C W Pasley KCB. He served in Sierra Leone 1898-9 and in the South African War. His nephew was killed yesterday at the same place while also serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Major Harold Henry Norman (Temporarily commanding 1st Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed in the above action at age 47. He served in Tirah in 1897-8 and Zakka Khel in 1908. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend Henry Wood.
  • Captain William Maynard Carlisle-Crowe (Warwickshire Regiment attached Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 42. He is a Swiss Alpine skier and the son of General Thomas Caralisle-Crowe.
  • Captain and Adjutant Ewen James Brodie (Cameron Highlanders) is killed when he is shot by a sniper at age 36 in the Nonne Bosch Wood. He is the son of J C J Brodie Lord Lieutenant of the County of Nairn.
  • Captain James William Lennox Sprot (Black Watch) is killed at age 28 less than three weeks after his brother was killed serving in the Cameron Highlanders.
  • Captain Arthur Edward Jeune Collins (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 29 while signaling for more men to protect the flank of his trench. Typically known by his initials A E J Collins is an English cricketer and soldier. He is most famous for achieving the highest-ever recorded score in cricket: as a 13-year-old schoolboy, he scored 628 not out over four afternoons in June 1899. Collins’ record-making innings drew a large crowd and increasing media interest; spectators at the Old Cliftonian match being played nearby were drawn away to watch a junior school house cricket match. One brother will be killed in August 1916 while his second brother will die of illness on service in February 1917.
  • Captain Hugh James Shaw (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28. His brother will be killed in November 1915.
  • Captain Arthur Kenneth Puzey (London Regiment) is killed at age 34. His daughter will be born next year.
  • Captain William Augustus Portman Foster(South Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds in a German hospital at Frankfort-on-Main of wounds received at Gheluvelt on 31 October at age 27. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Yorke Foster the 3rd Baronet and Lady Foster.
  • Second Lieutenant Thomas Symonds Holmes (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of Admiral of the Fleet ‘Sir’ Thomas M Symonds GCB.
  • Lance Corporal James Robert Newman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 18. His brother was killed less than three weeks earlier.
  • Private William Stoyan(Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He has two brothers who will be killed later in the Great War, one in 1916 the other in 1918.
  • Lance Corporal Robert Brown(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at age 25.  His brother Peter Hume Brown will fall in November 1916.
  • Private John Hamon Massy (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 35. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Private George Etherington (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 28 less than two weeks after his brother was killed serving in the West Surrey Regiment.
  • Rifleman Robert James Adair (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. His brother will die on service in March 1919.
  • Gunner Sidney Herbert Toll (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 23. His brother died on service at home in the first week of the war.
  • Private Edward Webster Wood (Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the first of three brothers who are killed in the Great War.

Turks forces attack the British camp at Sanniyeh with heavy loss and are forced to withdraw four miles.

  •  Major Richard Ducat (Infantry Indian Infantry) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of Major General Claude Malet Ducat and grandson of Hugh Hamersley JP. He was member of the force that fought on the North West Frontier of India in 1897-8.

Vice Admiral ‘Sir’ Doveton Sturdee departs Devonport his flag on HMS Invincible in company with HMS Inflexible on a voyage to the South Atlantic to search for the German squadron under Vice Admiral Graf Maximillan von Spee. At the same time HMS Princess Royal is dispatched to the Caribbean to guard the Panama Canal.

At a matinee at the Empire Theater John George Lambton 3rd Earl of Durham whose brother was killed on the Western Front less than two weeks earlier states the opinion that he would “wish that the Germans would drop a shell among these footballers some Saturday afternoon.  I really think it would be the best method of waking up the young men of Sunderland”.  In two weeks 16 members of The Hearts of Midlothan join the 16th Royal Scots becoming the only team in the history of British football to enlist en masse in the armed force. Seven members of the first team will lose their lives in the Great War.

Saturday 31 October 1914 – We Lost 1,178

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The outcome of the Battle of Ypres now hinges around the village of Gheluvelt.  Lying on a forward spur of the low ridge that covers the town of Ypres, Gheluvelt is the last point retained in British hands from which the enemy’s line can be dominated.  By noon the West Surrey, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Welsh and the King’s Royal Rifles have been overwhelmed, while on the right the South Wales Borderers have been rolled back.  Gheluvelt has been lost and a serious gap has been made in the British line. So serious is the situation that unless the gap can be closed, a breakthrough can not be avoided. Indeed orders have already been prepared for artillery to move back in preparation for a general retreat. At 13:00 hours the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment receives an order from Brigadier General Charles Fitzclarence VC to attack and retake Gheluvelt.  Captain A. F. Thorne of the Grenadier Guards is to act as a guide.  From Polygon Wood, the chateau which dominates the village can not be seen but the nearby church tower rising amidst the smoke is visible. All around are wounded and stragglers coming to the rear and batteries can be seen limbering up and moving back. The Worcestershires alone are moving towards the enemy. The ridge is littered with dead and wounded, and along the crest, German shells are falling fast. Major E B Hankey decides that the only way to cross this dangerous area is at the double.  As the leading men reach the ridge, they come in view of the German guns whose high explosive shells are quickly directed on the charging soldiers. Over 100 of the Battalion are killed or wounded but the rest push on and, increasing their speed as they come to the downward slope in sight of Gheluvelt, make the final charge through hedges and on to the Chateau grounds.  Here they meet the remnants of the South Wales Borderers who have made a heroic stand. The meeting is unexpected as the Worcestershires believe no British soldiers are left on the grounds.  The 2nd Worcestershires have gone into this action with about 370 men of whom 187 are killed or wounded.  Gheluvelt is saved and the line restored.  It is rare that the action of one unit can exert such a profound influence as did this famous counter attack.

