Great War Lives Lost

We died 100 years ago in the War to end all War

Tag: Ypres

Friday 23 October 1914 – We Lost 497

 

Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon

Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon

The first Indian Army units enter the line south of Ypres.

Drummer William Kenny (Gordon Highlanders) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery near Ypres in rescuing wounded men on five occasions under very heavy fire in the most fearless manner and for twice previously saving machine guns by carrying them out of action. On numerous occasions Drummer Kenny conveys urgent messages under very dangerous circumstances over fire swept ground.

Captain Robert Edward Rising (Gloucestershire Regiment) will be awarded the Distinguished Service Order when he goes up with supports and controls the defense of his battalion’s trenches against a determined attack by the enemy at Langemarck. But for his defense the line must have been penetrated.  He will be killed in two weeks. Lieutenant Ralph Escott Hancock (Devonshire Regiment) displays conspicuous gallantry in leaving his trench under very heavy fire and going back some sixty yards over absolutely bare ground to pick up Corporal Warwick who had fallen while coming up with a party of reinforcements.  Lieutenant Hancock conveyed this NCO to the cover of a haystack and then returned to his trench. For his actions on this day he will be awarded the DSO. He will be killed in six days.

Today’s losses include:

  • Cousin of the future Queen Mother Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon whose brother will be killed in action next year
  • Survivor of the Empress of Ireland sinking earlier this year
  • Grandson of the 13th Earl of Stratchmore and 26th Earl of Crawford
  • Great grandson of Field Marshall the 1st Baron Raglan who commanded British troops in the Crimean War
  • Son of a former Minister for Defence and the Colonial Secretary for New Zealand
  • Grandson of the 2nd Baron Carwshaw
  • Great grandson of the 2nd Earl of Verulam
  • Multiple sons and grandson of clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Son of Baronet
  • Grandson of a Waterloo veteran and nephew of Redan veteran
  • Great nephew of a man killed at the battle of Quatre Bras
  • Father of a man who will be killed in the Second World War
  • Multiple examples of families that will lose two sons
  • Two Gloucester cricket players
  • Somerset cricket player

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

 Lieutenant Charles Lindsay Claude Bowes-Lyon (Black Watch) is killed at age 29.  The son of ‘the Honorable’ Francis and Lady Bowes-Lyon was a survivor of the Empress of Ireland sinking the previous May. He is the grandson of the 13th Earl of Strathmore and 26th Earl of Crawford and cousin of the future Queen Mother whose brother will be killed in action next year.

  •  Captain Horace Sylvester Grimston (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at Ypres at age 22. He is the grandson of the Honorable and Reverend Francis Sylvester Grimston and great grandson of the 2nd Earl Verulam.
  • Captain Edward Frederick Maltby Urquhart(Black Watch) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of the Reverend Edward William Urquhart Vicar of King’s Sutton and he served in the South African War.
  • Captain Walter Russell Russell(Northamptonshire Regiment) is killed at age 33.  He is the son of the late Captain ‘Sir’ William Russell Russell former Minister for Defence and Colonial Secretary of New Zealand.
  • Captain Lawrence Peel(Yorkshire Regiment commanding 7th Divisional Cyclist Company) is killed at age 30. He is the husband of the Honorable Mrs. L Peel and grandson of William Brocks 2nd Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw.
  • Lieutenant Francis Lennox Holmes (South Staffordshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. He is the son of Major General Ponsonby Ross Holmes (Royal Marines), his uncle William served at the Redan and his grandfather served at Waterloo.
  • Lieutenant William Stanley Yalland (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at age 25. He was a cricketer for Gloucestershire in the 1910 County Championship.
  • Lieutenant Frederic William Joseph MacDonald Miller (Grenadier Guards) is killed at age 22. He is the son of ‘Sir’ William Frederic Miller the 5th Baronet and his great uncle Lieutenant Colonel William Miller died of wounds at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 17 July 1815.
  • Lieutenant William Stanley (Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed leading an attack on a German trench at age 25. He played cricket for Clifton and Gloucestershire.
  • Lieutenant Ivan Boyd Sprot (Cameron Highlanders) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in less than three weeks. His wife is the granddaughter of ‘Sir’ William Muir.
  • Second Lieutenant Cecil Kingsley (North Lancashire Regiment) is killed. He played Rugby Football for the Bedford Town Club.
  • Second Lieutenant Norman Arthur Henry Somerset (Grenadier Guards) the son of Captain the Honorable Arthur Charles Edward Somerset is killed in action at age 20. He is the great grandson of Field Marshall FitzRoy James Henry Somerset the 1st Baron Raglan commanding officer of British troops in the Crimean War.
  • Second Lieutenant Eric Laurene Arthur Hart Burges (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed by a shell on his 23rd He is the son of the Reverend J Hart Burges DD Rector of Devizes and grandson of the Reverend W C Burges.
  • Second Lieutenant Harold Edwin Hippisley(Gloucestershire Regiment) is killed at Langemarcke when two platoons hold a trench against a large enemy attack, as all the officers and sixty percent of the men are killed.  He played cricket for Somerset before the war and dies at age 24.
  • Private Henry Thomas Imbert(Border Regiment) is killed at age 29.  His son will die on active service in Italy in July 1945.
  • Private Charles Ernest Trout (Devonshire Regiment) is killed at age 27. His brother will be killed next May.
  • Private Cecil Harry Barrett (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in October 1917.