The town of Messines is held by British infantry with fighting in the streets and the front running north of town roughly parallel to and about 100 yards east of the road and is held by the 4th and 6th Dragoon Guards forming the right of the 4th Cavalry Brigade which holds the line towards Wytschaete. The 57th Wilde’s Rifles has been sent in to assist the Cavalry yesterday but suffers heavy casualties and is forced to withdraw.  The London Scottish is sent in today to fill the dangerous gap and help the Carabiniers to hold the right center of the line.   When the 1st Battalion comes under heavy fire and is pinned down upon reaching the ridge they dig in. They become the 1st Territorial Battalion to come under fire in the Great War. Fierce exchanges of fire continue all day. At about 21:00 the Germans attempt their first attack on the ridge. The attack is beaten off and the bombardment of the ridge by the Germans begins again and continues until after midnight.

Britain, France and Russia declare war on Turkey.

The final bombardment of Tsing-tau begins as the Japanese commence shelling of the fort and the city.

Captain Sydney Drury-Lowe discovers Konigsberg hiding at Salale (which had been prominently ringed in pencil on the freighter Prasident’s charts) up the Rufiji Delta. Dawn is breaking as HMS Chatham anchors off the delta. An armed raiding party goes ashore in Chatham’s steam cutter.  They learn from the natives of Kiomboni village that that the German lookouts have just left to go back to their base for breakfast. The village headman and two other men are taken back to the cutter for questioning. All three confirm that the Konigsberg, the collier Somali and three small vessels are anchored upriver from the Sima Uranga mouth of the Rufiji at Salala, some nine miles inland. The cooperative local headman shows Drury-Lowe the deep-water channels that lead up river from the Kiomboni and Simba Uganda entrances. And as the Chatham follows the coastline northward, her lookouts soon spot Konigsberg’s mastheads standing above the tree line. Chatham fires a few shells in the general direction, but all fall short.  Drury-Lowe signals HMS Weymouth and HMS Dartmouth to leave their patrol areas and join him of the Rufiji River.  While waiting for them, he shells the German wireless station at Mafia Island hoping to disrupt Konigsberg’s communications.

The steamship Karmala carrying Major General Arthur Edward Aitken’s force docks at Mombasa. Aitken and his staff meet with military authorities ashore to discuss the impending attack on Tanga in German East Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Robert Graham (Queen Victoria’s Corps of Guides attached and commander of the 3rd King’s Africa Rifles), offers Aitken some of his British led askaris who are familiar with the area, but Aitken declines the assistance. Additionally, in spite of his ship having engine trouble, the Captain of the battleship HMS Goliath offers to escort the invasion force to Tanga and lend fire support. Again Aitken refuses the offer. A staff officer, Major Frederick Keen tries to persuade Aitken to put his troops ashore for a few days after their miserable voyage and long confinement aboard ship, he is told that he is making an unnecessary fuss. The list of errors in judgment by Aitken is by now very long. Finally, failure to allow his troops time to recondition is probably Aitken’s worst mistake.  His plan for the attack on Tanga is simple, but he neglects the details.  He ignores local advice and fails to learn all that he can about his enemy and about the terrain where he proposes to land. He also neglects security. Secrecy is almost nonexistent.  Crates in Bombay have been marked “Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’, Mombasa, East Africa.”  Newspapers in British East Africa even write of the intended attack.

The cruiser HMS Hermes (Captain Charles Laverock Lambe) is torpedoed and sunk by U27 in the Straits of Dover while engaged in transporting aircraft to France.  The first torpedo strikes from a range of about 300 yards and as she is sinking by the stern a second torpedo hits and she quickly sinks.  There are twenty-two fatalities while four hundred survivors are picked up.

HMS Otranto rejoins Cradock’s squadron without having been able to obtain any information. HMS Glasgow signals from Coronel that German supply ships have been frequently sailing in and out of that port and that she has intercepted several transmissions between SMS Leipzig and one of her colliers.  Cradock orders HMS Glasgow to leave Coronel immediately and meet him the next day fifty miles west of Arauco Bay.

The 129th Baluchis come under heavy fire at Hollebeke. With the British officer in charge of his detachment having been wounded and another machine gun put out of action by a shell, Sepoy Khudadad Kahn though wounded himself remains working his gun until all other five men of his detachment have been killed. Naik Sair Amir shows conspicuous gallantry in the same action as he continues to fire his machine as the other guns are put out of action. Sepoy Khan will be awarded the Victoria Cross while Naik Amir will be rewarded with the Indian Order of Merit for their actions today.