photo from findagrave.com

Thursday 22 October 1914 – We Lost 466

 Golf Union of Wales

As part of the First Battle of Ypres, the Coldstream Guards, as part of the 4th Guards Brigade, attacks the high ground covering Langemarck and hold it until relieved tomorrow.

Private Henry May (Cameronians) will be awarded the Victoria Cross for most conspicuous bravery near La Boutillerie in voluntarily endeavoring to rescue under heavy fire a wounded man who is killed before Private May can save him. Subsequently on this day he carries a wounded officer a distance of three hundred yards into safety while exposed to very severe fire.

Drummer Spencer John Bent (East Lancashire Regiment) brings up ammunition under heavy shellfire.

Admiral Cradock leaves Port Stanley in HMS Good Hope to join the rest of his squadron on the west coast of South America.

Rebels in South Africa are routed at Keimoes.

Today’s casualties include:

  • A Welsh Amateur Golf Champion
  • Sons and grandsons of clergy
  • Battalion commander
  • Nephew of a man killed in the Zulu War
  • Son of Baron Burnham
  • Sons of Baronets
  • Grandsons of Generals
  • Son of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Son-in-law and great grandson of Justice’s of the Peace
  • Multiple families that will lose two sons

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Second Lieutenant Henry Noel Atkinson DSO (Cheshire Regiment) dies of wounds received two days earlier at age 25, when a German attack near Violaines succeeded in driving the Cheshire Regiment out of the village. He is the son of the late Reverend Canon Arthur Atkinson and grandson of the Bishop of Calcutta. He was the Welsh Amateur Golf Champion in 1913.

  • Lieutenant Colonel Bertram Edmund Ward (commanding 1st Middlesex Regiment) dies of wounds at age 50 in an ambulance train near Boulogne received near La Boutillerie the previous day at Le Maisnil. He is the great grandson of the Reverend John Savile Ogle.
  • Major William Northey DSO (Durham Light Infantry) dies of wounds at age 38. He is the son of the Reverend Edward William Northey and his uncle Lieutenant Colonel F W Northey was killed in the Zulu War while in command of the 3rd King’s Royal Rifle Corps while his brother Lieutenant Colonel E Northey commanded the 1st King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was wounded at Aisne. He also served in the South African War.
  • Captain Thomas Henry Rivers Bulkeley CMG MVO (Scots Guards) is killed at age 38. He is a veteran of the South African War and the son-in-law of Lady Lillian Yorke Lady in Waiting to H R H the Duchess of Connaught and the late ‘Sir’ Henry Pelly 3rd
  • Captain Mervyn Keats Sandys (York and Lancs Regiment) is killed at age 30. He is the grandson of Lieutenant General George Sandys and great grandson of Myles Sandys JP DL.
  • Captain Ronald Hugh Walrond Rose (Cameronians) is killed at age 34. His brother will be killed next month serving in the Royal Engineers.
  • Captain William Arthur Mould Temple(Gloucestershire Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day in the lung at age 42.  He served in the South African War and is the son of Colonel William Temple VC and grandson of Major General Mould CB. He is the son-in-law of J P L Hazledine JP.
  • Lieutenant William St John Coventry (Bedfordshire Regiment) is killed at age 21. He is the grandson of the Reverend John Coventry.
  • Lieutenant William Bernard Webster Lawson(Scots Guards) is killed in action at age 21. He is the son of Colonel ‘the Honorable’ William Webster Levy-Lawson DSO the 3rd Baron Burnham.
  • Lieutenant Charles Roger Ripley(York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 25. He is the son of the late ‘Sir’ Frederick Ripley, the 1st Baronet and grandson of ‘Sir’ Henry Ripley.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Robert Pollock (Coldstream Guards) dies of wounds received in action one day short of his 29th He is the eldest son of the late Robert Erskine Pollock KC.
  • Private Arthur William Carman (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother will be killed in June 1916.
  • Private Henry Stillman (Somerset Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next month in the explosion of HMS Bulwark.

Wednesday 21 October 1914 – We Lost 818 (Plus 1)

Mr Punch and the footballer

A Punch cartoon, later made into a poster, shows Mr. Punch saying to a professional football player, “No doubt you can make money on this field, my friend, but there’s only one field today where you can get honor”.

On this morning British and French cavalry at Passchendaele, on a ridge midway between Ypres and Roulers, leave the village and fall back towards Ypres.  They have not been attacked, but seek the greater security of proximity to the larger town. Both sides begin to dig trenches, linking them in a continuous line, with machine gun emplacements, dugouts, communication trenches leading to the rear and saps going forward as close as possible to the enemy front line.  The trench lines established in the Ypres Salient become the scene over the next four years of the harshest fighting of any war in history. The Irish Guards are given the orders to “drive back the enemy wherever met”.

The first Battle of Langemark begins. It will last for four days.

In heavy fighting at Le Maisnil, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and the Middlesex Regiment are forced to retire this evening leaving on the field eight officers and men who will be buried the following day by the enemy. Captain Edward Stephen Gibbons (Middlesex Regiment) displays great coolness and zeal in action at La Maisnil during what is described as a serious emergency.  For his actions he will be awarded the DSO.  He will be killed in September 1918.

The operation to capture Edea has scarcely commenced when a whaler belonging to the Nigerian Government Yacht Ivy capsizes on a sandbar in the Njong River, drowning the superintendent of the Nigeria Marine, Commander George Smith Booth Gray (HMS Cumberland, Royal Naval Reserve), Lieutenant Herbert Alexander Child CMG (HMS Cumberland, Royal Navy) is also killed at age 44.  He is the son of the Reverend Alfred Child also killed is a French staff officer and one of the nine native soldiers on board. The lifeboat of the steamship Fullah is immediately launched and succeeds in rescuing Captain Cyril T M Fuller and the remaining eight natives. Captain Fuller is pulled exhausted from the surf after struggling valiantly to save the others.

Today’s losses include:

  • Great grandson of the Defender of Fort Detroit in the War of 1763 against the Indians
  • Grandson of a Victoria Cross winner
  • Sons of clergy
  • Grandson of a member of the clergy
  • Son-in-law of a member of the clergy
  • Son of a General
  • Grandson of a General
  • Heir to the 5th Viscount Monck
  • Son-in-law of a Baronet
  • Multiple members of the Marylebone Cricket Club
  • Son of families that will lose another son in the Great War
  • Man whose brother will be killed in the Second World War
  • Grandson of a Judge
  • A man whose father was killed in the Soudan
  • Son of Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant Gladwyn Maurice Revell Turbutt (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 31. He is the son of William Gladwin Turbutt JP and great grandson of General Henry Gladwyn Defender of Fort Detroit Canada in the War of 1763 against the Indians.

 