Major General Samuel H Lomax (1st Division) is mortally wounded (he will die next April) and Major General Charles C Monro (2nd Division) is badly stunned when a German shell strikes as they are meeting close to the front at Hooge Chateau shortly after midday.

 Today’s casualties include:

  •  The winningest jockey in Ireland in 1907
  • The lightweight boxing champion of India
  • A member of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • A football player for Linfield Swifts and South End Rangers
  • A Show Horse Jumper
  • An Assistant Boy Scout Master
  • The son of a family that will lose four more sons in the Great War
  • The son of multiple families that will lose three sons between this war and the South African War
  • Multiple examples of a man who will have a brother killed in the war
  • A man whose brother-in-law will be killed
  • A man whose brother was killed in the South African War
  • Multiple men whose children will be born after their death
  • Multiple sons of clergy
  • Multiple grandsons of clergy
  • Multiple Justices of the Peace
  • Multiple sons of Justices of the Peace
  • The son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • The nephew of a Justice of the Peace
  • The son of a General
  • The stepson of a General
  • Multiple grandsons of Generals
  • The nephew of a General
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The Grandson of an Admiral
  • The son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • The half brother of a Member of Parliament
  • A member of the first class of Military Cross winners
  • Multiple battalion commanders
  • The son of the 4th Earl of Erne and father of the 5th Earl who will be killed in the next war
  • The son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale and the father of the 7th Baron
  • The son of the 1st Baron St Levan
  • The son of a Countess of the Holy Roman Empire
  • The son-in-law of the Duke of Westminster
  • The grandson of the 4th Marquess Townsend
  • The great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie
  • The great grandson of the 17th Baron Dunboyne
  • A cousin of a Baronet

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Charles Paget O’Brien-Butler (Royal Army Medical Corps attached Irish Lancers) is killed attempting to reach wounded comrades at age 33. He is an outstanding amateur jockey who while riding for His Majesty the late King Edward VII was the winningest rider in Ireland in 1907 and he finished fifth in the Grand National in 1913. His brother-in-law will be killed in less than two months and his brother will be killed in June 1917 while another brother an Irish International Rugby player died of dysentery during the South African War. Finally he is the great grandson of Edmund Butler the 17th Baron Dunboyne.