  • Major Nigel Lucius Samuel Lysons(Royal Lancaster Regiment) is killed in action at age 38. He is the son of the late Canon Samuel Lysons Vicar of Rowsley and served in the South African War.
  • Major Charles Inglis Stockwell(Seaforth Highlanders) dies of wounds received 20 October at age 38.  He is the son of General C M Stockwell CB and he served in the Nile Campaign of 1898.
  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ Charles Henry Stanley Monck(Coldstream Guards) is killed in action at age 37. He is the son and heir of the 5th Viscount Monck. He had served previously in the South African War. He is the son-in-law of ‘Sir’ William Wyndham Portal 2nd Baronet and he is a member of the MCC.
  • Captain S G Roe(Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 39.  His widow will marry Lord Gravers.
  • Lieutenant Anthony Gerald Malpas Robertsof the same Regiment is killed at age 19.  He was the “Victor Ludorum” three years in succession at Ardingly College, Sussex.
  • Captain William Miles DSO (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. He served in the South African War and is a member of the MCC, the I Zinjari and the Free Foresters.
  • Captain Penry Bruce Lendon MVO (Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 31. He is the grandson of the Reverend W P Lendon and son-in-law of the Reverend Canon Richardson Vicar of Northop Flints.
  • Captain John Ralph Mylton Thornycroft (Royal West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 30. His brother was killed last month.
  • Captain Cameron O’Bryen Harford Methuen (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 38. He is related to Field Marshall Methuen GCB and served in the South African War.
  • Captain Allan Humphrey Harden (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when shot in the head at age 33. He is the grandson of Judge Harden of Cheshire and General Atkinson of the Madras Army. His wife is the granddaughter of John Howe JP DL and a cousin of the Right Honorable Lord Musketry.
  • Captain William Miles Kington (Welsh Fusiliers) is killed at age 38. His brother will die on service at home in September 1943.
  • Captain Arthur Howell Romilly (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 37. His brother will be killed next September and he is the son of Captain Francis J Romilly Royal Engineers who was killed in Soudan at Trofek. He is also a descendant of ‘Sir’ Samuel Somilly Solicitor General and law reformer of the early 19th He served in the South African War.
  • Captain Daniel George Harold Auchinleck (Inniskilling Fusiliers) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of Major Thomas Auchinleck DL and played cricket for the Winchester XI in 1894 & 1895 against Eton.
  • Captain Logan Deare Passy (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 33. His brother will be killed in August next year.
  • Lieutenant Henry Stanley Lowe(Worcestershire Regiment) dies of wounds in Paris received over a month ago on the Aisne at age 24. He is a son of the late Reverend E J Lowe Vicar of Stallingborough.
  • Lieutenant Christopher Fowler Murphy (Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed at age 25. He is the son of the Reverend Richard William Murphy Canon of Tuam.
  • Lieutenant Theodore Prain(Leicestershire Regiment) is killed in action at age 26. He is the son of Lieutenant Colonel ‘Sir’ David Prain, CMG, CIE and Lady Prain.
  • Second Lieutenant Theodore Hugh Galton (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 26. His brother will be killed in April 1917 and they are grandsons of Major General ‘Sir’ Henry Hugh Clifford VC.
  • Second Lieutenant Horace Holmes Watkins (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will die of wounds next February.
  • Second Lieutenant William Woodthorpe Barnard-Smith (Royal Field Artillery) is killed at age 21. He is the son of the Reverend Barnard Gooh Barnard-Smith Rector of North Cove.
  • Second Lieutenant Leonard Amauri Filleul(Somerset Light Infantry attached Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) is killed when he is shot in the chest at age 26. He is the Master at Monkton Combe School, Bath and had rowed in the winning Oxford trial eights in 1910.  He is also the Secretary of the Lincoln College Boat Club and the son of the Reverend Philip William Girdlestone Filleul, Rector of Devizes Wiltsire.
  • Second Lieutenant Reginald Fydell Walker (Manchester Regiment) dies of wounds received the previous day. He is the son the Reverend David Walker Vicar of Darlington and nephew of General J T Walker Royal Engineers the Surveyor General of India.
  • Private Lionel Vernon Brown (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 25. His brother will die of wounds at home in July 1916.
  • Private Joseph Dowing Lake (West Surrey Regiment) is killed at age 21. His brother James will also lose his life in the war.
  • Private William Turner (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Walter John will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private John Banks (West Surrey Regiment) is killed. His brother Richard will be killed in one week.
  • Private John Charles Howell (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Arthur will also be killed in the war.
  • Private Lewis Pelgrena Mazzei (South Wales Borderers) is killed at age 30. His brother will be killed in May 1917 and they are the only Mazzei to lose their lives in the service of King and Country in the Great War.

The Plus 1 is Hungarian Gymnast Arpad Pedery who was a member of the Silver medal winning Men’s Team European System Gymnastics team at he 1912 Olympics.

Sunday 18 October 1914 – We Lost 318

Huddersfield Town FC

Huddersfield Town FC

Ypres is recaptured by the Germans.

Enemy shells set alight two ricks at Beaupuits, the flames clearly showing to the enemy the position of our trenches.  Under heavy fire from machine guns, Lance Corporal W H Stoneman (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) endeavors to extinguish the flames for which he will be award the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

The first destruction of a submarine by another submarine occurs when E3 (Lieutenant Commander George Francis Cholmley age 32) wanders too far into the Western Ems looking for likely targets on the third day of a patrol in the area off Borkum in Heligoland Bight.  It is sighted on the surface at 10:25 by the German U27 which fires a torpedo from a range of 300 yards that cuts E3 in half sending both halves to the bottom. There are no survivors among the 28 members of the crew. ERA Charles Ellman Blake is lost at age 28. He has two brothers-in-law who will lose their lives later in the war, Thomas Gawn in 1915 and Arthur James Woodford in 1918.

British monitors under Admiral Horace Lambert Alexander Hood aid the Belgians in the battle of Yser.  Admiral Hood will be killed at the Battle of Jutland.

SMS Emden finds three more victims. Number one is the cargo liner Troilus on her maiden voyage. The master, Captain George Long, is furious with the naval intelligence officer in Colombo who has told him that if he passes thirty miles north of Minicoy he will be safe.  Her cargo is rubber, copper, tin and other items. The 10,000 tons in her holds and her own value make this ship the most valuable catch of Emden’s career. The loss represents probably an excess of one million pounds sterling, which in the monetary values of the period is enough to build three light cruisers.  Shortly thereafter the St. Egbert carrying 6,600 tons to the United States is captured. This ship is used to carry away the crews of previously captured ships and she is released to do so.  Finally at about midnight the collier Exford laden with 5,500 tons of the best Cardiff coal, destined for the Royal Navy is captured.  A prize crew is put aboard and she goes into tow. SMS Emden captures her final British merchant ship, S S Chilkana with a valuable cargo of piece goods on her way to Calcutta from Britain, and is immediately sunk.

Today’s losses include:

  • Son of the Earl of Glasgow
  • Huddersfield Town Football player
  • Olympic Silver Medalist
  • British Isles Rugby International
  • Three uncles lost in the Crimean War
  • Two brothers-in-law
  • Two sons will be killed on service (one pre-World War II and one in that war)
  • Families that will lose two and three sons
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace

 Today’s highlighted casualty is

Captain Seymour Frederick Auckland Albert Hurt (Scots Fusiliers) is killed on his thirty-fifth birthday. He is the son of Albert Frederick Hurt JP DL. Two paternal uncles were killed in the Crimea while a maternal uncle died of wounds received at Inkerman.

  • Captain ‘the Honorable’ James Boyle(Royal Scots Fusiliers) is killed at Chateau Warneton at age 34.  He is the son of the 7th Earl and Countess of Glasgow.  His widow will marry ‘Sir’ Hugh Trenchard.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Longman (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 24. He is the grandson of ‘Sir’ John Evans.
  • Lieutenant Villiers Chernocke Downes(Bedfordshire Regiment) dies of wounds at age 23.  His two sons will be killed on service, the first serving as a Lieutenant in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers will be killed in an airplane accident in 1938 while the other will be killed in action serving as a Lieutenant Colonel in the 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers at Anzio on 27 May 1944 also dying at age 34. His brother will be killed next month.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Cunningham Gillespie (King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 21. His brother will be killed in September 1915. He won a Silver Medal at the 1912 Olympics as a member of the New College Rowing Eight team.
  • Lieutenant Edwin Maurice Bishop (Dorsetshire Regiment attached King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed. His brother will die at home on service in April 1915.
  • Corporal Sidney Nelson Crowther (Royal Engineers) is killed in action at age 39. A medical doctor, he served and was killed as a motor cycle dispatch rider. He earned four caps in Rugbyfor the British Isles in the 1904 tour of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Lance Corporal Harold Whitehorn Ahern (East Kent Regiment) is killed at age 19. His brother will be killed in March next year.
  • Lance Corporal Larrett Roebuck (York and Lancaster Regiment) is killed at age 25. He played 17 football games for Huddersfield Town last season.
  • Private Percy A Shorter (East Kent Regiment) is killed at Ploegsteert. His two brothers will be killed in the Great War.
  • Private George Frederick White (Lancers) is killed at age 25. His brother will be killed in September 1918.
  • Private Samuel Reuben Hibbert (Royal Fusiliers) is killed at age 32. His brother will be killed in May 1916.
  • Private Percy Turner (King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) is killed at age 21. His brother Henry will lose life in the Great War.