  •  Colonel Frederick Walter KerrDSO (Gordon Highlanders, staff 1st Divisional Headquarters) is killed at age 47 when the Divisional Headquarters in Hooge Chateau is hit by shellfire. He is the son of Admiral Lord Frederic Kerr and the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Peregrine Maitland GCB. He served in Chitral 1895, Tirah 1897-8 and the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander Browning (commanding 2nd Dragoon Guards) is killed at Messines at age 36.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Bernard Morland (commanding 2nd Welsh Regiment) dies of wounds at age 47. He is a veteran of the South African War.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Walter Edwin Venour(Commanding 58th Vaughan’s Rifles, Indian Army) is killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head at age 50. He is the son of Lieutenant General Edwin Venour and he has previously seen action in Chin-Luchai 1889-90, Miranzai 1891 and the North West Frontier of India 1897-8 being wounded at Tirah.
  • Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) Arthur Jex Blake Percival DSO (Northumberland Fusiliers and General Staff) is killed at age 43. He served in the Nile 1898 and the South African War and is the son of the Bishop of Hereford.
  • Major (Brevet Lieutenant Colonel) Henry William CrichtonDSO MVO (Royal Horse Guards) is killed at Wytschaete at age 42.  He is the Viscount Crichton and son of the 4th Earl of Erne. He is the son-in-law of the 1st Duke of Westminster and his widow will become Lady Mary Stanley and his son the 5th Earl of Erne will be killed in the Second World War. His brother-in-law was killed yesterday.
  • Major George Paley (Rifle Brigade) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of Canon Nepean Chaplain in Ordinary to her late Majesty Queen Victoria and he served in Soudan 1898 and in the South African War.
  • Major Neil MacPherson(2nd in command 2nd Gurkha Rifles) is killed at age 45. He is the son of the late General ‘Sir’ Herbert Taylor MacPherson VC KCB.  He served in the Isazai Expedition in 1892, the NorthWest Frontier of India, Samana and Tirah in 1897-8, the South African Campaign of 1900-02 and the Abor Expedition 1911-12. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General Eckford CB.
  • Major Robert MacGregor Stewart Gardner(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 44 at Gheluvelt.  He is a South African War veteran, a nephew of General ‘Sir’ Robert Stewart GCB and his daughter will be born in February 1915.
  • Major Edward Egerton Barwell (Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 42. He is the son of General Charles Arthur Barwell CB. He served in Waziristan 1894-5, the Northwest Frontier 1897-8 and China in 1900.
  • Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 36. His brother was killed in the South African War in April 1902 and they are grandsons of the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Richard Chenevix Trench.
  • Major Walter Gabriel Home(Dragoon Guards) dies of wounds at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend Robert Home and is a South African War veteran.
  • Captain and Adjutant William McMillan Black (Vaughan’s Rifles) is killed at age 31. He is the son of the Reverend William McMillan Black.
  • Captain William Joseph Wickham(Scots Guards) is killed at age 39. He is the son of Captain Henry Lampugh and ‘the Honorable’ Mrs Teresa Mary Wickham Countess of the Holy Roman Empire and the eldest daughter and co-heiress of the 11th Lord Arundell. His brother will die of wounds next January.
  • Captain John Edmund Simpson(King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 41.  He is the son of the late Reverend John Curwen Simpson.
  • Captain Leslie Sedgwick Whitchurch (Indian Army Cavalry attached Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son the Reverend Walter Beaumont Gurney Whitchurch Rector of Spixworth Norfolk. He served on the North West Frontier 1902.
  • Captain John Spottiswoode (King’s Royal Rifle Corps) is killed at age 40. He is the grandson of the Reverend ‘Sir’ St Vincent Love Hammick and nephew of William Spottiswood (former President of the Royal Society, the London Mathmatical Society and the British Association). He is the son-in-law of Dr. Christian David Gisnburg JP and his second son will be born next year.
  • Captain Mervyn Crawshay (Dragoon Guards) a Show Horse Jumper is killed. He has represented the military in tournaments in America in 1913.
  • Captain Albert Alexander Stephen DSO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. His brother was killed last month and they are grandsons of Admiral ‘Sir’ Cornwallis Ricketts 2nd
  • Captain Geoffrey Wilmot Herringham (Dragoons) is killed at Messines at age 31. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Wilmot Herringham.
  • Captain and Adjutant Walter Hughes Ferrar (Welsh Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and son of A M Ferrar DL.
  • Captain Frederick William Hunt (Lancers Indian Army) is killed at age 33. He is the son of the Reverend William Cornish Hunt of Odell Rectory Bedfordshire.
  • Captain Edward Hugh Bagot Stack (Gurkha Rifles) is killed atage 29. He is the great nephew of the late Right Reverend Charles Maurice Stack Bishop of Cloghern Clones Ireland.
  • Captain Graham Percival Shedden (Royal Garrison Artillery) dies of wounds at age 28. He is the son of George Shedden JP.
  • Captain Richard Vincent Barker (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed when shot in the chest. He is a South African War veteran and son of the Reverend Frederick Barker Rector of Wimborne St Giles.
  • Captain Hugh Clervaux Chaytor (Light Cavalry Indian Army attachded Hussars) is killed at Messines at age 30. He is the cousin of ‘Sir’ Edmund Chaytor Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Donald Godrid Campbell Thomson (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the nephew of Captain G C Karran JP and has a brother who will be killed in October 1917.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Elgood Punchard(Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed by a shot to the head at age 24. He is the son of the late Reverend Elgood George Punchard, Honorary Canon of Ely, DD and Vicar of Ely St Mary’s. His brother will be killed in March 1917.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Knight Nicholson (Hussars) is killed by a sniper at age 21. He is the only son of Herbert Nicholson JP.
  • Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Godfrey Evan Hugh Bosville MacDonald JP (Scots Guards) dies of wounds at age 35. He is the son of the 6th Baron MacDonald of Armadale Castle who has lost one son at Krugersdorp South Africa in April 1901 and another son will be killed in October 1918. His son will become the 7th
  • Lieutenant Spencer Julian Wilfred Railston (Lancers, Indian Army attached Dragoon Guards) the one time lightweight boxing champion of India is killed at age 25. He dies attempting to bring in a wounded peasant woman on the field of fire. He is the grandson of the Reverend C E Oakley and great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Ducie.
  • Lieutenant Alan Randall Aufrere Leggett(North Staffordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 21.  He is the first of three sons of Colonel Leggett to be killed in the Great War.  His older brothers will be killed on different days in July 1916.  The memory of the three sons is kept alive in the Chancel’s Screen and Memorial Cross in St Martin’s Church, Cheriton.
  • Lieutenant Langton Sacheverell Coke(Irish Guards) is killed at age 36.  He is the son of the late Colonel W L Coke JP DL.
  • Lieutenant Philip Walter Rudolph Doll(Liverpool Regiment) is killed at age 24.  He is the son of Charles FitzRoy Doll JP (London and Hertford) and was the winner of Lord Robert’s Gold Cup at Aldershot in 1914 with his guns. He was also a member of the MCC since 1911.
  • Lieutenant George Archer-Shee(South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 as a result of an order to withdraw not reaching his platoon. As a 13-year old cadet at Royal Navy College at Osborne he was accused of stealing a five shilling postal note from the locker of a fellow cadet in 1908. The college asserted that he signed his name to a postal order and cashed it and despite the young boy’s claims of innocence he was expelled. A trial in 1910 vindicated him completely. He is the half-brother of Major Martin Archer-Shee MP.
  • Lieutenant Algernon Lindsay Eric Smith (Life Guards) is killed at age 22. He is among the 1st group of officers to be awarded the Military Cross.
  • Lieutenant and Quartermaster ‘the Honorable’ Edmund WilkinsonDCM (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His daughter will be born next January and he was a South African War veteran.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald William Fletcher(Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 22. He rowed with the Oxford University VIII in 1914. His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Piers Stewart St Aubyn JP(King’s Royal Rifle Corps) dies of wounds at age 43. He is the son of the 1st Baron and Lady St Levan and grandson of 4th Marquess Townsend and a veteran of the South African War. His brother will be killed in December 1915 serving as a King’s Messenger when SS Persia is sunk.
  • Second Lieutenant Gerald Gordon Clement Elrington (East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at Festubert at age 20. He is the stepson of General Miles.
  • Second Lieutenant Arnold Septimus Jarvis (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the first of five brothers who will be killed in the war.
  • Sergeant Edward Charters White (Black Watch) is killed at age 32. He is the Assistant Scout Master of the Baden Powell Scouts at Fort William Calcutta.
  • Lance Corporal Thomas Alfred Tompkins (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother Wesley will also lose his life in the Great War.
  • Private Leslie Houston (Inniskilling Fusiliers) dies of wounds. He played football for the Linfield Swifts and South-End Rangers.
  • Private Robert Clive Forrest (London Scottish) is killed at age 18. He is the only son of Robert Forrest JP DL.
  • Gunner Frederick Blackwell (Royal Garrison Artillery) is killed at age 24. His brother will be killed next August.
  • Private Thomas Richard Dawes (Dragoon Guards) is killed the day after his brother met the same fate.
  • Private Albert Charles Love (Sussex Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in May 1917.
  • Private Charles Philip Libretto (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 18. His brother will be killed in September 1917.
  • Private William Perrin (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1917.
  • Private W Curtis (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed next January.
  • Private Basil Thomas Freffry (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in August 1917.
  • Henry William and Joseph Batchelor are killed together serving as privates in the Dragoon Guards. Henry is killed at age 28, while Joseph is one year older.
  • Private William Ayres (Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 28. He has two brothers who will be killed over the next two years.