Photos from Wikipedia.org

Saturday 17 October 1914 – We Lost 80

Anthony Eden

Anthony Eden

The small industrial town of Armentieres is captured by the 4th Division along with Houplines, Le Gheer and Ploegstgeer.  They will remain behind the British lines until it is evacuated on 10 April 1918.  The village of Aubers is captured by the 9th Brigade along with Herlies and part of Aubers Ridge.  These gains are lost within a few days however and the Ridge will not be captured by British forces for three years. A bridge over the canal ¾ of a mile east of Givenchy is captured; this is the farthest the British will advance in this sector until 1918.  Enemy fire from the positions known as the Brickstacks and Railway Triangle halt further advance on both sides of the canal. The 7th Division digs in on their salient around Ypres, although 20th Brigade pushes forward a mile or so to counter nuisance snipers, occupying positions near Kruisecke.

The force on the River Shat-el-Arab consists of the Dorsetshire Regiment, the Norfolk Regiment, an infantry and Mountain Battery from the Indian Army. The first position held by the enemy is along the edge of the date palm plantations which border the river bank in a belt in places two miles wild. Today the entire force attacks Sahil a place ten miles north of Sanizah on the River Shat-el-Arab, which is about thirty miles from Basra. The enemy put up a very heavy gun and rifle fire and advancing against it in the open is difficult.

A German half flotilla is engaged in laying mines in the Downs off the Dutch coast when the British light cruiser HMS Undaunted attacks it. The German destroyers T119, T118, T117 and T115 are sunk by gunfire from the cruiser in concert with the destroyers HMS Lance, HMS Lennox, HMS Legion and HMS Loyal. The British save as many of the survivors as possible.  The Germans send out the hospital ship Ophelia to pick up any survivors, however the British capture her and make her a prize charging that she has been sent off for the purpose of scouting. The Germans suffer a loss of over two hundred men, the British ships receive only superficial damage, one officer and four men are wounded.

Today’s losses include:

  • Brother of a future Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
  • Heir to the Earldom of Scarborough
  • Son of a Baronet
  • A man whose daughter will be born in 13 days
  • Son of a Justice of the Peace
  • First of two sons who are killed
  • Son of a General

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Lieutenant John Eden (Lancers) is killed. He is the son and heir of ‘Sir’ William Eden the 5th/7th Baronet and older brother of ‘Sir’ Anthony Eden future Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1955 to 1957. His younger brother will be killed at the Battle of Jutland serving as a Midshipman on HMS Indefatigable.

  • Major Archibald Ariel Mercer (Dorsetshire Regiment) is killed at age 39. His daughter will be born in thirteen days and he was wounded in the Tirah Campaign of 1897-8.
  • Captain Arthur Curgenven Magor (Wiltshire Regiment) is killed at age 35. He is the son of Edward Auriol Magor JP and he fought in the South African War.
  • Captain Miles Bertie Cunninghame Carbery (Irish Fusiliers) is killed at Houplines at age 37. He is the son-in-law of the Right Honorable Thomas Sinclair.
  • Second Lieutenant Richard John Lumley (Hussars) the son of Brigadier General ‘the Honorable’ Osbert Lumley CMG and heir presumptive to the Earldom of Scarborough is killed at age 20, by virtue of being the grandson of the 9th
  • Second Lieutenant Francis Lester Hastings-Medhurst (Worcestershire Regiment) is killed at age 19. He is the nephew of A Hastings-Medhurst His Majesty’s Consul Corunna.

 

Friday 16 October 1914 – We Lost 58

The First battle of Ypres begins. It will last until 22 November.  The Somerset Light Infantry occupies the village of Erquinghem-Lys, approximately 1.5 kilometers west of Armentieres.  German forces had captured it earlier in the month.  The Germans attempt to advance but as the Allied line is now complete the war of maneuver is over and the Battle of the Yser begins.  The Battle of the Yser is part of a general German attack that stretches from the sea to La Bassee. Givenchy is recaptured and held.

John French’s GHQ for the first time includes Rawlinson’s Corps. The forward movement of III Corps and Cavalry Corps to the Lys will continue and 7th Division will fan out of Ypres and take up a line from Zandvoorde, through Gheluvelt to Zonnebeke.  The weather is very poor, with heavy rain and fog. In the many places the fields are inundated with streams and ditches rising and little practical progress is made.

At 17:00 a convoy of forty-five ships, including fourteen troopships of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘B’ leaves Bombay harbor bound for Africa escorted by the battleship HMS Goliath. Most of the sepoys are soon sick.  The transports are badly overcrowded and any physical exercise is difficult; this is particularly true on board the small Assouan, 1,900 tons, which carries the Palamcottah Light Infantry. Many of the Indian units are not provided with their accustomed food, their digestions are upset and their religious scruples outraged. One officer declares the slow two-week voyage to Mombasa to be “a hell on crowded ships in tropical heat”.  Not surprisingly the troops are dispirited and discouraged. Major General Aitken and his staff travel in the Karmala, a converted P & O liner, and are somewhat more comfortable. On the same day Force “D” leaves Bombay bound for the Persian Gulf to be in place if Turkey enters the war.

The general attack on Tsing-tau begins from the sea by a combined British and Japanese force, assisted by airplanes.  The forts are damaged.  Casualties to the Allied forces are only three, all British.

The first Canadian Contingent (31,200 officers and men) arrives in Britain.

The New Zealand Expeditionary Forces leave Wellington with 8,250 men consisting of one mounted rifle brigade (three regiments) and one infantry brigade (four battalions) with their supply columns and a divisional headquarters in ten ships. They are bound for Albany at the southwestern extremity of Western Australia to join twenty-six transports there assembled for the 20,000 man Australian Army. This includes one infantry division (three infantry brigades plus field artillery) and one brigade of light horse as well as support troops.  This force is destined to join what will become the ANZAC force on Gallipoli.

The 17th (Duke of Cambridge’s Own) Lancers depart Sialkote, India for France aboard the transports SS Leicestershire and Islanda with 16 officers, 4 warrant officers, 533 other ranks and 619 horses.

After being quiet for almost three weeks SMS Emden strikes three times on this day. Her first victim is the Clan Grant (Captain Norman Leslie) carrying 4,000 tons of valuable mixed cargo from England to Calcutta via Madras. Victim number two is the dredger Ponrabbel.  Captain Edwin Gore and his men can hardly wait to become prisoners.  The final victim of the day is the Benmohr (Captain J D Sarchet) carrying a full cargo of 6,700 tons of valuable piece goods, including a large and elegant motor boat, from London to Penang and Japan.

Today’s losses include:

  • A Baronet
  • Son-in-law of the Earl of Lonsdale
  • A family that will suffer the loss of two sons

 

Cap Badge of the Life Guards

Cap Badge of the Life Guards

Today’s highlighted casualty is

Second Lieutenant Eric Dennys Murray (Hussars) is killed at Le Bizet at age 21.  He is the son of ‘Sir’ George Sheppard and Lady Murray. Hearing that Lieutenant Murray has been shot, Sergeant David Brunton sends information to the Squadron Commander and then gallops off with the patrol towards the village. On dismounting he calls for a volunteer to help him, and Private Walter Alfred Jerome at once dismounts. Having sent his horse and that of Jerome back to the inn with the rest of the patrol, Sergeant Brunton and Jerome crawl into the road to Lieutenant Murray, but as they raise him the reports of rifles rang out from point-blank range, and they are obliged to rush to cover. After waiting a short time they make a second attempt to carry away Lieutenant Murray. Upon going out they are again fired upon, but they quickly bring the officer under cover. To their dismay, however, they find he is dead, being wounded in the head, the left hand, and the region of the heart. Both men will be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for their efforts.

  • Lieutenant and Baronet ‘Sir’ Robert George Vivian Duff (Life Guards) is killed at age 37. He is the only son of ‘Sir’ Charles Garden Assheton-Smith Duff, the 1st He succeeded to the title and estate of his father three weeks after the death of his father. He is the son-in-law of the 4th Earl of Lonsdale.
  • Private James Nixon(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at age 23. His brother will be killed in April 1915.

photo from ebay.co.uk

Wednesday 14 October 1914 – We Lost 182

Hubert Hamilton

Hubert Hamilton

Air reconnaissance is impossible and artillery is badly hindered due to heavy mist and rain.  Still the first artillery “barrage” of the Great War is fired by the highly trained gunners of the 65th Field Howitzer Battery (Royal Artillery) in support of French infantry at Vermelles.

The 8th Brigade entrenches in the positions taken the previous day while the 9th Brigade which has made less progress pushes forward on its left.  British troops of the 19th Brigade and the 4th Division drive the Germans out of Bailleul which is easily occupied as are Dranoutre, Kemmel, Neuve Eglise, Wulverghem, Messines and Wytschate. The South Staffordshire Regiment reaches Ypres while units of the Cavalry Corps meet with the 3rd Cavalry Division south of Ypres completing a tenuous line of the BEF from the south of the La Bassee Canal to Ypres.