Thursday 29 October 1914 – We Lost 796

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

At 05:30 the Germans attack in the Ypres sector in an attempt to break through to the Channel Ports, and sever the lines of communication of the British Expeditionary Forces.  British artillery is restricted because of shell shortages to nine rounds per gun per day and is unable to take advantage of prior knowledge of the attack plans.  The 1st Coldstream Guards at Gheluvelt are attacked along a front of 800 yards by six German battalions and by the end of the day the 1st Guards Brigade suffers 1,100 casualties and is reduced in strength to 275 men.  The 1st Coldstream Guards lose all 11 Combatant Officers and is reduced to a party of 60 other ranks under the Quartermaster.  The 2nd and 3rd Coldstream Guards successfully defend Zonnebeke some three miles to the north.  The Germans force their way in between two companies of the 1st Middlesex Regiment so that one company finds itself with the enemy not only in the front but also directly in the rear within 50 feet. About 40 Germans who have penetrated to a communication trench are all killed or taken prisoner by the battalion’s reserve company.  Eventually with the help of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders the trenches are cleared of the enemy.

Lieutenant James Anson Otho Brooke (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and great ability near Gheluvelt in leading two attacks on the German trenches under heavy rifle and machine gun fire regaining a lost trench at a very critical moment.  His efforts prevented the enemy from breaking through the British line at a time when a general counter attack could not be organized.  Having regained the lost trench, he goes back to bring up support and while doing so is killed. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Harry Vesey Brooke JP DL, grandson of ‘Sir’ Arthur Brooke MP 2nd Baronet and great grandson of General ‘Sir’ George Anson GCB and had been awarded the Sword of Honor at Sandhurst and dies at age 30.  He has two brothers who will die during the Great War both dying at home, the first in 1916 the second in 1917. Their brother-in-law will be killed on Christmas Day this year.

Lieutenant Arthur Martin Leake (Royal Army Medical Corps) will be awarded his second Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty beginning on this day through 8 November near Zonnebeke in rescuing while exposed to constant fire a large number of the wounded who are lying close to the enemy trenches. He is one of only three men ever to be awarded the Victoria Cross twice.

Second Lieutenant James Leach and Sergeant John Hogan (Manchester Regiment) will each be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Festubert when after their trench has been taken by Germans and after two attempts at recapture fails they voluntarily decide in the afternoon of this day to recover the trench themselves, and, working from traverse to traverse at close quarters with great bravery, they gradually succeed in regaining possession, killing eight of the enemy, wounding two and taking sixteen prisoners.

The 2nd/8th Gurkha Rifles arrive at the Western Front and go into the trenches near Festubert.

Beduin tribesmen raid the Egyptian frontier.

Lord Fisher is appointed First Sea Lord.