Today’s losses include:

  • Major General H I W Hamilton
  • Son and grandson of a general
  • Families that will lose two children including one that will have a daughter die on service
  • Sons of clergy
  • Sons of Justices of the Peace
  • A multi sport athlete
  • Son of a Member of Parliament
  • Son of a Baronet
  • The first Australian to be killed on the Western Front

 Today’s highlighted casualty is:

Major General Hubert Ian Wetherall Hamilton CVO CB DSO General Officer Commanding 3rd Division is killed at age 53 by a shell while visiting the trenches of the 8th Brigade. He and his Aide de Camp are out to the north of Vieille Chapelle to see why an advance is hung up. They are dismounted and standing on a road when a salvo of shrapnel burst right over them.  One bullet hits him in the forehead and he dies almost immediately. No one else standing in the group is hit. He is the son of Lieutenant General Henry Meade Hamilton and brother of General ‘Sir’ Bruce Hamilton KCB KCVO. He served in Burma 1886-8, Nile 1897-8 and the South Africa War. His body will be returned to England for burial at Cherlton St Mary Churchyard.

 

  • Major William Lewis Campbell Allan(King’s Own Scottish Borderers) is killed at Mont des Cats age 43. He is the son of Major General William Allan.
  • Captain Arthur Milford Ker (Gordon Highlanders) is killed at age 32. He is the son of ‘Sir’ Arthur Milford Ker CIE MVO and the grandson of General T D Ker.
  • Captain Cecil Glendower Percival Gilliat (Warwickshire Regiment) is killed at age 29. His brother will be killed in April of next year.
  • Lieutenant Arthur Noel Whitfeld (Irish Rifles) is killed at age 24. He is the son of the Reverend Arthur Lewis Whitfeld Vicar of Hughenden.
  • Lieutenant Claude Davis Sneath (Middlesex Regiment) is killed at age 25. He is the son of George Sneath JP and a member of several Hendon and Middlesex hockey, football and cricket clubs.
  • Lieutenant John Stirling Ainsworth (Hussars) is killed age 24. He is the son of ‘Sir’ John Stirlng Ainsworth MP 1st Baronet and grandson of R R Macredie JP DL MP for Argyllshire.
  • Lieutenant Jasper Carew (West Yorkshire Regiment) is killed at age 20. He is the son of the Reverend Henry William Carew, the Vicar of Rattery, Devon whose daughter will die on service eight days before the Armistice.
  • Second Lieutenant William George Hewitt(Royal Scots) is killed 12 days before his brother will suffer the same fate. The brothers are sons of ‘the Honorable’ William James Hewitt.
  • Second Lieutenant John Dossie Patteson (Dragoon Guards) is killed at age 25. He is the son of Colonel Henry Tyrwhitt Stainforth Patteson JP DL.
  • Corporal of Horse William Thomas Leggett (Life Guards) is killed at Geluwe. He is the first Australian to be killed on the Western Front.

photo from Wikipedia.org

Friday 9 October 1914 – We Lost 31

 

Lovat Scouts Cap Badge

Lovat Scouts Cap Badge

‘Sir’ John French orders II Corps forward – by bus – to the line on the left of the French XXI who are in the Bethune-Fruges area.  The two Cavalry Divisions moving up through Picardy are formed into a Corps under General Allenby and ordered to extend the line to the left, past Merville (which the British will hold until 11 April 1918) and Hazebrouck and on the high ground of the Monts de Flandres and the canal near Ypres. The intention is for the line to continue its advance eastwards.

Antwerp falls to the Germans.

The merchant ship Condor is captured by the German collier Asuncion and the captured merchant ship Farn by trick.  The Germans hoist the Red Ensign and thus induce Condor to approach them, two hundred fifteen miles north east from Cape St. Roque.  She is then sunk using her own explosives.

Today’s losses include:

  •  A battalion commander
  • Son of a Baronet
  • Son-in-law of the Duke of Northumberland

 Today’s highlighted loss is 

Captain (Acting Lieutenant Colonel) Aylmer Edward Maxwell (Lovat Scouts attached Royal Marines and commanding Collingwood Battalion Royal Naval Division) dies of wounds received the previous day defending Antwerp at age 36. He is the son of the 7th Baronet the Right Honorable ‘Sir’ Herbert Eustace Maxwell PC and a son-in-law of the Duke of Northumberland. He served in the South African War with the Grenadier Guards.