Admiral Cradock’s squadron reaches Vallenar Roads, just south of Chiloe Island. He sends HMS Glasgow ahead to see if there are any messages for him with the British consulate in Coronel.  He also dispatches HMS Otranto to Puerto Montt to try to gather information as to the whereabouts of any German warships.

The hospital ship HMHS Rohilla departs Leith for Dunkirk to board wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • Victoria Cross winner
  • Son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and Grandson of the 1st Duke (The Iron Duke)
  • Battalion commander
  • A man whose father died on service in the South African War of typhoid fever
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Baronet
  • Grandson of a Member of Parliament
  • Nephew of a Member of Parliament
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Sons of Generals
  • Grandson of a General
  • Great grandson of a General
  • Great nephew of a General
  • Son of an Admiral
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • Son-in-law of a Justice of the Peace
  • Children born after their father’s death
  • Brother-in-law killed
  • A man whose son will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be killed in World War II
  • A man whose nephew will be later in the Great War
  • Sons of clergy
  • Son-in-law of clergy
  • A grandson of a member of the clergy
  • An uncle and nephew killed together
  • A Somerset cricket batsman
  • Grandson son of writer to the Signet
  • Son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzel
  • Son of the Marquis de la Pasture
  • Son and heir to the 3rd Baron Penrhyn
  • Son-in-law of the 2nd Earl of Darley
  • Son of the 7th Viscount Falmouth
  • Son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim
  • Nephew of the Earl of Kintore

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Captain ‘Lord’ Richard Wellesley (Grenadier Guards) the son of the 4th Duke of Wellington and the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ Maurice Fitzgerald Baronet and the 20th Knight of Kerry is killed in action at age 35. His daughter will be born on 8 January 1915. He is the grandson of the ‘Iron Duke’ the original Duke of Wellington

  •  Lieutenant Colonel Henry Lawrence Anderson(Bhopal Infantry) dies of wounds at age 47.  He is the son of Major General Robert Patrick Anderson.
  • Major Wilfred Beckett Walker(Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and his first brother was killed in the first few days of the Great War while his second brother will die of wounds two days after the Armistice in 1918.  They are grandsons of ‘Sir’ James Walker Baronet.
  • Major ‘the Honorable’ Leslie D’Henin Hamilton MVO(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 40. He is the son of the 1st Baron Hamilton of Dalzell father of the 3rd Baron and he served in the South African War.
  • Major Humphrey St Leger Stucley(Grenadier Guards) dies of injuries at age 37. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ George Stucley, 1st Baronet and had served in Egypt 1898 and in the South Africa War. His son will be killed in World War II.
  • Captain Charles Edward Mary de la Pasture (Scots Guards) is killed at age 35. He is the eldest son of the Marquis de la Pasture who will die what many will say is from shock and a broken heart within three months. Captain de la Pasture served in the South African War and from 1907-10 was Aide de Campe to General ‘Sir’ Frederick Forestier Walker at Gibraltar.
  • Captain Gordon Hargreaves Brown(Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 34.  He is the son and heir of the late ‘Sir’ Alexander Brown, the 1st Baronet and he had served in the South African War. His third child will be born next February and his only son Captain ‘Sir’ John Hargreaves Pigott-Brown who will become the 2nd Baronet will be killed in North Africa in December 1942.
  • Captain Colin Frederick Fitzroy Campbell(Scots Guards) is killed at age 34. He is the son of Major General F Lorn Campbell and son-in-law of Lady May Stewart.
  • Captain Robert Forbes Stanley Stanley-CreekDSO (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His widow is the daughter of ‘Sir’ David Masson.
  • Captain Arthur George McCausland Burn (East Surrey Regiment attached Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 31. His great grandfather Lieutenant Colonel William Burn successfully held Delhi against Holkar.
  • Captain Edgar W Walker(East Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 39.  He is the son of Rear Admiral Charles Walker and his brother-in-law will be killed next May.
  • Captain Geoffrey Malcolm Bentley(Northamptonshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 31. His brother was killed seventeen days earlier. They are sons of Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wilson Bentley JP.
  • Captain Guy Francis Headlam Keenlyside(Royal West Kent Regiment) dies of wounds received three days earlier at age 34. His second son will be born in May 1915 and his brother will be killed in July 1915.
  • Captain Robert John Blatchford Oldrey(Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 31. His brother will die on active service in February 1919.
  • Captain Percy Lionel Moubray (Black Watch) is killed at age 42. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Robert Moubray Kt and served in the South African War.
  • Captain John Kearsley Dawson-Scott (Royal Engineers) is killed at age 31. He is the son of General R N Dawson-Scott.
  • Lieutenant Morys Wynne-Jones(Royal Engineers) is killed at age 27. He is the son of the Reverend John William Wynne-Jones Vicar of Carnarvon and his wife the Honorable Jessie F Wynne-Jones and the grandson of Lord Aberdare.
  • Lieutenant and Adjutant John Henry Loftus Reade (Manchester Regiment) is killed at age 33. He is a veteran of the South African War and the grandson of the Right Reverend Loftus George Reade.
  • Lieutenant Charles Keith Latta (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of John Jopp Writer to the Signer.
  • Lieutenant Graham Eardley Dunsterville (Devonshire Regiment) is killed when he is shot in the head at Festubert at age 30 attepting to bring in a wounded man who was crying out. He is the son-in-law of F Hastings Coldney JP and his son will be born on 29 December.
  • Lieutenant James Raymond McClintock Lonsdale (Hussars) dies of wounds received 13 October at age 20. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ James Mathew Stronge 2nd Baronet and nephew of ‘Sir’ John B Lonsdale Baronet MP.
  • Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock DSO (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26 six days after performing the acts that will win him the DSO. He is the son-in-law of the Reverend P P Broadmead and a Somerset County cricket batsman.
  • Lieutenant Ian Hay Steuart Clarke(Wilde’s Rifles) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the late Hastings A Clarke DL JP.
  • Lieutenant the ‘Honorable’ Alan George Sholto Douglas-Pennant (Grenadier Guards)age 24 the son and heir of the 3rd Baron Penrhyn is killed. His uncle Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Charles Douglas-Pennant JP (Coldstream Guards) is killed in the same action. He served in the South Africa War and is a son of the 2nd Baron Penrhyn who will lose another son the following year.  He is also the son-in-law of the 2nd Earl Darley.
  • Lieutenant Geoffrey Arthur Campbell (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 29. He is the son of ‘the Honorable’ Mrs. George Campbell.
  • Lieutenant Granville Keith Falconer Smith (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 28. He is the son of the late Colonel Granville and Lady Blanche Smith. He is also the nephew of the Earl of Kintore and son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Leitrim.
  • Lieutenant ‘Sir’ Gilchrist Nevill Ogilvy (Scots Guards) 11th Baronet is killed at age 22. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ Reginald H A Ogilvy.
  • Second Lieutenant ‘the Honorable’ Vere Douglas Boscawen(Coldstream Guards) is also killed at age 24. He is the son of Major General Evelyn Edward Thomas Boscawen, the 7th Viscount Falmouth KCVO CB and his older brother will die of wounds in 1918. In 1909 he was with the Eton XI Cricket Club against Harrow. They will have a nephew, who is not yet born, killed in action with the Coldstream Guards in May 1940.
  • Second Lieutenant Herbert Knollys Foster(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Gheluvelt at age 19. He is the son of the Reverend Canon Herbert Charles Foster St Thomas’s Vicarage Groombridge.
  • Second Lieutenant Patrick Edward Adam Blair (Black Watch) is killed at age 21. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel A S Blair CMG (Royal Scots) writer to the Signet.
  • Second Lieutenant John William Harford Nicholl (Welsh Regiment) is killed at age 22. He is the great nephew of Major General C R H Nicholl.
  • Second Lieutenant Frederick McMahon Hardman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. His father Captain John Wreford Julian Hardman died of typhoid fever in May 1900 during the South African War at age 37. He is the grandson of General ‘Sir’ Thomas W McMahon Baronet CB whose son (and uncle of Lieutenant Hardman) Brigadier General Norman Reginald McMahon will be killed in the less than two weeks.
  • CQMS Ernest John Thompson (Grenadier Guards) is killed a day after his brother was killed with the 21st
  • Private Albert Shipp(Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22.  His brother will be killed in March 1915.
  • Private Fred (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. He has two brothers who will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private William Georgeson (Scots Guards) is killed. His brother will be killed in October 1917.
  • Private Henry Etherington (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in less than two weeks serving in the Royal Fusiliers.
  • Private Henry Long (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 35. His brothers George and Edward will also lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Private Fred Castle (Coldstream Guards) is killed at age 23. His two brothers will also die in service including one in the Second World War.

photo from wikipedia.org

Tuesday 27 October 1914 – We Lost 568

Prince Maurice of Battenberg

Prince Maurice of Battenberg

The Germans take Neuve Chapelle.

Gas is first used by the Germans when they fire a prototype of modern tear gas from artillery near Ypres.

A German wireless message is intercepted giving 05:30 two days later as the time and date for an attack on the Ypres sector.

Louis Botha is at Commissie Drift, near Rustenburg, South Africa and defeats the rebel Beyers.

A BE2a of 6 Squadron is shot down while on a reconnaisance patrol over Lille. The crew Lieutenant K Rawson-Shaw and Lieutenant H G L Mayne are taken prisoner becoming the first crew lost by this squadron.

At 09:00 the Second Battle Squadron is in line ahead formation twenty miles north-east of Tory Island when the battle ship HMS Audacious, third in line and in the process of turning starboard, strikes a mine. The mine explodes on the port side aft and the rolling of the ship causes a boat stowed on the quarter deck to break loose from its lashings, and as it thrashes back and forth it knocks the tops off the ventilators on the deck. As a result more and more water finds its way below, helped by a fractured waste pipe in the captain’s quarters below.  This extra flooding is outside of the area of subdivision enclosed by armored citadel and so it is virtually impossible to control.  Attempts to take her in tow by the liner Olympic and the collier Thornhill, meet with no success as she is almost unmanageable in the heavy swells. The crew is finally taken off by the Olympic and at 21:00 twelve hours after being mined she is shaken by an internal explosion and sinks.  Despite the fact that the Olympic, packed with British and American passengers, has seen the Audacious in critical condition the decision is made to ban all mention of the incident from the newspapers and it remains an official secret until after the war.  For four years the name Audacious appears in all official returns, even the most secret lists of day to day strength. Since virtually everyone in the Grand Fleet knows the truth, the only effect of this is to discredit the Admiralty. For a time the newspapers content themselves with using phrases such as ‘the audacious sinking of this ship”, and “another audacious loss”, etc.

 Today’s losses include:

  • Prince Maurice of Battenberg a Grandson of Queen Victoria
  • A nephew of the Irish Unionist politician, barrister and judge Edward Carson
  • Brother of a future Member of Parliament
  • Brother of the Captain of HMS Hood who will be killed when his ship is sunk by the Bismarck in 1941
  • Son of a man who died on service during the Ashanti War in 1896
  • A Battalion commander
  • The son of an Admiral
  • The great grandson of a General
  • The uncle of a man killed in the Second World War
  • A man married to the grand-daughter of a Baronet
  • The grandson of a man who fought the French in the West Indies in 1804
  • A man whose great great grandfather was killed at Quatre Bras
  • Son of clergy
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two and three sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Prince Maurice Victor Donald Battenberg KCVO a Lieutenant in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps and a grandson, like the King, the Kaiser and the Tsar, of Queen Victoria dies of wounds at age 23.  He is the youngest grandson and names Victor to honor the late queen and Donald to Honor Scotland. His mother is the 5th daughter and youngest child of Victoria and Albert the Prince Consort. His father died of malaria at age 38 contracted while fighting in the Gold Coast in the Ashanti War in 1896.  He is leading his battalion across an open space when a shell explodes near him. Wishing his men good bye, he is taken by stretcher towards a field dressing station but dies before reaching it.

  •  Major Matthew Perceval BuckleDSO (commanding 1st Royal West Kent Regiment) is killed at age 45. He is the son of Admiral C E Buckle and he served in the South African War where he was wounded.
  • Captain Walter Neave Wells (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Richard Wells KCB and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Henry Ouseley Davis (Irish Rifles) is killed by shrapnel at age 30. He is the great grandson of Major General ‘Sir’ Ralph Ouseley.
  • Captain Edward Spread Mulcahy Morgan (Irish Rifles) dies of wounds. His brother will be killed in September 1916 and their nephew will be killed serving in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve ion 4 January 1945.
  • Captain Frederick William Stoddart (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 43. His wife is the granddaughter of ‘Sir’ Robert Williams Baronet.
  • Lieutenant Alec Arthur Crichton Maitland-Addison(Cheshire Regiment) is killed in action at age 28. He will have two brothers killed later in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Leather (Northumberland Fusiliers) is killed in action at age 31. He is the first of three brothers to lose their lives in the Great War.
  • Lieutenant Victor Harriott Hardy (York and Lancs Regiment) is killed at age 27. His grandfather was one of a small body of Englishmen who held the Fort of Roseau Dominica West Indies in 1804 when the French landed until relived by the British fleet under Nelson.
  • Lieutenant Francis Edward Robinson (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 19 leading an attack. He is the nephew of ‘Sir’ Edward Carson the Irish Unionist Politician, barrister and judge who represented the Marquess of Queensberry in his libel case with Oscar Wilde and who defended George Archer-Shee in 1911.
  • Lieutenant Edmund Swetenham (Durham Light Infantry) becomes the second of only two Swetenham’s to be killed in the war at age 24. His cousin was killed less than two months ago.
  • Second Lieutenant Robert Francis McLean Gee (Wiltshire Regiment) dies of wounds in England at age 20. He is the great great grandson of Captain William Buckley Royal Scots who was killed at Quatre Bras.
  • Second Lieutenant Owen William Eugene Herbert(Royal Field Artillery) is killed in action at age 21. He is the brother of Alan Patrick Herbert a Member of Parliament for the University of Oxford for fifteen years from 1935 to 1950. Another brother, Captain Sidney Jasper Herbert (Royal Navy) will be the Captain of HMS Hood and is killed when that ship is sunk by the Bismark on 24 May 1941.
  • Sergeant Frank Goodman Line (Border Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Lance Sergeant Sidney Barnard Thompson (Lancers) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed tomorrow.
  • Private William Campbell(Black Watch) is killed at age 30. His younger brother will die of dysentery while serving at Salonica in 1917.
  • Private Ernest Condick (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 26. In 1916 his two brothers will both be killed serving in the same regiment.
  • Private George Edwin Swain (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother Henry William will also be killed in the war.
  • Rifleman Frederick McCracken (Irish Rifles) is killed. His brother will be killed in the explosion of HMS Vanguard in July 1917.
  • Lieutenant General ‘Sir’ William Edmund FranklynKCB (3rd Division) dies at home at age 58.  He is the son of the Reverend J E Franklyn.